2,948 results match your criteria Cancer Nurs[Journal]


Resilience in Patients With Lung Cancer: Structural Equation Modeling.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Jun 29. Epub 2020 Jun 29.

Author Affiliations: Nursing Psychology Research Center of XiangYa School of Nursing, Central South University (Dr Jie Zhang, Mrs Yang, Mss Juan Li and Wu, and Dr Jingping Zhang); and Hunan Provincial People's Hospital (Mrs Yin), Changsha; School of Nursing, Fudan University, Shanghai (Dr Wang); and West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu (Ms Hui Li), China.

Background: Resilience is important for patients with cancer. However, the relationships among factors affecting the resilience of patients with lung cancer have not been studied sufficiently.

Objective: The aim of this study was to clarify the relationships among social support, resilience, self-efficacy, and symptom distress among patients with lung cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000838DOI Listing

Concomitant Benefits of an Auricular Acupressure Intervention for Women With Cancer on Family Caregiver Sleep Quality.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Jun 29. Epub 2020 Jun 29.

Author Affiliations: Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (Ms Wu, Dr Pan, Ms Kuo, and Dr Chen); Perinatal Mental Health, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia (Dr Creedy); Department of Nursing, Tzu-Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (Dr Tsao).

Background: Sleep disturbance is a frequent and significant problem challenge for family caregivers of patients with cancer. A previously tested 6-week auricular acupressure intervention was found to reduce symptom burden in women with cancer. It is possible that such an intervention has a concomitant benefit for family caregivers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000842DOI Listing

Experience of Ambulatory Cancer Care: Understanding Patients' Perspectives of Quality Using Sentiment Analysis.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Jun 29. Epub 2020 Jun 29.

Author affiliations: Department of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Eastern Finland (Drs Vehviläinen-Julkunen and Kvist and Ms Ryden-Kortelainen); and Kuopio University Hospital (Drs Vehviläinen-Julkunen and Turpeinen, Ms Nelimarkka), Finland; and Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Centre for Vision, Speech and Language Processing (Dr Enshaeifar), and Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey (Dr Faithfull), Guildford, United Kingdom. For INEXCA Consortium (Professors Walter Sermeus, Merja Miettinen, and Piera Poletti; CEO, Dr Keijo Haataja, Professor Paula Sherwood and Senior Advisor, and Associate Professor Dr Christian von Plessen).

Background: The move of cancer treatment into the outpatient setting can impact patient experience. Understanding how service delivery change impacts different people requires service feedback to inform future delivery development. The use of patient experience questionnaires often generates large amount of free-text data that are difficult to analyze. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000845DOI Listing

Stories of Lymphoma Survivors in Early Aftercare: A Narrative Inquiry.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Jun 24. Epub 2020 Jun 24.

Author Affiliations: Research Centre Autonomy and Participation of Persons With a Chronic Illness (Drs Friesen-Storms, Bours, Moser) and Academy of Nursing (Drs Friesen-Storms, Bours, and Moser), Zuyd University of Applied Sciences, Heerlen; Research Centre for Integrative Patient Centred Health Care, Heerlen, the Netherlands (Dr Jie); Department of Health Services Research (Dr Bours) and Department of Family Medicine (Drs Friesen, Moser, van der Weijden, and Beurskens), Care and Public Health Research Institute, Maastricht University; Zuyderland Medical Center, Sittard-Geleen (Dr Jie and Mr Quadvlieg-Delnoy); and Sytrec Psychotrauma Expertise Centre, Weert (Mr Heijmans), the Netherlands.

Background: Survivors of lymphoma experience multiple challenges after treatment. However, a lack of knowledge of in-depth experiences of lymphoma survivors in early aftercare persists.

Objective: To gain an in-depth understanding of the experiences of lymphoma survivors in early aftercare who have received an aftercare consultation based on evidence-based guideline recommendations, with an advanced practice nurse. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000850DOI Listing

Cardiorespiratory Fitness, Physical Activity, Walking Speed, Lack of Participation in Leisure Activities, and Lung Cancer Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

Authors:
Junga Lee

Cancer Nurs 2020 Jun 24. Epub 2020 Jun 24.

Author Affiliation: Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Physical Education, Sports Medicine and Science, Kyung Hee University, Republic of Korea.

Background: Lung cancer (LC) is the most common cause of death in cancer patients. The influence of cardiorespiratory fitness (CF) and physical activity (PA) on LC mortality has not previously been investigated.

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate through a meta-analysis the associations among CF, PA, walking speed, or leisure activity, and LC mortality and all-cause mortality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000847DOI Listing

A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Physical Activity Intervention for Self-management of Fatigue in Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Jun 17. Epub 2020 Jun 17.

Author Affiliations: College of Nursing (Drs Erickson and Ke) and College of Health Sciences and Department of Kinesiology (Mr Tokarek and Dr Swartz), University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Background: Fatigue remains a persistent and troubling symptom for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer. Physical activity (PA) is recommended as a strategy for self-management of fatigue.

Objective: The aim of the study was to examine a PA intervention to improve the self-management of fatigue in AYAs during chemotherapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000834DOI Listing

The Usefulness of Patient-Reported Outcomes and the Influence on Palliative Oncology Patients and Health Services: A Qualitative Study of the Prospective Outcomes and Support Initiative.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Jun 17. Epub 2020 Jun 17.

Author Affiliations: School of Nursing, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada (Dr Howard); BC Cancer-Centre for the North, Prince George (Ms Medhurst, Mr Brown, Ms Brown, and Dr Olson); and Faculty of Medicine (Mr Manhas, Ms Yang, and Dr Olson) and Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Surgery (Dr Olson), The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

Background: Through the British Columbia, Prospective Outcomes and Support Initiative (POSI), registered nurses collect patient-reported outcome (PRO) data during telephone follow-up with palliative oncology patients.

Objective: The research objective was to describe the usefulness and influence of the nursing care provided through POSI follow-up on palliative patients and health services.

Methods: We used a qualitative interpretive description approach involving the collection and analysis of semistructured interview data with 20 palliative patients and 12 oncology nurses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000840DOI Listing
June 2020
1.931 Impact Factor

Using Patient-Reported Outcomes to Measure Symptoms in Children With Advanced Cancer.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Jul/Aug;43(4):281-289

Author Affiliations: Department of Nursing, American Family Children's Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin (Dr Montgomery); Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders and Palliative Care, Aurora, Colorado (Ms Raybin); Institute for Nursing and Interprofessional Research (Dr Ward and Dr Murray) and Center for Cancer and Blood Disease (Ms Balian), Children's Hospital Los Angeles, California; Cancer and Blood Disease Institute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Ohio (Ms Gilger); and Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison (Dr Li).

Background: Children with advanced cancer experience symptoms despite access to quality care. Symptom research has previously relied upon retrospective designs and parent proxy rather than prospective measurement with self-report.

Objective: This study evaluated the feasibility of electronic data collection in children with advanced cancer using self-report of symptom frequency, severity, and distress. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000721DOI Listing

Religion and Spirituality in Healthcare: Distinguishing Related and Overlapping Concepts From an African American Perspective.

Authors:
Jill B Hamilton

Cancer Nurs 2020 Jul/Aug;43(4):338-339

Author Affiliation: Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000749DOI Listing

So I Have Cancer, How Long Do I Have to Live?

Cancer Nurs 2020 Jul/Aug;43(4):257-258

Capstone College of Nursing University of Alabama Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000835DOI Listing

Predictive Model of Psychological Distress in Patients With Lung Cancer: A Cross-sectional Study.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Jun 11. Epub 2020 Jun 11.

Author Affiliations: The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University (Ms Lv and Dr Hong) and School of Nursing, Anhui Medical University (Ms Lv, Dr Hong, and Mss Wang, Tong, and Liu), Anhui, China; and School of Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle (Dr Tang).

Background: Patients with lung cancer suffer from significant psychological distress. The underlying theoretical model that may explain what predicts or mediates the degree of psychological distress has not been elucidated.

Objectives: To describe the incidence of psychological distress in patients with lung cancer and to test a predictive theoretical model of psychological distress based on symptom burden, type D personality, social support, and intrusive thoughts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000837DOI Listing

Observing the Implementation of Shared Decision-making in Routine Radiotherapy Cancer Nursing: An Explorative Longitudinal Questionnaire Study.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Jun 11. Epub 2020 Jun 11.

Author Affiliations: Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, (Dr Efverman); and Department of Quality and Development, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm (Mrs Bergius Axelsson).

Background: Healthcare professionals have driven decision-making in the past. However, shared decision-making has the potential to increase quality of care.

Objective: To determine to what degree patients undergoing routine pelvic radiotherapy care perceive decision-making as being shared between patient and healthcare professionals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000830DOI Listing

The Experiences and the Needs of Caregivers of Patients With Head and Neck Cancer: An Integrative Review.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Jun 12. Epub 2020 Jun 12.

Author Affiliations: Susan Wakil School of Nursing and Midwifery (Sydney Nursing School), Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Australia.

Background: Head and neck cancer (HNC) is a devastating disease, and its corresponding treatments can result in substantial functional challenges for patients. These patients require a considerable amount of care, and the tasks of caregiving can be challenging for the caregivers. To date, there is no published literature review on the experiences and the needs of caregivers of patients with HNC. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000833DOI Listing

Psychometric Validation of the Chinese Version of the Lymphedema Functioning, Disability, and Health Questionnaire for Upper Limb Lymphedema in Patients With Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Jun 12. Epub 2020 Jun 12.

Author Affiliations: Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, PR China (Mss Zhao, Wu, Zhou, Li and Chen), Longgang District Central Hospital of Shenzhen, Shenzhen, Guangdong, PR China (Ms Tao) and Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, KU Leuven-University of Leuven, ResearchGroup for Rehabilitation in Internal Disorders, Leuven, Belgium (Ms De Vrieze).

Background: Breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) has a notable impact on patients' quality of life. However, no instrument is available to assess the problems in functioning due to BCRL in China.

Objective: The aims of this study were to translate and validate a Chinese version of the Lymphedema Functioning, Disability, and Health Questionnaire for Upper Limb Lymphedema (Lymph-ICF-UL). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000848DOI Listing

Psychometric and Linguistic Evaluation of a Coping Scale for Breast Cancer Survivors in Taiwan.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Jun 12. Epub 2020 Jun 12.

Author Affiliations: Nursing Department, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan, Republic of China (Drs Huang and Lu); Nursing Department, Tzu Chi University of Science and Technology, Hualien City, Taiwan, Republic of China (Dr Perng); Management College, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung City, Taiwan, Republic of China (Dr Chen).

Background: Coping strategies are essential in dealing with threatening situations or difficulties for better psychological adjustments and quality of life. A short-form modified Ways of Coping Questionnaire (MWCQ) would be useful to quickly assess the coping strategies used by breast cancer survivors.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of a Chinese version of a brief version of the MWCQ in breast cancer survivors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000846DOI Listing

Virtual Reality Intervention Targeting Pain and Anxiety Among Pediatric Cancer Patients Undergoing Peripheral Intravenous Cannulation: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Jun 4. Epub 2020 Jun 4.

Author Affiliations: The Nethersole School of Nursing (Dr Wong, Prof Chan, Drs Choi and Chen, and Miss Yeung and Chan) and Department of Paediatrics (Dr Li), Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.

Background: Peripheral intravenous cannulation (PIC) is commonly performed in cancer treatment and causes pain and anxiety to children with cancer.

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether virtual reality distraction intervention can alleviate pain and anxiety and reduce length of procedure among pediatric cancer patients undergoing PIC.

Methods: One hundred eight pediatric cancer patients aged 6 to 17 years were recruited from a regional public hospital in Hong Kong to participate in this randomized controlled trial. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000844DOI Listing

Death Self-efficacy, Attitudes Toward Death and Burnout Among Oncology Nurses: A Multicenter Cross-sectional Study.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Jun 3. Epub 2020 Jun 3.

Author Affiliations: Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute & Hospital, National Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin's Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Tianjin (Ms Zheng and Dong); and School of Nursing, Capital Medical University, Beijing (Dr Guo and Ms Gao), China.

Background: To effectively care for dying patients, nurses need to possess death self-efficacy-the state of having both a range of skills and capabilities to provide care to dying patients and confidence in one's ability to do so. A paucity of death self-efficacy may lead to burnout.

Objectives: The aims of this study are to clarify oncology nurses' death self-efficacy and to explore its relationships with attitudes toward death and burnout. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000839DOI Listing

Storytelling Through Music to Improve Well-being in Oncology Nurses: A Feasibility Study.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Jun 3. Epub 2020 Jun 3.

Author Affiliations: The Phyllis F. Cantor Center for Research in Nursing and Patient Care, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (Dr Phillips); and Schools of Nursing (Drs Volker and Becker) and Law (Dr Davidson), The University of Texas at Austin.

Background: Professional grief is one cause of psychosocial stress that, if not attended to, may contribute to burnout and compassion fatigue. Oncology nurses often avoid their emotions and learn to cope with professional grief in isolation. Interventions aimed at professional grief are limited. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000836DOI Listing

Clinicians Report Barriers and Facilitators to High-Quality Ambulatory Oncology Care.

Cancer Nurs 2020 May 28. Epub 2020 May 28.

Author Affiliations: University of Michigan School of Nursing (Drs. Lafferty, Manojlovich, and Friese and Mr. Wright); Michigan Oncology Quality Consortium (Dr Griggs); Ann Arbor Veterans Administration Health System, Center for Clinical Management Research (Dr Harrod); and Division of Hematology/Oncology, Internal Medicine, University of Michigan (Dr Griggs), Ann Arbor.

Background: Ambulatory oncology practices treat thousands of Americans on a daily basis with high-risk and high-cost antineoplastic agents. However, we know relatively little about these diverse practices and the organizational structures influencing care delivery.

Objective: The aim of this study was to examine clinician-reported factors within ambulatory oncology practices that affect care delivery processes and outcomes for patients and clinicians. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000832DOI Listing

Systematic Review of Video Education in Underrepresented Minority Cancer Survivors.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Jul/Aug;43(4):259-268

Author Affiliations: School of Nursing (Drs Hirschey and Bryant) and Health Sciences Library (Ms Walker), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; and School of Nursing, The Ohio State University (Dr Nolan), Columbus, Ohio.

Background: Underrepresented minority (URM) cancer survivors experience disparities in mortality and quality of life, compared with non-Hispanic whites. Disparities are associated with poor social determinants of health, enhanced by mistrust of the healthcare system. Trust can be facilitated by provider-patient racial/ethnic concordance, yet URM survivors rarely experience concordance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000829DOI Listing

Frequent Stools Were Related to Reduced Quality of Life and Capacity in Daily Activities: Weekly Observations During and After Pelvic or Abdominal Radiotherapy.

Cancer Nurs 2020 May 21. Epub 2020 May 21.

Author Affiliations: Division of Coordinated Cancer Evaluation, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping (Dr Enblom); Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm; and Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg (Dr Steineck); Division of Nursing, Department of Oncology and Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping (Dr Börjeson), Sweden.

Background: Greater knowledge regarding stool frequency and infrequency during pelvic and abdominal irradiation is needed to accurately identify patients at risk of either.

Objective: To describe occurrence of frequent and infrequent stools during pelvic-abdominal radiotherapy, and to compare quality of life (QoL) and activities of daily living (ADLs) of those patients experiencing frequent stools with those of patients experiencing infrequent stools.

Methods: Longitudinally during radiotherapy, 193 patients (64% had gynecological tumors) documented stool frequency, medications, and QoL using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000831DOI Listing

Fatigue and Sleep Disturbance in Arabic Cancer Patients After Completion of Therapy: Prevalence, Correlates, and Association With Quality of Life.

Cancer Nurs 2020 May 14. Epub 2020 May 14.

Author Affiliations: Institute of Nursing and Health Research, Ulster University, Newtownabbey, UK (Drs Al Maqbali, Hughes and Gracey); Physiotherapy Department, Cancer Center, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, UK (Ms Rankin); Psychology Research Institute, Ulster University, Coleraine, UK (Dr Dunwoody); School of Nursing, Indiana University, Indianapolis (Dr Hacker).

Background: Fatigue and sleep disturbance are 2 of the most common and distressing cancer symptoms that negatively affect quality of life.

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of, and factors contributing to, fatigue and sleep disturbance in Arabic-speaking cancer patients in Oman after completion of their cancer treatment.

Methods: A cross-sectional and descriptive correlational design was used. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000825DOI Listing

Toward an Understanding of the Factors Associated With Reproductive Concerns in Younger Female Cancer Patients: Evidence From the Literature.

Cancer Nurs 2020 May 11. Epub 2020 May 11.

Author Affiliations: Center for Health Technology and Services Research (CINTESIS), Department of Education and Psychology, University of Aveiro (Drs Bártolo and Monteiro); William James Center for Research, Department of Education and Psychology, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal (Dr Santos).

Background: Cancer treatments may compromise fertility and family building in reproductive-age women. Previous research has shown that younger women with cancer experienced several reproductive health concerns.

Objective: The aim of this study was to conduct a focused review of existing research about the subjective perceptions of reproductive concerns among young women with cancer (aged 15-49 years) and identify their potential predictors and outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000822DOI Listing

The Correlation of Symptom Clusters and Functional Performance in Adult Acute Leukemia Patients Under Chemotherapy.

Cancer Nurs 2020 May 11. Epub 2020 May 11.

Author Affiliations: West China School of Nursing (Mrs Chen and Li) and Departments of Hematology (Mrs Chen, Leng, Zhang, Xu, Zhang, and Dr Zheng) and Nursing (Mrs Li), West China Hospital, Sichuan University; and Department of Endocrinology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (Dr Qin).

Background: Adult acute leukemia (AL) patients who receive chemotherapy usually experience multiple symptoms during the treatment course. The symptom clusters (SCs) as well as subsets of concurrent symptoms in AL patients have not yet been demonstrated.

Objective: To investigate the SCs of adult AL patients who were receiving chemotherapy and to determine their correlations with functional performance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000816DOI Listing

The Use of Mobile Applications for Managing Care Processes During Chemotherapy Treatments: A Systematic Review.

Cancer Nurs 2020 May 6. Epub 2020 May 6.

Author Affiliations: Surgical-oncology Department, Portuguese Institute of Oncology of Porto, Porto, Portugal (Dr Magalhães); Health School Santa Maria (Dr Magalhães); Nursing School of Porto (Drs Santos and Fernandes); and CINTESIS-Center for Health Technology and Services Research, NursID: Innovation and Development in Nursing, Porto, Portugal (Drs Magalhães, Santos, and Fernandes); and Department of Nursing, University of Jaen, Jaén, Spain (Drs Magalhães and Martínez-Galiano) and CIBERESP - Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public Health, Madrid, Spain (Dr Martínez-Galiano.).

Background: The recent mobile technology advancements, such as the development of applications (apps) for mobile phones and tablets, can assist in the development of low-cost platforms to monitor therapeutic adherence or complications, providing easily accessible information or guidelines in self-care focused on the care recipient.

Objective: The aim of this study was to gather scientific evidence about the efficacy of the use of mobile apps during chemotherapy treatments.

Methods: A systematic review of quantitative studies was performed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000823DOI Listing

Mindfulness-Based Interventions for Young People With Cancer: An Integrative Literature Review.

Cancer Nurs 2020 May 6. Epub 2020 May 6.

Author Affiliations:School of Nursing and Midwifery, Western Sydney University, NSW, Australia (Drs Pathrose, Everett, Salamonson and Ramjan); Research and Youth Cancer Services, CanTeen, Newtown, NSW, Australia (Drs Patterson and McDonald); Stressed Teens, Campbell, California, USA (Ms Biegel); Translational Health Research Institute, Western Sydney University, NSW, Australia (Dr Ussher).

Background: Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) have demonstrated benefits for adults with chronic illness and are becoming increasingly popular among children and young people. Mindfulness-based interventions could have benefits for young people with cancer throughout the treatment journey, through to survivorship.

Objective: The aim was to review intervention studies about MBI used with young people with cancer between the ages of 10 and 29 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000821DOI Listing

Short Versus Long Timing of Flushing of Totally Implantable Venous Access Devices When Not Used Routinely: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Cancer Nurs 2020 May 6. Epub 2020 May 6.

Author Affiliations: Department of Public Health and Pediatrics, University of Torino (Dr Clari and Drs Campagna); Cardiology, Coronary Intensive Care, Hospital Civic of Chivasso, Torino (Mrs Spoto); Intensive Care Unit, Versilia Hospital, Lucca (Mrs Franceschi); Emergency Surgery, CTO Hospital, Torino (Mrs Acuto); School of Nursing, Biella Hospital (Mr Tonella); Department of Translational Medicine, University of Eastern Piedmont, Novara (Mrs Caristia, Mrs Busca, and Dr Dal Molin); Department of Medical and Surgery Emergency Acceptance, Biella Hospital (Mrs Buratti and Mrs Gaboardi); and Department of Health Science, University of Florence, Careggi Teaching Hospital (Mrs Rasero), Italy.

Background: Flushing and locking of totally implantable venous access devices (TIVADs) is recommended to maintain their patency when not in use. Although manufacturers' recommendations indicate monthly access for TIVAD maintenance, there is a tendency in real life to prolong this interval.

Objectives: To assess the effectiveness of prolonged versus short flushing and locking intervals to prevent TIVAD occlusions in adults with cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000819DOI Listing

Sleep During Pelvic-Abdominal Radiotherapy for Cancer: A Longitudinal Study With Special Attention to Sleep in Relation to Nausea and Quality of Life.

Cancer Nurs 2020 May 4. Epub 2020 May 4.

Author Affiliations: Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, & Stockholm Health Care Services, Region Stockholm, Sweden (Dr Blom); Division of Psychiatry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway (Dr Blom); and Department of Caring Science, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden (Dr Efverman).

Background: Poor sleep, nausea, psychological distress, and a lowered quality of life are common during radiotherapy for cancer. There is a lack of studies on the relationship between radiotherapy-induced nausea and sleep. This longitudinal study analyzes data from 196 patients who underwent pelvic-abdominal radiotherapy for cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000826DOI Listing

Body Image, Sexuality, and Sexual Functioning in Women With Gynecologic Cancer: An Integrative Review of the Literature and Implications for Research.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Apr 21. Epub 2020 Apr 21.

Author Affiliations: University of Utah College of Nursing, Salt Lake City (Dr. Wilson); Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing, Richmond (Drs McGuire, Rodgers, and Elswick); and Anne Arundel Medical Center, Annapolis, Maryland (Dr Temkin).

Background: Cervical and uterine cancers are common in women. Diagnosis and treatment of these cancers can lead to significant issues with body image, sexuality, and sexual functioning. A comprehensive review can improve understanding of these 3 concepts, in turn enhancing identification and management. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000818DOI Listing

Forgiveness and Health Outcomes in Cancer Survivorship: A Scoping Review.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Apr 21. Epub 2020 Apr 21.

Author Affiliations: School of Social Work, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Dr Kim); School of Nursing, University of Missouri (Dr Hulett), Columbia; and College of Nursing, University of South Carolina (Dr Heiney), Columbia.

Background: Religious and spiritual beliefs including forgiveness are an important aspect of cancer survivorship; however, the relationship between forgiveness and health is not well understood.

Objective: The aim of this study was to conduct a scoping review that examines and maps the current research regarding relationships between forgiveness and health outcomes in individuals with cancer.

Methods: We searched 5 electronic databases using key search terms related to forgiveness and cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000809DOI Listing

The Value of Synthesizing Evidence to Inform Cancer Nursing.

Authors:
Jane Noyes

Cancer Nurs 2020 May/Jun;43(3):173-176

School of Health Sciences, Bangor University, Bangor, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000824DOI Listing

The Evidence Synthesis Imperative.

Cancer Nurs 2020 May/Jun;43(3):171-172

Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing, Richmond, VA, USA University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA, USA University of Exeter College of Medicine and Health, Exeter, England, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000807DOI Listing

Reviewer Thank You.

Authors:

Cancer Nurs 2020 May/Jun;43(3):169-170

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000806DOI Listing

Adapting and Going the Extra Mile: A Qualitative Study of Palliative Care in Rural Northern Norway From the Perspective of Healthcare Providers.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Mar 24. Epub 2020 Mar 24.

Authors Affiliations: Department of Oncology, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø (Dr Ervik); and Department of Community Medicine, UiT, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø (Drs Brøndbo and Johansen).

Background: Despite significant developments in palliative care in recent decades, we still find important differences in access to and delivery of care in rural Norway.

Objective: The aim of this study was to explore what healthcare professionals consider necessary to provide equality in care for palliative patients in rural areas.

Methods: A qualitative approach with focus group discussions and individual interviews with 52 health professionals was used, starting with 5 uniprofessional focus groups of general practitioners and nurses/cancer nurses, followed by 5 interprofessional groups and 6 individual interviews. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000815DOI Listing

A Systematic Review on Oncology Nurses' Knowledge on Palliative Care.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Mar 24. Epub 2020 Mar 24.

Authors' Affiliation: College of Nursing, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park.

Background: Patients with cancer have high symptom burden and unmet needs and therefore can benefit from palliative care. Oncology nurses are consistent providers of care to patients with cancer and can provide palliative care to these patients. However, oncology nurses' knowledge on palliative care has not been systematically evaluated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000817DOI Listing

Nurses' Experiences When Introducing Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in an Outpatient Clinic: An Interpretive Description Study.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Mar 24. Epub 2020 Mar 24.

Author Affiliations: Department of Haematology, Zealand University Hospital, Roskilde (Mrs Hansen and Drs Kjerholt and Christensen); Department of Regional Health Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Mrs Hansen and Hølge-Hazelton); Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences (Dr Christensen) and Department of General Practice, Institute of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences (Dr Brodersen), University of Copenhagen; and The Research Support Unit at Zealand University Hospital, Roskilde (Mrs Hølge-Hazelton), Denmark.

Background: Application of patient-reported outcome measures (PROM) seems to be a step toward person-centered care and identifying patients' unmet needs.

Objective: To investigate the experiences of nurses when PROMs were introduced in a hematological clinical practice as part of a multimethod intervention study.

Methods: The qualitative framework was guided by the interpretive description (ID) methodology, including a focused ethnographic approach with participant observations and interviews. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000808DOI Listing

Infertility After Cancer: How the Need to Be a Parent, Fertility-Related Social Concern, and Acceptance of Illness Influence Quality of Life.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Mar 24. Epub 2020 Mar 24.

Author Affiliations: CanTeen Australia (Drs Patterson, Tindle, and McDonald), Sydney; Cancer Nursing Research Institute, The University of Sydney (Drs Patterson and McDonald); and Translational Health Research Institute, Western Sydney University (Drs Perz and Ussher), Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia.

Background: Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) given a diagnosis of cancer who experience infertility concerns often report having poorer quality of life (QoL). However, the role of infertility-related stressors and illness acceptance on QoL is not clear.

Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the impact of psychosocial factors surrounding cancer treatment and infertility on QoL. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000811DOI Listing

The Experiences of Women Living With Cervical Cancer in Africa: A Metasynthesis of Qualitative Studies.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Mar 24. Epub 2020 Mar 24.

Author Affiliations: Department of Nursing Education, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa (Dr Maree, Dr Holtslander, and Ms Maree); and College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada (Dr Holtslander).

Background: Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide. However, developing countries bear 85% of the burden, with Africa sharing the highest incidence with Melanesia.

Objectives: The aims of this study were to explore the experiences of women living with cervical cancer in Africa and to inform others of the extent of the work done in this field of study by synthesizing the findings of qualitative research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000812DOI Listing

Maternal Experiences of Parenting Young Children While Battling Breast Cancer in Taiwan.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Mar 24. Epub 2020 Mar 24.

Author Affiliations: Department of Early Childhood Education, University of Taipei (Dr Chin); School of Nursing, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University (Dr Chang); and Department of Early Childhood Education, National University of Tainan (Dr Lin), Taiwan.

Background: Western mothers with breast cancer find themselves struggling with parenting responsibilities. Because parenting is culturally shaped, literature on ill mothers' experiences of parenting young children from a collectivist culture is limited.

Objective: The aim of this study was to examine Taiwanese mothers' experiences of and cultural practices embedded in parenting young children while in treatment for breast cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000813DOI Listing

Too Much Cancer Care?: Nurses' Perspectives on the Unnecessary Use of Oncology Services.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Mar 24. Epub 2020 Mar 24.

Author Affiliations: Guilford Glazer Faculty of Business and Management and Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Health Systems Management, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (Dr Ellen and Ms Perlman), Beersheba, Israel; Institute for Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto (Dr Ellen), Ontario, Canada; McMaster Health Forum, McMaster University (Dr Ellen), Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; and Department of Psychology, Saint Louis University (Ms Shach), Missouri.

Background: "Unnecessary use of health services" refers to care that does not add value for patients and can lead to physical, emotional, and economical harm. High rates of overuse have been reported within oncology, and patients experience its consequences.

Objective: The aim of this study was to explore perceptions and experiences of oncology nurses regarding unnecessary use of oncology services. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000814DOI Listing

Inpatient Step Counts, Symptom Severity, and Perceived Health Status After Lung Resection Surgery.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Mar 24. Epub 2020 Mar 24.

Author Affiliations: Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Granada (Drs Rodríguez-Torres, López-López, Cabrera-Martos, and Valenza); and "Virgen de las Nieves" Hospital (Dr Quero-Valenzuela), Granada, Spain; University of Miami (Dr Cahalin), Coral Gables, Florida; and Universitat de Valencia (Dr Cebrià-i-Iranzo), Spain.

Background: The clinical relevance of inpatient step counts after lung surgery remains unknown.

Objective: The aim of this study was to identify those factors related to physical activity measured by step count, during the inpatient stay, and its relationship with symptom severity and perceived health status at hospital admission, discharge, and 1 month after discharge.

Methods: We studied the inpatient step count of 73 participants who underwent lung resection surgery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000810DOI Listing

Defining Expertise in Cancer Nursing Practice.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Mar 17. Epub 2020 Mar 17.

Author Affiliations: Department of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne (Drs Krishnasamy and Milne; Mss Webb, Babos, Duong, and Rohde; and Mr Ting); Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre (Drs Krishnasamy and Milne and Mss Mathieson and Koproski); Cancer Nursing Research Group, Centre for Cancer Research, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne (Dr Krishnasamy); and Cancer Experiences Research, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (Drs Krishnasamy and Milne and Ms Koproski), Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Background: Thirty-five years ago, Benner defined an expert nurse as one who applies deep knowledge and experience across different contexts and clinical situations. Since that time, there has been little exploration of expertise in cancer nursing.

Objectives: To explore and describe characteristics of expert cancer nurses and to consider whether Benner's typology of an expert nurse remains relevant in today's complex oncology settings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000805DOI Listing

Oncology and Palliative Care Nurses' Knowledge and Attitudes Toward Artificial Nutrition and Hydration for Patients at End of Life in Italy: A Cross-sectional Survey.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Mar 17. Epub 2020 Mar 17.

Author Affiliations: Department of Biomedicine and Prevention University of Rome 'Tor Vergata' (Dr Albanesi); Research Unit Nursing Science, Campus Bio-Medico di Roma University, Rome (Drs Marchetti and Piredda and Ms De Marinis); and Antea Center (Drs Chiara and Magnani), Rome; Palliative Care and Pain Therapy Unit, Azienda ULSS 4 Veneto Orientale, San Donà di Piave, Venice (Dr Artico); CNEC Center for Clinical Excellence and Quality of Care Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome (Dr D'Angelo); Biomedical Sciences for Health, University of Milan, Milan (Ms Lusignani); and Research Unit in Hygiene, Statistics and Public Health, Campus Bio Medico di Roma University, Rome (Dr Ianni), Italy.

Background: Nutrition is a basic patients' need and an important component of nursing. End-of-life cancer patients can experience difficulties in eating and drinking, sometimes requiring artificial nutrition and hydration (ANH). Nurses' knowledge and attitudes greatly influence nursing care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000803DOI Listing

Rural-Urban Differences in Neuroimmune Biomarkers and Health Status Among Women Living With Breast Cancer.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Mar 17. Epub 2020 Mar 17.

Author Affiliations: Sinclair School of Nursing and Ellis Fischel Cancer Center, University of Missouri, Columbia (Drs Hulett and Armer); College of Nursing, University of South Carolina, Columbia (Dr Abshire); and Wildlife Biology Program, Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, W. A. Franke College of Forestry and Conservation, University of Montana, Missoula (Ms Millspaugh and Dr Millspaugh).

Background: Because of chronic emotional and psychosocial stressors following breast cancer (BC) treatment, BC survivors are at risk of neuroimmune dysfunction in survivorship. Rural BC survivors experience more health disparities than urban BC survivors. Rural-urban residence as a variable on neuroimmune activity in extended BC survivorship continuum has not been explored. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000802DOI Listing

The Effects of Cognitive-Behavioral Stress Management for Breast Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Cancer Nurs 2020 May/Jun;43(3):222-237

Author Affiliations: Key Laboratory of Birth Defects and Related Diseases of Women and Children of Ministry of Education, West China Second Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu (Ms Tang); Huazhong University of Science and Technology Union Shenzhen Hospital (Nanshan Hospital), Shenzhen (Dr Liu); School of Nursing, Jinggangshan University, Ji'an (Dr Liu); and 10th People's Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai (Ms Wu and Dr Shi), China.

Background: Treatment for breast cancer can be stressful for patients. Cognitive-behavioral stress management (CBSM) interventions aim to improve patients' skills in coping with stress and buffer against the negative effects of cancer.

Objectives: This meta-analysis aimed to demonstrate the impact of CBSM on breast cancer patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000804DOI Listing

The Interaction Between Hematological Cancer Patients and Family Caregivers and Their Life Changes: A Qualitative Dyadic Approach.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Mar 17. Epub 2020 Mar 17.

Author Affiliations: Psychiatric Nursing Department, Faculty of Nursing, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey.

Background: Diagnosis of hematological cancer affects patients and caregivers as a unit. Few studies have focused on the relationship between hematological cancer patients and their caregivers.

Objective: To explore (a) the interaction between patients receiving treatment for hematological cancer in a hematology-oncology clinic and their family caregivers and (b) perceived changes in lives of patients receiving treatment for hematological cancer in a hematology-oncology clinic and their family caregivers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000800DOI Listing

Exploring Young People's Experience of Ending Active Cancer Treatment: When the "Little Cancer Treatment Bubble" Pops.

Cancer Nurs 2020 Mar 17. Epub 2020 Mar 17.

Author Affiliations: Cancer Division, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (Drs Lea, Martins, Fern, Soanes, and Taylor); Coventry University (Mrs Cable and Dr Whelan); Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (Ms Morgan), England.

Background: The end of active cancer treatment is described as a stressful period for adolescents and young adults (AYAs). However, research evidence describing the experience of AYAs as they transition from active treatment into follow-up care is scarce.

Objective: We aimed to understand AYAs' experiences within the first 12 months of ending active treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000798DOI Listing

The Asian Immigrant Cancer Survivor Experience in the United States: A Scoping Review of the Literature.

Cancer Nurs 2020 May/Jun;43(3):177-199

Author Affiliations: Duquesne University School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Dr Lockhart); University of Louisiana at Lafayette, College of Nursing and Allied Health Professions, Lafayette, Louisiana (Dr Oberleitner); and Duquesne University Gumberg Library, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Mr Nolfi).

Background: Cancer is the leading cause of death for Asian Americans, a growing population in the United States. While cancer survivors often experience complex issues after diagnosis, being an immigrant and having cancer pose additional challenges.

Objective: This scoping review analyzed research about immigrant cancer survivors of Asian ethnicity in the United States and provided a structured method to understand an area of research and evidence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000797DOI Listing

Exercise Effects on Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy: A Comprehensive Integrative Review.

Cancer Nurs 2020 May/Jun;43(3):E172-E185

Author Affiliations: School of Nursing (Mrs Kanzawa-Lee and Drs Larson and Smith) and School of Public Health (Dr Resnicow), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Background: No effective cures for chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) are known; however, exercise may be beneficial.

Objective: The purpose of this review was to synthesize high-quality research publications reporting the effects of exercise on CIPN and related outcomes among people of all age groups who received neurotoxic chemotherapy.

Methods: PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, PsycINFO, and SPORTDiscus databases were searched first between May and November 2016 and then again in April 2019 for all clinical trials and meta-analyses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NCC.0000000000000801DOI Listing
March 2020
1.931 Impact Factor