82 results match your criteria Canalith-Repositioning Maneuvers


Impaired Calcium Metabolism in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A Topical Review.

J Neurol Phys Ther 2019 Apr;43 Suppl 2 Supplement, Special Supplement: International Conference on Vestibular Rehabilitation:S37-S41

Department of Neurology (S.-H.J.), Chungnam National University Hospital, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea; Department of Neurology (J.-S.K.), Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; Dizziness Center (J.-S.K.), Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea.

Background And Purpose: Although acute attacks of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) may be treated with canalith repositioning maneuvers, there have been no well-designed prospective trials to prevent this highly prevalent and recurrent disorder. This topical review explores the evidence related to the association between deficient calcium metabolism and BPPV. We also describe the development of therapeutic options to prevent recurrences of BPPV and introduce results from a recent randomized controlled trial on the effect of vitamin D and calcium supplementation in preventing BPPV recurrences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NPT.0000000000000273DOI Listing

Diagnosis and treatment choices of suspected benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: current approach of general practitioners, neurologists, and ENT physicians.

Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2019 Apr 29;276(4):985-991. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Clinic of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania.

Purpose: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a frequently underdiagnosed cause of vertigo, potentially due to the underuse of diagnostic and therapeutic canalith repositioning procedures (CRPs). We aimed to investigate self-reported use of the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to BPPV patients by Lithuanian neurologists, ear, nose, and throat (ENT) physicians, and general practitioners (GPs), and to explore potential reasons for the underuse of the maneuvers.

Methods: Neurologists, ENT physicians, and GPs were invited to complete a written questionnaire focused on diagnostic and therapeutic practices related to BPPV. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00405-019-05313-yDOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Dizziness and the Otolaryngology Point of View.

Med Clin North Am 2018 Nov 20;102(6):1001-1012. Epub 2018 Sep 20.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 601 North Caroline Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA; Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 601 North Caroline Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. Electronic address:

Dizziness can be due to pathology from multiple physiologic systems, the most common being vestibular. Dizziness may be categorized as vertigo, disequilibrium, lightheadedness, or oscillopsia. Vertigo is an illusion of motion often caused by asymmetrical vestibular input to the brainstem. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00257125183006
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mcna.2018.06.004DOI Listing
November 2018
11 Reads

Spontaneous Canalith Jam and Apogeotropic Horizontal Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: Considerations on a Particular Case Mimicking an Acute Vestibular Deficit.

Otol Neurotol 2018 Oct;39(9):e843-e848

Department of Neurosciences, Institute of Otolaryngology, Padova University, Padova, Italy.

Objective: Canalith jam refers to a condition caused by an otolithic clump blocked inside a semicircular canal, generally provoked by canalith repositioning procedure. We describe the first case of spontaneous canalith jam mimicking an acute vestibular deficit.

Patient: We report the case of an 82-year-old woman who suffered a sudden episode of persistent rotational vertigo with nausea and vomiting, not provoked by head movements. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000001949DOI Listing
October 2018
19 Reads

Comparison of the effectiveness of Brandt-Daroff Vestibular training and Epley Canalith repositioning maneuver in benign Paroxysmal positional vertigo long term result: A randomized prospective clinical trial.

Pak J Med Sci 2018 May-Jun;34(3):558-563

Hakan Coskun, Uludag University Medical School, Department of Otolaryngology, Bursa, Turkey.

Objective: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common peripheral cause of vertigo. It can be defined as transient vertigo induced by rapid change in head position, associated with a characteristic paroxysmal positional nystagmus. Posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the most frequent form of BPPV. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12669/pjms.343.14786DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6041543PMC
July 2018
1 Read

[Curative effect analysis of the vestibular rehabilitation training on residual dizziness after successful canalith repositioning maneuvers in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

Lin Chung Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi 2017 Jun;31(12):897-900

Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, the First Hospital Shanxi Medical University.

To explore the curative effect and quality life of the vestibular rehabilitation training on residual dizziness after successful canalith repositioning maneuvers in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Residual dizziness after successful canalith repositioning maneuvers in patients with BPPV were enrolled in our study. They were randomized into three groups, the control group A were no disposition which include 32 patients, the intervention group B were guided to self rehabilitation training which include 33 patients, the control group C were guided to Brandt Daroff training which include 33 patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.13201/j.issn.1001-1781.2017.12.001DOI Listing
June 2017
3 Reads

[Relationship between 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in female patients].

Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi 2018 Apr;98(16):1223-1226

Department of Neurology, Ningbo No.2 Hospital, Ningbo 315010, China.

To investigate the relationship between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D[25(OH) D] levels and idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) in female patients. A total of 67 women diagnosed with idiopathic BPPV were selected as the study group between January and December 2016 in Ningbo No.2 Hospital, and 95 healthy women without a history of vertigo or dizziness were selected as the control group. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3760/cma.j.issn.0376-2491.2018.16.007DOI Listing
April 2018
3 Reads

Treatment of Patients With Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo and Severe Immobility Using the Particle Repositioning Chair: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 2018 Jun 7;127(6):390-394. Epub 2018 May 7.

2 Department of Neurotology, Michigan Ear Institute, St. John Providence Hospital and Medical Centers, Novi, Michigan, USA.

Objective: To report treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) in patients unable to undergo traditional canalith repositioning maneuvers (CRMs) using a particle repositioning chair (PRC).

Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted at a single high-volume otology practice of patients diagnosed with BPPV from 2007 to 2017 with immobility prohibiting use of traditional CRMs. Patients were diagnosed and treated using a PRC, and outcome measures including resolution, recurrence, and number of treatment visits were recorded. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003489418771988DOI Listing
June 2018
1 Read

Peripheral Vestibular Disorders in Children and Adolescents with Concussion.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2018 Aug 24;159(2):365-370. Epub 2018 Apr 24.

1 Department of Otolaryngology and Communication Enhancement, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Objective To review peripheral vestibular disorders in pediatric patients with dizziness following concussion. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Pediatric vestibular clinic and pediatric multidisciplinary concussion clinic at a tertiary level pediatric hospital. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0194599818770618DOI Listing
August 2018
5 Reads

The aVOR App Increases Medical Students' Competence in Treating Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV).

Otol Neurotol 2018 Jun;39(5):e401-e406

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar, Germany.

Hypothesis: Implementation of the "aVOR app" into teaching courses at medical school enhances students' satisfaction with the course and increases their competence in treating benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV).

Background: BPPV is often underdiagnosed and left untreated. One problem in teaching the management of BPPV to health care professionals is the lack of simulation-based training tools. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000001778DOI Listing
June 2018
3 Reads

The impact of diabetes on mobility, balance, and recovery after repositioning maneuvers in individuals with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

J Diabetes Complications 2017 Jun 22;31(6):976-982. Epub 2017 Mar 22.

Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160.

Aim: The prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is higher in people with type 2 diabetes (DM). The impact of DM on mobility, balance, and management of BPPV is unknown. This prospective study compared symptom severity, mobility and balance before and after the canalith repositioning maneuver (CRM) in people with posterior canal BPPV canalithiasis, with and without DM. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2017.03.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5466168PMC
June 2017
23 Reads

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo secondary to laparoscopic surgery.

SAGE Open Med Case Rep 2017 8;5:2050313X17692938. Epub 2017 Feb 8.

Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery and Institute of Vertigo, General Hospital of Chinese People's Armed Police Forces, Beijing, China.

Objectives: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is a common vestibular disorder and it may be idiopathic or secondary to some conditions such as surgery, but rare following laparoscopic surgery.

Methods: We report two cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo secondary to laparoscopic surgery, one after laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a 51-year-old man and another following laparoscopic hysterectomy in a 60-year-old woman.

Results: Both patients were treated successfully with manual or device-assisted canalith repositioning maneuvers, with no recurrence on the follow-up of 6 -18 months. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2050313X17692938DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5315360PMC
February 2017
2 Reads

Clinical Practice Guideline: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (Update).

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2017 03;156(3_suppl):S1-S47

16 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, Alexandria, Virginia, USA.

Objective This update of a 2008 guideline from the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation provides evidence-based recommendations to benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), defined as a disorder of the inner ear characterized by repeated episodes of positional vertigo. Changes from the prior guideline include a consumer advocate added to the update group; new evidence from 2 clinical practice guidelines, 20 systematic reviews, and 27 randomized controlled trials; enhanced emphasis on patient education and shared decision making; a new algorithm to clarify action statement relationships; and new and expanded recommendations for the diagnosis and management of BPPV. Purpose The primary purposes of this guideline are to improve the quality of care and outcomes for BPPV by improving the accurate and efficient diagnosis of BPPV, reducing the inappropriate use of vestibular suppressant medications, decreasing the inappropriate use of ancillary testing such as radiographic imaging, and increasing the use of appropriate therapeutic repositioning maneuvers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0194599816689667DOI Listing
March 2017
30 Reads

Central positional nystagmus associated with cerebellar tumors: Clinical and topographical analysis.

J Neurol Sci 2017 Feb 27;373:147-151. Epub 2016 Dec 27.

Department of Neurology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

Purpose: Positional nystagmus is usually caused by peripheral vestibular disorder, mostly benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). However, positional nystagmus is also encountered in central lesions. We aimed to determine clinical characteristics of the structures responsible for central positional nystagmus (CPN) associated with brain tumors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jns.2016.12.050DOI Listing
February 2017
25 Reads

Repositioning intervals in the modified Epley's maneuver and their effect on benign paroxysmal positional vertigo treatment outcome.

Acta Otolaryngol 2017 May 14;137(5):490-494. Epub 2016 Nov 14.

b Department of Otorhinolaryngology- Head and Neck Surgery , Bezmialem Vakif University , Istanbul , Turkey.

Introduction: This study showed that short and long interval treatments achieved comparable success rates. There was no statistically significant difference in the rate of early and late recurrences between the two groups. Modified Epley maneuver can be applied in a short interval time with comparable success and recurrence rates which are as effective as in a long interval time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00016489.2016.1252852DOI Listing
May 2017
8 Reads

"Positive to Negative" Dix-Hallpike test and Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo recurrence in elderly undergoing Canalith Repositioning Maneuver and Vestibular Rehabilitation.

Int Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2016 Oct 16;20(4):344-352. Epub 2016 Feb 16.

Department of Physiotherapy, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil.

 Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo is the most common cause of dizziness in elderly people. Recent studies have shown that the elderly present higher Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo recurrence and that vertiginous symptomatology remission varies according to comorbidities and the therapeutic techniques applied.  To assess the short-term effectiveness of Vestibular Rehabilitation in addition to Canalith Repositioning Maneuver on positive to negative Dix-Hallpike test, on recurrence and number of maneuvers to achieve a negative test in elderly patients with chronic Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0036-1572528DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5063735PMC
October 2016
4 Reads

Determinants for a Successful Sémont Maneuver: An Study with a Semicircular Canal Model.

Front Neurol 2016 16;7:150. Epub 2016 Sep 16.

Department of Neurology, German Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders, University Hospital Munich , Munich , Germany.

Objective: To evaluate the effect of time between the movements/steps, angle of body movements as well as the angular velocity of the maneuvers in an model of a semicircular canal (SCC) to improve the efficacy of the Sémont maneuver (SM) in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

Materials And Methods: Sémont maneuvers were performed on an SCC model. Otoconia trajectories were captured by a video camera. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2016.00150DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5025435PMC
September 2016
21 Reads

Experiences Engaging Healthcare When Dizzy.

Otol Neurotol 2016 09;37(8):1122-7

*Department of Rehabilitation Science, College of Health and Human Services, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia†Vestibular Disorders Association (VEDA), Portland, Oregon‡Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Laboratory of Vestibular NeuroAdaptation§Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Objective: Dizziness is a common yet difficult symptom to manage in patients seeking medical care. The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences of participants with dizziness engaging the medical community for help.

Patients: Five hundred twenty one participants were recruited from the Vestibular Disorder Association (VEDA) website using the association's list-serve, social media (Facebook), and fliers distributed through healthcare providers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000001145DOI Listing
September 2016
1 Read

An Abbreviated Diagnostic Maneuver for Posterior Benign Positional Paroxysmal Vertigo.

Front Neurol 2016 18;7:115. Epub 2016 Jul 18.

Otolaryngology Department, San Juan de Dios Hospital, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile; Clínica Alemana de Santiago, Facultad de Medicina Clínica Alemana, Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago, Chile.

Introduction: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) secondary to canalolithiasis of the posterior semicircular canal is perhaps the most frequent cause of vertigo and dizziness. One of its properties is a high response rate to canalith repositioning maneuvers. However, delays in the diagnosis and treatment of this entity can range from days to years, depending on the setting. Read More

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http://repositorio.uchile.cl/bitstream/handle/2250/142017/An
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https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/b01f/5b75d3c7fa637ac70b63df
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2016.00115DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4947899PMC
August 2016
6 Reads

[Challenge in the management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

Authors:
H Wang D Z Yu

Lin Chung Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi 2016 Jul;30(14):1161-1163

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common peripheral vestibular disorder,which is defined as a disorder of the inner ear characterized by repeated episodes of positional vertigo as changes in head position.The effective positioning maneuvers has made BPPV the most successfully treated type of vertigo.However,some patients experience a serious disturbance with residual vertigo,light cupula and persistent or repeated attacks of BPPV even after several trials of canalith repositioning procedures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.13201/j.issn.1001-1781.2016.14.020DOI Listing

Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Following Sinus Floor Elevation in Patient with Antecedents of Vertigo.

J Maxillofac Oral Surg 2016 Jul 2;15(Suppl 2):351-4. Epub 2016 Apr 2.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Izmir Katip Celebi University Ataturk Training and Research Hospital, Atatürk Eğitim Araştırma Hastanesi Basın Sitesi, 35360 Izmir, Turkey.

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is an unfamiliar and rare complication occurring following osteotome sinus floor elevation (OSFE) and simultaneous implant placement. Etiology of this disorder is commonly displacement of otoliths by vibratory forces transmitted by osteotomes and mallet along with the hyperextension of the head during the operation, causing them to float around in the endolymph. This report presents a case of protracted BPPV following OSFE and simultaneous implant placement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12663-016-0891-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4925608PMC
July 2016
10 Reads

Diagnostic value of repeated Dix-Hallpike and roll maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

Braz J Otorhinolaryngol 2017 May - Jun;83(3):243-248. Epub 2016 Apr 22.

Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Istanbul, Turkey.

Introduction: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is the most common peripheral vestibular disorder. The Dix-Hallpike and Roll maneuvers are used to diagnose BPPV.

Objective: This study aims to investigate the diagnostic value of repeated Dix-Hallpike and Roll maneuvers in BPPV. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjorl.2016.03.007DOI Listing
June 2017
9 Reads

A Geriatric Perspective on Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo.

J Am Geriatr Soc 2016 Feb 25;64(2):378-85. Epub 2016 Jan 25.

Center on Aging, UCONN Health, Farmington, Connecticut.

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of vertigo in older adults. Beyond the unpleasant sensation of vertigo, BPPV also negatively affects older adults' gait and balance and increases their risk of falling. As such it has a profound effect on function, independence, and quality of life. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/jgs.13926
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jgs.13926DOI Listing
February 2016
50 Reads

Canalith repositioning in apogeotropic horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: Do we need faster maneuvering?

J Neurol Sci 2015 Nov 28;358(1-2):183-7. Epub 2015 Aug 28.

Department of Neurology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

A correct diagnosis and a proper treatment may yield a rapid and simple cure for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Although the Gufoni maneuver is widely used to treat apogeotropic horizontal-canal BPPV (HC-BPPV), few studies have clarified the relationship between the speed and intensity of maneuver execution and successful canalith reposition. To evaluate the effect of accelerated execution of the Gufoni maneuver, a prospective randomized controlled study was conducted with HC-BPPV patients in a single dizziness clinic. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jns.2015.08.1534DOI Listing
November 2015
49 Reads

Effect of a hybrid maneuver in treating posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

J Am Acad Audiol 2015 Feb;26(2):138-44

Elmokatam Hospital, Cairo, Egypt.

Background: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common disorder of the vestibular system of the inner ear, which is a vital part of maintaining balance. Although the efficacy of the Epley maneuver-also known as the canalith repositioning maneuver (CRM)-is well established, data comparing CRM versus a hybrid treatment are lacking.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a hybrid treatment, the Gans repositioning maneuver (GRM) either with or without postmaneuver restrictions, compared with CRM on treatment of posterior canal BPPV (PC-BPPV). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3766/jaaa.26.2.4DOI Listing
February 2015
76 Reads

Effects of postural restriction after modified Epley maneuver on recurrence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

Auris Nasus Larynx 2014 Oct 29;41(5):428-31. Epub 2014 May 29.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Dumlupinar University Hospital, Kutahya, Turkey.

Objective: In the present study, we calculated the success rate of the modified Epley maneuver and determined the effectiveness of post-maneuver positional restriction in terms of the prevention of early and late recurrence.

Methods: The present study was conducted on 78 patients who had unilateral benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) of the posterior semicircular canal (SCC) and who were treated in the Otorhinolaryngology Department of Susehri State Hospital. The Dix-Hallpike test was performed on all patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anl.2014.05.007DOI Listing
October 2014
12 Reads

Rapid systematic review of repeated application of the epley maneuver for treating posterior BPPV.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2014 Sep 29;151(3):399-406. Epub 2014 May 29.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, the Netherlands Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Objective: To evaluate the effect of repeated application of the Epley maneuver on patient-reported symptom relief and resolution of nystagmus in patients with posterior benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (p-BPPV).

Data Sources: PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library.

Methods: A systematic search was conducted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0194599814536530DOI Listing
September 2014
11 Reads

Utricular Dysfunction in Refractory Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2014 08 25;151(2):321-7. Epub 2014 Apr 25.

Department of Otolaryngology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA.

Objective: To determine the prevalence of otolith dysfunction in patients with refractory benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV).

Study Design: Unmatched case control.

Setting: Tertiary care institution. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0194599814533075DOI Listing
August 2014
6 Reads

Repositioning nystagmus: prognostic usefulness?

Acta Otolaryngol 2014 May;134(5):491-6

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Centro Hospitalar de S. João EPE , Porto , Portugal.

Conclusions: The presence of orthotropic nystagmus (ON), in multiple positions, appears to predict the success of canalith repositioning maneuvers (CRMs). In this sense CRMs under video-Frenzel are informative for the immediate follow-up, although not related to the degree of disability or emotional distress. Still, attention should be given to psychological assistance even in cases of clinically cured benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/00016489.2013.87
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2013.872291DOI Listing
May 2014
6 Reads

Treatment of objective and subjective benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

J Am Acad Audiol 2013 Jul-Aug;24(7):600-6

Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Knoxville, TN.

Background: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of vertigo in adults and is a result of otolithic particles or debris that become free floating within a semicircular canal or adhere to the cupula. Characteristics of BPPV include brief episodes of latent onset vertigo that occur with changes in head position, transient rotary nystagmus beating toward the dependent ear, and reversed nystagmus upon sitting up. Both the vertigo and nystagmus fatigue quickly while maintaining the same head position. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3766/jaaa.24.7.8DOI Listing
June 2014
15 Reads

A multicenter observational study on the role of comorbidities in the recurrent episodes of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

Auris Nasus Larynx 2014 Feb 6;41(1):31-6. Epub 2013 Aug 6.

ENT Institute, Department of Oral and Nano-Biotechnological Sciences, "G. d'Annunzio" University of Chieti-Pescara, Italy.

Objective: Primary objective of this study was to find a statistical link between the most worldwide comorbidities affecting the elderly population (hypertension, diabetes, osteoarthrosis, osteoporosis and depression) and recurrent episodes of BPPV. Secondary objective was defining possible "groups of risk" for people suffering recurrent positional vertigo related to the presence of a well documented comorbidity.

Methods: This was an observational, cross-sectional, multicenter, spontaneous, non-pharmacological study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anl.2013.07.007DOI Listing
February 2014
12 Reads

[Anxiolytics reduce residual dizziness after successful canalith repositioning maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

Lin Chung Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi 2013 Mar;27(5):259-63

Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam.

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March 2013
7 Reads

Unintentional conversion of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo caused by repositioning procedures for canalithiasis: transitional BPPV.

Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2014 May 19;271(5):967-73. Epub 2013 Apr 19.

Institute of Otorhinolaryngology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, Pasterova 2, 11000, Belgrade, Serbia,

BPPV when diagnosed before any repositioning procedure is called primary BPPV. Primary BPPV canalithiasis treatment with repositioning procedures sometimes results in unintentional conversion of BPPV form: transitional BPPV. Objectives were to find transitional BPPV forms, how they influence relative rate of canal involvement and how to be treated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00405-013-2494-0DOI Listing
May 2014
23 Reads

Delayed diagnosis and treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo associated with current practice.

Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2014 Feb 2;271(2):261-4. Epub 2013 Mar 2.

The Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital, Otolaryngology Institute of Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 600 Yishan Road, Shanghai, 200233, China.

The purposes of this study were to demonstrate the current status of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) management and the advantages of repositioning maneuvers as well as to facilitate the accurate and efficient diagnosis and management of BPPV. Of 131 participants with severe dizziness/vertigo who were examined and treated, 31 (23.7%) fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for BPPV. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s00405-012-2333
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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00405-012-2333-8
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00405-012-2333-8DOI Listing
February 2014
2 Reads

Positional dizziness.

Authors:
Terry D Fife

Continuum (Minneap Minn) 2012 Oct;18(5 Neuro-otology):1060-85

Barrow Neurological Institute, 240 West Thomas Road, Suite 301, Phoenix, Arizona 85013, USA.

Purpose: This article reviews the most common conditions that are caused by changes in head or body positions. Practical clinical methods to help distinguish vestibular from nonvestibular and central from peripheral vestibular positional dizziness are discussed. This article also reviews the treatment methods of selected canal variants of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Read More

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https://insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00132979-201210000-000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/01.CON.0000418376.80099.24DOI Listing
October 2012
4 Reads

Canal switch after canalith repositioning procedure for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

Laryngoscope 2012 Sep 1;122(9):2076-8. Epub 2012 May 1.

Division of Otology and Neurotology, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

Canal switch is a complication following canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) for posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Instead of being returned to the utricle, the loose otoconia migrate into the superior or horizontal semicircular canal. Patients remain symptomatic, and treatment can be ineffective unless the switch is recognized and additional repositioning maneuvers directed toward the appropriate semicircular canal are performed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/lary.23315DOI Listing
September 2012
5 Reads

The Role of Postural Restrictions after BPPV Treatment: Real Effect on Successful Treatment and BPPV's Recurrence Rates.

Int J Otolaryngol 2012 2;2012:932847. Epub 2012 Feb 2.

ENT Department, Elpis General Hospital, 7 Dimitsanas street, 11528 Athens, Greece.

Background. Canalith repositioning techniques are adequately established in the literature, as the treatment of choice for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. However, the role of the posttreatment instructions is still not clearly defined. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/932847DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3299224PMC
August 2012
6 Reads

Postural control in older patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2012 May 13;146(5):809-15. Epub 2012 Jan 13.

Master Program of Balance Rehabilitation and Social Inclusion of Bandeirante University of São Paulo, UNIBAN-Brazil, São Paulo, Brazil.

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of a canalith-repositioning procedure in postural control of older patients with idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV).

Study Design: Prospective clinical trial.

Setting: A tertiary referral center. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0194599811434388DOI Listing
May 2012
3 Reads

Anxiolytics reduce residual dizziness after successful canalith repositioning maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

Acta Otolaryngol 2012 Mar 27;132(3):277-84. Epub 2011 Dec 27.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea.

Conclusions: This study suggests that adjuvant anti-anxiety medication may be helpful for patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) even after a successful canalith repositioning procedure (CRP).

Objective: Although the CRP is an effective treatment for BPPV, many patients suffer from persistent dizziness despite successful CRPs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adjuvant anxiolytic medication on residual dizziness after successful CRP. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016489.2011.637179DOI Listing
March 2012
4 Reads

Canal conversion and reentry: a risk of Dix-Hallpike during canalith repositioning procedures.

Otol Neurotol 2012 Feb;33(2):199-203

Department of Otolaryngology, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, USA.

Objective: To determine the incidence, cause, and prevention of horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (H-BPPV) and reentry into the common crus during canalith repositioning procedures (CRPs).

Study Design: Prospective case series.

Setting: Academic tertiary referral center. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0b013e31823e274aDOI Listing
February 2012
3 Reads

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo with multiple canal involvement.

Am J Otolaryngol 2012 Mar-Apr;33(2):250-8. Epub 2011 Sep 13.

ENT Department, Tzanion General Hospital of Pireaus, Pireaus, Greece.

Purpose: The aims of this study were to describe the frequency and clinical features of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) with multiple canal involvement and to evaluate the results of treatment by appropriate canalith repositioning procedures.

Materials And Methods: A total of 345 patients were referred for BPPV between 2006 and 2010. Thirty-two of them (9. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01960709110016
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjoto.2011.07.007DOI Listing
October 2012
8 Reads

Treatment of the horizontal semicircular canal canalithiasis: pros and cons of the repositioning maneuvers in a clinical study and critical review of the literature.

Otol Neurotol 2011 Oct;32(8):1302-8

ENT Department, Hippocrateion General Hospital of Athens, National University of Athens, Athens, Greece.

Objective: Several repositioning maneuvers have been proposed for the treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) due to canalithiasis of the horizontal semicircular canal (HSC). However, comparisons between these canalith repositioning procedures as well as a generally accepted algorithm for the management of HSC canalithiasis are currently lacking. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of 3 different treatment proposals and review the relevant literature. Read More

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https://insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00129492-201110000-000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0b013e31822f0bc5DOI Listing
October 2011
9 Reads

Diagnosis of Single- or Multiple-Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo according to the Type of Nystagmus.

Int J Otolaryngol 2011 14;2011:483965. Epub 2011 Jul 14.

ENT Department, Tzanio General Hospital of Piraeus, Afentouli 1 and Zanni, 18536 Piraeus, Greece.

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common peripheral vestibular disorder encountered in primary care and specialist otolaryngology and neurology clinics. It is associated with a characteristic paroxysmal positional nystagmus, which can be elicited with specific diagnostic positional maneuvers, such as the Dix-Hallpike test and the supine roll test. Current clinical research focused on diagnosing and treating various types of BPPV, according to the semicircular canal involved and according to the implicated pathogenetic mechanism. Read More

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http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ijoto/2011/483965/
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/483965DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3139887PMC
November 2011
10 Reads

Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: comparison of two recent international guidelines.

Braz J Otorhinolaryngol 2011 Mar-Apr;77(2):191-200

UNISUAM - Rio de Janeiro - RJ.

Unlabelled: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is characterized by vertigo, lasting for a few seconds and usually managed by head positioning maneuvers. To educate clinicians concerning the state-of-the art knowledge about its management, the international societies developed guidelines.

Aim: the aim of this paper is to discuss, in a practical fashion, the current options available to manage BPPV. Read More

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September 2011
7 Reads

Bilateral multicanal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo coexisting with a vestibular schwannoma: case report.

Ear Nose Throat J 2011 Jan;90(1):E10-5

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL, USA.

We describe a rarely encountered case of coexisting bilateral multicanal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and vestibular schwannoma in a 56-year-old woman. The patient had presented with a 10-year history of dizziness and imbalance, and her vestibular findings were perplexing. We decided on a working diagnosis of BPPV and began treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/014556131109000114DOI Listing
January 2011
4 Reads

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

J Clin Neurol 2010 Jun 30;6(2):51-63. Epub 2010 Jun 30.

Department of Neurology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea.

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is characterized by brief recurrent episodes of vertigo triggered by changes in head position. BPPV is the most common etiology of recurrent vertigo and is caused by abnormal stimulation of the cupula by free-floating otoliths (canalolithiasis) or otoliths that have adhered to the cupula (cupulolithiasis) within any of the three semicircular canals. Typical symptoms and signs of BPPV are evoked when the head is positioned so that the plane of the affected semicircular canal is spatially vertical and thus aligned with gravity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3988/jcn.2010.6.2.51DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2895225PMC
June 2010
4 Reads

Effectiveness of particle repositioning maneuvers in the treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a systematic review.

Phys Ther 2010 May 25;90(5):663-78. Epub 2010 Mar 25.

Department of Physical Therapy, Midwestern University, 555 31st St, Downers Grove, IL 60515, USA.

Background: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of vertigo.

Purpose: The purpose of this systematic review was to determine whether patients diagnosed with posterior canal (PC) BPPV, based on positional testing, and treated with a particle repositioning maneuver will show the resolution of benign paroxysmal positional nystagmus (BPPN) on the Dix-Hallpike Test performed 24 hours or more after treatment.

Data Sources: Data were obtained from an electronic search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases from 1966 through September 2009. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2522/ptj.20090071DOI Listing
May 2010
18 Reads

Long-term follow-up of patients with posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

Acta Otolaryngol 2010 Sep;130(9):1009-12

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Baskent University, Ankara, Turkey.

Conclusions: Recurrence of posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (PC-BPPV) developed in one-third of patients when followed for an average of 5 years from diagnosis. History of head trauma and Ménière's disease contributed significantly to recurrence (p < 0.05). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00016481003629333DOI Listing
September 2010
7 Reads

Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and canalith repositioning procedure for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

J Am Acad Audiol 2010 Feb;21(2):73-7; quiz 139-40

Department of Otolaryngology, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA.

Background: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, ampulla cardiomyopathy, or transient left ventricular dysfunction is characterized by chest pain, electrocardiographic changes, transient left ventricular apical aneurysm, and normal coronary arteries. Takotsubo is a round-bottomed, narrow-necked Japanese octopus trap and lends its name to takotsubo cardiomyopathy because of its resemblance to echocardiographic and ventricular angiographic images of the left ventricle in this condition. This appearance takes its source from peculiar, transient regional systolic dysfunction involving the left ventricular apex and mid-ventricle with hyperkinesis of the basal left ventricular segments. Read More

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February 2010
44 Reads

Clinical management of a patient with chronic recurrent vertigo following a mild traumatic brain injury.

Authors:
Eric G Johnson

Case Rep Med 2009 8;2009:910596. Epub 2009 Oct 8.

Department of Physical Therapy, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA 92350, USA.

Vertigo, was provoked and right torsional up-beat nystagmus was observed in a 47-year-old patient when she was placed into the right Hallpike-Dix test position using infrared goggle technology. The clinical diagnosis was benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), specifically right posterior canalithiasis, resulting from a mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) suffered approximately six-months earlier. Previous medical consultations did not include vestibular system examination, and Meclizine was prescribed to suppress her chief complaint of vertigo. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/910596DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2760235PMC
July 2011
1 Read