1,690 results match your criteria Cancer epidemiology[Journal]


Risk of positive selection bias in longitudinal surveys among cancer survivors: Lessons learnt from the national Norwegian Testicular Cancer Survivor Study.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jul 8;67:101744. Epub 2020 Jul 8.

Department of Oncology, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Department of Clinical Medicine, University in Tromsø, The Arctic University, Tromsø, Norway.

Background: Selection bias due to non- or incomplete compliance is challenging in surveys. Using data from a longitudinal survey in testicular cancer survivors (TCSs), we identify factors predicting incomplete compliance.

Method: In a questionnaire-based national survey (1998-2016; three waves) 1,813 > 5 year TCSs were invited to report post-treatment adverse health outcomes (AHOs). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101744DOI Listing

Is increased symptom interval associated with advanced stage and poorer outcome? A prospective multicenter study of 220 patients with osteosarcoma around the knee.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jul 6;67:101776. Epub 2020 Jul 6.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital, Shanghai, China.

Objective: Osteosarcoma is rare disease and there is a strong controversy about the potential impact of symptom interval on the stage of disease and patients' outcomes. We want to assess whether increased symptom interval (SI) is associated with advanced tumor stage and poor prognosis for patients with osteosarcoma.

Methods: We analyzed prospectively collected data of 220 patients younger than 40 years who had osteosarcoma around the knee. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101776DOI Listing

CA-PROM: Validation of a general patient-reported outcomes measure for Chinese patients with cancer.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jul 2;67:101774. Epub 2020 Jul 2.

Department of Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Shanxi Medical University, 56 South XinJian Road, Taiyuan, Shanxi Province 030001, China. Electronic address:

Background: Based the important role of patient-reported outcome in measuring patients' QoL, a general PRO instrument was designed for Chinese patients with cancer.

Methods: The instrument was administered in eight hospitals. Based on PRO guidelines, a conceptual framework and item pool were generated after literature review and patients' interviews. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101774DOI Listing

Changing risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma in hyperendemic regions in the era of universal hepatitis B vaccination.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jul 2;67:101775. Epub 2020 Jul 2.

Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Guangxi Key Laboratory for the Prevention and Control of Viral Hepatitis, Nanning, Guangxi 530028, China. Electronic address:

Background: LongAn, Guangxi, was the first county in China to implement universal childhood hepatitis B virus (HBV) immunization. We aimed to determine its long-term effects in preventing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) 32 years after the immunization programme was launched.

Methods: Information on HCC deaths for LongAn and its neighbouring county, BinYang (where universal hepatitis B vaccination was not started till 2002), were obtained from the national mortality surveillance system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101775DOI Listing

Self-reported health, lifestyle and social circumstances of Australian adult cancer survivors: A propensity score weighted cross-sectional study.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 29;67:101773. Epub 2020 Jun 29.

Department of Medical Oncology, Nelune Cancer Centre, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, Australia.

Background: With the prevalence of cancer survivors increasing, their unique needs must be better understood. We examined the health, lifestyles and social circumstances of adults with and without a history of cancer.

Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study, using exposure and outcome data from the baseline survey (2006-2009) of participants in the 45 and Up Study, a prospective cohort study in New South Wales, Australia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101773DOI Listing

Childhood cancer mortality trends in Europe, 1990-2017, with focus on geographic differences.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 24;67:101768. Epub 2020 Jun 24.

Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences L. Sacco, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy.

Aim: To monitor trends in childhood cancer mortality in Europe.

Methods: We calculated age-standardized mortality rates per 100,000 children (age 0-14 years) from 1990 to the last available calendar year, for all neoplasms and six main cancers in childhood, in selected European countries and geographic areas, plus the European Union (EU), using data from the World Health Organization database. We carried out a joinpoint regression analysis of mortality trends for all neoplasms, leukaemia and tumours of the nervous system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101768DOI Listing

Change in stage of presentation of head and neck cancer in the United States before and after the affordable care act.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 24;67:101763. Epub 2020 Jun 24.

Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Saint Louis, MO, USA; Saint Louis University Cancer Center, Saint Louis, MO, USA. Electronic address:

Objective/hypothesis: Early diagnosis and stage at presentation, two prognostic factors for survival among patients with head and neck cancer (HNC), are significantly impacted by a patient's health insurance status. We aimed to assess the impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) on stage at presentation across socioeconomic and demographic subpopulations of HNC patients in the United States.

Study Design: Retrospective data analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101763DOI Listing

Socioeconomic and administrative factors associated with treatment delay of esophageal and gastric carcinoma: Prospective study from a tertiary care centre in a developing country.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 24;67:101770. Epub 2020 Jun 24.

Department of Medical Oncology, Kidwai Memorial Institute of Oncology, India. Electronic address:

This study was aimed to analyze the spectrum of time intervals, from the onset of symptoms to the commencement of treatment in esophagogastric cancers. Factors influencing these time delays and correlation between these time points with variables including socioeconomic strata, educational level, histopathology, location of tumor and the initial modality of treatment were assessed.

Study Setting And Methods: A prospective analysis of patients with esophagogastric cancer presenting to a single tertiary care unit over a period of 12 months was performed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101770DOI Listing
June 2020
2.558 Impact Factor

Cancer incidence and cancer control in Bangkok, Thailand: Results from the cancer registry 2011-15 and projections to 2035.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 22;67:101765. Epub 2020 Jun 22.

Cancer Surveillance Section, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. Electronic address:

Background: With considerable diversity in the patterns of cancer in different regions of Thailand and between urban vs. rural areas, this report focuses on cancer incidence burden in the Bangkok Metropolis 2011-15.

Methods: Incidence rates in Bangkok were derived as the mean annual number of new cancer cases per 100,000 inhabitants for the period 2011-2015 stratified by 5-year age group and sex. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101765DOI Listing

Renal cell carcinoma incidence rates and trends in young adults aged 20-39 years.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 22;67:101762. Epub 2020 Jun 22.

Cancer Prognostics and Health Outcomes Unit, University of Montreal Health Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Background: The burden of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in young adults received marginal attention. We assessed contemporary gender, race and stage-specific incidence and trends of RCC among young adults (20-39 years-old) in the United States.

Methods: Within Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database (2000-2016), patients aged 20-39 years with histologically confirmed RCC were included. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101762DOI Listing

Estimation of the performance of a risk prediction model for gastric cancer occurrence in Japan: Evidence from a small external population.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 19;67:101766. Epub 2020 Jun 19.

Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Center for Public Health Sciences, National Cancer Center, Tokyo, Japan.

Introduction: We recently developed a risk prediction model for gastric cancer which showed good performance in terms of discrimination. However, lack of external validation hampers the generalizability of our results.

Methods: The study population consisted of 1292 individuals from JPHC cohort I (Omonogawa town, Akita prefecture). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101766DOI Listing

HLA-DRB1 alleles and cervical cancer: A meta-analysis of 36 case-control studies.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 17;67:101748. Epub 2020 Jun 17.

Sydney Brenner Institute for Molecular Bioscience, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics, Faculty of Life Sciences and Medicine, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.

Background: Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) are encoded by closely linked genetic loci, and are important in cervical carcinogenesis. The association between HLA-DRB1 alleles with cervical cancer has been studied extensively, but results reported thus far have been inconsistent. Hence, we performed a meta-analysis to precisely assess this association. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101748DOI Listing

Epidemiology of liver metastases.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 17;67:101760. Epub 2020 Jun 17.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Penn State Cancer Institute, Hershey, PA, USA; Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA. Electronic address:

Aims: The objectives of this study were to (1) characterize the epidemiology of liver metastases at the time of primary cancer diagnosis (synchronous liver metastases), (2) characterize the incidence trends of synchronous liver metastases from 2010-2015 and (3) assess survival of patients with synchronous liver metastases.

Methods: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database from 2010 to 2015 was queried to obtain cases of patients with liver metastases at the time of primary cancer diagnosis. The primary cancers with an incidence rate of liver metastasis >0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101760DOI Listing

An examination between census tract unhealthy food availability and colorectal cancer incidence.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 16;67:101761. Epub 2020 Jun 16.

Department of Preventative Medicine and Population Health, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, United States.

Background: Unhealthy food environments may be associated with higher risks of developing diet-related cancers, such as, colorectal cancer. We conducted an ecological analysis to evaluate the relationship between the local food environment and colorectal cancer incidence overall and separately for males and females.

Methods: Data from the Texas Cancer Registry was utilized to geocode individuals aged 40 years and older diagnosed with colorectal cancer from 2005 to 2015 to their residential 2010 census tract. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101761DOI Listing

Incidence trends of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Saudi Arabia: Increasing incidence or competing risks?

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 16;67:101764. Epub 2020 Jun 16.

Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Introduction: The incidence of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (cALL) varies between countries likely as a result of competing risks including infections, access-to-care, socioeconomic influences, and/or ethnicity. However, little is known about disease burden in high-income Arab countries offering free-of-charge healthcare. The hypothesis was that, due to population characteristics (young age, high fertility and parental consanguinity rate), the incidence of cALL in Saudi Arabia is equal or higher than that observed in high-income Western countries. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101764DOI Listing

Estimation of age-standardized net survival, even when age-specific data are sparse.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 15;67:101745. Epub 2020 Jun 15.

Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, UK; Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.

Background: Age-standardization is vital in international comparison studies of cancer patient survival, but standard approaches can fail to produce estimates in the case of sparsity.

Methods: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that using a standardization pre-weighting approach is a viable alternative approach for external age-standardization in population-based cancer data and performs well in cases of sparsity. We further de;1;scribe how the pre-weighting approach to age-standardization can be coupled with the Pohar Perme estimator in both a cohort and period analysis setting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101745DOI Listing

Genetic variants association with cancers in African-based populations: A systematic review.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 15;67:101739. Epub 2020 Jun 15.

Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Department, Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria.

Background: Cancer is the single leading cause of human deaths worldwide. The highest incidence and mortality are recorded from Africa. The last two decades have witnessed extensive research which has led to emerging prognosis and new gene therapy technologies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101739DOI Listing

Recent cancer incidence trends and short-term predictions in Golestan, Iran 2004-2025.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 15;67:101728. Epub 2020 Jun 15.

Section for Cancer Surveillance, International Agency for Research in Cancer, Lyon, France. Electronic address:

Background: We examine recent trends in the major cancers occurring in the Golestan province, a high-risk region for upper gastrointestinal cancers in Northern Iran, and provide short-term cancer predictions of the future cancer burden.

Methods: New cancer cases diagnosed in Golestan 2004-2016 were obtained from the Golestan population-based cancer registry (GPCR) database, and age-standardized rates by cancer site, year and sex calculated per 100,000 person-years. Using IARC's DepPred package we fitted time-linear age-period models to the available GPCR data to predict the cancer incidence burden in the year 2025. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101728DOI Listing
June 2020
2.558 Impact Factor

Can different definitions of date of cancer incidence explain observed international variation in cancer survival? An ICBP SURVMARK-2 study.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 13;67:101759. Epub 2020 Jun 13.

Cancer Registry of Norway, Department of Registration, P.O. Box 5313 Majorstuen, 0304 Oslo, Norway.

Background: Differences in registration practices across population-based cancer registries may contribute to international variation in survival estimates. In particular, there are variations in recorded date of incidence (DOI) as cancer registries have access to different sources of information and use different rules to determine an official DOI. This study investigates the impact of different DOI rules on cancer survival estimates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101759DOI Listing

Temporal and geographic changes in stage at diagnosis in England during 2008-2013: A population-based study of colorectal, lung and ovarian cancers.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 11;67:101743. Epub 2020 Jun 11.

Cancer Survival Group, Department of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, WC1E 7HT, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

Background: Increasing diagnosis of cancer when the disease is still at early stages is a priority of cancer policy internationally. In England, reducing geographical inequalities in early diagnosis is also a key objective. Stage at diagnosis is not recorded for many patients, which may bias assessments of progress. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101743DOI Listing

Rare cancers are not rare in Asia as well: The rare cancer burden in East Asia.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 10;67:101702. Epub 2020 Jun 10.

Research Department, Fondazione IRCSS, Istituto Nazionale dei Tumouri, Via Venezian 1, 20133, Milan, Italy.

Introduction: Epidemiologic information on rare cancers is scarce outside of the Western countries. The project "surveillance of rare cancers in Asia" (RARECAREnet Asia) provides, for the first time, the burden of rare cancers in some Asian countries based on the latest list.

Objectives: 1) to assess whether the European list of rare cancers fits the Asian setting and 2) to compare the incidences of rare cancers between Europe and Asian countries. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101702DOI Listing

Inaccurate reporting in an article about pediatric cancers after in vitro fertilization in Israel.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 10:101735. Epub 2020 Jun 10.

Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Women's Health, Postboks 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101735DOI Listing

Coffee intake during pregnancy and childhood acute leukemia - A cohort study.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 8;67:101747. Epub 2020 Jun 8.

Department of Public Health, Research Unit for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Denmark. Electronic address:

Objectives: To estimate a possible association between coffee intake during pregnancy and risk of childhood acute leukemia by using a cohort design.

Methods: We included data from two birth cohorts; the Danish National Birth Cohort and the Aarhus Birth Cohort. Recruitment of 141,216 eligible pregnancies occurred from 1 August 1989 to 31 December 2012. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101747DOI Listing

Coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 8;67:101730. Epub 2020 Jun 8.

Behavioral and Epidemiology Research Group, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, United States.

Background: The association between coffee consumption and colorectal cancer risk generally appears null, but recent evidence suggests that risk may vary by coffee type. We examined associations of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee intake with colorectal cancer risk overall and with colon and rectum separately, among older U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101730DOI Listing

The tobacco epidemic curve in Brazil: Where are we going?

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 7;67:101736. Epub 2020 Jun 7.

National Cancer Institute, Brazil; The Johns Hopkins University. Electronic address:

Background: Brazil experienced a robust decline in smoking prevalence rates as a consequence of public policies. Since lung cancer is strongly associated with smoking, trends in lung cancer mortality rates may be used as a delayed effectiveness indicator of smoking prevention interventions.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to estimate lung cancer mortality trends from 1980 through 2017 and to predict temporal trends in lung cancer mortality rates, in Brazil from 2016 through 2040. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101736DOI Listing

Platelet and hemoglobin count at diagnosis are associated with survival in African American and Caucasian patients with colorectal cancer.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 7;67:101746. Epub 2020 Jun 7.

Department of Public Health Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States; The Biomedical Informatics Center, and Department of Oral Health Sciences, College of Dental Medicine, and Department of Healthcare Leadership and Management, College of Health Professions, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States.

Background: African Americans (AAs) compared to Caucasian Americans (CAs) with colorectal cancer (CRC) have lower stage-specific survival. CRC patients often present with several hematopathologies (such as thrombocytosis, thrombocytopenia, anemia) at diagnosis, which is associated with poorer survival. However, whether these measures impact the racial disparity in survival is not known. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101746DOI Listing

Association of physical activity, body mass index and reproductive history with breast cancer by menopausal status in Iranian women.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 5;67:101738. Epub 2020 Jun 5.

Cancer Research Center, Cancer Institute of Iran, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Breast Disease Research Center, Cancer Institute of Iran, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Cancer Biology Research Center, Cancer Institute of Iran, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

Background: The incidence rate of breast cancer (BC) is increasing in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), including Iran. We investigated the association between BC risk and physical activity (PA), body mass index (BMI), and reproductive history among Iranian women.

Methods: We conducted a large hospital-based case-control study and compared 958 BC cases with 967 controls at the Cancer Institute of Iran during 2011-2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101738DOI Listing

The proportion of cancers attributable to social deprivation: A population-based analysis of Australian health data.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 5;67:101742. Epub 2020 Jun 5.

Population Health Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, 300 Herston Road, Herston, Queensland, 4006, Australia; The University of Queensland, Faculty of Medicine, Herston Road, Herston, Queensland, 4006, Australia.

Background: Cancer is a major disease burden globally and people who are socioeconomically disadvantaged have a higher incidence of many types of cancer. We investigated the potential to reduce socioeconomic disparities in cancer incidence in Australia by lowering the prevalence of exposure to four modifiable causes: smoking, alcohol, overweight/obesity and physical inactivity.

Methods: We used cancer incidence data from the Australian Cancer Database and risk factor prevalence data from the Australian National Health Survey to estimate the proportions of cancers attributable to the four factors, by area-level socioeconomic disadvantage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101742DOI Listing

Childhood cancer care in the Middle East, North Africa, and West/Central Asia: A snapshot across five countries from the POEM network.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 2:101727. Epub 2020 Jun 2.

Children's Cancer Institute, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon; Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Beirut, Lebanon. Electronic address:

Background: The Pediatric Oncology East and Mediterranean (POEM) network, through this report, provides a snapshot view of an expected child's treatment journey in five countries in the region.

Methods: Pediatric oncologists from cancer centers in Egypt, Lebanon, Iraq, Jordan, and Pakistan provided input on referral pathways, barriers to care, and patient outcomes, based on personal experience and published data. Outcome data were extracted from institutional registries. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101727DOI Listing

Response to the letter to the editor Re: "Agreement between questionnaires and registry data on routes to diagnosis and milestone dates of the cancer diagnostic pathway: Methodological issues".

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 May 30:101740. Epub 2020 May 30.

Research Centre for Cancer Diagnosis in Primary Care, Research Unit for General Practice, Bartholins Allé 2, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101740DOI Listing

Agreement between questionnaires and registry data on routes to diagnosis and milestone dates of the cancer diagnostic pathway; Methodological issues.

Authors:
Siamak Sabour

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 May 27:101741. Epub 2020 May 27.

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, School of Health and Safety, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Chamran Highway, Velenjak, Daneshjoo Blvd, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran; Safety Promotion and Injury Prevention Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101741DOI Listing

The effects of shift work and sleep duration on cancer incidence in Alberta`s Tomorrow Project cohort.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 May 25;67:101729. Epub 2020 May 25.

Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention Research, CancerControl Alberta, Alberta Health Services, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Departments of Oncology and Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address:

Introduction: We investigated the main effects of shift work and sleep duration on cancer incidence, and effect modification of the shift work-cancer incidence association by sleep duration.

Methods: Shift work and sleep duration were assessed among 21,804 participants from Alberta`s Tomorrow Project. Incident cases of breast, prostate, colorectal and lung cancers were identified through registry linkage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101729DOI Listing

CT scans in childhood predict subsequent brain cancer: Finite mixture modelling can help separate reverse causation scans from those that may be causal.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 May 25;67:101732. Epub 2020 May 25.

Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, 207 Bouverie Street Carlton, VIC, 3053, Australia.

Background: Excess brain cancers observed after computed tomography (CT) scans could be caused by ionizing radiation. However, as scans are often used to investigate symptoms of brain cancer, excess cancers could also be due to reverse causation bias. We used finite mixture models (FMM) to differentiate CT exposures that are plausibly causal from those due to reverse causation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101732DOI Listing

Childhood cancer: Survival, treatment modalities, late effects and improvements over time.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 May 24:101733. Epub 2020 May 24.

Childhood Cancer Research Group, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Denmark; Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health, Aarhus University and University Hospital, Denmark.

Since the 1960s, paediatric oncologists have gradually become better organised in large study groups and participation in clinical trials is today considered as the standard of care, with most children with cancer in Europe and North America being enrolled on available treatment protocols. Chemotherapy is nowadays the main element of therapy, but irradiation is still required for some patients. With the advent of multimodality therapy and supportive care, five-year cancer survival exceeds 80 % in most European and North American countries today. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101733DOI Listing

Sex is a strong prognostic factor in stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer patients and should be considered in survival rate estimation.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 May 22;67:101737. Epub 2020 May 22.

Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro-Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address:

Background: Biological differences between the sexes have a major impact on disease and treatment outcome. In this paper, we evaluate the prognostic value of sex in stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the context of routine clinical data, and compare this information with other external datasets.

Methods: Clinical data from stage IV NSCLC patients from Hospital Puerta de Hierro (HPH) were retrieved from electronic health records using big data analytics (N = 397). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101737DOI Listing

Contrasting serum biomarker profiles in two Colombian populations with different risks for progression of premalignant gastric lesions during chronic Helicobacter pylori infection.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 May 21;67:101726. Epub 2020 May 21.

Division of Comparative Medicine, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA; Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA. Electronic address:

Background: Colombians in coastal Tumaco have a lower incidence of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric cancer compared to individuals from Tuquerres in the high Andes. This is despite nearly universal prevalence of H. pylori infection and chronic gastritis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101726DOI Listing

Maternal and paternal ages at conception of index child and risk of childhood acute leukaemia: A multicentre case-control study in Greater Mexico City.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 May 19;67:101731. Epub 2020 May 19.

Coordinación de Investigación en Salud, CMN "Siglo XXI", IMSS. Av. Cuauhtemoc 330, Delegación Cuauhtémoc, Mexico City, 06720, Mexico; Unidad de Investigación Médica en Epidemiología Clínica, Unidad Médica de AltaEspecialidad (UMAE) Hospital de Pediatría, Centro Médico Nacional (CMN) "Siglo XXI", Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS). Av. Cuauhtemoc 330, Delegación Cuauhtémoc, Mexico City, 06720, Mexico; Laboratorio de Biología Molecular de las Leucemias, Unidad de Investigación en Genética Humana, UMAE, Hospital de Pediatría, CMN "Siglo XXI", IMSS. Av. Cuauhtemoc 330, Delegación Cuauhtémoc, Mexico City, 06720, Mexico. Electronic address:

Background: The parental age at conception has been reported to be a risk factor for childhood acute leukaemia (AL); however, the relationship is controversial. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between parental age at conception and the risk of AL in Mexican children, a population with a high incidence of the disease and a high prevalence of pregnancies in adolescents and young adults.

Methods: A multicentre case-control study was conducted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101731DOI Listing
May 2020
2.558 Impact Factor

Assisted reproductive technology and the risk of pediatric cancer: Response to Reigstad et al.

Authors:
Gideon Koren

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 May 20:101734. Epub 2020 May 20.

Adelson Faculty of Medicine, Ariel University, Motherisk Israel Program, Shamir Hospital, Israel. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101734DOI Listing

The fall and rise of cancer registration in Estonia: The dangers of overzealous application of data protection.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 20;66:101708. Epub 2020 May 20.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.

Background: The population-based Estonian Cancer Registry (ECR) has maintained a database of cancer cases since 1968. Between 2001 and 2007 the ECR was prohibited from linking cancer records to death certificates. In January 2008, the prohibition was lifted, and two years later the ECR was able to begin tracing back unmatched deaths. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101708DOI Listing

Rare cancers in Canada, 2006-2016: A population-based surveillance report and comparison of different methods for classifying rare cancers.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 May 13;67:101721. Epub 2020 May 13.

School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.

Background: The cumulative burden from rare cancers has not been adequately explored in Canada. This analysis aims to characterize the occurrence of rare cancers among Canadians and estimate the probability of being diagnosed with a rare cancer among cancer patients with different demographic characteristics.

Methods: The Canadian Cancer Registry was used for this analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101721DOI Listing

Insurance status and level of education predict disparities in receipt of treatment and survival for anal squamous cell carcinoma.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 May 11;67:101723. Epub 2020 May 11.

Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, United States; Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, United States.

Introduction: Anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) is relatively rare, but its incidence and mortality have been steadily climbing in marginalized populations. We explored the impact of insurance status, education, and income on survival and receipt of chemoradiation therapy.

Methods: We included patients with ASCC from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program database from 2004 to 2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101723DOI Listing

Factors associated with appropriate and low-value PSA testing.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 8;66:101724. Epub 2020 May 8.

Huntsman Cancer Institute and University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA. Electronic address:

Background: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing for early detection of prostate cancer is low-value when it is not indicated by guidelines and the harms outweigh the benefits. In this retrospective cohort study, we identify provider and patient factors associated with PSA testing, particularly in situations where testing would be low-value.

Methods: We used electronic health record data from 2011 to 2018 representing 1,738,021 health system encounters in the United States. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101724DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7275910PMC

Impact of geography on Scottish cancer diagnoses in primary care: Results from a national cancer diagnosis audit.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 30;66:101720. Epub 2020 Apr 30.

Usher Institute, University of Edinburgh, Old Medical School, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, EH8 9AG, United Kingdom.

Background: A recent meta-analysis of global research found cancer patients living in rural locations are 5% less likely to survive than their urban counterparts, a survival disadvantage that has never been satisfactorily explained.

Aims: [1] To describe and compare primary-care involvement in the diagnosis of cancer between rural and urban patients in Scotland. [2] To compare the length of key diagnostic pathway intervals between rural and urban cancer patients in Scotland. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101720DOI Listing

Association of population mixing and acute lymphocytic leukemia in children and young adults.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 28;66:101722. Epub 2020 Apr 28.

Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Cancer Center, Houston, United States.

Background: The association of population mixing (PM) with childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) has been reproduced in multiple studies. However, the mechanism underlying this association is unknown.

Methods: Ecological study of incidence of pediatric ALL among 253 counties in the State of Texas (USA) using surrogates of genetic and environmental PM. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101722DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7275880PMC
June 2020
2.558 Impact Factor

The association of serum lipid levels with colorectal cancer recurrence.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 27;66:101725. Epub 2020 Apr 27.

Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Background: Biologic and epidemiologic evidence suggests that tumor cells depend on reprogrammed lipid metabolic function for survival and growth. Lipids may promote tumor recurrence by providing energy needed for proliferation. Studies have found associations of serum lipids with cancer incidence, mortality, and disease-free mortality, though they have yet to evaluate the prognostic potential of serum lipids for colorectal cancer (CRC) recurrence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101725DOI Listing

Imaging activity possibly signalling missed diagnostic opportunities in bladder and kidney cancer: A longitudinal data-linkage study using primary care electronic health records.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 22;66:101703. Epub 2020 Apr 22.

Epidemiology of Cancer Healthcare and Outcomes (ECHO) Research Group, Department of Behavioural Science and Health, University College London, London, UK.

Introduction: Sub-optimal use or interpretation of imaging investigations prior to diagnosis of certain cancers may be associated with less timely diagnosis, but pre-diagnostic imaging activity for urological cancer is unknown.

Method: We analysed linked data derived from primary and secondary care records and cancer registration to evaluate the use of clinically relevant imaging tests pre-diagnosis, in patients with bladder and kidney cancer diagnosed in 2012-15 in England. As pre-diagnostic imaging activity increased from background rate 8 months pre-diagnosis, we used logistic regression to determine factors associated with first imaging test occurring 4-8 months pre-diagnosis, considering that such instances may reflect possible missed opportunities for expediting the diagnosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101703DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7294227PMC
June 2020
2.558 Impact Factor

Cumulative burden of subsequent neoplasms, cardiovascular and respiratory morbidity in young people surviving cancer.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 9;66:101711. Epub 2020 Apr 9.

Clinical and Population Science Department, School of Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK; Leeds Institute for Data Analytics, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.

Background: Long-term childhood and young adult cancer survivors are at increased risk of the late effects of multiple chronic conditions. In this study we estimate the cumulative burden of subsequent malignant neoplasms (SMN), cardiovascular and respiratory hospitalisations in long-term survivors of childhood and young adult cancers and associated treatment risks.

Methods: Five-year survivors of cancer diagnosed aged 0-29 years between 1992-2009 in Yorkshire, UK were included. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101711DOI Listing

Impact of preexisting type 2 diabetes mellitus and antidiabetic drugs on all-cause and cause-specific mortality among Medicaid-insured women diagnosed with breast cancer.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 1;66:101710. Epub 2020 Apr 1.

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York, One University Place, Rensselaer, NY, United States; Bureau of Cancer Epidemiology, New York State Department of Health, 150 Broadway, Suite 361, Albany, NY, United States.

Background: We investigated the influence preexisting type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and antidiabetic drugs have on all-cause and cause-specific mortality among Medicaid-insured women diagnosed with breast cancer.

Methods: 9221 women aged <64 years diagnosed with breast cancer and reported to the New York State (NYS) Cancer Registry from 2004 to 2016 were linked with Medicaid claims. Preexisting T2DM was determined by three diagnosis claims for T2DM with at least one claim prior to breast cancer diagnosis and a prescription claim for an antidiabetic drug within three months following breast cancer diagnosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101710DOI Listing

Environmental exposures related to parental habits in the perinatal period and the risk of Wilms' tumor in children.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 1;66:101706. Epub 2020 Apr 1.

CRESS, UMR1153, INSERM, Université de Paris, Villejuif, France; National Registry of Childhood Cancers, APHP, CHU Paul Brousse, Villejuif and CHU de Nancy, France.

Introduction: Wilms' tumor is the most frequently diagnosed renal tumor in children. Little is known about its etiology. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of specific exposures related to parental habits such as parental smoking, maternal alcohol consumption and the use of household pesticides during pregnancy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101706DOI Listing

Cancer mortality among US blacks: Variability between African Americans, Afro-Caribbeans, and Africans.

Cancer Epidemiol 2020 Jun 30;66:101709. Epub 2020 Mar 30.

Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society, United States. Electronic address:

Introduction: Aggregation of all Black populations in US cancer mortality profiles masks remarkable heterogeneity by place of birth. Comparing U.S-born African Americans with African and Afro-Caribbean immigrants may highlight specific cancer prevention and control needs and clarify global cancer epidemiology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.canep.2020.101709DOI Listing