16 results match your criteria Canadian Journal Of Sociology-cahiers Canadiens De Sociologie[Journal]

  • Page 1 of 1

Disability studies: the old and the new.

Authors:
T Titchkosky

Can J Sociol 2000 ;25(2):197-224

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 2007

Canadian immigration policy: a reply to Foot and Simmons.

Can J Sociol 1994 ;19(4):535-40

This article is a response to comments on a recent article on the links between immigration and unemployment in Canada. "In their commentaries, Foot (1994) and Simmons (1994) focus on our interpretations, and advance alternative or supplementary interpretations. In this response, we critically examine the role of demographic objectives; the economic demand theory; globalization; and the state-centered immigration model. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

Canada's unemployment-immigration linkage: demographic, economic, and political influences.

Authors:
D K Foot

Can J Sociol 1994 ;19(4):513-23

"This paper rejects Veugelers and Klassen's initial suggestion that greater concern with demographic considerations might provide a useful explanation for their empirical finding of a post-1989 change in the unemployment-immigration linkage [in Canada] and offers alternative explanations consistent with economic and, especially, sociological-political theories. It shows how elements of Hawkins's (1988) ┬┐bureaucratic control' and Simmons and Keohane's (1991) ┬┐political legitimacy' theories can be combined to explain both continuity and change in Canada's postwar immigration policy." Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

Continuity and change in Canada's unemployment-immigration linkage (1946-1993).

Can J Sociol 1994 ;19(3):351-77

"Between 1946 and 1976, variation in unemployment rates strongly affected the number of immigrants allowed into Canada. Implementation of the Immigration Act of 1976 should have weakened the effect of unemployment on immigration, for the Act requires that immigration levels be set after consideration of demographic as well as labour market conditions. Our analysis shows the unemployment-immigration linkage actually strengthened after 1978, and only weakened significantly after 1989. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

[Geo-linguistic mobility of the Francophone population of Quebec and Ontario].

Can J Sociol 1993 ;18(4):383-404

"The relation between geographic and linguistic mobility among the population of French mother tongue in Ontario and Quebec [Canada] is explored. The results show that language behaviour, in particular the use of English as home language, is fairly regularly and coherently related to spatial behaviour. A distinct positive correlation between geographic and linguistic mobility is observed. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

The Quebec question: a matter of population.

Can J Sociol 1987 ;12(1-2):16-41

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 1988
3 Reads

Childlessness in Canada 1971: a further analysis.

Authors:
N Tomes

Can J Sociol 1985 ;10(1):37-57

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

Family background and perceived marital happiness: a comparison of voluntary childless couples and parents.

Authors:
G N Ramu

Can J Sociol 1984 ;9(1):47-67

The purpose of theis paper is to examine the previously reported relationships between family background, marital happiness, and voluntary childlessness in light of data collected from samples of intentionally childless couples and parents in Winnipeg. The findings show that, contrary to earlier assertions, family background factors such as birth order, size of family of orientation, mother's employment, and perceived parental happiness do not predispose individuals to voluntary childlessness. Further, while the reported level of marital happiness is higher among childless couples, the sources of marital dissatisfaction among parents are not always children. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 1985

The decline of official language minorities in Quebec and English Canada.

Authors:
R P Beaujot

Can J Sociol 1982 ;7(4):367-89

"This paper considers the evolution of French outside of Quebec and the English in Quebec... Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 1983

Intermarriage and language shift in Canada, 1971 and 1976.

Authors:
C Castonguay

Can J Sociol 1982 ;7(3):263-77

"Basic observations are made on the linguistic outcome of mixed marriages between English, French, and Other language groups, using Canadian census data. Current trends among the major French language groups are highlighted. A longitudinal interpretation of cross-sectional age group data on intermarriage and language shift is presented, and leads to the inference, from 1971 data, of a steady increase in exogamy and anglicisation rates among most French language groups. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 1983

Separation in Canada: new insights concerning marital dissolution.

Can J Sociol 1981 ;6(3):353-66

"Interfaced between marriage and divorce lies an intermediate stage of separation which involves the emotional, physical, and sometimes legal termination of a marriage at some point in time. Examination of special cross-tabulations from the 1976 Census of Canada indicates that the proportion of the population separated is equal to or exceeds the proportion divorced in every five-year age category commencing at age fifteen. The difference between the levels of separation and divorce is most noticeable for the younger and older age ranges. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 1983

Socio-demographic correlates of childlessness: an analysis of the 1971 Canadian census.

Can J Sociol 1981 ;6(3):337-51

"The purpose of this paper is to examine childless women and the different socio-demographic characteristics associated with this demographic pattern. The study focuses on the proportion of ever-married and currently married women 15 years of age and over who were childless in 1971. The data source is the 1971 Canadian census 1 percent sample tape based on individual files, which yields a total sample of 46,376 women from all across Canada. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
October 1983

Components of change in the numbers of households in Canada, 1951-1971.

Authors:
R P Beaujot

Can J Sociol 1977 ;2(3):305-20

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
  • Page 1 of 1