2,789 results match your criteria Cancer nursing[Journal]


The Art of Living With Symptoms: A Qualitative Study Among Patients With Primary Brain Tumors Receiving Proton Beam Therapy.

Cancer Nurs 2019 Jan 25. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Author Affiliations: Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg (Mrs Langegård and Dr Ahlberg); Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, and Regional Cancer Center West, Gothenburg (Dr Björk-Eriksson); The Skandion Clinic, Uppsala (Drs Björk-Eriksson and Witt-Nyström); Department of Nursing, Umeå University, and Department of Cancercentrum, Norrlands University Hospital, Umeå (Dr Fransson); Experimental Oncology, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala University Hospital (Dr Johansson); University Healthcare Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University (Dr Ohlsson-Nevo); Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Section of Oncology, Uppsala University (Dr Witt-Nyström); and Department of Oncology, Skåne University Hospital, and Department of Oncology, Lund University, Sweden (Dr Sjövall).

Background: Symptom management in conjunction with proton beam therapy (PBT) from patient's perspective has not been explored. Such knowledge is essential to optimize the care in this relatively new treatment modality.

Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the process of symptom management in patients with brain tumor receiving PBT. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000692DOI Listing
January 2019

Recent Advances in Antiemetics: New Formulations of 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonists in Adults.

Cancer Nurs 2019 Jan 25. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Author Affiliations: Gabrail Cancer Center (Ms C. Smith), Canton, Ohio; Cancer Center of Kansas (Mss M. Smith and Davis), Wichita; and Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (Dr Cunningham), Philadelphia.

Background: Despite the availability of effective antiemetic regimens, patients still experience chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). 5-Hydroxytryptamine 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists (RAs) are the mainstay of CINV prevention, and updated antiemetic guidelines include new options.

Objective: The aim of this study was to highlight advances in CINV management, focusing on new 5-HT3 RA formulations in adults, updated antiemetic guidelines, and the role of nurses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000694DOI Listing
January 2019

Chinese Children's Experience When the Mother Has Breast Cancer: Voices From Mothers and Children.

Cancer Nurs 2019 Jan 30. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Author Affiliations: School of Nursing, Fudan University, Shanghai, China (Drs Huang and Hu) School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Frankston, Australia (Drs Huang, Lee, and O'Connor); and Psychological Medicine Department, Children's Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China (Dr Gao).

Background: A large number of women with breast cancer may have children younger than 18 years. When the mother has breast cancer, children may experience various concerns.

Objective: The aim of this study was to explore Chinese children's experience when confronted with maternal breast cancer from the perspectives of both children and their mothers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000695DOI Listing
January 2019

The Meaning of Self-efficacy for Symptom Management in the Acute Phase of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

Cancer Nurs 2019 Jan 23. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Author Affiliations: College of Nursing, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha (Drs White, Cohen, Berger, and Kupzyk); Avera McKennan Hospital and University Health Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota (Dr White); Department of Nursing, Augustana University, Sioux Falls, South Dakota (Dr White); Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Oncology & Hematology, College of Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha Nebraska (Dr Bierman).

Background: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an intensive treatment that offers the potential for longer life or cure for some types of cancer. Hematopoietic stem cell transplant is associated with decreased quality of life and functional status and distressing symptoms. Self-efficacy for symptom management (SESM) is a person's belief in his/her ability to implement behaviors to manage these symptoms. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00002820-900000000-9906
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000685DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Racial Disparities in Cervical Cancer Screening: Implications for Relieving Cervical Cancer Burden in Asian American Pacific Islander Women.

Cancer Nurs 2019 Jan 8. Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Author Affiliations: School of Social Work, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (Dr Lee); and School of Social Work (Ms Beltran), Department of Educational Psychology (Mr Kim), and School of Medicine (Mr Lee), University of Minnesota, Twin Cities.

Background: While cervical cancer is considered preventable and the overall Papanicolaou (Pap) test utilization rate has gradually increased in the United States, certain Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) women consistently rate lower in Pap test receipt compared with non-Latina whites (NLWs), leading to a higher cervical cancer mortality rate for various AAPI women. Few studies, however, have focused on female AAPI college students' cervical cancer screening behavior in comparison with NLW students.

Objective: This study aimed to investigate cervical cancer screening behaviors among college-aged females by (1) determining AAPIs' and NLWs' screening rates, (2) assessing their knowledge about Pap tests, and (3) discovering factors associated with Pap test receipt. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000642DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Effects of Exercise Interventions on Breast Cancer Patients During Adjuvant Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Authors:
Junga Lee

Cancer Nurs 2018 Dec 29. Epub 2018 Dec 29.

Author Affiliation: Graduate School of Sport Science, Kyung Hee University, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea.

Background: Effects of exercise interventions on patients with breast cancer (BC) have shown benefits regardless of the measured variables, although the type of exercise and its duration during adjuvant therapy are unclear.

Objective: We investigated the effects of exercise interventions on each measurement, physical fitness, quality of life (QL), fatigue, depression, anxiety, and body compositions and found effective exercise interventions during adjuvant therapy for BC.

Methods: Twenty-nine studies were found by searching the databases of MEDLINE and EMBASE from January 2000 to February 2018. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000682DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Trajectory Patterns and Factors Influencing Self-management Behaviors in Chinese Patients With Breast Cancer.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Dec 29. Epub 2018 Dec 29.

Author Affiliations: School of Nursing, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China (Drs Wu and Yuan); Department of Supportive Care, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada (Dr Howell); Nursing Department, Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China (Dr Fang); Department of General Surgery, Changhai Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China (Mrs Chen).

Background: Self-management plays an important role in improving quality of life among patients with breast cancer. Self-management behaviors change with treatment periods, and the trajectory varies in patients with different demographic and psychosocial characteristics. However, the trajectory patterns and the predictive factors have not been fully studied. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000681DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Psychometric Evaluation of a Korean Version of the Cancer Survivors' Self-efficacy Scale.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Dec 29. Epub 2018 Dec 29.

Author affiliations: Department of Nursing, Inha University, Incheon (Dr SH Kim and Mrs Han); College of Nursing, The Research Institute of Nursing Science, Catholic University of Daegu (Dr BG Lee); College of Nursing, Yonsei University, Seoul (Mrs JY Lee); Departments of Surgery (Drs SJ Kim and Hur) and Hemato-Oncology (Dr MH Lee), and Breast Thyroid Surgery Center (Mrs Han), Inha University Hospital, Incheon; and School of Medicine, Inha University, Incheon, South Korea (Drs SJ Kim, Hur, and MH Lee).

Background: Self-efficacy has become the target outcome of many self-management interventions for cancer survivors. However, no measurement is available that can be used to measure cancer-specific self-efficacy in Korea.

Objective: The aim of this study was to cross-culturally evaluate the reliability and validity of a Korean version of the Cancer Survivors' Self-Efficacy Scale (CSSES-K). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000691DOI Listing
December 2018
8 Reads

A Multicenter Investigation of Caring Behaviors and Burnout Among Oncology Nurses in China.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Dec 29. Epub 2018 Dec 29.

Author Affiliations: Department of Nursing, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, China.

Background: Job burnout could negatively affect nursing care provided. However, little is known about burnout and caring behaviors among oncology nurses in China.

Objectives: The aims of this study were to investigate the status of burnout and caring behaviors among oncology nurses in China, to examine the relationship between them, and to identify factors that affect caring behaviors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000680DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Friendship in Adolescents and Young Adults With Experience of Cancer: A Dimensional Analysis.

Authors:
Jane A Evered

Cancer Nurs 2018 Dec 29. Epub 2018 Dec 29.

Author Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia.

Background: Friendship is a complex social phenomenon important to human development, emotional health, and socialization. While making and maintaining peer friends are an emphasized task of adolescent and young adult development, the multidimensional experience of friendship is incompletely defined, particularly in the context of adolescents and young adults with cancer.

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of friendship more deeply and completely by breaking down and then rebuilding meaning in this phenomenon. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000686DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Changes in Fatigue, Psychological Distress, and Quality of Life After Chemotherapy in Women with Breast Cancer: A Prospective Study.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Dec 29. Epub 2018 Dec 29.

Author Affiliations: Department of Nursing (Dr Oh); Department of Nursing, Graduate School (Ms Cho), Sahmyook University, Seoul, Korea.

Background: Chemotherapy leads to various symptoms and psychological distress, which contribute to a significant decrease in the quality of life of the patients.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify changes and interrelationships in the fatigue-depression-anxiety symptom cluster and quality of life during the cancer care trajectory in women with breast cancer.

Methods: Fifty women participated in the study and completed questionnaires at 3 different times: prechemotherapy, postchemotherapy, and 6 months after the completion of chemotherapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000689DOI Listing
December 2018

Childhood Trauma Predicts Cancer Treatment-Related Pain in Breast Cancer Survivors.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Dec 29. Epub 2018 Dec 29.

Author Affiliations: School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Mrs Kanzawa-Lee, Ms Bridges, and Dr Lavoie Smith); Phyllis F. Cantor Center for Research in Nursing and Patient Care Services, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (Dr Knoerl); Department of Anesthesiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Drs Williams, Clauw, and Harte and Mrs Kolarik and Houghtby).

Background: Childhood trauma has been linked to neuropathic pain in noncancer populations, but its relationship with cancer treatment-related neuropathic pain is unknown.

Objective: This secondary data analysis of a prospective, longitudinal, observational study aimed to explore the relationship of childhood trauma experience with pain severity, pain interference, and neuropathic symptom severity (NSS) 12 months after surgery in women receiving treatment for stage 0 to III breast cancer.

Methods: Women (N = 44) recruited from a comprehensive cancer center self-reported childhood trauma experience, pain severity, pain interference, NSS, co-occurring symptoms, and pain beliefs via questionnaires. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000687DOI Listing
December 2018
5 Reads

Relationships Among Fatigue, Anxiety, Depression, and Pain and Health-Promoting Lifestyle Behaviors in Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Dec 12. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Author Affiliations: Department of Biobehavioral Nursing Science, College of Nursing, University of Florida, Gainesville (Drs Lynch Kelly, Alexander-Delpech, Lyon, Siangphoe, and Yang); School of Nursing (Dr. Starkweather), University of Connecticut, Storrs.

Background: With a nearly 89% 5-year survival rate for women with early-stage breast cancer, symptoms are a priority. Healthy lifestyle behaviors may be temporally associated with symptoms; however, evidence is lacking.

Objective: This research examined temporal relationships among healthy lifestyle behaviors and symptoms in women diagnosed with breast cancer receiving chemotherapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000676DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read
1.931 Impact Factor

The Effects of Patient Care Results of Applied Nursing Intervention to Individuals With Stoma According to the Health Belief Model.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Dec 12. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Author Affiliations: Department of Public Health Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Dokuz Eylül University, Izmir (Dr Cengiz); Department of Public Health Nursing, Faculty of Nursing, Koç University, İstanbul (Prof Bahar); and Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Prof Canda), Turkey.

Background: Individuals who have undergone stoma surgery take time to adjust to the stoma, and their quality of life is decreasing.

Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the effects of home-based nursing interventions informed by the Health Belief Model on patient care outcomes for individuals having a stoma.

Methods: This pretest, posttest, and semiexperimental design with a control group included adults who underwent a stoma operation in the previous 3 months. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000678DOI Listing
December 2018
4 Reads

"I'm a Survivor": Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cancer Survivors' Perspectives of Cancer Survivorship.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Dec 12. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Author Affiliations: Centre for Online Health, Faculty of Medicine Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, The University of Queensland (Ms Meiklejohn); University Centre for Rural Health, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Dr Bailie); Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, New South Wales (Dr Jon Adams); Wellbeing and Preventable Chronic Diseases Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT (Dr Garvey); QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Royal Brisbane Hospital, Queensland (Drs Bernardes and Valery, Ms Marcusson, and Mr Arley); Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Unit, Queensland Health, Brisbane, QLD (Dr Williamson); Wellbeing and Preventable Chronic Diseases Division, Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT (Mr Arley); University of Newcastle School of Medicine and Public Health, Callaghan, NSW; Southside Clinical School, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (Dr Martin); Division of Cancer Services, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD; Cancer Stream Leader-Metro South Health and Hospital Service; University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (Dr Walpole); QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Royal Brisbane Hospital, Queensland, Australia (Dr Valery).

Background: Disparity in outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people after cancer diagnosis is multifactorial, including lower cancer screening participation, later diagnosis, reduced access and uptake of cancer treatment, higher rate of comorbidities, and barriers accessing the health system. Little is known about cancer survivorship experiences.

Objective: The aim of this study was to explore Indigenous Australian cancer survivor's perspectives of cancer survivorship. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000671DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Factors Affecting the Levels of Satisfaction With Nurse-Patient Communication Among Oncology Patients.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Dec 12. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Author Affiliations: Schools of Nursing (Drs Lam and Chan) and Optometry (Dr Wong), The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China.

Background: Nurse-patient communication is of the utmost importance to oncology patients.

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the factors influencing the level of satisfaction with nurse-patient communication among oncology patients during their daily routine procedures.

Methods: In this observational study, 25 registered nurses and 94 patients were recruited from an oncology unit. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000672DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read
1.931 Impact Factor

Primary Family Caregivers' Reasons for Disclosing Versus Not Disclosing a Cancer Diagnosis in India.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Dec 12. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Author Affiliations: Department of Liberal Arts, Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad, Hyderabad, India (Dr Chittem); and Department of Psychology, University of Sheffield (Dr Norman); and Department of Psychology, University of Sussex (Dr Harris), United Kingdom.

Background: Nondisclosure of cancer diagnosis continues to be practiced in India, with many family caregivers concealing it from patients in order to protect them from emotional distress.

Objective: The aim of this study was to explore Indian primary family caregivers' reasons for, and experiences of, disclosure versus nondisclosure to patients about their cancer diagnosis.

Methods: Indian disclosing (n = 8) and nondisclosing (n = 7) primary family caregivers participated in semistructured interviews exploring their reasons for disclosure versus nondisclosure of cancer diagnosis to their patient. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000669DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

The Post-Master's Doctor of Nursing Practice as a Critical Strategy to Reduce the Time Lag to Implement Research in Clinical Care.

Authors:
Ruth McCorkle

Cancer Nurs 2019 Jan/Feb;42(1):86-87

Author Affiliation: Yale University School of Nursing, West Haven, Connecticut.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000659DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

"How Many Recipes for Chocolate Cake Do We Need?" or When Does Similarity Become Self-plagiarism?

Authors:
Pamela S Hinds

Cancer Nurs 2019 Jan/Feb;42(1):1-2

Editor-in-Chief Department of Nursing Research and Quality Outcomes Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000679DOI Listing
December 2018
7 Reads

Well-being, Self-transcendence, and Resilience of Parental Caregivers of Children in Active Cancer Treatment: Where Do We Go From Here?

Cancer Nurs 2018 Nov 7. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

Author Affiliations: Daniel K. Inouye Graduate School of Nursing, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (Dr Bajjani-Gebara); College of Nursing, University of Arizona, Tucson (Drs Insel, Reed, Moore, and Badger); Department of Nursing Research and Quality Outcomes, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC (Dr Hinds).

Background: Childhood cancer profoundly impacts the well-being of many parental caregivers in the United States yearly. Empirical evidence is extensive for negative well-being and scarce for positive well-being in this population.

Objective: Study aims were to (1) describe resilience, self-transcendence, and positive (general well-being) and negative well-being (depression and anxiety); (2) examine if caregiver-related personal factors (resilience and/or demographic characteristics) and/or child-related contextual factors (child's cancer and/or demographic characteristics) are associated with well-being; and (3) test if self-transcendence mediates the relationship between resilience and well-being. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00002820-900000000-9909
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000662DOI Listing
November 2018
8 Reads

The Impact of Hematologic Cancer and Its Treatment on Physical Activity Level and Quality of Life Among Children in Mainland China: A Descriptive Study.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Nov 14. Epub 2018 Nov 14.

Author Affiliations: School of Nursing, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (Ms Xia and Drs Li, Ho, Lam, and Chung); Centre for Global Health Research, Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom (Ms Song); and Paediatric Oncology Unit (Ms Chiu) and Department of Paediatrics & Adolescent Medicine (Dr Chan), Queen Mary Hospital, Pokfulam, Hong Kong.

Background: The effects of hematologic cancer and its treatment on Chinese children's physical activity level and quality of life (QoL) remain unclear despite numerous studies conducted in Western countries and Hong Kong.

Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the effects of hematologic cancer and its treatment on the physical activity level and QoL among Chinese children.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00002820-900000000-9909
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000661DOI Listing
November 2018
13 Reads

Patients' Evaluation of a Preparatory Online Communication Tool for Older Patients With Cancer Preceding Chemotherapy.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Nov 14. Epub 2018 Nov 14.

Author Affiliations: Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research, Utrecht (Ms Driesenaar and Prof van Dulmen and Dr Noordman); and Department of Primary and Community Care, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen (Dr van Dulmen), the Netherlands; Faculty of Health Sciences, University College of Southeast Norway, Drammen (Prof van Dulmen); and Amsterdam School of Communication Research, Department of Communication Science, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands (Prof van Weert).

Background: The online tool PatientVOICE has been developed to enhance older patients' participation during educational nursing encounters preceding chemotherapy and to increase their information recall.

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate perceived usefulness, usability, satisfaction with emotional support, language use, attractiveness, and visit intention of PatientVOICE by older (ex-)patients with cancer.

Methods: Older (ex-)patients with cancer were invited to evaluate the website via an online questionnaire. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000660DOI Listing
November 2018
10 Reads

Correlation Between Postoperative Health-Related Quality of Life and Care Needs of Oral Cancer Patients.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Nov 15. Epub 2018 Nov 15.

Author Affiliations: School of Nursing, National Yang Ming University, Taipei (Ms Wang and Mr Li); Department of Nursing, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei (Mss Chen and Yang); and Excellent Dental Center, Taipei (Dr Chou), Taiwan.

Background: Oral cancer is the fifth most common form of cancer in Taiwan in terms of incidence and death rate and results in at least 2700 deaths each year.

Objective: The aims of this study were to assess the postoperative health-related quality of life (QOL) and care needs of oral cancer patients comprehensively and to evaluate the correlation between health-related QOL and care needs.

Interventions/methods: This cross-sectional study enrolled 126 oral cancer patients who had received surgical treatment within the previous 2 years and were without cognitive impairment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000677DOI Listing
November 2018
12 Reads

Fatigue Time Warp.

Authors:
Sarah H Kagan

Cancer Nurs 2018 Nov/Dec;41(6):520-521

Author Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000654DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Helping Patient-Reported Outcomes Be "At Home" in Clinical Practice.

Authors:
Changrong Yuan

Cancer Nurs 2018 Nov/Dec;41(6):433

Editorial Board Member, Cancer Nursing School of Nursing, Fudan University Shanghai, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000655DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Parent Psychological and Physical Health Outcomes in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Oct 23. Epub 2018 Oct 23.

Author Affiliations: Children's Hospital Los Angeles, California (Drs Ward and Kapoor); University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles (Dr Kapoor); Rush University College of Nursing, Chicago, Illinois (Drs Ward, Fogg, Breitenstein, and Swanson); and Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina (Dr Rodgers).

Background: Parents of children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are at risk of adverse health outcomes due to their intense caregiver demands.

Objective: The aim of this study was to describe adverse health outcomes in parents of children who survived an allogeneic HSCT done within the past 1 to 10 years.

Methods: This cross-sectional study, conducted at a children's hospital in the western United States, enrolled English- and Spanish-speaking parents of children who survived allogeneic HSCT between 2005 and 2015. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000652DOI Listing
October 2018
10 Reads

A Hermeneutic Interpretation of Nurses' Experiences of Truth Telling and Harms in Cancer Care in Qatar.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Oct 20. Epub 2018 Oct 20.

Author Affiliations: Department of Nursing, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar (Mrs Alsaadi); University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada (Dr Rankin); Medial Education Department, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar (Dr Bylund); and Weill Cornell Medical College, New York (Dr Bylund).

Background: Telling the truth to cancer patients remains under debate in the Middle East, where concealment about diagnosis and prognosis occurs in some cases. Concealment results in challenges for nurses providing care.

Objective: The aim of this study was to understand nurses' lived experiences of caring for cancer patients whose cancer diagnosis or prognosis has been withheld from them. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000663DOI Listing
October 2018
20 Reads

"I Have Both Lost and Gained." Norwegian Survivors' Experiences of Coping 9 Years After Primary Breast Cancer Surgery.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Oct 20. Epub 2018 Oct 20.

Author Affiliations: Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences (Dr Drageset); Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen (Dr Lindstrøm); and VID University College of Applied Sciences (Dr Ellingsen), Bergen, Norway.

Background: Increased breast cancer survival means that many women live with long-term consequences of their cancer and treatment. Knowledge about their coping is important.

Objective: This qualitative follow-up study describes survivors' coping experiences 9 years after primary breast cancer surgery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000656DOI Listing
October 2018
6 Reads

Issues in Recruiting and Retaining Asian American Breast Cancer Survivors in a Technology-Based Intervention Study.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Oct 20. Epub 2018 Oct 20.

Author Affiliation: School of Nursing, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (Drs Im, Kim, and W. Chee; Mss Xu, Lee, Hamajima, Inohara, and Chang); and North Carolina State University, Raleigh (Ms E. Chee).

Background: Difficulties in recruiting and retaining Asian Americans in traditional research have been well documented. Despite an increasing number of technology-based cancer studies among racial/ethnic minorities, little is still known about potential issues in recruiting and retaining racial/ethnic minority cancer survivors for technology-based intervention research.

Objective: This discussion article aims to examine issues in recruiting and retaining a group of racial/ethnic minorities-Asian American breast cancer survivors-for a technology-based intervention study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000657DOI Listing
October 2018
9 Reads

Like Prisoners in a War Camp: Adolescents and Young Adult Cancer Survivors' Perspectives of Disconnectedness From Healthcare Providers During Cancer Treatment.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Oct 20. Epub 2018 Oct 20.

Author Affiliation: Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis.

Background: Adolescent/young adult (AYA) cancer survivors experience greater psychosocial distress than younger or older adults. To address their psychosocial distress, it is important that healthcare providers (HCPs) foster connectedness with AYAs; however, some HCPs' words and behaviors may actually create a sense of disconnectedness with AYAs.

Objective: The aim of this study was to describe AYA cancer survivors' experiences of disconnectedness from HCPs during cancer treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000653DOI Listing
October 2018
6 Reads

Symptom Trajectories of Adolescents During Hematopoietic Stem Cell Recovery.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Oct 17. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

Author Affiliations: Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, North Carolina (Drs Rodgers and Douglas); Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (Ms Highberger); and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago (Ms Powers); and Northwestern Medical Group, Lake Forest (Ms Voigt), Illinois.

Background: Adolescents undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) experience multiple symptoms during and after the transplant. These symptoms can increase the need for medical care and reduce the quality of their life. However, little is known about symptom experiences specific to adolescents undergoing HSCT. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000643DOI Listing
October 2018
9 Reads

Validation of the Smoking Cessation Counseling Scale Chinese Version in Taiwan.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Oct 16. Epub 2018 Oct 16.

Author Affiliation: Department of Nursing, Hsin-Sheng Junior College of Medical Care and Management, Taoyuan (Dr Tsai); School of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei (Drs Tsai, Lai, and Lee); and Department of Nursing, College of Nursing, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology (Dr Chen); and Department of Nursing, Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan (Dr Chen); and Department of Thoracic Medicine Adventist Hospital (Dr Wu); and Department of Nursing, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (Ms Hong).

Background: Providing tobacco control (TC) and smoking cessation (SC) counseling is an important part of healthcare. An assessment tool to understand healthcare providers' experiences in providing SC counseling may enhance TC.

Objective: The aims of this study were to (1) translate and develop the Smoking Cessation Counseling Scale-Chinese version (SCCS-C) and (2) evaluate its psychometric properties in Taiwan. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00002820-900000000-9910
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000636DOI Listing
October 2018
7 Reads
1.931 Impact Factor

Cancer Patients' Long-term Experiences of Participating in a Comprehensive Lifestyle Intervention Study While Receiving Chemotherapy.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Oct 12. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

Author Affiliations: Department of Health and Nursing Sciences, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway (Mss Mikkelsen and Antonsen and Dr Fegran); Department of Oncology, Southern Hospital Trust, England (Drs Vassbakk-Brovold and Kersten); and Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway (Drs Vassbakk-Brovold and Berntsen).

Background: Lifestyle interventions seem promising with regard to cancer patients' potential for physical and psychological health benefits and as an empowerment tool. Nevertheless, there is a lack of knowledge concerning cancer patients' longer-term experiences of participating in comprehensive lifestyle interventions.

Objective: The aim of this study was to explore cancer patients' long-term experiences of participating in a 12-month individualized comprehensive lifestyle intervention study focusing on physical activity, diet, smoking cessation, and stress management while receiving curative or palliative chemotherapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000650DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

A Patient Decision Aid for Men With Localized Prostate Cancer: A Comparative Case Study of Natural Implementation Approaches.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Dec 19. Epub 2018 Dec 19.

Author Affiliations: School of Nursing, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (Dr Stacey); Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Clinical Epidemiology Program, The Ottawa Hospital, Ontario, Canada (Drs Stacey, Taljaard, and Breau and Ms Carley); Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (Dr Breau); St. Paul's Hospital, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada (Ms Baba); Quality and Continuous Improvement, Acute and Emergency Services Branch, Saskatchewan Ministry of Health, Regina, Canada (Ms Blackmore); Population Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (Ms Boland); Department of Surgery, Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (Dr Wu); Ages Cancer Assessment Clinic, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Canada (Ms Smylie); and Research Center CHU de Québec-Université Laval, Hospital Saint-François D'Assise, Canada (Dr Légaré).

Background: There are multiple options for men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer. Patient decision aids (PtDAs) help empower individuals and reduce unwarranted practice variation, but few are used in clinical practice.

Objective: We compared 2 programs implementing PtDAs for men with localized prostate cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000651DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Predicting Engagement With Online Walking Promotion Among Metropolitan and Rural Cancer Survivors.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Oct 12. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

Author Affiliations: Adelaide Nursing School, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Adelaide University (Dr Frensham); and Sansom Institute for Health Research, School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia (Drs Parfitt and Dollman).

Background: Physical activity has numerous associated benefits for cancer survivors. Compared with their urban counterparts, rural Australians experience a health disadvantage, including poorer survival rate after diagnosis of cancer.

Objective: The aims of this study were to test the effectiveness of an online 12-week walking intervention designed for cancer survivors and explore region-specific psychological predictors of behavior change. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000649DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Association of Time-Varying Rest-Activity Rhythm With Survival in Older Adults With Lung Cancer.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Oct 5. Epub 2018 Oct 5.

Author Affiliations: School of Nursing, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan (Ms Kuo and Drs Chang, Huang, and Lin); Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, New Taipei City, Taiwan (Dr Chang); Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, School of Nursing, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam (Dr Lin); and Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Charity Foundation Professor in Nursing (Dr Lin), Tai Po, Hong Kong.

Background: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the relationship of rest-activity rhythm with survival in older adults with lung cancer and to consider variations in rest-activity rhythm over time.

Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between rest-activity rhythm variations and survival in 33 older adults with lung cancer by considering rest-activity rhythm as a time-dependent covariate over time.

Methods: In this prospective study with 5 repeated measurements, patients' rest-activity rhythm over 3 days was measured using actigraphy. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00002820-900000000-9911
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000647DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Does the Oral Administration of Ginger Reduce Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting?: A Meta-analysis of 10 Randomized Controlled Trials.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Oct 6. Epub 2018 Oct 6.

Author Affiliations: Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, New Taipei City (Dr Chang); School of Nursing, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University, Taipei (Dr Chang); and Department of Nursing, College of Nursing, Tzu Chi University, Hualien (Mr Peng), Taiwan.

Background: Preclinical tests in animals have shown that ginger extract can be used to treat chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV); however, research findings in clinical trials have not been conclusive.

Objective: Through this meta-analysis, we aimed to determine whether ginger could be used to treat CINV, which was interpreted using the PICOS (patient, problem/population, intervention, comparison, outcome, study) framework, with P being patients who underwent chemotherapy; I being 0.5 to 2. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00002820-900000000-9911
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000648DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Recognition of Insufficient Competence-Nurses' Experiences in Direct Involvement With Adolescent Children of Cancer Patients.

Authors:
Trine Tafjord

Cancer Nurs 2018 Oct 6. Epub 2018 Oct 6.

Author Affiliation: Faculty of Health Sciences and Social Care, Molde University College-University in Logistics, Molde; and Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.

Background: A parent's cancer may have disruptive impact on his/her adolescent children. Currently, nurses have been regarded as central actors in direct involvement with patients' minor children. Development of an extended nursing role has become a pertinent issue. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000646DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Effects of an Empowerment Program on Resilience and Posttraumatic Growth Levels of Cancer Survivors: A Randomized Controlled Feasibility Trial.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Sep 25. Epub 2018 Sep 25.

Author Affiliation: Faculty of Nursing, Psychiatric Nursing Department, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

Background: Psychosocial empowerment of cancer survivors can help improve their psychological resilience and enhance their posttraumatic growth. However, there is a lack of research exploring the effects of such empowerment programs on resilience and posttraumatic growth of cancer survivors.

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of an integrated empowerment program on cancer survivors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000644DOI Listing
September 2018
9 Reads

Quality of Life in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Structural Equation Modeling.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Sep 10. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

Author Affiliations: Department of Nursing, Woosong University, Daejeon (Dr Lee); and College of Nursing Science and East-West Nursing Research Institute, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Dr Jeong), Korea.

Background: Quality of life (QOL) is important for cancer patients, even for survival. However, factors affecting QOL of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients have not been studied sufficiently.

Objective: The aims of this study were to understand the relationships among social support, resilience, distress, and symptom and to identify predictors of QOL for NSCLC patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000645DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Physical Activity Among Postoperative Esophageal Cancer Patients.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Sep 3. Epub 2018 Sep 3.

Author Affiliations: Graduate School of Health Management (Ms Ichijo and Drs Takeda and Oguma) and Department of Surgery, School of Medicine (Dr Kitagawa), Keio University, Tokyo; and Second Department of Surgery, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Dr Takeuchi), Japan; and School of Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle (Dr Doorenbos).

Background: Previous literature has reported that regular physical activity enhances health-related quality of life for cancer patients. However, there is a lack of studies that focus on physical activity among postoperative esophageal cancer patients.

Objective: The aims of this study were to (1) describe the prevalence of physical activity among postoperative esophageal cancer patients, (2) explore variables related to physical activity (demographics, nutrition, dysphagia, and health-related qualify of life), and (3) examine potential reasons for inactivity among participants who scored low using case studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000638DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Self-management Needs of Breast Cancer Survivors After Treatment: Results From a Focus Group Interview.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Aug 24. Epub 2018 Aug 24.

Author Affiliations: Departments of Nursing (Drs S. H. Kim, Park, and Mrs Han) and Surgery, Inha University Hospital and School of Medicine, Inha University (Drs S. J. Kim and Hur); and Women's Cancer Center, Inha University Hospital (Mrs Han), Incheon, South Korea; and College of Nursing, The Research Institute of Nursing Science, Catholic University of Daegu, South Korea (Dr Lee).

Background: Recognition of the importance of self-management (SM) for breast cancer survivors (BCSs) is increasing, but evidence from investigations of their needs focusing on SM is limited.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the SM needs of BCSs who had completed treatment.

Methods: Using a qualitative study design, we interviewed a focus group of 20 BCSs who underwent cancer therapy (mean time since diagnosis 3. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000641DOI Listing
August 2018
12 Reads

Resilience and Its Predictors Among Chinese Liver Cancer Patients Undergoing Transarterial Chemoembolization.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Aug 24. Epub 2018 Aug 24.

Author Affiliations: School of nursing (Ms C. Li and Dr Lu), Fudan University; and Departments of Nursing (Mrs Qin), Intervention Therapy (Mrs X. Li), Hepatology (Mss Yu and Fang), Zhongshan Hospital Affiliated to Fudan University, Shanghai, China.

Background: Although resilience has many positive effects on cancer patients, little is known about the level of resilience and its predictors in Chinese liver cancer patients undergoing transarterial chemoembolization (TACE).

Objective: The aims of this study were to evaluate resilience level and identify its predictors among Chinese liver cancer patients undergoing TACE.

Methods: Two hundred fifty-one patients were recruited from a tertiary hospital in Shanghai, China. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000640DOI Listing
August 2018
18 Reads

Symptom Map of Endocrine Therapy for Breast Cancer: A Scoping Review.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Aug 22. Epub 2018 Aug 22.

Author Affiliations: School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Background: Multiple symptoms associated with endocrine therapy have a detrimental impact on medication adherence and quality of life.

Objective: The purpose of this scoping review is to map the symptoms during endocrine therapy for breast cancer to provide implications for current practice and suggestions for future research.

Methods: The PubMed, CINAHL, and China Science Periodical Databases were searched to identify related studies published in English and Chinese languages. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000632DOI Listing
August 2018
5 Reads

Population Size or Passion as the Basis for Research Academic Success?

Cancer Nurs 2018 Sep/Oct;41(5):431

Author Affiliation: The Nethersole School of Nursing The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China.

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00002820-201809000-0001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000639DOI Listing
August 2018
15 Reads

Chinese Version of Pediatric Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Short Form Measures: Reliability, Validity, and Factorial Structure Assessment in Children With Cancer in China.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Aug 17. Epub 2018 Aug 17.

Author Affiliations: School of Nursing, Shanghai JiaoTong University, China (Dr Liu); School of Nursing, Fudan University (Dr Yuan), Shanghai, China; Division of Biostatistics and Study Methodology (Dr Wang), Department of Nursing Research and Quality Outcomes (Dr Hinds), Center for Translational Science, Children's National Health System, Washington, DC; School of Medicine, The George Washington University (Drs Wang and Hinds), Washington, DC; Nursing Department, Shanghai Children's Medical Center Affiliated to Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine (Ms N. Shen), China; and Nursing Department, Children's Hospital of Soochow University (Ms M. Shen), Jiangsu, China.

Background: The Pediatric Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) was developed to measure symptoms and functions of children with a variety of chronic diseases. As the Chinese version of pediatric PROMIS (C-Ped-PROMIS) measures was developed, the measurement properties of C-Ped-PROMIS have not been demonstrated.

Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the reliability, validity, and factorial structure of the C-Ped-PROMIS measures in children with cancer in China. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000633DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads

Physical Activity, the Childhood Cancer Symptom Cluster-Leukemia, and Cognitive Function: A Longitudinal Mediation Analysis.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Nov/Dec;41(6):434-440

Author Affiliations: School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (Dr Hooke); School of Nursing, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (Drs Rodgers, Pan, and Hockenberry); Texas Children's Cancer and Hematology Centers/Baylor College of Medicine, Houston (Ms Taylor and Dr Scheurer); College of Nursing, University of Arizona, Tucson (Ms Koerner and Dr Moore); Children's Minnesota Cancer and Blood Disorders Program, Minneapolis (Ms Mitby and Dr Hooke).

Background: Children undergoing leukemia treatment report co-occurring symptoms of fatigue, sleep disturbances, pain, nausea, and depression as a symptom cluster. Physical activity (PA) is essential for development and may influence symptom severity. Children with leukemia are at risk of cognitive impairments from central nervous system therapies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000634DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6203650PMC
November 2019
5 Reads
1.931 Impact Factor

Staff's Experiences of Preparing and Caring for Children With Cancer and Their Families During the Child's Radiotherapy.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Aug 7. Epub 2018 Aug 7.

Author Affiliations: Departments of Nursing (Drs Ångström-Brännström and V. Lindh) and Radiation Sciences (Drs Nyholm and J. Lindh), Umeå University; and Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University (Dr Engvall), Sweden.

Background: Approximately one-third of children diagnosed with cancer are treated with radiotherapy (RT). Staff experiences of preparing and distracting the children and their families during a child's RT are sparsely described.

Objective: The aim of this study was to describe staff experiences of preparing and caring for children with cancer and their families during the child's RT. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000635DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads

What Do Breast Cancer Survivors Expect From Exercise?

Cancer Nurs 2019 Jan/Feb;42(1):E15-E19

Author Affiliations: School of Nursing, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (Dr Hirschey); and Schools of Nursing, Duke University, Durham (Drs Pan, Hockenberry, Shaw, and Lipkus) and Medicine (Dr Kimmick), North Carolina.

Background: Exercise outcome expectations (OEs) (ie, what one expects to obtain or avoid by exercising) are influential to increase exercise among cancer survivors.

Objective: The aim of this study was to measure the accessibility (ie, frequency one thinks about exercise resulting in an outcome) and importance (ie, one's value of the outcome) of OEs among breast cancer survivors.

Methods: Stage IA to IIB breast cancer survivors who were 1 to 5 years posttreatment completed OE questionnaires. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000631DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6283677PMC
January 2020
2 Reads

A Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention for the Symptom Clusters of Chinese Patients With Gastrointestinal Tract Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy: A Pilot Study.

Cancer Nurs 2018 Jul 24. Epub 2018 Jul 24.

Author Affiliations: School of Nursing, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, China.

Background: Patients with gastrointestinal tract (GIT) cancer undergoing chemotherapy often experience several symptoms that constitute symptom clusters and can cause patients to suffer. Effective interventions are lacking for this kind of patients.

Objective: The aims of this study were to test the feasibility and acceptability of a cognitive-behavioral (CB) intervention developed for Chinese patients with GIT cancer undergoing chemotherapy and to estimate the efficacy of the intervention for symptom clusters. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00002820-900000000-9912
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000625DOI Listing
July 2018
4 Reads
1.931 Impact Factor