394 results match your criteria Cancer Journal[Journal]


Effect of concurrent intra-arterial infusion of platinum drugs for patients with stage III or IV uterine cervical cancer treated with radical radiation therapy.

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Jan-Feb;6(1):40-5

Department of Radiology, Yamanashi Medical University, Nakakoma-gun, Japan.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of concurrent intra-arterial infusion of platinum drugs in patients with stage III or IV uterine cervical cancer treated with radical radiation therapy.

Patients And Methods: Thirty-three patients with advanced (stage IIIA, 2; IIIB, 28; IVA, 3) uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma were randomized into a concurrent intra-arterial infusion of platinum drugs with radiation therapy (IAPRT) group (18 patients) and a radiation therapy alone group (15 patients). After altering intrapelvic blood flow by embolization of the superior and inferior gluteal arteries under pelvic angiography, intra-arterial infusion of platinum drug through catheters inserted into both internal iliac arteries was performed concurrently with radiation therapy. Read More

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March 2000
5 Reads

Pilot study with weekly chemotherapy for patients with extensive small cell lung cancer: an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Study (PA586).

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Jan-Feb;6(1):34-9

Stanford University Medical Center, California 94304, USA.

Purpose: Six of the most active chemotherapy agents in small cell lung cancer were administered sequentially in a weekly fashion in an attempt to optimize the dose and the number of agents received over a 12-week period. The purpose of this study was to estimate the efficacy and to characterize the toxicity of this approach.

Patients And Methods: Thirty-six patients with extensive-stage small cell lung cancer received weekly treatments with cisplatin and etoposide (weeks 1, 5, and 11), cyclophosphamide (weeks 2, 7, and 10), vincristine (weeks 2, 4, 7, 8, 10, and 12), methotrexate (weeks 3, 6, and 9), and doxorubicin (weeks 4, 8, and 12). Read More

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March 2000
1 Read

Negative margin status improves local control in conservatively managed breast cancer patients.

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Jan-Feb;6(1):28-33

Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8040, USA.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of final pathologic margin status on breast relapse-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival in patients undergoing conservative surgery and radiation therapy for invasive breast cancer.

Materials And Methods: Between January 1970 and December 1990, 984 patients underwent conservative surgery and radiation therapy at our institution as treatment for invasive breast cancer. After lumpectomy, patients were given radiation therapy to the intact breast with or without treatment to regional nodes with the routine use of electron boost to a total median tumor bed dose of 64 Gy. Read More

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March 2000
3 Reads

The value of postlumpectomy mammogram in the management of breast cancer patients presenting with suspiciouis microcalcifications.

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Jan-Feb;6(1):25-7

Department of Radiation Oncology, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute and Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan 48201, USA.

Purpose: It is recommended that patients with breast cancer who present with mammographically detected microcalcification should undergo postlumpectomy mammogram with magnification views to ensure adequate removal of all clinically demonstrable disease. The value of postlumpectomy mammogram has not been adequately examined in the literature. This report aims to quantify the value of such a study. Read More

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March 2000
2 Reads

Elevations in serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor levels predict relapse in patients with hairy cell leukemia.

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Jan-Feb;6(1):21-4

Lombardi Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington DC, USA.

Purpose: Interferon-alfa, 2'-deoxycoformycin, and 2-chlorodeoxy-adenosine (2-CdA) are effective in the management of patients with hairy cell leukemia. These agents produce remissions in most patients, but relapses occur with all three drugs. The optimal means to follow patients for relapse after treatment has not been determined. Read More

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March 2000
1 Read

Prevention with tamoxifen or other hormones versus prophylactic surgery in BRCA1/2-positive women: a decision analysis.

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Jan-Feb;6(1):13-20

Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA.

Purpose: Recent randomized controlled trials have shown that tamoxifen and raloxifene may prevent invasive breast cancer. This decision analysis study compares the outcomes of chemoprevention with tamoxifen, raloxifene, or oral contraceptives with the outcomes of prophylactic surgery among women with high-risk BRCA1/2 mutations.

Patients And Methods: We used a simulated cohort of 30-year-old women who tested positive for BRCA1/2 mutations and constructed a Markov model with Monte Carlo simulations, incorporating cumulative breast and ovarian cancer incidence rates from the literature and survival figures from SEER data. Read More

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March 2000
4 Reads

Should postoperative mammograms be obtained routinely following the surgical excision of a breast cancer?

Authors:
D B Kopans

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Jan-Feb;6(1):11-2

Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02114, USA.

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March 2000
1 Read

Translational research offers individually tailored treatments for cancer patients.

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Jan-Feb;6(1):2-10

Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam.

The measurement of the effect of cisplatin on DNA has become feasible with the development of antibodies against DNA adducts. In a phase II dose escalation trial with concomitant radiotherapy and daily cisplatin in lung cancer, we found that patients with high DNA adduct levels measured in the buccal mucosa had a much higher survival rate than patients with a low or undetectable amount of cisplatin-DNA adducts. The use of this assay may therefore allow the selection of individual patients for concomitant treatment with cisplatin and radiotherapy, as has been shown to be effective in randomized trials in patients with lung, head and neck, and cervix malignancies. Read More

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March 2000
1 Read

Overview of interleukin-2 inhalation therapy.

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Feb;6 Suppl 1:S104-12

Department of Urology, University of Hamburg, University Clinic Eppendorf, Germany.

Purpose: Locoregional administration of interleukin (IL)-2, which acts physiologically as a local hormone, is an effective therapeutic modality. Diverse preclinical and clinical models have described methods of administration that expose tumor tissues to continuously high levels of cytokines. Regional administration of IL-2 that does not raise intravascular IL-2 levels induces local and systemic immunomodulation and produces objective local tumor responses. Read More

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February 2000
4 Reads

The role of interleukin-2 in the management of stage IV melanoma: the EORTC melanoma cooperative group program.

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Feb;6 Suppl 1:S99-103

Department of Medicine III (Hematology, Oncology and Transfusion Medicine), University Hospital Benjamin Franklin, Free University of Berlin, Germany.

Purpose: To review the current information available from the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) programs on the use of interleukin (IL)-2 in stage IV melanoma patients.

Patients And Methods: A database from 631 patients treated within 27 trials with high-dose IL-2-based regimens was compiled to develop hypotheses and valid stratification factors for randomized trials. Subsequently, 126 patients were enrolled in a trial evaluating interferon alfa (IFN-alpha) and IL-2 with or without cisplatin, and 325 patients were enrolled in an ongoing EORTC trial (18951) to evaluate dacarbazine, cisplatin, and IFN-alpha, with or without IL-2. Read More

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February 2000
1 Read

Long-term follow-up of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with intravenous recombinant interleukin-2 in Europe.

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Feb;6 Suppl 1:S93-8

Centre Léon-Bérard, Lyon, France.

Purpose: The median survival for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is generally < 1 year. Immunotherapy with high-dose recombinant interleukin (IL)-2 has been reported to produce objective responses in approximately 15% of treated patients and is associated with durable complete responses and prolonged survival in responding patients. The impact of IL-2 therapy on survival of metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients has begun to emerge, based on long-term follow-up data from large databases. Read More

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February 2000
2 Reads

Expanding the indications for surgery and adjuvant interleukin-2-based immunotherapy in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma.

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Feb;6 Suppl 1:S88-92

Department of Urology, UCLA School of Medicine, UCLA Kidney Cancer Program, Los Angeles, California 90095-1738, USA.

Purpose: To determine the role of surgery and adjuvant interleukin (IL)-2-based immunotherapy in the treatment of patients with advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma

Patients And Methods: The survival of 354 consecutive patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with IL-2-based immunotherapy through the UCLA Medical Center Kidney Cancer Program was analyzed There were five groups of patients. Patients who initially presented with metastatic disease received either (1) IL-2 therapy with primary tumor in place; (2) nephrectomy followed by IL-2 therapy, or (3) nephrectomy followed by immunotherapy with IL-2 plus tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Patients who underwent nephrectomy for localized disease were divided into two groups: (4) those who developed metastatic disease > or = 6 months after nephrectomy and then received IL-2 therapy; and (5) those who developed metastatic disease < 6 months after nephrectomy and then received IL-2 therapy. Read More

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February 2000
4 Reads

Tumor-induced dysfunction in interleukin-2 production and interleukin-2 receptor signaling: a mechanism of immune escape.

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Feb;6 Suppl 1:S81-7

Department of Immunology, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Ohio 44195, USA.

Purpose: The development of an effective antitumor immune response is compromised in patients with renal cell carcinoma. Despite significant infiltration by T lymphocytes into renal tumors, no detectable induction of gene expression is associated with the generation of an antitumor immune response. Tumor-induced down-regulation of interleukin (IL)-2 expression may contribute to the impaired development of the T cell-mediated antitumor immune response. Read More

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February 2000
2 Reads

The future of interleukin-2: enhancing therapeutic anticancer vaccines.

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Feb;6 Suppl 1:S76-80

Surgery Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1502, USA.

Purpose: The purpose of our efforts is to trigger the immune destruction of established cancer. Interleukin (IL)-2 can mediate the regression of tumors in patients with melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. In animal models, the antitumor effects of IL-2 are mediated by T lymphocytes. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2538796PMC
February 2000
3 Reads

Potentiation of immunologic responsiveness to dendritic cell-based tumor vaccines by recombinant interleukin-2.

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Feb;6 Suppl 1:S67-75

Department of Surgery, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor 48109-0666, USA.

Purpose: Dendritic cells (DC) can elicit potent immune responses to tumors through their capacity to efficiently process and present tumor-associated antigens. In a variety of animal tumor models, vaccines based on tumor lysate-pulsed DC (TP-DC) have been shown to effectively immunize against lethal tumor challenges as well as to treat established growing tumors at skin and organ sites. The antitumor effects elicited by TP-DC-based vaccines in vivo have been shown to be mediated by tumor-specific proliferative, cytotoxic, and cytokine-secreting host-derived T cells. Read More

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February 2000
1 Read

Interleukin-2: developing additional cytokine gene therapies using fibroblasts or dendritic cells to enhance tumor immunity.

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Feb;6 Suppl 1:S61-6

University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pennsylvania 15261, USA.

Purpose: Recombinant interleukin (IL)-2 administration can mediate regression of solid tumors in patients with melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. A better understanding of the mechanisms of IL-2-mediated antitumor effects has led to the investigation of novel immunotherapeutic approaches. The rationale for these immunotherapeutic approaches and the results of preliminary clinical studies are presented. Read More

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February 2000
2 Reads

The future role of interleukin-2 in cancer therapy.

Authors:
M T Lotze

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Feb;6 Suppl 1:S58-60

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February 2000
1 Read

Long-term survival update for high-dose recombinant interleukin-2 in patients with renal cell carcinoma.

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Feb;6 Suppl 1:S55-7

Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois 60153, USA.

Purpose: To update response duration and survival data for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with high-dose interleukin (IL)-2.

Patients And Methods: Two hundred fifty-five assessable patients were entered onto seven phase II clinical trials. Recombinant IL-2 600,000 or 720,000 IU/kg was administered by 15-minute intravenous infusion every 8 hours for up to 14 consecutive doses over 5 days as clinically tolerated with maximal support. Read More

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February 2000
2 Reads

Renal cell carcinoma: current status and future plans.

Authors:
R A Figlin

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Feb;6 Suppl 1:S52-4

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February 2000
2 Reads

Cytokine replacement in patients with HIV-1 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: the rationale for low-dose interleukin-2 therapy.

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Feb;6 Suppl 1:S45-51

Division of Hematology/Oncology, The Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Columbus, Ohio, USA.

Purpose: The drastic increase in the incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in patients infected with HIV-1 is testimony to the fact that our immune system is critical for the prevention of certain malignancies. Preclinical and clinical studies were conducted to (1) gain further insight into defects in immunity that can lead to malignant transformation and (2) determine if certain immune deficiencies could be corrected by cytokines delivered at doses that result in near-physiologic concentrations in vivo.

Methods: We have used the severe combined immune deficient mouse engrafted with human peripheral blood leukocytes from healthy individuals who are seropositive for the Epstein-Barr virus to study the spontaneous development of malignant Epstein-Barr virus-positive human B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. Read More

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February 2000
1 Read

Children's cancer group trials of interleukin-2 therapy to prevent relapse of acute myelogenous leukemia.

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Feb;6 Suppl 1:S39-44

Clinical Research Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Purpose: Up to 80% of children with acute myelogenous leukemia treated with intensive chemotherapy achieve remission; however, a large proportion of patients develops recurrent disease. Because interleukin (IL)-2 can induce remission in patients with overt evidence of acute myelogenous leukemia, we hypothesized that it might prevent relapse when administered to patients in first remission after intensive consolidation chemotherapy. A pilot Children's Cancer Group (CCG) trial (CCG-0941) demonstrated the feasibility of this approach, and we initiated a prospective randomized trial (CCG-2961) to further evaluate the safety and potential efficacy of IL-2 therapy in preventing relapse of acute myelogenous leukemia. Read More

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February 2000
1 Read

Immunotherapy with interleukin-2 after hematopoietic cell transplantation for hematologic malignancy.

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Feb;6 Suppl 1:S33-8

Department of Medical Oncology and Therapeutics Research, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California 91010, USA.

Purpose: The results of trials using interleukin (IL)-2-based therapy in leukemia and after hematopoietic stem cell transplant suggest that such therapy could have an impact on preventing disease relapse in patients with hematologic malignancy who achieve a minimal disease state. The use of immunotherapy in the autologous transplant setting is modeled in part on the well-characterized immunotherapeutic effect of the graft-versus-tumor response in patients undergoing allogeneic transplantation. The graft-versus-tumor response, mediated by donor cells, contributes to the higher cure rates seen in patients undergoing allogeneic transplant for the treatment of a variety of hematologic malignancies, including acute and chronic myelogenous and lymphoblastic leukemia, myeloma, and lymphoma

Patients And Methods: The literature was reviewed, and we relate our own clinical experience with IL-2 therapy in this setting. Read More

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February 2000
1 Read

Interleukin-2 in the treatment of hematologic malignancies.

Authors:
A Fefer

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Feb;6 Suppl 1:S31-2

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February 2000
1 Read

Strategies to reduce side effects of interleukin-2: evaluation of the antihypotensive agent NG-monomethyl-L-arginine.

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Feb;6 Suppl 1:S21-30

Department of Medicine, Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Purpose: The clinical utility of high-dose intravenous recombinant interleukin (IL)-2 therapy is limited by severe toxicity including hypotension, fever, chills, pulmonary edema, and oliguria Hypotension has been previously shown to result from excessive vascular relaxation due to overproduction of the endogenous vasodilator nitric oxide. Nitric oxide production can be decreased by administration of the competitive enzyme inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMA). A clinical trial to investigate the dose-dependent effects of NMA on blood pressure was undertaken in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Read More

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February 2000

Rationale for intergroup trial E-3695 comparing concurrent biochemotherapy with cisplatin, vinblastine, and DTIC alone in patients with metastatic melanoma.

Authors:
L E Flaherty

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Feb;6 Suppl 1:S15-20

Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201, USA.

Purpose: The modest activity of chemotherapy and biologic agents in the treatment of advanced metastatic melanoma has prompted investigators to consider combinations of chemotherapy and biologic agents (i.e., biochemotherapy) as a way of improving response rates and survival. Read More

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February 2000
5 Reads

High-dose recombinant interleukin-2 therapy in patients with metastatic melanoma: long-term survival update.

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Feb;6 Suppl 1:S11-4

Cytokine Working Group, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Purpose: To update response duration and survival data for patients with metastatic melanoma receiving the high-dose IV bolus recombinant interleukin (IL)-2 regimen.

Patients And Methods: Two hundred seventy assessable patients were entered into eight clinical trials conducted between 1985 and 1993. IL-2 600,000 or 720,000 IU/kg was administered by 15-minute intravenous infusion every 8 hours for up to 14 consecutive doses over 5 days as clinically tolerated with maximum support, including pressors. Read More

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February 2000
14 Reads

Interleukin-2 in metastatic melanoma: what is the current role?

Authors:
M B Atkins

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Feb;6 Suppl 1:S8-10

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February 2000

Interleukin-2 and the development of immunotherapy for the treatment of patients with cancer.

Authors:
S A Rosenberg

Cancer J Sci Am 2000 Feb;6 Suppl 1:S2-7

Surgery Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1502, USA.

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February 2000
2 Reads

How DNA vaccines work.

Authors:

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Nov-Dec;5(6):380-1

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December 1999
2 Reads

Postoperative borderline elevated CEA predicts for earlier relapse in patients with rectal cancer receiving adjuvant postoperative therapy.

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Nov-Dec;5(6):374-9

Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a borderline elevated postoperative carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) on the duration of disease-free survival in patients with rectal cancer treated with postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

Patients And Methods: A retrospective review was undertaken of 145 patients undergoing curative surgery for rectal adenocarcinoma (American Joint Committee on Cancer stages II and III) and treated with postoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy from January 1994 to February 1997. Patients with known metastatic disease, with gross residual disease after surgery, or without an available postoperative CEA level before adjuvant therapy were not included. Read More

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December 1999
2 Reads

Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation prior to transperineal prostate brachytherapy: smaller volumes, less morbidity.

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Nov-Dec;5(6):370-3

Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19104, USA.

Purpose: Prostate brachytherapy is becoming increasingly utilized in the definitive treatment of men with early-stage prostate cancer. Others have reported a close relation between total dose to the gland and genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. We tested the hypothesis that 3 months of hormone deprivation would decrease gland size and decrease radioactivity implanted, which would result in less morbidity. Read More

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December 1999
1 Read

The phase I/II clinical study of carbon ion therapy for cancer of the uterine cervix.

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Nov-Dec;5(6):362-9

Division of Radiation Medicine, Center of Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Japan.

Purpose: The phase I/II clinical study of carbon beam therapy was undertaken for 31 cases of advanced cervical cancer of stages IIIB and IVA from June 1995 to November 1997. The main purpose was to determine clinically useful fraction doses without severe acute reaction of normal tissues and to assess tumor control dose levels achievable without significant normal tissue toxicity.

Patients And Methods: The treatment was given with four fixed fractions per week (24 fractions over 6 weeks) and was initiated with a fraction dose of 2. Read More

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December 1999
3 Reads

Radiofrequency ablation: a minimally invasive technique with multiple applications.

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Nov-Dec;5(6):356-61

John Wayne Cancer Institute at Saint John's Health Center, Santa Monica, California 90404, USA.

Purpose: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of soft tissue, which has recently been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration, destroys tumor cells by delivering an electrical current through a 15-gauge needle. This study evaluated RFA for patients with hepatic malignancies considered unresectable because of their distribution, their number, and/or the presence of liver dysfunction.

Patients And Methods: Between November 1997 and February 1999, 50 patients with 132 unresectable hepatic metastases underwent RFA of tumors from 0. Read More

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December 1999
1 Read

Paclitaxel, carboplatin, and hexamethyl-melamine (taxchex) as first-line therapy for ovarian cancer.

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Nov-Dec;5(6):348-55

University of Wisconsin, Madison Comprehensive Cancer Center, USA.

Background: The addition of hexamethylmelamine to therapy with cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin significantly enhanced outcomes of patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Hexamethylmelamine, also known as altretamine, has potent antineoplastic activity when used as a single agent in patients who have failed to respond to both platinum-based and paclitaxel therapy. We have conducted a pilot study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of adding this drug to the popular ovarian cancer regimen of paclitaxel plus carboplatin. Read More

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December 1999
1 Read

Radiation therapy with hyperbaric oxygen at 4 atmospheres pressure in the management of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: results of a randomized clinical trial.

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Nov-Dec;5(6):341-7

Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8040, USA.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to present the results of a randomized trial evaluating HBO-4 in combination with hypofractionated radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN).

Methods And Materials: Between April 1974 and December 1975, 48 patients with locally advanced unresected SCCHN, referred for primary radiation therapy, were randomized to radiation delivered in air in two fractions of 12.65 Gy over 21 days to a total of 25. Read More

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December 1999

A promising technique for liver cancer?

Authors:
Y Fong

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Nov-Dec;5(6):339-40

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10021, USA.

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December 1999
1 Read

Chemotherapy for ovarian cancer: beyond paclitaxel plus carboplatin.

Authors:
R F Ozols

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Nov-Dec;5(6):336-8

Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111, USA.

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December 1999
2 Reads

Importance of hypoxic cells to radiation treatment: further considerations.

Authors:
H D Suit

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Nov-Dec;5(6):334-5

Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston 02114, USA.

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December 1999

The Janeway lecture. Hodgkin's disease--finding the balance between cure and late effects.

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Nov-Dec;5(6):325-33

Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, California 94305, USA.

Purpose: The purpose of this review is to summarize the Stanford experience in Hodgkin's disease, the late effects of treatment, and strategies to improve management to maximize cure and decrease late effects in these patients.

Patients And Methods: Between 1960 and 1999, 2617 consecutive patients with Hodgkin's disease have been seen, treated, and rigorously followed at Stanford. This population includes patients of all ages and stages of disease. Read More

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December 1999
1 Read

Oncology specialties at the turn of the century: a workforce analysis.

Authors:
D H Hussey

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Nov-Dec;5(6):315-24

Department of Radiology, University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City 52242, USA.

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December 1999
1 Read

Essentials of immune response: the macrophage approach: the antibody approach.

Authors:

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Sep-Oct;5(5):312-3

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January 2000
1 Read

Feasibility trial of postoperative radiotherapy and cisplatin followed by three courses of 5-FU and cisplatin in patients with resected head and neck cancer: a Southwest Oncology Group study.

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Sep-Oct;5(5):307-11

Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan, USA.

Background: Appropriate adjuvant chemotherapy for resected head and neck cancer patients has yet to be defined. Multiple trials have noted trends toward improved disease-free survival and local control. The Southwest Oncology Group undertook a feasibility trial of postoperative cisplatin and radiotherapy followed by three cycles of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. Read More

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January 2000

Risk profiles to predict PSA relapse-free survival for patients undergoing permanent prostate brachytherapy.

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Sep-Oct;5(5):301-6

Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Mercy Medical Center, Rockville Centre, New York 11570, USA.

Purpose: Combined risk profiles are helpful in assessing the likelihood of prostate-specific antigen relapse-free survival (PSA-RFS) for patients with localized prostate cancer. This retrospective analysis reports the 5-year biochemical outcome of a large cohort of patients according to prognostic factors and risk profiles for patients undergoing ultrasound-guided transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy (TIPPB).

Patients And Methods: Seven hundred seventeen consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated between June 1992 and November 1997 underwent TIPPB. Read More

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January 2000
1 Read

Treatment of Ras-induced cancers by the F-actin cappers tensin and chaetoglobosin K, in combination with the caspase-1 inhibitor N1445.

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Sep-Oct;5(5):293-300

Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Australia.

Unlabelled: For transforming normal fibroblasts to malignant cells, oncogenic Ras mutants such as v-Ha-ras require Rho family GTPases (Rho, Rac, and CDC42) that are responsible for controlling actin-cytoskeleton organization. Ras activates Rac through a PI-3 kinase-mediated pathway. Rac causes uncapping of actin filaments (F-actin) at the plus-ends, through phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate (PIP2), and eventually induces membrane ruffling. Read More

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January 2000
1 Read

The quality of life associated with prophylactic treatments for women with BRCA1/2 mutations.

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Sep-Oct;5(5):283-92

Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA.

Purpose: This study was conducted to obtain and compare the preferences assigned to cancer states and prevention measures by women who had breast cancer, were at high risk for breast cancer, or had neither condition.

Patients And Methods: We administered a time trade-off questionnaire to 21 breast cancer patients, 28 women with a personal history of multiple breast biopsies or a family history of breast cancer, and 135 women without these conditions (the reference group). We stratified the reference group into two groups aged 20 to 32 years and 33 to 50 years, respectively. Read More

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January 2000

Long-term results of an intensive regimen: VEBEP plus involved-field radiotherapy in advanced Hodgkin's disease.

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Sep-Oct;5(5):275-82

Division of Medical Oncology A, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy.

Purpose: This pilot study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of a new intensive drug regimen, combined with involved-nodal-field radiotherapy, in advanced Hodgkin's disease not treated by chemotherapy.

Patients And Methods: From September 1990 to March 1993, 73 evaluable patients with newly diagnosed stage IIB, III (A and B), and IV (A and B) Hodgkin's disease or who were relapsing after primary subtotal or total nodal irradiation were treated with eight cycles of etoposide, epirubicin, bleomycin, cyclophosphamide, and prednisolone (VEBEP) followed by radiotherapy (30-36 Gy) to the nodal site or sites of pretreatment disease. The median duration of follow-up was 68 months. Read More

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January 2000
1 Read

A survey of treatments used in patients with metastatic melanoma: analysis of 189 patients referred to the National Cancer Institute.

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Sep-Oct;5(5):269-74

Surgery Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

Background: Few effective treatments exist for patients with metastatic melanoma. The United States Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of interferon alfa-2b after the resection of locoregional disease, and dacarbazine or interleukin-2 for the treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma beyond the locoregional area, although many additional agents and combinations of agents are currently in use.

Methods: Between January 1997 and June 1998, the Surgery Branch of the National Cancer Institute conducted a prospective analysis of 226 consecutive patients with metastatic melanoma referred for protocol evaluation. Read More

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January 2000
1 Read

Complex decision-making for BRCA1/2 carriers.

Authors:
E T Matloff

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Sep-Oct;5(5):266-8

Department of Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06195, USA.

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January 2000
3 Reads

Greater curability in advanced Hodgkin's disease?

Authors:
C S Portlock

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Sep-Oct;5(5):264-5

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021-6007, USA.

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January 2000
3 Reads

Cancer predisposition associated with defective DNA repair: studies with mutant mouse strains.

Authors:
E C Friedberg

Cancer J Sci Am 1999 Sep-Oct;5(5):257-63

Department of Pathology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas 75235-9027, USA.

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Source
January 2000