18 results match your criteria Canadian Public Administration-administration Publique Du Canada[Journal]

  • Page 1 of 1

Parent child coalitions: innovative public-sector management and early childhood development in Manitoba.

Authors:
Jeffery Cottes

Can Public Adm 2011 ;54(3):377-98

Carleton University.

This article considers a coalition model of governance as an innovative approach to public management. In general, the coalition governance model adopts key principles of new public management and inherits criticisms similar to those levelled against the new managerialism. Looking at a case study of parent child coalitions in Manitoba, this article explores some benefits and consequences of implementing and utilizing coalition governance as a model for social policy. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

Are happy employees healthy employees? Researching the effects of employee engagement on absenteeism.

Authors:
Dann Hoxsey

Can Public Adm 2010 ;53(4):551-71

University of Victoria.

In 2007, a survey was conducted to measure the levels of workplace engagement for British Columbian civil servants. Following the Heskett et al. model of the “service profit chain” (1994, 2002), the government's primary concerns were the increasing attrition rates and their effects on service delivery. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2011
1 Read

Alberta's and Ontario's liquor boards: why such divergent outcomes?

Authors:
Malcolm G Bird

Can Public Adm 2010 ;53(4):509-30

The provinces of Alberta and Ontario have chosen very different methods to distribute alcoholic beverages: Alberta privatized the Alberta Liquor Control Board (ALCB) in 1993 and established a private market to sell beverage alcohol, while Ontario, in stark contrast, opted to retain and expand the Liquor Control Board of Ontario (LCBO). This article examines the reasons for the divergent policy choices made by Ralph Klein and Mike Harris' Conservative governments in each province. The article draws on John Kingdon's “multiple streams decision-making model,” to examine the mindsets of the key decision-makers, as well as “historical institutionalism,” to organize the pertinent structural, historical and institutional variables that shaped the milieu in which decision-makers acted. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

One step forward, one step back: Quebec's 2003–04 health and social services regionalization policy.

Can Public Adm 2010 ;53(4):467-88

Université Laval.

This article focuses on Quebec's most recent reform in the regionalization of health care to understand why the government chose to transform the regional boards into agencies. This case study used interviews and documentary analysis. Rooted in a political science perspective, the conceptual framework is inspired by the work of John Kingdon (1995) and draws on the four variables that influence the choice of policy: ideas, interests, institutions and events. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

Does public reporting measure up? Federalism, accountability and child-care policy in Canada.

Can Public Adm 2010 ;53(3):417-38

Human Early Learning Partnership, University of British Columbia.

Governments in Canada have recently been exploring new accountability measures within intergovernmental relations. Public reporting has become the preferred mechanism in a range of policy areas, including early learning and child-care, and the authors assess its effectiveness as an accountability measure. The article is based on their experience with a community capacity-building project that considers the relationship between the public policy, funding and accountability mechanisms under the federal/provincial/territorial agreements related to child-care. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 2010

Tensions entre rationalité technique et intérêts politiques : l'exemple de la mise en œuvre de la au Québec.

Can Public Adm 2008 ;50(2):219-243

Département d'administration de la santé et Groupe de recherche interdisciplinaire en santé à l'université de Montréal.

This article focuses on the decision-making processes surrounding the implementation of Bill 25, Quebec's Act Respecting Local Health and Social Services Network Development Agencies. Our intention is to shed light on the strategies of the various groups or institutions that expressed their preferences and attempted, with varying degrees of success, to influence decisions with respect to this major reform of the Quebec health system structure. On a theoretical level, we are relying mostly on the models for analysing the lobbying process, which, since the seminal work of Milbrath (1960, 1963), have essentially presented this practice as a process for exchanging information. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1754-7121.2007.tb02011.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3598858PMC
January 2008
7 Reads

Policy legacies and the potential for radical surgery on health-care systems.

Authors:
D Cohn

Can Public Adm 2001 ;44(4):503-9

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2009
2 Reads

Globalization forces and social policy choices: glass half-full or half-empty?

Authors:
J P Boase

Can Public Adm 2001 ;44(1):110-18

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2009
1 Read

[Not Available].

Authors:
F Rivest

Can Public Adm 1984 ;27(1):24-47

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

Toxic chemical regulation in Canada: preliminary estimates of costs and benefits.

Can Public Adm 1982 ;25(3):405-19

This paper makes an assessment of the impact of toxic chemical regulation in Canada. Ranges of costs and benefits, supplemented by survey information, analogous American data, interviews and case studies have been used to demonstrate the general usefulness of a cost-benefit framework for public sector decision-making even where information availability is constrained and complete analysis is not feasible. It is concluded that, with few exceptions, the impact of environmental regulation on chemical producers in Canada is neither excessive nor unduly onerous. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 1982
2 Reads

Regulation and the paramedical professions: an interest group study.

Authors:
J Boase

Can Public Adm 1982 ;25(3):332-53

This article examines the relationship between government regulation and interest group activity of two paramedical groups in Ontario: chiropractors and physioptherapists. These disciplines occupy positions vis-à-vis the provincial medical insurance plan opposite to those which their relationships with the medical profession would suggest. It will be argued that the employment of sophisticated pressure group tactics can be highly effective as a surrogate for medical recognition. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 1982

Accountability, efficiency, and the "bottom line" in non-profit organizations.

Authors:
J Cutt

Can Public Adm 1982 ;25(3):311-31

Financial reporting by non-profit organizations deals only with accountability for propriety and regularity, and ignores output measurement. The development of output measures of a physical or index nature offers a means of relating dollar costs to output in the form of cost-efficiency or cost-effectiveness measures, but does not provide any measure of the absolute value or worthwhileness of such programs. This fundamental absolute value question should be asked of all non-profit programs and documented to the greatest possible extent in budgetary submissions, and subsequent control and audit. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 1982

Regulation and the paramedical professions: an interest group study.

Authors:
J Boase

Can Public Adm 1982 ;25(3):332-53

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 1984

Public policy analysis and the Canadian health care system.

Authors:
P Aucoin

Can Public Adm 1980 ;23(1):166-74

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 1981
  • Page 1 of 1