82 results match your criteria Cancer nanotechnology[Journal]


Comb-like PEG-containing polymeric composition as low toxic drug nanocarrier.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2018 20;9(1):11. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

5International Research and Innovation in Medicine Program, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 6500 Wilshire Blvd., Ste. 2102, Los Angeles, CA 90048-5502 USA.

Background: Development of biocompatible multifunctional polymeric drug carriers is crucial in modern pharmaceutics aimed to create "smart" drugs. The high potential of the PEGylated comb-like polymeric nanocarrier (PNC) in delivering both traditional and experimental drugs to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo has been demonstrated previously. In the present study, we investigated the general toxicity of polyethylene glycol (PEG) processed with both covalent and non-covalent attachments of PEG to compose a comb-like polymer that behaves like a simple chain of n monomers decorated with swollen side chains. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-018-0045-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6302051PMC
December 2018
3 Reads

Enhanced nanoparticle delivery exploiting tumour-responsive formulations.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2018 21;9(1):10. Epub 2018 Nov 21.

School of Pharmacy, Queens University Belfast, Lisburn Road, Belfast, BT9 7BL UK.

Nanoparticles can be used as drug carriers, contrast agents and radiosensitisers for the treatment of cancer. Nanoparticles can either passively accumulate within tumour sites, or be conjugated with targeting ligands to actively enable tumour deposition. With respect to passive accumulation, particles < 150 nm accumulate with higher efficiency within the tumour microenvironment, a consequence of the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-018-0044-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6276285PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

Towards photon radiotherapy treatment planning with high Z nanoparticle radiosensitisation agents: the Relative Biological Effective Dose (RBED) framework.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2018 9;9(1). Epub 2018 Nov 9.

1School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland UK.

A novel treatment planning framework, the Relative Biological Effective Dose (RBED), for high Z nanoparticle (NP)-enhanced photon radiotherapy is developed and tested in silico for the medical exemplar of neoadjuvant (preoperative) breast cancer MV photon radiotherapy. Two different treatment scenarios, conventional and high Z NP enhanced, were explored with a custom Geant4 application that was developed to emulate the administration of a single 2 Gy fraction as part of a 50 Gy radiotherapy treatment plan. It was illustrated that there was less than a 1% difference in the dose deposition throughout the standard and high Z NP-doped adult female phantom. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-018-0043-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6244633PMC
November 2018
3 Reads

C fullerene and its nanocomplexes with anticancer drugs modulate circulating phagocyte functions and dramatically increase ROS generation in transformed monocytes.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2018 31;9(1). Epub 2018 Oct 31.

4Institute of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Technical University of Ilmenau, Weimarer str. 25, 98693 Ilmenau, Germany.

Background: C fullerene-based nanoformulations are proposed to have a direct toxic effect on tumor cells. Previous investigations demonstrated that C fullerene used alone or being conjugated with chemotherapeutic agents possesses a potent anticancer activity. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect of C fullerene and its nanocomplexes with anticancer drugs on human phagocyte metabolic profile in vitro. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://cancer-nano.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s12645
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-017-0034-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6208740PMC
October 2018
26 Reads

Magnetic hyperthermia of breast cancer cells and MRI relaxometry with dendrimer-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2018 8;9(1). Epub 2018 Oct 8.

6Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: Recently, some studies have focused on dendrimer nanopolymers as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent or a vehicle for gene and drug delivery. Considering the suitable properties of these materials, they are appropriate candidates for coating iron-oxide nanoparticles which are applied in magnetic hyperthermia. To the best of our knowledge, the novelty of this study is the investigation of fourth-generation dendrimer-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles (G@IONPs) in magnetic hyperthermia and MRI. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://cancer-nano.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s12645
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-018-0042-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6182570PMC
October 2018
34 Reads

Cisplatin-loaded hollow gold nanoparticles for laser-triggered release.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2018 3;9(1). Epub 2018 Aug 3.

1Department of Cancer Systems Imaging, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA.

Background: Hollow gold nanoparticles (HGNPs) exposed to near-infrared (NIR) light yield photothermal effects that can trigger a variety of biological effects for potential biomedical applications. However, the mechanism of laser-triggered drug release has not been studied before.

Methods: A tripeptide Ac-Glu-Glu-Cys-NH (Ac-EEC) was directly linked to the surface of HGNPs. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-018-0041-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6096947PMC
August 2018
1 Read

Gene therapy with RALA/iNOS composite nanoparticles significantly enhances survival in a model of metastatic prostate cancer.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2018 1;9(1). Epub 2018 Jun 1.

1School of Pharmacy, Queen's University Belfast, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast, BT9 7BL Northern Ireland, UK.

Background: Recent approvals of gene therapies by the FDA and the EMA for treatment of inherited disorders have further opened the door for assessment of nucleic acid pharmaceuticals for clinical usage. Arising from the presence of damaged or inappropriate DNA, cancer is a condition particularly suitable for genetic intervention. The RALA peptide has been shown to be a potent non-viral delivery platform for nucleic acids. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-018-0040-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5982451PMC
June 2018
3 Reads

Antiangiogenic and antiapoptotic effects of green-synthesized zinc oxide nanoparticles using algae extraction.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2018 2;9(1). Epub 2018 Apr 2.

2Departments of Medicine & AMP; Applied Biology Research Center, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad, Iran.

Background: Algae are one of the natural materials used to green synthesis of nanoparticles. This method leads to minimize the toxicity of the chemical materials used to nanoparticle synthesis.

Methods: In this study, zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) synthesized by algae extraction used to evaluate its cytotoxicity and apoptotic properties on human liver cancer cell line (HepG2). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-018-0037-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5879045PMC
April 2018
5 Reads

Important parameters for optimized metal nanoparticles-aided electromagnetic field (EMF) effect on cancer.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2018 15;9(1). Epub 2018 Mar 15.

Physics Department, Kenyatta University, Box 43844, Nairobi, 00100 Kenya.

Background: A number of experimental research findings for the metal nanoparticles (NPs)-mediated EMF photothermal therapy of cancer cells show an intriguing trend of the NPs' size-dependent efficacy. This is a phenomenon we find to trend with the light absorption bandwidth behavior (full width at half maximum) of the NPs and the accompanying electric field enhancement. We find that the nanoparticle sizes that have been reported to produce the optimized effect on cancer cells are of minimum absorption bandwidth and optimized electric field magnitude. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://cancer-nano.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s12645
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-018-0038-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5854759PMC
March 2018
2 Reads

Electrochemical and optical biosensors for early-stage cancer diagnosis by using graphene and graphene oxide.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2017 11;8(1):10. Epub 2017 Dec 11.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond St., London, ON N6A 5B9 Canada.

Conventional instruments for cancer diagnosis including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography scan, are expensive and require long-waiting time, whilst the outcomes have not approached to the successful early-stage diagnosis yet. Due to the special properties of graphene-based nanocomposites, e.g. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-017-0035-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5725514PMC
December 2017
2 Reads

Particle therapy and nanomedicine: state of art and research perspectives.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2017 21;8(1). Epub 2017 Nov 21.

Biophysics Department, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt, Germany.

Cancer radiation therapy with charged particle beams, called particle therapy, is a new therapeutic treatment presenting major advantages when compared to conventional radiotherapy. Because ions have specific ballistic properties and a higher biological effectiveness, they are superior to x-rays. Numerous medical centres are starting in the world using mostly protons but also carbon ions as medical beams. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-017-0029-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5698390PMC
November 2017
2 Reads

From basics to clinic: .

Cancer Nanotechnol 2017 10;8(1). Epub 2017 Nov 10.

Mark Bellringer, Brighton, UK.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-017-0033-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5681614PMC
November 2017
62 Reads

Cancer resistance to treatment and antiresistance tools offered by multimodal multifunctional nanoparticles.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2017 26;8(1). Epub 2017 Oct 26.

Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), Passeig Vall d'Hebron 119-129, 08035 Barcelona, Spain.

Chemotherapeutic agents have limited efficacy and resistance to them limits today and will limit tomorrow our capabilities of cure. Resistance to treatment with anticancer drugs results from a variety of factors including individual variations in patients and somatic cell genetic differences in tumours. In front of this, multimodality has appeared as a promising strategy to overcome resistance. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-017-0030-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5658477PMC
October 2017
7 Reads

The application of titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, fullerene, and graphene nanoparticles in photodynamic therapy.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2017 19;8(1). Epub 2017 Oct 19.

Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Macromoléculaire, Université de Lorraine-CNRS, UMR 7375, 1 rue Grandville, BP 20451, 54001 Nancy Cedex, France.

Nanoparticles (NPs) have been shown to have good ability to improve the targeting and delivery of therapeutics. In the field of photodynamic therapy (PDT), this targeting advantage of NPs could help ensure drug delivery at specific sites. Among the commonly reported NPs for PDT applications, NPs from zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, and fullerene are commonly reported. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-017-0032-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5648744PMC
October 2017
19 Reads
2 Citations

Platinum nanoparticles: an exquisite tool to overcome radioresistance.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2017 11;8(1). Epub 2017 Jul 11.

CNRS, UMR 8214, Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d'Orsay, Université Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex, France.

Backgroud: Small metallic nanoparticles are proposed as potential nanodrugs to optimize the performances of radiotherapy. This strategy, based on the enrichment of tumours with nanoparticles to amplify radiation effects in the tumour, aims at increasing the cytopathic effect in tumours while healthy tissue is preserved, an important challenge in radiotherapy. Another major cause of radiotherapy failure is the radioresistance of certain cancers. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-017-0028-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5506239PMC
July 2017
16 Reads

An overview of current practice in external beam radiation oncology with consideration to potential benefits and challenges for nanotechnology.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2017 3;8(1). Epub 2017 Feb 3.

Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, BT9 7AE UK.

Over the past two decades, there has been a significant evolution in the technologies and techniques employed within the radiation oncology environment. Over the same period, extensive research into the use of nanotechnology in medicine has highlighted a range of potential benefits to its incorporation into clinical radiation oncology. This short communication describes key tools and techniques that have recently been introduced into specific stages of a patient's radiotherapy pathway, including diagnosis, external beam treatment and subsequent follow-up. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-017-0027-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5291831PMC
February 2017
66 Reads

Biological mechanisms of gold nanoparticle radiosensitization.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2017 2;8(1). Epub 2017 Feb 2.

Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queens University Belfast, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast, BT9 7AE Northern Ireland, UK.

There has been growing interest in the use of nanomaterials for a range of biomedical applications over the last number of years. In particular, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) possess a number of unique properties that make them ideal candidates as radiosensitizers on the basis of their strong photoelectric absorption coefficient and ease of synthesis. However, despite promising preclinical evidence in vitro supported by a limited amount of in vivo experiments, along with advances in mechanistic understanding, GNPs have not yet translated into the clinic. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-017-0026-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5288470PMC
February 2017
44 Reads

A local effect model-based interpolation framework for experimental nanoparticle radiosensitisation data.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2017 31;8(1). Epub 2017 Jan 31.

School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK.

A local effect model (LEM)-based framework capable of interpolating nanoparticle-enhanced photon-irradiated clonogenic cell survival fraction measurements as a function of nanoparticle concentration was developed and experimentally benchmarked for gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-doped bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) under superficial kilovoltage X-ray irradiation. For three different superficial kilovoltage X-ray spectra, the BAEC survival fraction response was predicted for two different AuNP concentrations and compared to experimental data. The ability of the developed framework to predict the cell survival fraction trends is analysed and discussed. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://cancer-nano.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s12645-
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-016-0025-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5285431PMC
January 2017
8 Reads

Application of nanotechnology to cancer radiotherapy.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2016 19;7(1):11. Epub 2016 Dec 19.

Laboratory of Nano- and Translational Medicine, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Carolina Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence, Carolina Institute of Nanomedicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA ; Department of Radiation Oncology, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.

Radiotherapy has been an integral treatment modality for cancer. The field arose from and progressed through innovations in physics, engineering, and biology. The evolution of radiation oncology will rely on the continued adoption of advances from other fields. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-016-0024-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5167776PMC
December 2016
6 Reads

Profiling lung adenocarcinoma by liquid biopsy: can one size fit all?

Cancer Nanotechnol 2016 22;7(1):10. Epub 2016 Nov 22.

OneTest Diagnostics, Cambridge Applied Research, Future Business Centre, Cambridge, UK.

Background: Cancer is first and foremost a disease of the genome. Specific genetic signatures within a tumour are prognostic of disease outcome, reflect subclonal architecture and intratumour heterogeneity, inform treatment choices and predict the emergence of resistance to targeted therapies. Minimally invasive liquid biopsies can give temporal resolution to a tumour's genetic profile and allow the monitoring of treatment response through levels of circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-016-0023-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5119837PMC
November 2016
50 Reads

Synthetic nanoparticles for delivery of radioisotopes and radiosensitizers in cancer therapy.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2016 16;7(1). Epub 2016 Nov 16.

Department of Cancer Systems Imaging, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1881 East Road, Houston, TX 77054 USA.

Radiotherapy has been, and will continue to be, a critical modality to treat cancer. Since the discovery of radiation-induced cytotoxicity in the late 19th century, both external and internal radiation sources have provided tremendous benefits to extend the life of cancer patients. Despite the dramatic improvement of radiation techniques, however, one challenge persists to limit the anti-tumor efficacy of radiotherapy, which is to maximize the deposited dose in tumor while sparing the rest of the healthy vital organs. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-016-0022-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5112292PMC
November 2016
10 Reads

Gold nanoparticles for cancer radiotherapy: a review.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2016 3;7(1). Epub 2016 Nov 3.

Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA UK.

Radiotherapy is currently used in around 50% of cancer treatments and relies on the deposition of energy directly into tumour tissue. Although it is generally effective, some of the deposited energy can adversely affect healthy tissue outside the tumour volume, especially in the case of photon radiation (gamma and X-rays). Improved radiotherapy outcomes can be achieved by employing ion beams due to the characteristic energy deposition curve which culminates in a localised, high radiation dose (in form of a Bragg peak). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-016-0021-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5095165PMC
November 2016
63 Reads

Optical fibre sensors: their role in in vivo dosimetry for prostate cancer radiotherapy.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2016 18;7(1). Epub 2016 Oct 18.

Optical Fibre Sensors Research Centre, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland.

Review is made of dosimetric studies of current optical fibre technology in radiotherapy for therapeutic applications, focusing particularly on in vivo dosimetry for prostate radiotherapy. We present the various sensor designs along with the main advantages and disadvantages associated with this technology. Optical fibres are ideally placed for applications in radiotherapy dosimetry; due to their small size they are lightweight and immune to electromagnetic interferences. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-016-0020-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5069313PMC
October 2016
11 Reads

Trends in targeted prostate brachytherapy: from multiparametric MRI to nanomolecular radiosensitizers.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2016;7. Epub 2016 Jul 4.

Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Ave, Toronto, ON M4N3M5 Canada.

The treatment of localized prostate cancer is expected to become a significant problem in the next decade as an increasingly aging population becomes prone to developing the disease. Recent research into the biological nature of prostate cancer has shown that large localized doses of radiation to the cancer offer excellent long-term disease control. Brachytherapy, a form of localized radiation therapy, has been shown to be one of the most effective methods for delivering high radiation doses to the cancer; however, recent evidence suggests that increasing the localized radiation dose without bound may cause unacceptable increases in long-term side effects. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-016-0018-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4932125PMC
July 2016
5 Reads

Intravital microscopy for evaluating tumor perfusion of nanoparticles exposed to non-invasive radiofrequency electric fields.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2016;7. Epub 2016 Jun 30.

Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Research, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030 USA ; Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, 77005 TX USA ; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, 77204 TX USA.

Poor biodistribution and accumulation of chemotherapeutics in tumors due to limitations on diffusive transport and high intra-tumoral pressures (Jain RK, Nat Med. 7(9):987-989, 2001) have prompted the investigation of adjunctive therapies to improve treatment outcomes. Hyperthermia has been widely applied in attempts to meet this need, but it is limited in its ability to reach tumors in deeply located body regions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-016-0016-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4927593PMC
June 2016
13 Reads

Gazelles, unicorns, and dragons battle cancer through the Nanotechnology Startup Challenge.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2016;7. Epub 2016 Jun 9.

The Center for Advancing Innovation, INC., Bethesda, MD USA.

On March 4th, 2016, Springer's C office promoted the launch of the ( ). This innovation-development model is a partnership among our company, the Center for Advancing Innovation (CAI), MedImmune, the global biologics arm of AstraZeneca, and multiple institutes at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). "crowdsources" talent from around the world to launch startups with near-term, commercially viable cancer nanotechnology inventions, which were developed by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-016-0017-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4901082PMC
June 2016
4 Reads

Nanotechnology and cancer: improving real-time monitoring and staging of bladder cancer with multimodal mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2016;7. Epub 2016 Apr 27.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA ; NanoMedTrix, LLC, 2500 Crosspark Road, Suite E119, Coralville, IA 52241-4710 USA.

Background: Despite being one of the most common cancers, bladder cancer is largely inefficiently and inaccurately staged and monitored. Current imaging methods detect cancer only when it has reached "visible" size and has significantly disrupted the structure of the organ. By that time, thousands of cells will have proliferated and perhaps metastasized. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-016-0015-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4846680PMC
April 2016
27 Reads

Cancer Nanotechnology Startup Challenge: a new way to realize the fruits of innovation.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2016;7. Epub 2016 Mar 4.

London, UK.

A significant new innovation-development model is being launched in the field of cancer and nanotechnology. A significant new innovation-development model is being launched in the field of cancer and nanotechnology. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-016-0014-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4779129PMC
March 2016
2 Reads

Bio-conjugation of antioxidant peptide on surface-modified gold nanoparticles: a novel approach to enhance the radical scavenging property in cancer cell.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2016 9;7. Epub 2016 Feb 9.

Department of Nano-biotechnology, Vision Research Foundation, Sankara Nethralaya, 18, College Road, Nungambakkam, Chennai, 600 006 India.

Background: Functionalized gold nanoparticles are emerging as a promising nanocarrier for target specific delivery of the therapeutic molecules in a cancer cell, as a result it targeted selectively to the cancer cell and minimized the off-target effect. The functionalized nanomaterial (bio conjugate) brings novel functional properties, for example, the high payload of anticancer, antioxidant molecules and selective targeting of the cancer molecular markers. The current study reported the synthesis of multifunctional bioconjugate (GNPs-Pep-A) to target the cancer cell. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-016-0013-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4747989PMC
February 2016
13 Reads

AGuIX nanoparticles as a promising platform for image-guided radiation therapy.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2015;6(1). Epub 2015 Sep 2.

Radiation Oncology Department, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215 USA.

AGuIX are gadolinium-based nanoparticles developed mainly for imaging due to their MR contrast properties. They also have a potential role in radiation therapy as a radiosensitizer. We used MRI to quantify the uptake of AGuIX in pancreatic cancer cells, and TEM for intracellular localization. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-015-0012-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4556741PMC
September 2015
33 Reads

DNA vaccination for prostate cancer: key concepts and considerations.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2015;6(1). Epub 2015 Jul 2.

School of Pharmacy, Queen's University Belfast, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast, BT9 7BL Northern Ireland UK.

While locally confined prostate cancer is associated with a low five year mortality rate, advanced or metastatic disease remains a major challenge for healthcare professionals to treat and is usually terminal. As such, there is a need for the development of new, efficacious therapies for prostate cancer. Immunotherapy represents a promising approach where the host's immune system is harnessed to mount an anti-tumour effect, and the licensing of the first prostate cancer specific immunotherapy in 2010 has opened the door for other immunotherapies to gain regulatory approval. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-015-0010-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4488504PMC
July 2015
4 Reads

Exploratory use of docetaxel loaded acid-prepared mesoporous spheres for the treatment of malignant melanoma.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2015;6. Epub 2015 Jan 24.

Department of Pathology, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT USA.

Introduction: Five year survival for metastatic melanoma (MM) is very low at <10%. Therapeutic options have been limited secondary to systemic toxicity. As a result there has been a growing movement towards developing targeted drug delivery models. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.cancer-nano.com/content/6/1/1
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-015-0009-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4305083PMC
January 2015
28 Reads

Cell localisation of gadolinium-based nanoparticles and related radiosensitising efficacy in glioblastoma cells.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2014 10;5(1). Epub 2014 Oct 10.

Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d'Orsay (UMR 8214) Bât 351, Université Paris Sud, CNRS, 91405 Orsay Cedex, France.

Recently, the addition of nanoparticles (NPs) has been proposed as a new strategy to enhance the effect of radiotherapy particularly in the treatment of aggressive tumors such as glioblastoma. The physical processes involved in radiosensitisation by nanoparticles have been well studied although further understanding of its biological impact is still lacking, and this includes the localisation of these NPs in the target cells. Most studies were performed with NPs tagged with fluorescent markers. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-014-0006-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4192560PMC
October 2014
30 Reads

Could nanoparticle corona characterization help for biological consequence prediction?

Cancer Nanotechnol 2014 1;5(1). Epub 2014 Oct 1.

Laboratoire de Chimie Physique, CNRS UMR8000, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay, Cedex France.

As soon as they enter a biological medium (cell culture medium for , blood or plasma for studies), nanoparticles, in most cases, see their surface covered by biomolecules, especially proteins. What the cells see is thus not the ideal nanoparticle concocted by chemists, meaning the biomolecular corona could have great biological and physiological repercussions, sometimes masking the expected effects of purposely grafted molecules. In this review, we will mainly focus on gold nanoparticles. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-014-0007-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4181791PMC
October 2014
9 Reads

The role of mitochondrial function in gold nanoparticle mediated radiosensitisation.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2014 16;5(1). Epub 2014 Sep 16.

Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's, BT9 7AE Northern Ireland.

Gold nanoparticles (GNPs), have been demonstrated as effective preclinical radiosensitising agents in a range of cell models and radiation sources. These studies have also highlighted difficulty in predicted cellular radiobiological responses mediated by GNPs, based on physical assumptions alone, and therefore suggest a significant underlying biological component of response. This study aimed to determine the role of mitochondrial function in GNP radiosensitisation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://cancer-nano.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s12645-
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-014-0005-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4164854PMC
September 2014
23 Reads

Advantages of gadolinium based ultrasmall nanoparticles vs molecular gadolinium chelates for radiotherapy guided by MRI for glioma treatment.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2014;5(1). Epub 2014 Jul 1.

Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306 Université Lyon 1 - CNRS, Team FENNEC, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne, Cedex France.

AGuIX nanoparticles are formed of a polysiloxane network surrounded by gadolinium chelates. They present several characteristics. They are easy to produce, they present very small hydrodynamic diameters (<5 nm) and they are biodegradable through hydrolysis of siloxane bonds. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-014-0004-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4631720PMC
July 2014
42 Reads

Potential carriers of chemotherapeutic drugs: matrix based nanoparticulate polymeric systems.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2014;5(1). Epub 2014 Jun 26.

Division of Cyclotron and Radiopharmaceutical Sciences, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Defence Research & Development Organization(DRDO), Brig S. K. Mazumdar Road, Timarpur, Delhi 110054 India.

In this work matrix based nanoparticulate polymer systems have been designed using the diacrylate derivative of the well-known biocompatible polymer, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). This has been crosslinked using bifunctional (ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate) and tetrafunctional (pentaerythritol tetraacrylate) crosslinkers in varied concentrations (10-90%) to result in a polymeric network. The crosslinked polymers thus obtained were characterized by spectroscopic techniques (NMR and FTIR) and then prepared nanoparticles by the nanoprecipitation technique. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-014-0003-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4631724PMC
June 2014
4 Reads

Modulation of cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of nanoparticles in cancer cells by external magnetic field.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2014;5(1). Epub 2014 Jun 26.

Department of Biochemistry and Centre for excellence in Biomedical Engineering and Systems Biology, University of Calcutta, Kolkata, 700019 India.

Magnetic nanoparticles are well known for anticancer activity by deregulating cellular functions. In the present study, cellular effects of low strength static magnetic field (SMF) were explored. How nanoparticles affect the cellular response in presence and absence of static magnetic field was also studied. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-014-0002-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4631716PMC
June 2014
17 Reads

Effective cellular internalization of silica-coated CdSe quantum dots for high contrast cancer imaging and labelling applications.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2014;5(1). Epub 2014 Jun 27.

Department of Biochemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom campus, 695581 Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala India.

The possibility of developing novel contrast imaging agents for cancer cellular labelling and fluorescence imaging applications were explored using silica-coated cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum dots (QDs). The time dependent cellular internalization efficiency study was carried out using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (cLSM) after exposing QDs to stem cells and cancer cells. The strong fluorescence from the cytoplasm confirmed that the QDs were efficiently internalized by the cells. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://cancer-nano.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s12645-
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-014-0001-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4631722PMC
June 2014
25 Reads

Contact-mediated intracellular delivery of hydrophobic drugs from polymeric nanoparticles.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2014;5(1). Epub 2014 Dec 6.

Department of Physics, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Høgskoleringen 5, 7491 Trondheim, Norway.

Encapsulation of drugs in nanoparticles can enhance the accumulation of drugs in tumours, reduce toxicity toward healthy tissue, and improve pharmacokinetics compared to administration of free drug. To achieve efficient delivery and release of drugs at the target site, mechanisms of interaction between the nanoparticles and cells and the mechanism of delivery of the encapsulated drug are crucial to understand. Our aim was to determine the mechanisms for cellular uptake of a fluorescent hydrophobic model drug from poly(butylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12645-014-0008-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4355425PMC
December 2014
3 Reads

Size-dependent cellular toxicity and uptake of commercial colloidal gold nanoparticles in DU-145 cells.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2013;4(1-3):13-20. Epub 2013 Mar 9.

Department of Biological Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 USA.

Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a predominant condition in prostate cancer patients. ORN178 (EC-178) is the uropathogen that causes recurrent infection by binding specifically to adhesins of prostate cancer cells (DU-145 cells). Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been used in biodiagnosis of pathogens. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12645-013-0033-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4544071PMC
March 2013
6 Reads

Gemcitabine-loaded PLGA-PEG immunonanoparticles for targeted chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2013;4(6):145-157. Epub 2013 Sep 24.

Nanomedicine Research Centre, Department of Pharmaceutics, I.S.F. College of Pharmacy, Moga, 142-001 Punjab India.

The aim of the present study was the direct covalent coupling of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) to the surface of poly(lactide)-co-glycolide (PLGA)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) nanoparticles in order to achieve a cell type-specific drug carrier system against pancreatic cancer. The PLGA-PEG-NH diblock copolymer was synthesized by coupling reaction via amide linkage between PEG-diamine and activated PLGA. PLGA and PLGA-PEG-NH nanoparticles loaded with gemcitabine were prepared using the double-emulsion solvent evaporation method. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12645-013-0046-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4452077PMC
September 2013
7 Reads

Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using the extract of -antiproliferative effect against prostate cancer cells.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2013;4(6):137-143. Epub 2013 Sep 15.

Department of Chemistry, Avinashilingam Institute for Home Science and Higher Education for Women University (estd u/s 3 of UGC Act 1956), Coimbatore, 641043 Tamil Nadu India.

Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles was carried out using the aqueous extract of under various experimental conditions. The aqueous extract of showed significant potential for the quick reduction of silver ions. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were characterized with UV-visible absorption spectrophotometer, XRD, SEM, and FTIR analysis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12645-013-0045-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4451506PMC
September 2013
1 Read

Cisplatin-functionalized silica nanoparticles for cancer chemotherapy.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2013;4(6):127-136. Epub 2013 Jul 20.

Proteomics and Molecular Cell Physiology Lab, Department of Zoology, School of Life Sciences, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, 641 046 TN India.

Cisplatin is used to treat a variety of tumors, but dose-limiting toxicities or intrinsic and acquired resistance limit its application in many types of cancer including breast. Cisplatin was attached to silica nanoparticles using aminopropyltriethoxy silane as a linker molecule and characterized in terms of size, shape, as well as the dissolution of cisplatin from the silica surface. The primary particle diameter of the as received silica nanoparticles ranged from 20 to 90 nm. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12645-013-0043-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4451868PMC
July 2013
9 Reads
1 Citation

Intelligent system design for bionanorobots in drug delivery.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2013;4(4-5):117-125. Epub 2013 Jul 14.

Biomedical Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario Canada ; BioNano Laboratory, School of Engineering, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 Canada.

A nanorobot is defined as any smart structure which is capable of actuation, sensing, manipulation, intelligence, and swarm behavior at the nanoscale. In this study, we designed an intelligent system using fuzzy logic for diagnosis and treatment of tumors inside the human body using bionanorobots. We utilize fuzzy logic and a combination of thermal, magnetic, optical, and chemical nanosensors to interpret the uncertainty associated with the sensory information. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12645-013-0044-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4452041PMC
July 2013
5 Reads

Surface modification of cobalt oxide nanoparticles using phosphonomethyl iminodiacetic acid followed by folic acid: a biocompatible vehicle for targeted anticancer drug delivery.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2013;4(4-5):103-116. Epub 2013 Jun 26.

Immunology and Microbiology Laboratory, Department of Human Physiology with Community Health, Vidyasagar University, Midnapore, 721 102 West Bengal India.

The aim of our study was to prepare multifunctional, biocompatible nanoparticles for site-specific drug delivery. Hydrophilic nanoparticles with surface-adorned amine, carboxyl, or aldehyde groups, to be later used for bio-conjugation, were designed using phosphonomethyl iminodiacetic acid (PMIDA) as the coupling agent. These PMIDA-coated cobalt oxide nanoparticles (PMIDA-CoO) were further functionalized with folic acid (FA), using simple technique. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.cancer-nano.com/content/4/4/
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12645-013-0042-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4451626PMC
June 2013
4 Reads

Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of negatively charged pectin nanoparticles encapsulating paclitaxel.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2013;4(4-5):99-102. Epub 2013 Jun 12.

Nano-Bio-tech Lab, Department of Zoology, K. M. College, University of Delhi, Delhi, 11000 India.

Pectin, a naturally occurring biopolymer has been found to have increasing applications in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry. Sugars with their three-dimensional structures are important for many biological functions. We report preparation of negatively charged pectin nanoparticles encapsulating paclitaxel, a broad-spectrum anticancer drug for possible therapeutic applications. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.cancer-nano.com/content/4/4/
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12645-013-0041-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4452040PMC
June 2013
10 Reads

Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles and their anticancer activity.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2013;4(4-5):91-98. Epub 2013 Jun 5.

Nanoscience Division, Department of Zoology, Thiruvalluvar University, Vellore, 632 115 India.

As the nano revolution unfolds, it is imperative to integrate nanoscience and medicine. The secret gleaned from nature have led to the generation of biogenic technologies for the fabrication of advanced nanomaterials. Present investigation discloses the gold nanoparticles biosynthesizing capability of the flower of pharmacologically important tree . Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12645-013-0040-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4451866PMC
June 2013
22 Reads

Surface plasmon-enhanced Ag/CuS nanocomposites for cancer treatment.

Cancer Nanotechnol 2013;4(4-5):81-89. Epub 2013 May 18.

Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019-0059 USA.

Photothermal therapy (PTT) for cancer treatment is the use of heat between 41 and 45 °C to damage cancer cells. As a new type of transducer agent for PTT of cancer, CuS nanoparticles have several advantages. The most favorable features are the low cost, simple, and easy preparation and small size for targeting. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12645-013-0039-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4452078PMC
May 2013
13 Reads

Fungus-mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles and evaluation of antitumor activity.

Authors:
S M El-Sonbaty

Cancer Nanotechnol 2013;4(4-5):73-79. Epub 2013 May 24.

Biochemistry, National Center of Radiation Research and Technology, Cairo, Egypt.

Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were biologically synthesized using aqueous extract of fungi. Physicochemical analysis of silver nanoparticles revealed that they are of spherical shape ranged size of 8-20 nm, and their zeta potential equal -7.23 mV. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12645-013-0038-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4451754PMC
May 2013
3 Reads