120,426 results match your criteria Canadian Journal Of Statistics-revue Canadienne De Statistique[Journal]


Screen-time is associated with inattention problems in preschoolers: Results from the CHILD birth cohort study.

PLoS One 2019 17;14(4):e0213995. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

Background: Pre-school children spend an average of two-hours daily using screens. We examined associations between screen-time on pre-school behavior using data from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) study.

Methods: CHILD participant parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) at five-years of age. Read More

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0213995PLOS

Lymphedema Impact and Prevalence International Study: The Canadian Data.

Lymphat Res Biol 2019 Apr;17(2):178-186

2 Parkwood Institute Research, St. Joseph's Health Care London, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Canada.

Chronic edema/lymphedema is defined as edema present for more than 3 months. It is underrecognized and undertreated. The International Lymphedema Framework developed an international study, Lymphedema Impact and Prevalence International (LIMPRINT), to estimate the prevalence and impact of chronic edema in heterogeneous populations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/lrb.2019.0014DOI Listing

mTORC1 is required for expression of LRPPRC and cytochrome c oxidase but not HIF-1α in Leigh Syndrome French Canadian Type Patient Fibroblasts.

Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 2019 Apr 17. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

Department of Nutrition, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada. Department of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada.

Leigh syndrome French Canadian type (LSFC) is a mitochondrial disease caused by mutations in the LRPRRC gene leading to a reduction of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) expression reaching 50% in skin fibroblasts. We have shown that, under basal conditions, LSFC and control cells display similar ATP levels. We hypothesized that this occurs through upregulation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR)-mediated metabolic reprogramming. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/ajpcell.00160.2017DOI Listing

Cost-Utility Analysis of Imaging for Surveillance and Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

AJR Am J Roentgenol 2019 Apr 17:1-9. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

1 Centre de recherche du Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada.

The purpose of this study is to compare imaging-based surveillance and diagnostic strategies in patients at risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) while taking into account technically inadequate examinations and patient compliance. A Markov model simulated seven strategies for HCC surveillance and diagnosis in patients with cirrhosis: strategy A, ultrasound (US) for surveillance and CT for diagnosis; strategy B, US for surveillance and complete MRI for diagnosis; strategy C, US for surveillance and CT for inadequate or positive surveillance; strategy D, US for surveillance and complete MRI for inadequate or positive surveillance; strategy E, surveillance and diagnosis with CT followed by complete MRI for inadequate surveillance; strategy F, surveillance and diagnosis with complete MRI followed by CT for inadequate surveillance; and strategy G, surveillance with abbreviated MRI followed by CT for inadequate surveillance or complete MRI for positive surveillance. Two compliance scenarios were evaluated: optimal and conservative. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2214/AJR.18.20341DOI Listing

Identification of Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells in Mouse Lung, Liver, Small Intestine, Bone Marrow, and Mediastinal and Mesenteric Lymph Nodes.

Curr Protoc Immunol 2019 Apr 17:e73. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a heterogeneous family of lymphocytes that populate barrier and non-barrier tissues. ILCs regulate immune responses to pathogens and commensals but also sustain metabolic homeostasis, tissue remodeling after injury and establish dialogue with the nervous system. ILCs rapidly become activated in the absence of adaptive antigen receptors by responding to signaling molecules provided by hematopoietic or non-hematopoietic cells. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/cpim.73
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cpim.73DOI Listing
April 2019
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Recent trends in prostate cancer in Canada.

Health Rep 2019 Apr;30(4):12-17

Adult Chronic Diseases and Conditions Division, Centre for Surveillance and Applied Research, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.

Background: Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer in Canadian men. Screening recommendations have changed substantially over the last 25 years. Since 2011 (United States) and 2014 (Canada), taskforce guidelines have recommended against screening using the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test in low-risk men of all ages. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.25318/82-003-x201900400002-engDOI Listing

Healthy immigrant effect by immigrant category in Canada.

Health Rep 2019 Apr;30(4):3-11

Health Analysis Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.

Background: Medical screening plays a role in explaining the healthy immigrant effect (HIE) among immigrants newly landed in Canada. The 2002 Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA) modernized immigration selection by exempting certain immigrant categories (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.25318/82-003-x201900400001-engDOI Listing

A retrospective cohort study comparing non-fatal self-harm emergency department visits between Canadian veterans living in Ontario and matched civilians.

Int Rev Psychiatry 2019 Apr 17:1-9. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

d IC/ES , Toronto , Canada.

This was a retrospective cohort study linking provincial administrative databases to compare rates of non-fatal self-harm between CAF and RCMP veterans living in Ontario and age-matched civilians. This study included male veterans who registered for provincial health insurance between 2002 and 2013. A civilian comparator group was matched 4:1 on age and sex. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09540261.2019.1580685DOI Listing

IL-2 modulates Th2 cell responses to glucocorticosteroid: A cause of persistent type 2 inflammation?

Immun Inflamm Dis 2019 Apr 17. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada.

Background: Glucocorticosteroids (GCs) are the main treatment for asthma as they reduce type 2 cytokine expression and induce apoptosis. Asthma severity is associated with type 2 inflammation, circulating Th2 cells and higher GC requirements.

Objective: The aim of this study was to assess whether ex vivo production of interleukin 2 (IL-2), a T-cell survival factor, associated with clinical features of asthma severity, the proportion of blood Th2 cells and Th2 cell responses to GC. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/iid3.249DOI Listing

Children under 10 years of age were more affected by the 2018/19 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 epidemic in Canada: ‎possible cohort effect following the 2009 influenza pandemic.

Euro Surveill 2019 Apr;24(15)

University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

IntroductionFindings from the community-based Canadian Sentinel Practitioner Surveillance Network (SPSN) suggest children were more affected by the 2018/19 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 epidemic.AimTo compare the age distribution of A(H1N1)pdm09 cases in 2018/19 to prior seasonal influenza epidemics in Canada.MethodsThe age distribution of unvaccinated influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 cases and test-negative controls were compared across A(H1N1)pdm09-dominant epidemics in 2018/19, 2015/16 and 2013/14 and with the general population of SPSN provinces. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2019.24.15.1900104DOI Listing
April 2019
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Importance of Participant-Centricity and Trust for a Sustainable Medical Information Commons.

J Law Med Ethics 2019 Mar;47(1):12-20

Amy L. McGuire, J.D., Ph.D., is the Leon Jaworski Professor of Biomedical Ethics and Director of the Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy at Baylor College of Medicine. Dr. McGuire serves on the program committee for the Greenwall Foundation Faculty Scholars Program in Bioethics and is immediate past president of the Association of Bioethics Program Directors. Mary A. Majumder, J.D., Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy, Baylor College of Medicine. Angela G. Villanueva, M.P.H., is a Research Associate at the Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy at Baylor College of Medicine. Jessica Bardill, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Indigenous Canadian Literatures and Cultures at Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec. Juli M. Bollinger, M.S., is a Research Associate in the Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the Baylor College of Medicine and a Research Associate and Associate Faculty at the Berman Institute of Bioethics at Johns Hopkins University. Eric Boerwinkle, Ph.D., is the Dean of the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Public Health and the Associate Director, Human Genome Sequencing Center at Baylor College of Medicine. Tania Bubela, Ph.D., J.D., is the Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences at Simon Fraser University and a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences. Patricia Deverka, M.D., M.S., M.B.E., is Director, Value Evidence and Outcomes at Geisinger National Precision Health, where she focuses Outcomes at Geisinger National Precision Health, where she focuses systems and policymakers. Barbara Evans, MS, Ph.D., J.D., LL.M., is the Mary Ann and Lawrence E. Faust Professor of Law and Director of the Center for Biotechnology & Law at the University of Houston Law Center and holds a joint appointment as Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the UH Cullen College of Engineering. Nanibaa' A. Garrison, Ph.D. (Navajo), is an Assistant Professor at the Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics at Seattle Children's Hospital and Research Institute and at the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. David Glazer is an engineering director at Verily Life Sciences, where he helps life science organizations use cloud computing to accelerate and scale their work with big data. Melissa M. Goldstein, J.D., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University. Henry T. Greely, J.D., is the Deane F. and Kate Edelman Johnson Professor of Law and a professor (by courtesy) of Genetics at Stanford University, where he directs the Center for Law and the Biosciences. He is President of the International Neuroethics Society, co-chair of the Neuroethics Work Group of the NIH BRAIN Initiative, and a member of the National Academies' Committee on Science, Technology, and Law. Scott D. Kahn, Ph.D., is the Chief Information Officer at LunaDNA where he is responsible for all informatics and data science strategy. Bartha M. Knoppers, Ph.D., (Comparative Medical Law), is a Full Professor, Canada Research Chair in Law and Medicine and Director of the Centre of Genomics and Policy of the Faculty of Medicine at McGill University. Barbara A. Koenig, Ph.D., is Professor of Bioethics and Medical Anthropology, based at the Institute for Health & Aging, University of California, San Francisco. She also serve as Director of the UCSF Program in Bioethics. J. Mark Lambright, M.B.A., is the Chairman, Trident Advisors, LLC - CEO (Interim), Private Access, Inc. Mark Lambright has been a senior executive of a number of healthcare and technology companies ranging in size from startup to multi-billion in revenue. John Mattison, M.D., is Assistant Medical Director, KP, SCAL, Chief Health Information Officer. Founder of CDA/CCD (XML standard for healthcare interoperability). Co-Editor of Healthcare Information Technology (2017 McGraw Hill). Christopher J. O'Donnell, M.D., M.P.H., is Chief, Cardiology Section and Director, Center for Population Genomics, of the Boston VA Healthcare System and co-Principal Investigator (Chief Scientist) of the national VA Million Veteran Program; and is VA Contact Principal Investigator of the NIH All of Us Research Program. He is also a faculty member of the Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School. Arti K. Rai, J.D., is the Elvin R. Latty Professor of Law and co-Director of the Center for Innovation Policy at Duke Law. Laura L. Rodriguez, Ph.D., is the Director of the Division of Policy, Communications, and Education at the National Human Genome Research Institute. Tania Simoncelli, M.S., is the Director of Science Policy at the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative. Formerly Executive Director, Count Me In at the Broad Institute, Assistant Director of Forensic Science and Biomedical Innovation, White House Office of Science & Technology Policy, and Science Advisor to the American Civil Liberties Union. Sharon F. Terry, M.A., is the president and CEO of Genetic Alliance. Adrian Thorogood, B.C.L./LL.B., is a lawyer and Academic Associate at the Centre of Genomics and Policy at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. He manages the Regulatory and Ethics Work Stream of the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health. Michael S. Watson, M.S., Ph.D., is the Executive Director, American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and ACMG Foundation for Genetic and Genomic Medicine and an Adjunct Professor of Pediatrics at Washington University School of Medicine. John T. Wilbanks is the Chief Commons Officer at Sage Bionetworks, and co-PI on awards for AllofUs Research Program, ELSI Issues in Unregulated Mobile Research, CTSA Center for Data To Health. Robert Cook-Deegan, M.D., is a Professor in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at Arizona State University.

Drawing on a landscape analysis of existing data-sharing initiatives, in-depth interviews with expert stakeholders, and public deliberations with community advisory panels across the U.S., we describe features of the evolving medical information commons (MIC). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1073110519840480DOI Listing

Medical Information Commons to Support Learning Healthcare Systems: Examples From Canada.

J Law Med Ethics 2019 Mar;47(1):97-105

Tania Bubela, Ph.D., J.D., F.C.A.H.S., is an expert in health and intellectual property law and policy, combining her training in genetics (Ph.D. Biology, University of Sydney) and law (Gold medalist, University of Alberta). She is the Dean of Faculty of Health Sciences at Simon Fraser University (Burnaby, British Columbia), developing sector-leading policies, processes, practices, and infrastructure to support excellence in interdisciplinary education, research, and engagement that will improve health, health equity, and well-being. Shelagh K. Genuis, Ph.D., is the project manager for the Genome Canada's Precision Medicine Policy Network, based in the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry at the University of Alberta, Alberta. Naveed Z. Janjua, M.D., Ph.D., is a Senior Scientist at the BC Centre for Disease Control and Clinical Associate Professor at School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia. Mel Krajden, M.D., F.R.C.P.C., is the Director of BC's Public Health Laboratory and the Medical Head, Hepatitis at the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control. He is also a Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of British Columbia. He has extensive clinical trials expertise and is a Co-investigator/Mentor on the CIHR funded National Research Training Program (CanHepC). Nicole Mittmann, Ph.D., is the Chief Research Officer at CCO. She is an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and an Associate Scientist at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. Katerina Podolak is the Group Manager for Data Acquisition and Disclosure at Cancer Care Ontario, working with data partners to bring data into CCO, and health system partners who want access to CCO data. Katerina has extensive experience with information management in the hospital setting, as well as Ontario's Ministry of Health and Long-term Care. Larry Svenson, Ph.D., F.R.S.P.H., is the Provincial Health Analytics Officer and Executive Director for Analytics and Performance Reporting at Alberta Health. He is also an Associate Professor with the Division of Preventive Medicine at the University of Alberta and an Adjunct Professor with the School of Public Health at the University of Alberta and the Cumming School of Medicine at the University of Calgary.

We explore how principles predicting the success of a medical information commons (MIC) advantaged or disadvantaged three MIC initiatives in three Canadian provinces. Our MIC case examples demonstrate that practices and policies to promote access to and use of health information can help improve individual healthcare and inform a learning health system. MICs were constrained by heterogenous health information protection laws across jurisdictions and risk-averse institutional cultures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1073110519840488DOI Listing

A family systems perspective on supporting self-determination in young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

J Appl Res Intellect Disabil 2019 Apr 16. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Departments of Public Health Sciences and Psychiatry, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

Background: This study explored the way families support self-determination in young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) during life transitions.

Method: Qualitative case studies were conducted with two Canadian families who participated in semi-structured interviews and ethnographic observations every quarter for one year. Analyses were informed by family systems theory and self-determination theory. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jar.12601DOI Listing

Effects of macro-cracks on the load bearing capacity of articular cartilage.

Biomech Model Mechanobiol 2019 Apr 16. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr. NW, Calgary, T2N 1N4, Canada.

Macro-cracks on the surface of articular cartilage are one of the hallmarks of early osteoarthritis and joint damage initiation. Macro-cracks negatively affect cartilage mechanobiology and load bearing capacity. The aim of this study was to quantify the changes in transient and steady-state force response of healthy cartilage in the presence of macro-cracks when compressed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10237-019-01149-xDOI Listing

Oleoyl glycine: interference with the aversive effects of acute naloxone-precipitated MWD, but not morphine reward, in male Sprague-Dawley rats.

Psychopharmacology (Berl) 2019 Apr 16. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Department of Psychology and Collaborative, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1H 2GW, Canada.

Rationale: Oleoyl glycine (OlGly), a recently discovered fatty acid amide that is structurally similar to N- acylethanolamines, which include the endocannabinoid, anandamide (AEA), as well as endogenous peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) agonists oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), has been shown to interfere with nicotine reward and dependence in mice.

Objectives And Methods: Behavioral and molecular techniques were used to investigate the ability of OlGly to interfere with the affective properties of morphine and morphine withdrawal (MWD) in male Sprague-Dawley rats.

Results: Synthetic OlGly (1-30 mg/kg, intraperitoneal [ip]) produced neither a place preference nor aversion on its own; however, at doses of 1 and 5 mg/kg, ip, it blocked the aversive effects of MWD in a place aversion paradigm. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00213-019-05237-9DOI Listing
April 2019
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Prevalence and Demographics of CKD in Canadian Primary Care Practices: A Cross-sectional Study.

Kidney Int Rep 2019 Apr 21;4(4):561-570. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.

Introduction: Surveillance systems enable optimal care delivery and appropriate resource allocation, yet Canada lacks a dedicated surveillance system for chronic kidney disease (CKD). Using data from the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network (CPCSSN), a national chronic disease surveillance system, this study describes the geographic, sociodemographic, and clinical variations in CKD prevalence in the Canadian primary care context.

Methods: This cross-sectional study included 559,745 adults in primary care in 5 provinces across Canada from 2010 through 2015. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S24680249193001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ekir.2019.01.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6451150PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Combining Integration of Care and a Population Health Approach: A Scoping Review of Redesign Strategies and Interventions, and their Impact.

Int J Integr Care 2019 Apr 11;19(2). Epub 2019 Apr 11.

School of Epidemiology, Public Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, CA.

Background And Aim: Many health systems attempt to develop integrated and population health-oriented systems of care, but knowledge of strategies and interventions to support this effort is lacking. We aimed to identify specific redesign strategies and interventions, and to present evidence of their effectiveness.

Method: A modified scoping review process was carried out. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5334/ijic.4197DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6460499PMC

Fitness of animals for transport to slaughter.

Can Vet J 2019 Apr;60(4):423-429

Sir James Dunn Animal Welfare Centre, Department of Health Management, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 4P3.

Fitness for transport is an important factor affecting the potential for suffering during animal transportation. Examination of Canadian condemnation statistics, surveys of animals transported to slaughter, and legal case studies show that current guidelines and regulations do not always ensure that only fit animals are transported. Consideration of the pathophysiological implications of ill-health and injury on an animal's response to the potential physical and physiological challenges that can occur during transportation can assist in identifying the welfare implications of transporting compromised animals. Read More

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Vaccine usage in western Canadian cow-calf herds.

Can Vet J 2019 Apr;60(4):414-422

Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5B4.

The aims of this study were to describe when and how vaccines are administered during the production cycle in cow-calf herds in western Canada, as well as the factors that influence vaccine usage as reported by producers. The most commonly used vaccines were bovine viral diarrhea virus/infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (BVDV/IBR) in adult animals and clostridial vaccines in calves. While there has been improvement in usage of reproductive and respiratory viral vaccines since previous studies, there are still several areas in which uptake could be improved. Read More

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Occupational stressors and desired changes for wellness amongst employees at a Canadian animal welfare organization.

Can Vet J 2019 Apr;60(4):405-413

Department of Population Medicine, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1.

While occupational stressors in human caregiving environments have been well-explored, little is known about these stressors in the animal caregiving professions. To address this, a cross-sectional survey was conducted (June and July, 2016) with employees at a Canadian animal welfare organization to explore perceived occupational stressors and desired wellness resources. Responses to open-ended questions were analyzed thematic network analysis. Read More

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April 2019
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Attitudes towards antimicrobial use and factors associated with antimicrobial use in western Canadian cow-calf herds.

Can Vet J 2019 Apr;60(4):391-398

Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5B4 (Waldner, Parker, Campbell); Public Health Agency of Canada, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5B4 (Gow); Animal Welfare Program, Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Wilson).

One hundred cow-calf producers in western Canada were surveyed to determine their perceptions regarding antimicrobial use (AMU) and how these perceptions and other herd management factors were associated with AMU. Veterinarians were the most important source of AMU information. Half of the producers considered antimicrobial resistance (AMR) when choosing antimicrobials, while 24% considered the influence of AMU on AMR in human health. Read More

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January Veterinary Medical Ethics - Cannabinoids to treat dogs and cats.

Authors:

Can Vet J 2019 Apr;60(4):345

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April 2019
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Standard laboratory housing for mice restricts their ability to segregate space into clean and dirty areas.

Sci Rep 2019 Apr 16;9(1):6179. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Animal Welfare Program, University of British Columbia, 2357 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4, Canada.

Laboratory mice (Mus musculus) are typically housed in simple cages consisting of one open space. These standard cages may thwart mouse ability to segregate resting areas from areas where they eliminate, a behaviour that is prevalent across the animal kingdom. No scientific work has directly tested whether mice engage in such segregation behaviour, or whether the ability to do so may have welfare consequences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-42512-3DOI Listing

Problematizing Sexual Harassment in Residential Long-Term Care: The Need for a More Ethical Prevention Strategy.

Can J Aging 2019 Apr 17:1-11. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

Toronto Rehab Institute-University Health Network.

ABSTRACTSupporting sexual rights in residential long-term care is ethically complex. The well-being of care workers and residents is inextricably linked, and increasingly recognized empirically, yet public policy in Canada generally continues to exclusively focus on either the well-being of residents or workers. The consequences of this are particularly evident when we consider how to prevent sexual harassment towards workers without unjustly restricting the freedom of sexual expression for residents living with dementia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0714980819000199DOI Listing

Real-life assessment of aripiprazole monthly (Abilify Maintena) in schizophrenia: a Canadian naturalistic non-interventional prospective cohort study.

BMC Psychiatry 2019 Apr 16;19(1):114. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Background: With previously established efficacy of aripiprazole once-monthly injectable formulation (AOM) in pre-registration randomized controlled trials, the current study was designed to evaluate its effectiveness in patients treated for schizophrenia in regular clinical settings in Canada.

Methods: Following their clinicians' decision to prescribe AOM, 193 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, were recruited from 17 Canadian community or hospital-based settings. The primary outcome of global functioning was assessed with the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (GAF) at 3-month intervals for 1 year. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12888-019-2103-xDOI Listing

A cross-sectional study examining convergent validity of a frailty index based on electronic medical records in a Canadian primary care program.

BMC Geriatr 2019 Apr 16;19(1):109. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

NIHR CLAHRC Older People's Theme Academic Unit of Elderly Care and Rehabilitation, University of Leeds, Bradford Institute for Health Research, Temple Bank House, Bradford Royal Infirmary, Duckworth Lane, Bradford, BD9 6RJ, UK.

Background: An electronic frailty index (eFI) has been developed and validated in the UK; it uses data from primary care electronic medical records (EMR) for effective frailty case-finding in primary care. This project examined the convergent validity of the eFI from Canadian primary care EMR data with a validated frailty index based on comprehensive geriatric assessment (FI-CGA), in order to understand its potential use in the Canadian context.

Methods: A cross-sectional validation study, using data from an integrated primary care research program for seniors living with frailty in Edmonton, AB. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12877-019-1119-xDOI Listing

Association Between Tinnitus and Temporomandibular Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 2019 Apr 16:3489419842577. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

3 Department of Neuroscience, Canadian Center for Behavioral Neuroscience (CCBN), University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB, Canada.

Objectives: Tinnitus is one of the most common otological symptoms in patients with temporomandibular disorders. This study aimed to investigate the possible association between tinnitus and temporomandibular disorders.

Methods: The online databases of PubMed, Ovid, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science were explored for all English articles published until September 2018 using the combined keywords tinnitus and temporomandibular. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003489419842577DOI Listing

Gastric Cancer in Northern Canadian Populations: A Focus on Cardia and Non-Cardia Subsites.

Cancers (Basel) 2019 Apr 15;11(4). Epub 2019 Apr 15.

The CANHelp Working Group, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1, Canada.

In northern Canada where there is a high prevalence of infection, there is a paucity of information on gastric cancer by the topographical subsites cardia (CGC) and non-cardia (NCGC). Here we describe the incidence of CGC and NCGC, separately, among northern Canadian populations. We used data from the Cancer Incidence in Five Continents Volumes X (CI5X) and XI (CI5XI) to obtain CGC and NCGC incidence for Canada and for Yukon (YT), a northern Canadian territory. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers11040534DOI Listing

ANCHOR: A 16S rRNA gene amplicon pipeline for microbial analysis of multiple environmental samples.

Environ Microbiol 2019 Apr 16. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Institut de Recherche en Biologie Végétale, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC H1X 2B2, Canada.

Analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene amplification data for microbial barcoding can be inaccurate across complex environmental samples. A method is presented, ANCHOR, designed for improved species level microbial identification using paired-end sequences directly, multiple high-complexity samples and multiple reference databases. An SOP is reported alongside benchmarking against artificial, single sample and replicated mock datasets. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.14632DOI Listing

"Automatic assumption of your gender, sexuality and sexual practices is also discrimination": Exploring sexual healthcare experiences and recommendations among sexually and gender diverse persons in Arctic Canada.

Health Soc Care Community 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Fostering Open eXpression Among Youth (FOXY), Yellowknife, NT, Canada.

Sexual and mental health disparities are reported in Arctic Canada as in other Arctic regions that experience shared challenges of insufficient healthcare resources, limited transportation, and a scarcity of healthcare research. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer persons (LGBTQ+) report sexual and mental health disparities in comparison with their heterosexual and cisgender counterparts, and these disparities may be exacerbated in rural versus urban settings. Yet limited research has explored sexual healthcare experiences among LGBTQ+ persons in the Arctic who are at the juncture of Arctic and LGBTQ+ health disparities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hsc.12757DOI Listing

Accelerated interleaved spiral-IDEAL imaging of hyperpolarized Xe for parametric gas exchange mapping in humans.

Magn Reson Med 2019 Apr 16. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of mapping gas exchange with single breath-hold hyperpolarized (HP) Xe in humans, acquiring parametric maps of lung physiology. The potential benefit of acceleration using parallel imaging for this application is also explored.

Methods: Six healthy volunteers were scanned with a modified spiral-IDEAL sequence to acquire gas exchange-weighted images using a single dose of Xe. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mrm.27765DOI Listing

Income-based inequities in access to mental health services in Canada.

Authors:
Mary Bartram

Can J Public Health 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Carleton University's School of Public Policy and Administration, Ottawa, Canada.

Objectives: While mental health services provided by general practitioners and psychiatrists can be billed to public health insurance programs in Canada, services provided by psychologists, social workers and other non-physician providers cannot. This study assesses the extent to which access to mental health services varies by income after first taking into account the higher concentration of mental health needs at lower income levels.

Method: Data from the Canadian Community Health Survey 2013-2014 are used to calculate need-standardized concentration indices for access to mental health services. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.17269/s41997-019-00204-5
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http://dx.doi.org/10.17269/s41997-019-00204-5DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Selective Sensory Axon Reinnervation and TRPV1 Activation.

Mol Neurobiol 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine and the Neuroscience and Mental Health Institute, University of Alberta, 132A-Clinical Sciences Building, 11350 Ave, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G3, Canada.

Current strategies to enhance regeneration of peripheral neurons involve broad activation of sensory, autonomic, and motor axons. Peripheral neuron regeneration is limited in persons with damage or disease of peripheral axons. Here, we provide evidence that subtoxic activation of TRPV1 channels in sensory neurons is associated with activation of growth and subtle changes in skin reinnervation. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s12035-019-1574-6
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12035-019-1574-6DOI Listing
April 2019
4 Reads

Moderate maternal folic acid supplementation ameliorates adverse embryonic and epigenetic outcomes associated with assisted reproduction in a mouse model.

Hum Reprod 2019 Apr 16. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Child Health and Human Development Program (CHHD), Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, 1001 Décarie Boulevard, Montréal QC, Canada.

Study Question: Could clinically-relevant moderate and/or high dose maternal folic acid supplementation prevent aberrant developmental and epigenetic outcomes associated with assisted reproductive technologies (ART)?

Summary Answer: Our results demonstrate dose-dependent and sex-specific effects of folic acid supplementation in ART and provide evidence that moderate dose supplements may be optimal for both sexes.

What Is Known Already: Children conceived using ART are at an increased risk for growth and genomic imprinting disorders, often associated with DNA methylation defects. Folic acid supplementation is recommended during pregnancy to prevent adverse offspring outcomes; however, the effects of folic acid supplementation in ART remain unclear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/humrep/dez036DOI Listing

Occupational injury trends in the Canadian workforce: An examination of the Canadian community health survey.

Int J Crit Illn Inj Sci 2019 Jan-Mar;9(1):29-35

Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada.

Background: Previous studies suggest that various factors including the type of occupation, employment status, and level of education have significant associations with the rates of occupational injuries. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of demographics, such as age and gender, and various occupational factors on the rate of occupational injuries for a 14-year period from 2001 to 2014 and to study the differences in trends over time.

Methods: The Canadian Community Health Survey data for 2001, 2003, 2005, 2007, and 2009-2014 was used to examine the impact of various occupational factors on workplace injuries in the Canadian population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/IJCIIS.IJCIIS_43_18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6423929PMC

To Choose or Not To Choose: Evaluating the Effect of a Choosing Wisely Knowledge Translation Initiative for Imaging in Low Back Pain by Emergency Physicians.

Cureus 2019 Feb 4;11(2):e4002. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Emergency Medicine, Saint John Regional Hospital, Saint John, CAN.

Introduction: We aimed to quantify the baseline familiarity of emergency medicine (EM) physicians with the Choosing Wisely Canada (CWC)-EM recommendations. We then assessed whether a structured knowledge translation (KT) initiative affected awareness, knowledge, and practice patterns for imaging in low back pain.

Methods: We completed a two-center, before and after practice evaluation study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.4002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6447138PMC
February 2019

Implementation and evaluation of a quality and safety tool for ambulatory strongyloidiasis patients at high risk of adverse outcome.

Trop Dis Travel Med Vaccines 2019 3;5. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

1University of Toronto, 27 King's College Circle, Toronto, Ontario M5S1A1 Canada.

Background: Strongyloidiasis is a common infection in Canadian migrants that can cause life-threatening hyperinfection in immunosuppressed hosts. We designed and implemented a safety tool to guide management of patients with in order to prevent adverse outcomes. Methods: Patients treated at our centre for strongyloidiasis from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2015 were identified through our ivermectin access log. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40794-019-0080-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448213PMC

A retrospective observational analysis of red blood cell transfusion practices in stable, non-bleeding adult patients admitted to nine medical-surgical intensive care units.

J Intensive Care 2019 4;7:19. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

1Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3D18, Teaching Research and Wellness Building, 3280 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N1 Canada.

Background: Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are common procedures performed in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, conservative transfusion approaches have been recommended to avoid RBC transfusions that are not clinically necessary and to achieve optimal patient outcomes. The objective of this study was to examine the utilization and costs of RBC transfusions in medical-surgical ICUs and to compare this information against clinical guideline recommendations for best practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40560-019-0375-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6449900PMC

Omalizumab in patients with severe asthma and persistent sputum eosinophilia.

Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol 2019 3;15:21. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

1Department of Medicine, Division of Respirology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON Canada.

Omalizumab, a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody targeting the IgE molecule, is the first biologic approved for moderate-to-severe allergic asthmatics, who remain uncontrolled despite high dose inhaled corticosteroid and bronchodilators. Steroid-sparing effect of omalizumab has not been demonstrated in asthmatics with persistent airway eosinophilia in a randomised controlled trial till date. From this double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-centred, randomized parallel group design, we report that omalizumab is possibly inadequate to control sputum eosinophilia, and therefore may not have a steroid-sparing effect, especially in those maintained on oral corticosteroids daily. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13223-019-0337-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448265PMC

Quasi-experimental causality in neuroscience and behavioural research.

Nat Hum Behav 2018 Dec 26;2(12):891-898. Epub 2018 Nov 26.

Departments of Neuroscience and Bioengineering, Leonard Davis Institute, Warren Center for Network Science, Wharton Neuroscience Initiative, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

In many scientific domains, causality is the key question. For example, in neuroscience, we might ask whether a medication affects perception, cognition or action. Randomized controlled trials are the gold standard to establish causality, but they are not always practical. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41562-018-0466-5DOI Listing
December 2018

Statistically downscaled climate dataset for East Africa.

Sci Data 2019 Apr 15;6(1):31. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Institute of Hydrology and Meteorology, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062, Dresden, Germany.

For many regions of the world, current climate change projections are only available at coarser spatial resolution from Global Climate Models (GCMs) that cannot directly be used in impact assessment and adaptation studies at regional and local scale. Impact assessment studies require high-resolution climate data to drive impact assessment models. To overcome this data challenge, we produced a station based climate projection (precipitation and maximum and minimum temperature) for Ethiopia, Kenya, and Tanzania using observed daily data from 211 stations obtained from the National Meteorological Agency of Ethiopia and international databases. Read More

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41597-019-0038-1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41597-019-0038-1DOI Listing
April 2019
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Mutation-specific peripheral and ER quality control of hERG channel cell-surface expression.

Sci Rep 2019 Apr 15;9(1):6066. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Department of Physiology, McGill University, Montréal, H3G 1Y6, Québec, Canada.

Impaired functional plasma membrane (PM) expression of the hERG K-channel is associated with Long-QT syndrome type-2 (LQT2) and increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia. Reduced PM-expression is primarily attributed to retention and degradation of misfolded channels by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein quality control (QC) systems. However, as the molecular pathogenesis of LQT2 was defined using severely-misfolded hERG variants with limited PM-expression, the potential contribution of post-ER (peripheral) QC pathways to the disease phenotype remains poorly established. Read More

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http://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-42331-6
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-42331-6DOI Listing
April 2019
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Report on two hypervirulent producing a carbapenemase from a Canadian patient.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada (Y. Longtin)

This report describes two hypervirulent producing KPC identified from a rectal swab and urine culture upon hospital admission. The patient had recent travel to Greece where he was hospitalized. The isolates were sequence type 86, contained an IncHI1B, IncFIB(K) hypervirulent plasmid and an IncFII(K) plasmid harbouring KPC. Read More

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http://aac.asm.org/lookup/doi/10.1128/AAC.00517-19
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.00517-19DOI Listing
April 2019
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Construction of a frailty index as a novel health measure in systemic lupus erythematosus.

J Rheumatol 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; Department of Community Health & Epidemiology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; Department of Rheumatology, Hanyang University Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases, Seoul, Korea;Rheumatology Research Group, School of Immunity and Infection, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK; Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutrición, Mexico City, Mexico; Cedars-Sinai/David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA; Divisions of Rheumatology and Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Division of Rheumatology, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK, USA; Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA; Division of Rheumatology, CHU de Québec et Université Laval, Quebec City, Canada; Center for Prognosis Studies in the Rheumatic Diseases, Toronto Western Hospital and University of Toronto, ON, Canada; Arthritis Research UK Epidemiology Unit, Faculty of Biology Medicine and Health, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Center, The University of Manchester, and NIHR Manchester Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Centre, Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester Academic Health Science Center Manchester, UK; Center for Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University College London, UK; Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA; Division of Rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; Lupus Research Unit, The Rayne Institute, St Thomas' Hospital, King's College London School of Medicine, UK, London, UK; Thurston Arthritis Research Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; Northwestern University and Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA; Lupus Center of Excellence, Allegheny Health Network, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; Lanarkshire Center for Rheumatology, Hairmyres Hospital, East Kilbride, Scotland UK; Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA; Autoimmune Diseases Research Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, BioCruces Health Research Institute, Hospital Universitario Cruces, University of the Basque Country, Barakaldo, Spain; Emory University School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Atlanta, Georgia, USA Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey; Unit for clinical therapy research (ClinTRID), Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Rheumatology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Josep Font Autoimmune Diseases Laboratory, IDIBAPS, Department of Autoimmune Diseases, Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, Spain; Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA; UCSD School of Medicine, La Jolla, CA, USA; Copenhagen Lupus and Vasculitis Clinic, 4242, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Hospital for Joint Diseases, NYU, Seligman Center for Advanced Therapeutics, New York NY; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine and Department of Pathology, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Center and Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Funding for this work was provided by the Nova Scotia Health Authority Research Fund. Dr. Sang-Cheol Bae's work was supported in part by NRF-2017M3A9B4050335, Republic of Korea. Dr. Caroline Gordon's work was supported by Lupus UK and the NIHR /Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Facility. The Montreal General Hospital Lupus Clinic is partially supported by the Singer Family Fund for Lupus Research. Dr. Clarke holds The Arthritis Society Chair in Rheumatic Diseases at the University of Calgary. Dr. Paul R. Fortin presently holds a tier 1 Canada Research Chair on Systemic Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases at Université Laval, and part of this work was done while he was still holding a Distinguished Senior Investigator of The Arthritis Society. Dr. Bruce is a National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Senior Investigator and is supported by Arthritis Research UK, the NIHR Manchester Biomedical Centre and the NIHR/Wellcome Trust Manchester Clinical Research Facility. The views expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the National Institute for Health Research or the Department of Health. Dr Isenberg and Dr Rahman are supported by and supported by the National Institute for Health, Research University College London Hospitals Biomedical Research Center. The Hopkins Lupus Cohort is supported by the NIH (grant AR43727 and 69572). Dr. Mary Anne Dooley's work was supported by the NIH (grant RR00046). Dr. Ramsey-Goldman's work was supported by the NIH (grants 5UL1TR001422-02, formerly 8UL1TR000150 and UL-1RR-025741, K24-AR-02318, and P60AR064464 formerly P60-AR- 48098). Dr. Ruiz-Irastorza is supported by the Department of Education, Universities and Research of the Basque Government. Dr. Soren Jacobsen is supported by the Danish Rheumatism Association (A3865) and the Novo Nordisk Foundation (A05990). Dr. John G. Hanly is supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (grant MOP-88526). Address Correspondence to: Dr. John G Hanly, Division of Rheumatology, Nova Scotia Rehabilitation Centre (2nd Floor), 1341 Summer Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, B3H 4K4.Email:

Objective: To construct a frailty index (FI) as a measure of vulnerability to adverse outcomes among patients with SLE, using data from the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) inception cohort.

Methods: The SLICC inception cohort consists of recently diagnosed SLE patients followed annually with clinical and laboratory assessments. For this analysis, the baseline visit was defined as the first study visit at which sufficient information was available for construction of a frailty index. Read More

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http://www.jrheum.org/lookup/doi/10.3899/jrheum.181338
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.181338DOI Listing
April 2019
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Patient preferences for disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug treatment in rheumatoid arthritis: A systematic review.

J Rheumatol 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

From the Department of Medicine and Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta; Arthritis Research Canada; Centre for Health Evaluation and Outcome Sciences, Providence Health Care, St Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia. The work was supported in part by a Canadian Initiative for Outcomes in Rheumatology Care (CIORA) grant. Dr. Hazlewood is supported by a Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) New Investigator Salary Award and The Arthritis Society Young Investigator Salary Award. Dr. Marshall is supported by a CIHR Canada Research Chair in Health Services and Systems Resea. Address correspondence to Dr. Glen Hazlewood, 3330 Hospital Dr NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2N 4N1 Tel: (403) 220-5903, Fax: (403) 210-7367 Email:

Objective: To summarize patients' preferences for disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Methods: We conducted a systematic review to identify English-language studies in adult RA patients that measured patients' preferences for DMARDs or health states and treatment outcomes relevant to DMARD decisions. Study quality was assessed using a published quality assessment tool. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.181165DOI Listing

Effect of Concomitant Disease-modifying Antirheumatic Drugs and Methotrexate Administration Route on Biologic Treatment Durability in Rheumatoid Arthritis: OBRI Cohort Results.

J Rheumatol 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

From McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario; Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, Ontario; Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario; JSS Medical Research; McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; University of Toronto, Department of Medicine and Institute of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation; Mount Sinai Hospital, Division of Rheumatology, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. OBRI was funded by peer-reviewed grants from Canadian Institute for Health Research (CIHR), Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (MOHLTC), Canadian Arthritis Network (CAN), and unrestricted grants from AbbVie, Amgen, Celgene, Hospira, Janssen, Lilly, Merck, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche, Sanofi, and UCB. MM, AC, XL, SC, and CB are employees at OBRI, which was funded by peer-reviewed grants from CIHR, MOHLTC, CAN, and unrestricted grants from AbbVie, Amgen, Bristol Myers Squibb, Celgene, Hospital Janssen, Pfizer, Roche, Sanofi, and UCB. ER and JSS are employees at JSS Medical Research, a contract research organization. A.N. Lau, MD, McMaster University; J.C. Thorne, MD, Southlake Regional Health Centre; M. Movahedi, MD, PhD, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network; E. Rampakakis, PhD, JSS Medical Research; A. Cesta, BSc, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network; X. Li, BSc, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network; S. Couto, MSc, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network; J. Sampalis, PhD, JSS Medical Research, and McGill University; C. Bombardier, MD, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, and University of Toronto, Department of Medicine and Institute of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation, and Mount Sinai Hospital, Division of Rheumatology. Address correspondence to Dr. A.N. Lau, 501-25 Charlton Ave. East, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 1Y2, Canada. E-mail: Accepted for publication October 30, 2018.

Objective: Prior studies have suggested that concurrent conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (csDMARD) therapy enhances the efficacy of biologic DMARD (bDMARD). Here, we assessed the effect of concomitant csDMARD use and methotrexate (MTX) route of administration on time to bDMARD discontinuation in a large Canadian (Ontario), observational, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cohort.

Methods: Patients from the Ontario Best Practices Research Initiative (OBRI) who initiated bDMARD therapy and had ≥ 1 followup assessment were included. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3899/jrheum.180486DOI Listing

Cost-effectiveness of faecal calprotectin used in primary care in the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease.

BMJ Open 2019 Apr 14;9(4):e027043. Epub 2019 Apr 14.

Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

Objective: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, autoimmune, gastrointestinal disorder. Canada has one of the highest prevalence and incidence rates of IBD in the world. Diagnosis is challenging due to the similarity of symptoms to functional gastrointestinal disorders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-027043DOI Listing

Predictors of Obstetric Fistula Repair Outcomes in Lubango, Angola.

J Obstet Gynaecol Can 2019 Apr 12. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

Program in Global Surgery and Social Change, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Center for Surgery and Public Health,(,) Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

Objective: Obstetric fistulas have a significant physical and social impact on many women in Angola. The majority of the population of this sub-Saharan African nation does not have access to high-quality obstetric care, and this is associated with a risk of prolonged labour and formation of obstetric fistulas. Fistulas are challenging to correct surgically and may require repeated operations. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S17012163193008
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jogc.2019.01.025DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Improved oil spill dispersant monitoring in seawater using dual tracers: Dioctyl and monoctyl sulfosuccinates sourced from corexit EC9500A.

J Chromatogr A 2019 Apr 7. Epub 2019 Apr 7.

Pacific and Yukon Laboratory for Environmental Testing, Science and Technology Branch, Pacific Environmental Science Centre, Environment & Climate Change Canada, North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Electronic address:

A high resolution mass spectrometry method was developed for the environmental impact monitoring of oil spill dispersants. Previously reported instability of dioctyl sulfosuccinate (DOSS) dispersant tracer was addressed by the new procedure. The method monitors both DOSS and its degradation product, monooctyl sulfosuccinate (MOSS), by liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00219673193031
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chroma.2019.03.049DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read