593 results match your criteria Canadian bulletin of medical history = Bulletin canadien d'histoire de la medecine[Journal]


Remembering Gina Feldberg.

Authors:
Naomi Rogers

Can Bull Med Hist 2020 ;37(1):10-13

Professor in the History of Medicine, Section of the History of Medicine and Program in the History of Science and Medicine, Department of History, Yale University.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.37.1.02DOI Listing
January 2020

In Memory of the Life and Work of Gina Feldberg.

Authors:
Ian Mosby

Can Bull Med Hist 2020 ;37(1):14-18

Department of History, Ryerson University.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.37.1.03DOI Listing
January 2020

Gina Feldberg: A Brief Intellectual Biography.

Authors:
Robert Vipond

Can Bull Med Hist 2020 ;37(1):2-9

Professor, Political Science, University of Toronto.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.37.1.01DOI Listing

Georgina Feldberg Memorial Student Award in the History of Health and Medicine.

Authors:

Can Bull Med Hist 2020 ;37(1):19-20

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.37.1.04DOI Listing
January 2020

Editors' Note / Note de la rédaction.

Can Bull Med Hist 2020 ;37(1)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.37.01.00DOI Listing

The 1918 "Spanish Flu" Pandemic in the Ottoman Capital, Istanbul.

Authors:
M Kemal Temel

Can Bull Med Hist 2020 20;37(1):195-231. Epub 2020 Mar 20.

Department of Medical History and Ethics, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University.

Although the general course, possible transmission routes, and actual sociodemographic destruction of the 1918 influenza pandemic in the Western world are well documented, the literature lacks similar data about the Middle East. On the calamity's centenary, this article aims to contribute to filling this gap, investigating the presence and effects of the pandemic in Istanbul, the city bridging the West and East, then as the capital of the Ottoman Empire. After the retrieval of the most relevant articles in , a daily Istanbul newspaper active throughout the pandemic, a variety of items, including articles with firsthand pronouncements from contemporaneous medical authorities and a clinical account of supportive autopsy findings, are scrutinized and interpreted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.356-052019DOI Listing

Darwinian Evolution's First 50 Years of Impact on Medicine and Botany at the University of Toronto, 1859 to 1909.

Authors:
John P M Court

Can Bull Med Hist 2020 23;37(1):232-267. Epub 2020 Mar 23.

Department of Psychiatry and Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto; Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH).

Prior to Darwin's masterworks, a university professor of medicine's purview generally included the professorship of botany and direction of the botanical gardens. Yet from the landmark 1876 Johns Hopkins model and especially after the 1910 Flexner Report, botany was limited at certain medical schools to (exaggerating somewhat) "decorating their lobbies!" Darwinian-era scientific paradigms spread from continental Europe through promulgators such as Huxley and Osler, transforming laboratory research, disease aetiology, biochemical therapeutics, and clinical "bedside" teaching. Unintended consequences at universities with medical schools might include altered loyalties and resources among competing disciplines. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.413-012020DOI Listing

"Whatever Works": Innovations in the Treatment of Hemophilia in the United States 1783-1950.

Authors:
Alan R Rushton

Can Bull Med Hist 2020 20;37(1):119-146. Epub 2020 Mar 20.

Department of Pediatrics, Hunterdon Medical Center.

Treatment of the bleeding disorder hemophilia in the nineteenth century was empirical, based on clinical experience. Medications, transfusions of human or animal blood, and injections of blood sera were utilized in an attempt to halt life-threatening hemorrhages. After 1900, the application of clinical laboratory science facilitated the utilization of anti-coagulated blood and donor blood compatibility tests for safer emergency transfusions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.386-092019DOI Listing

The Stethoscope in 19-Century American Practice: Ideas, Rhetoric, and Eventual Adoption.

Can Bull Med Hist 2020 20;37(1):50-87. Epub 2020 Mar 20.

Professor of Medicine Emeritus, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University.

The stethoscope was invented in 1816 by the French physician R.T.H. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.317-022019DOI Listing

"Babies Needn't Follow": Birth Control and Abortion Policy and Activism at the University of Waterloo and Waterloo Lutheran University, 1965-74.

Authors:
Megan Blair

Can Bull Med Hist 2020 20;37(1):88-118. Epub 2020 Mar 20.

Department of History, University of Waterloo.

Access to birth control and abortion was a contentious issue for university students throughout the 1960s and 1970s. Despite liberalized legislation regarding access to contraception and abortion, young, single women were often limited in their ability to access contraception. In response to this, university students initiated programs on campus in attempts to promote safe and accessible methods of contraception. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.355-052019DOI Listing

The Beginnings of the Canadian Cooperative Clinical Cancer Trials Program and the American Influences, 1962-76.

Authors:
Fedir Razumenko

Can Bull Med Hist 2020 20;37(1):23-49. Epub 2020 Mar 20.

Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary.

Clinical cancer research in Canada entered a new phase in 1971. In that year, the National Cancer Institute of Canada agreed to initiate and support a multidisciplinary cooperative clinical trials program. The first collaborative randomized controlled trial (RCT) for the treatment of advanced Hodgkin's disease was launched in medical centres across the country in December 1971. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.361-052019DOI Listing

Travailler auprès des familles indigentes : les gardes-malades catholiques à l'avant-garde de la santé communautaire au Canada (1934-1959).

Can Bull Med Hist 2020 23;37(1):173-194. Epub 2020 Mar 23.

École des sciences infirmières, Université d'Ottawa.

Several articles in the and the refer to the personalist philosophy. In this article, we posit that this philosophy influenced the "social sense" promoted by the Church among nurses from 1934 to 1959 and that it enabled the transfer from a charitable model to one challenging the social order. We present the as agents of resistance to a science perceived as being devoid of morality, in the face of a growing administrative technocracy seen as detrimental to human beings' living conditions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.349-042019DOI Listing

À la recherche de la vision « normale » : mesurer l'acuité visuelle au XIX siècle.

Authors:
Corinne Doria

Can Bull Med Hist 2020 20;37(1):147-172. Epub 2020 Mar 20.

School for Advanced Studies, University of Tyumen.

This article aims to reconstruct and analyze debates centring on normal eye and vision standards during the second half of the 19 century in Europe. It particularly addresses the creation of ophthalmology charts, one of the main tools for measuring visual acuity. Having briefly described the historical context in which modern eye charts were developed, we will present the better known examples of these and their characteristics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.312-012019DOI Listing

Editors' Note / Note de la rédaction.

Can Bull Med Hist 2019;36(2):253

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.36.2.noteDOI Listing
January 2020

"A Normal Amount of Masculine Hardness": Representations of Male Nurses in 1960s West Germany.

Can Bull Med Hist 2019;36(2):413-443. Epub 2019 Sep 16.

Christoph Schwamm - Robert Bosch Stiftung, Institut für Geschichte der Medizin Originally submitted 20 March 2019; accepted 6 June 2019.

The nursing studies narrative of the role of masculinity can be summarized as follows: hegemonic masculinity prevents men from doing care work. An analysis of public relations efforts to recruit male nurses in West Germany during the 1960s does not provide evidence for such a link. Representing nursing as compatible with hegemonic masculinity was also able to legitimize the existence of male nurses, while the idea of promoting gender equality in nursing was advocated by exactly those institutions that enabled the eventual gender inequality within the profession. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.343-032019DOI Listing
January 2020
2 Reads

Who Controls the Power over Pain? A Comparative History of Nurse Anaesthesia.

Can Bull Med Hist 2019 16;36(2):308-345. Epub 2019 Sep 16.

Sukumar Desai - Department of Anaesthesia, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Massachusetts General Hospital Originally submitted 4 September 2018; accepted 24 April 2019.

From the advent of the use of anaesthesia during surgery through the Second World War, confusion and competition over who should administer the technology - doctors or nurses - dominated gendered discussions of professional boundaries. Using information about practice in the United States, the United Kingdom, and France in this period, we find vastly different outcomes for nurse-administered anaesthesia. Differences in perceptions regarding the gendered nature of this technology and its related level of prestige largely determined who could practice it. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.284-092018DOI Listing
January 2020
2 Reads

A Master Mariner's Left Testicle and the Law of Surgical Consent in Mid-20th Century Canada.

Authors:
R Blake Brown

Can Bull Med Hist 2019 6;36(2):255-280. Epub 2019 Sep 6.

Blake Brown - Department of History, Saint Mary's University Originally submitted 4 July 2018; accepted 11 September 2018.

Canadian medical and legal historians have given little attention to the history of medical malpractice law. This article examines one aspect of this subject, the litigation that arose over issues of consent in advanced surgeries, by offering a contextualized case study of (1933). In , a master mariner from Nova Scotia sued for $10,000 in damages for negligence and assault after a surgeon removed his left testicle without his approval during a hernia operation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.272-072018DOI Listing
January 2020
1 Read

Erasing the Personal Baseline: Graphing Responders to Psychiatric Drug Maintenance Therapy.

Authors:
Dorian Deshauer

Can Bull Med Hist 2019;36(2):346-380. Epub 2019 Sep 6.

Dorian Deshauer - Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto Originally submitted 29 March 2019; accepted 17 May 2019.

Since the 1950s, the practice of psychiatric drug maintenance therapy has been supported by graphics. Lacking physical markers to identify "responders" to long-term drugs, psychiatrists have used graphics to make the outcomes of their interventions visible. This article identifies changes in the graphical representation of drug responders in psychiatric journals between the mid-1950s and the mid-1990s. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.345-032019DOI Listing
January 2020

Politics Ahead of Patients: The Battle between Medical and Chiropractic Professional Associations over the Inclusion of Chiropractic in the American Medicare System.

Authors:
Kenneth J Young

Can Bull Med Hist 2019 6;36(2):381-412. Epub 2019 Sep 6.

Kenneth J. Young - College of Science, Health, Engineering and Education, Murdoch University Originally submitted 15 February 2019; accepted 28 May 2019.

Health care professions struggling for legitimacy, recognition, and market share can become disoriented to their priorities. Health care practitioners are expected to put the interests of patients first. Professional associations represent the interests of their members. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.330-022019DOI Listing
January 2020

Borders and Blood Fractions: Gamma Globulin and Canada's Fight against Polio, 1950-55.

Can Bull Med Hist 2019 6;36(2):444-468. Epub 2019 Sep 6.

Stephen E. Mawdsley - University of Bristol Originally submitted 17 August 2018; accepted 2 July 2019.

During the early 1950s, Canada's efforts to prevent polio became heavily influenced by developments in the United States. America's foremost polio charity, the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, sponsored University of Pittsburgh researcher Dr. William McD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.365-052019DOI Listing
January 2020

En quête de financement pour la création d'une clinique externe et d'un service social comme parachèvement de la désinstitutionnalisation à l'Hôpital Saint-Michel-Archange de Beauport, 1961-72.

Authors:
Karine Aubin

Can Bull Med Hist 2019;36(2):281-307. Epub 2019 Jul 12.

Karine Aubin - Sciences infirmières, Faculté des sciences de la santé, Université d'Ottawa Article initialement soumis le 29 septembre 2018 ; article accepté le 18 janvier 2019.

The release of the report of the (Bédard report) in 1962 was long considered a transformative moment in the history of Québec psychiatry. But recent historiography suggests that deinstitutionalization in Québec features initiatives dating back to the early 20 century. Following this line of argumentation, we suggest that the Bédard report was primarily a political tool to obtain funding in the wake of the 1961 Hospital Insurance Act, and that the report's recommendations built upon ongoing changes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.288-092018DOI Listing

The Greater Good: Agency and Inoculation in the British Army, 1914-18.

Authors:
Simon H Walker

Can Bull Med Hist 2019 22;36(1):131-157. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

Department of History, University of Strathclyde.

As the First World War progressed, rates of typhoid diminished. This was heralded as a triumph of sanitary improvement and disease protection; yet as to how the British military achieved this remains a contentious issue. Objections arose around the danger of inoculation and the unpleasant and potentially deadly side effects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.280-082018DOI Listing
June 2019
4 Reads

Medical History as Fine Art in American Mural Painting of the 1930s.

Authors:
Bert Hansen

Can Bull Med Hist 2019 22;36(1):80-111. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

Professor Emeritus of History, Baruch College of the City University of New York.

To illuminate popular notions of medical progress during the inter-war era, this article examines four large mural projects depicting medical history. Aside from portraits of individual medical heroes, such as Pasteur and Lister, artists also created imagery strongly contrasting traditional and modern medicine in general. This analysis features the works of four stylistically distinct artists (Bernard Zakheim, Charles Alston, William C. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.246-012018DOI Listing

Les expertises dans l'affaire Lafarge ou la fabrique du doute.

Authors:
Nicolas Sueur

Can Bull Med Hist 2019;36(1):158-183. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

Laboratoire de Recherches historiques Rhône Alpes, Institut des Sciences de l'Homme.

This paper focuses on the role of expertise in the trial of Marie Lafarge, accused of poisoning and killing her husband Charles Pouch-Lafarge on 14 January 1840. Historians have argued that testimonial evidence remained dominant in French criminal law throughout the nineteenth century, thus minimizing the part taken by expert testimony. Lafarge's case provides an opportunity to revisit this claim. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.247-022018DOI Listing
October 2019
1 Read

University of Alberta Hospital Acute and Convalescent Polio Care and the Reintegration of Polio Patients into Albertan Communities, 1953-80.

Authors:
Geraldine Huynh

Can Bull Med Hist 2019 22;36(1):112-130. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta.

Following Canada's largest polio epidemic in 1953, Station 67 at the University of Alberta Hospital (UAH) in Edmonton became home to patients who contracted the virus. As young as nine years old, some of these patients lived at the UAH for more than three decades. Akin to wartime services, the epidemic banded together families, patients, doctors, nurses, community members, and later respiratory, physical, and occupational therapists. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.249-022018DOI Listing
June 2019
6 Reads

L'auto-expérimentation athlétique du docteur Fernand Lagrange (1880-1900).

Can Bull Med Hist 2019;36(1):27-50. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

Faculté des Lettres et Sciences Humaines, Université de Limoges.

This article examines the efforts of Dr. Fernand Lagrange to establish the study of the physiology of exercise on a scientific basis. As a sports enthusiast and physician, Lagrande was inspired by the efforts of Claude Bernard and Étienne-Jules Marey to use his own body as a source of experimentation and methodical observation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.283-082018DOI Listing
October 2019
3 Reads

"Snips and Snails and Puppy Dog Tails": Boys and Behaviour in the USA.

Authors:
Matthew Smith

Can Bull Med Hist 2019 22;36(1):51-79. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

Matthew Smith - Department of History, University of Strathclyde.

In and , Mark Twain introduced two of the most iconic boys in American literature. Tom and Huck become heroic figures, despite their penchant for bad behaviour. Indeed, it is their propensity to be impulsive, break rules and defy authority that win them the day. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.236-112017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6499728PMC
June 2019
2 Reads

"Everything Possible Is Being Done": Labour, Mobility, and the Organization of Health Services in Mid-20 Century Newfoundland.

Authors:
Peter L Twohig

Can Bull Med Hist 2019;36(1):1-26. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

Department of History, Saint Mary's University.

This article is the Presidential Address to the 2018 meeting of the Canadian Society for the History of Medicine at the University of Regina. It examines the organization of the nursing service in Newfoundland during the 1950s and 1960s, as well as the recruitment and retention of nurses in cottage hospitals and nursing stations in outport communities. A number of interconnected strategies were used by the Newfoundland government to staff the nursing service, including recruiting internationally educated nurses, adjusting expectations with respect to registration standards, and using both trained and untrained workers to support nurses' labour. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.286-092018DOI Listing
October 2019
1 Read

« Imaginaire et sensibilités » : la mise en récit de la déshospitalisation psychiatrique en Ontario.

Can Bull Med Hist 2019;36(1):184-193. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

Faculté des sciences de la santé, Université d'Ottawa.

This paper proposes a historiographical discussion based on the article « Les contrecoups de la déshospitalisation psychiatrique. L'exemple du parcours transinstitutionel de Françoise ». Françoise's transinstitutional journey presented in the collective publication , gives me the opportunity to reveal the subtext of this article, and to describe the method and the historical reasoning that gave life to the psychiatric journey of an anonymous person named Françoise. Read More

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https://utpjournals.press/doi/10.3138/cbmh.263-062018
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.263-062018DOI Listing
October 2019
2 Reads

Mrs. Robinson's Revenge: Pete Seeger, Earl Robinson, and the Medicare Protest Song.

Can Bull Med Hist 2018 ;35(2):413-436

Department of Oncology, Queen's University.

In 1962, Pete Seeger recorded "The Ballad of Doctor Dearjohn" about Canadian Medicare and the Saskatchewan doctors' strike of the same year. How had this New Yorker, recently relieved of a jail sentence, learned of Medicare in the distant prairie province? And why was his song never released? This article traces the ballad's fortunes through the papers of composer Earl Robinson (University of Washington) and the archives of the American Medical Association. It is situated in the historiography of folk revival and the expatriate adventures of artistic Americans persecuted in the McCarthy era. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.243-122017DOI Listing
January 2018
3 Reads

Despite Being "Known, Highly Promiscuous and Active": Presumed Heterosexuality in the USPHS's STD Inoculation Study, 1946-48.

Can Bull Med Hist 2018 1;35(2):337-356. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

Department of History, Queen's University.

The Sexually Transmitted Disease Inoculation Study of the United States Public Health Service (USPHS) was a short-term deliberate exposure experiment into the prevention of venereal diseases. Between 1946 and 1948, over 1,300 Guatemalan prisoners, psychiatric patients, soldiers, and sex workers were exposed to syphilis, gonorrhoea, and chancroid. USPHS researchers initially proposed hiring sex workers to "naturally" transmit venereal diseases to male subjects who would then be given various prophylaxes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.235-112017DOI Listing
June 2019
13 Reads

Mrs. Robinson's Revenge: Pete Seeger, Earl Robinson, and the Medicare Protest Song.

Can Bull Med Hist 2018 Oct 1:1-24. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

Department of Oncology, Queen's University.

In 1962, Pete Seeger recorded "The Ballad of Doctor Dearjohn" about Canadian Medicare and the Saskatchewan doctors' strike of the same year. How had this New Yorker, recently relieved of a jail sentence, learned of Medicare in the distant prairie province? And why was his song never released? This paper traces the ballad's fortunes through the papers of composer Earl Robinson (University of Washington) and the archives of the American Medical Association. It is situated in the historiography of folk revival and the expatriate adventures of artistic Americans persecuted in the McCarthy era. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.243-012018DOI Listing
October 2018
4 Reads

From Improving Egos to Perfecting Smiles: Orthodontics and Psychology, 1945-2000.

Can Bull Med Hist 2018 1;35(2):309-336. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

Department of History, University of Guelph.

From World War II to the end of 20 century, the types of patients undergoing orthodontic treatment and their reasons for doing so changed significantly. In the 1950s and 1960s, Canadian parents were told that orthodontics would "cure" inferiority complexes and protect children with crooked teeth, especially girls, from a life of delinquency and missed opportunities. By the last two decades of the 20 century, the consumer health movement and rising incomes empowered patients to decide which treatments were right for them, and an increasing number of adult patients sought orthodontic treatment to improve their appearance. Read More

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https://utpjournals.press/doi/10.3138/cbmh.237-112017
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.237-112017DOI Listing
June 2019
1 Read

Savoir rire entre les lignes : matérialisme médical et « hiéropsychologie » dans la Revue de l'hypnotisme (1887-1910).

Authors:
Vincent Guillin

Can Bull Med Hist 2018 1;35(2):373-412. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

Département de philosophie, Université du Québec à Montréal.

Laughter played a crucial strategic role in the fight against clericalism and religion in France during the second half of the 19 century and the first half of the 20 century. The cultural output from this polemical use of laughter is contrasted with a "scholarly literature," which fought against religion in a radically different manner that featured reason facing obscurantism and prejudice. Drawing on a study of the contributions dealing with "the psychology of religion" or "hieropsychology" published in the Revue de l'hypnotisme, I will try to show that there also exists a "scholarly ridicule," the forms, codes, and uses of which are characteristic of the anticlerical laughter associated with "medical materialism. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.245-012018DOI Listing
June 2019
2 Reads

Disappearing Acts: Anguish, Isolation, and the Re-imagining of the Mentally Ill in Global Psychopharmaceutical Advertising (1953-2005).

Can Bull Med Hist 2018 1;35(2):247-277. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

Health, Aging, and Society, McMaster University.

The visualization of mental illness has attracted substantial attention from scholars in recent decades. Due to the invisible nature of mental disorders, this work has stressed the importance of representations in shaping perceptions of mental illness. In the second half of the 20 century, advertisements for psychopharmaceutical medications became important avenues through which mental illness was made visible. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.231-112017DOI Listing
June 2019
3 Reads

"Hotel Refuses Negro Nurse": Gloria Clarke Baylis and the Queen Elizabeth Hotel.

Authors:
Karen Flynn

Can Bull Med Hist 2018 1;35(2):278-308. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

Departments of Gender and Women's Studies and African American Studies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

On 2 September 1964, one day after the Act Respecting Discrimination in Employment was introduced in Quebec, Gloria Clarke Baylis, a British-trained Caribbean migrant nurse, inquired about a permanent part-time nursing position at the Queen Elizabeth Hotel (QEH). In response, she was told that the position had already been filled. Less than a year later, Gloria appeared as the key witness in Her Majesty the Queen, Complainant v. Read More

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https://utpjournals.press/doi/10.3138/cbmh.256-042018
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.256-042018DOI Listing
June 2019
14 Reads

Veterinarians at the Connaught Medical Research Laboratories, 1931-72.

Can Bull Med Hist 2018 21;35(2):357-382. Epub 2018 Sep 21.

Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph.

This study traces the changing mission of the University of Toronto's Connaught Medical Research Laboratories regarding the health of animals. We argue that the early work of Connaught's veterinarians in the 1930s and 1940s focused on the care for experimental animals as well as lending veterinary knowledge to problems in human medicine and public health. This gave way to a more direct focus on veterinary products after the Second World War. Read More

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https://utpjournals.press/doi/10.3138/cbmh.239-112017
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.239-112017DOI Listing
June 2019
28 Reads

Psychiatry in American Medical Education: The Case of Harvard's Medical School, 1900-1945.

Authors:
Tara H Abraham

Can Bull Med Hist 2018 16;35(1):63-93. Epub 2018 Apr 16.

Department of History, University of Guelph.

As American psychiatrists moved from the asylum to the private clinic during the early twentieth century, psychiatry acquired a growing presence within medical school curricula. This shift in disciplinary status took place at a time when medical education itself was experiencing a period of reform. By examining medical school registers at Harvard University, records from the Dean's office of Harvard's medical school, and oral histories, this paper examines the rise in prominence of psychiatry in medical education. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.210-062017DOI Listing

When Ernest Jones First Arrived in Toronto; or, Reappraising the Bruce Letter.

Authors:
Philip Kuhn

Can Bull Med Hist 2018 16;35(1):94-136. Epub 2018 Apr 16.

Independent Scholar.

In July 1962, Toronto-based surgeon, Herbert Bruce, wrote a private and confidential letter to social worker and historian Cyril Greenland with some memories and impressions of Sigmund Freud's lifelong friend and biographer, Ernest Jones, in Toronto (1908-1913). In the letter, Bruce described Jones as a "sexual pervert." Despite Bruce's condemnation of Jones, historians and biographers have largely ignored his controversial memories of Jones in Toronto. Read More

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https://utpjournals.press/doi/10.3138/cbmh.211-072017
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.211-072017DOI Listing
June 2019
2 Reads

The Healing Arts and Social Capital: The Paston Women of Fifteenth-Century England.

Authors:
Ashlee Barwell

Can Bull Med Hist 2018 16;35(1):137-159. Epub 2018 Apr 16.

Department of History, York University.

In late-medieval England, women's informal and gratis healthcare services helped them to accumulate and recompense social capital, which improved their families' and their own status and resources. Given the precariousness of health, special skills in the healing arts had a particular power to create a sense of gratitude and obligation. Evidence comes from the 15th-century letter collection of the Pastons, an ambitious gentry family from Norfolk. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.214-082017DOI Listing
June 2019
1 Read

Ethopathology and Civilization Diseases: Niko and Elisabeth Tinbergen on Autism.

Authors:
Marga Vicedo

Can Bull Med Hist 2018 16;35(1):1-31. Epub 2018 Apr 16.

Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology University of Toronto.

The idea that some diseases result from a poor fit between modern life and our biological make-up is part of the long history of what historian of medicine Charles Rosenberg has called the "progress-and-pathology narrative." This article examines a key episode in that history: 1973 Nobel laureate Niko Tinbergen's use of an evolutionary framework to identify autism as a pathogenic effect of progress. Influenced by British psychiatrist John Bowlby's work, Tinbergen and his wife Elisabeth saw autistic children as victims of environmental stress caused mainly by mothers' failure to bond with their children and to protect them from conflicting situations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.191-122016DOI Listing
June 2019
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Female Gynecologists and Their Birth Control Clinics: Eugenics in Practice in 1920s-1930s China.

Authors:
Mirela David

Can Bull Med Hist 2018 16;35(1):32-62. Epub 2018 Apr 16.

Department of History, University of Saskatchewan.

Yang Chao Buwei, the first Chinese translator of Margaret Sanger's What Every Girl Should Know, was the first female gynecologist to open up a birth control clinic in China. By the 1930s, other female gynecologists, like Guo Taihua, had internalized and combined national and eugenic concerns of race regeneration to focus on the control of women's reproduction. This symbiosis between racial regeneration and birth control is best seen in Yang Chongrui's integration of birth control into her national hygiene program. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.200-022017DOI Listing
June 2019
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Dr. Polio: Revisiting FDR's Medical Legacy.

Can Bull Med Hist 2018 22;35(1):160-192. Epub 2017 Sep 22.

Department of Anaesthesia, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School.

The National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis (NFIP), the March of Dimes, and the Georgia Warm Springs Resort were reflections of Franklin D. Roosevelt's (FDR) complicated and personal relationship with polio. Between 1934 and 1957, significant advances were made in the care of polio survivors, and new and innovative medical fields gained both public attention and funding. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3138/cbmh.192-122016DOI Listing
September 2017
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