678 results match your criteria Canadian Journal Of Infectious Diseases & Medical Microbiology[Journal]


The hemophagocytic syndrome in an immunocompromised patient: A diagnostic challenge.

Can J Infect Dis 2004 Mar;15(2):101-3

Department of Internal Medicine, Clínica Montpellier;

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094959PMC

Clinical outcome with oral linezolid and rifampin following recurrent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia despite prolonged vancomycin treatment.

Can J Infect Dis 2004 Mar;15(2):97-100

Department of Medicine; and.

Drug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria, especially Staphylococcus aureus, are emerging as the predominant organisms involved in both nosocomial and community-acquired infections. Since the 1980s, vancomycin has been the first-line antibiotic used to treat methicillin- resistant S aureus. However, allergy and intolerance to vancomycin, the increasing number of vancomycin clinical failures and the existence of vancomycin intermediate-susceptible isolates of S aureus suggest that new antibiotics are needed. Read More

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http://downloads.hindawi.com/journals/cjidmm/2004/768765.pdf
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094963PMC

Risk and prevention of meningococcal disease among education workers: A review.

Can J Infect Dis 2004 Mar;15(2):89-93

Institut national de Santé publique du Québec, Quebec City, Quebec;

The aims of the present study were to review the risk of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) among education workers, particularly pregnant women, and to evaluate preventive measures, in a context of endemicity, outbreak or epidemic as observed in the province of Quebec. The literature was reviewed and persons in charge of IMD surveillance in France, Quebec, the United Kingdom and the United States were interviewed. Surveys of asymptomatic carriage of Neisseria meningitidis show that transmission among students is higher than transmission between students and teachers. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094960PMC
March 2004
2 Reads

Translocation of Clostridium difficile toxin B across polarized Caco-2 cell monolayers is enhanced by toxin A.

Can J Infect Dis 2004 Mar;15(2):83-8

Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba;

Clostridium difficile is the etiological agent of antibiotic-associated diarrhea; the most common form of nosocomial infectious diarrhea. The basis for the shock-like systemic symptoms observed in severe cases of this infection are not known. It is hypothesized that the invasion of C difficile toxins A and/or B from the gut mucosa may contribute to these symptoms. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094961PMC
March 2004
2 Reads

Patient safety: What does it all mean?

Can J Infect Dis 2004 Mar;15(2):75-7

Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre and Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094965PMC
March 2004
4 Reads

Immunization and autism links: Ethics in research.

Authors:
Joanne Embree

Can J Infect Dis 2004 Mar;15(2):73-4

University of Manitoba,Winnipeg, Manitoba.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094964PMC

Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae infection causing hemolytic uremic syndrome in children: Two recent cases.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Nov;14(6):339-43

Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Alberta.

Introduction: Streptococcus pneumoniae is an uncommon cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) with a unique pathophysiology that differs from Shiga toxin-related HUS.

Methods: Case descriptions for each patient are provided. Each strain of S pneumoniae was subjected to a pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis, Shiga toxin assay and polymerase chain reaction to detect Shiga toxin genes. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094953PMC
November 2003
13 Reads

Three generations of experience and thought in microbiology and infection.

Authors:
Morris Goldner

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Nov;14(6):329-35

Faculté de Médecine, Université Laval, Cité Universitaire, Quebec, Quebec, and Academic Visitor, Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine at Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Views and comments were sought from Brian Lacey, who was professionally active from the 1930s to the 1970s, Alain Dublanchet, active from the 1960s to the 2000s, and Mark Pallen, active from the 1990s to 2000 and beyond. Professor Lacey was professor of microbiology at the Westminster Medical School, University of London, United Kingdom, for many years and is now retired. Docteur Dublanchet is the long time head of the laboratory of microbiology and virology at the Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal de Villeneuve-Saint-Georges in the greater Paris area. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094954PMC
November 2003

Assessment of two alternative sample transport and fixation methods in the microbiological diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Nov;14(6):322-6

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario.

Background: The standard method for specimen collection and transport for microbiological diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis is an air-dried smear of vaginal secretions, promptly heat- or alcohol-fixed, Gram-stained and scored by Nugent's criteria.

Objective: TWO ALTERNATIVE METHODS ARE EVALUATED: sending a swab in transport medium to be smeared and Gram-stained in the laboratory two days later; and sending a smear of vaginal secretions sprayed with cytological fixative to the laboratory for Gram staining seven days later.

Methods: One hundred fifty-two women aged 18 years and older who attended a hospital colposcopy clinic or a community healthy sexuality clinic were studied. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094956PMC
November 2003
2 Reads

A retrospective analysis of practice patterns in the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infections at three Canadian tertiary care centres.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Nov;14(6):315-21

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario.

Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are increasingly being encountered and pose an increasing burden to the health care system in Canada.

Objective: To elucidate and characterize the factors influencing the current MRSA treatment patterns in patients with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) before linezolid became available on the Canadian market.

Methods: A retrospective study collected demographic, treatment and resource use data on patients hospitalized at one of three geographically distinct tertiary care facilities, where MRSA SSTI treatment was initiated with intravenous (IV) vancomycin. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094957PMC
November 2003
5 Reads

Staphylococcus aureus: The persistent pathogen.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Nov;14(6):311-4

Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre and Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094958PMC
November 2003
2 Reads

Witnesses.

Authors:
Lindsay Nicolle

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Nov;14(6):310

Health Sciences Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094955PMC
November 2003
3 Reads

The changing pattern of nontuberculous mycobacterial disease.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Sep;14(5):281-6

Nontuberculous mycobacteria are human opportunistic pathogens whose source of infection is the environment. These include both slow-growing (eg, Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium avium) and rapid-growing (eg, Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium fortuitum) species. Transmission is through ingestion or inhalation of water, particulate matter or aerosols, or through trauma. Read More

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http://www.faculty.biol.vt.edu/falkinham/Articles/CJID281.pd
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094944PMC
September 2003
2 Reads

Food safety and foodborne disease in 21st century homes.

Authors:
Elizabeth Scott

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Sep;14(5):277-80

Over the past decade there has been a growing recognition of the involvement of the home in several public health and hygiene issues. Perhaps the best understood of these issues is the role of the home in the transmission and acquisition of foodborne disease. The incidence of foodborne disease is increasing globally. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094945PMC
September 2003

A descriptive study of human Salmonella serotype typhimurium infections reported in Ontario from 1990 to 1998.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Sep;14(5):267-73

Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario.

Background: Salmonella infections cause gastrointestinal and systemic diseases worldwide and are the leading causes of food-borne illnesses in North America (1-4). Salmonella serotype typhimurium (ST), in particular, is increasingly becoming a major public health concern because of its ability to acquire multiple resistant genes (5,6).

Objective: To describe demographic, temporal and geographical distributions, and reported risk factors of nonoutbreak cases of ST reported to a surveillance system in Ontario. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094948PMC
September 2003
8 Reads

Epidemiology, antibiotic susceptibility, and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae associated with invasive pneumococcal disease in British Columbia - A call to strengthen public health pneumococcal immunization programs.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Sep;14(5):261-6

Canadian Blood Services, British Columbia/Yukon Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia.

Background: This study examined the epidemiology, antibiotic susceptibility and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae associated with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in British Columbia.

Methods: Six hospitals and one private laboratory network participated in a prospective, sentinel laboratory based surveillance study of IPD, between October 1999 and October 2000. At each site, S pneumoniae isolates were collected and epidemiological data were gathered using a structured questionnaire, for all cases of IPD meeting the study case definition. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094947PMC
September 2003
2 Reads

Antimicrobials in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - An analysis of the time to next exacerbation before and after the implementation of standing orders.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Sep;14(5):254-9

Department of Pharmacy, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Objective: To compare the mean time to next exacerbation in patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) before and after the implementation of standing orders.

Setting: Tertiary care hospital, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Population Studied: The records of 150 patients were analyzed, 76 were in the preimplementation group, 74 in the postimplementation group. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094950PMC
September 2003
5 Reads

The Red Book is coming to town.

Authors:

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Sep;14(5):252-3

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094951PMC
September 2003

The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as a community-acquired pathogen in Canada.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Sep;14(5):249-51

Departments of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medicine, and Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094949PMC
September 2003
4 Reads

Smallpox 2003.

Authors:
Lindsay Nicolle

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Sep;14(5):247-8

Joseph's Health Care London, Department of Paediatrics, Child Health Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094952PMC
September 2003
6 Reads

Case report: Acute hepatitis E infection with coexistent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Jul;14(4):230-1

Hepatitis E virus is one of the leading causes of acute viral hepatitis in India but usually manifests as a mild self-limiting illness. Viral hepatitis in the presence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency may be associated with complications such as severe anemia, hemolysis, renal failure, hepatic encephalopathy and even death. The incidence of G6PD deficiency in the general population of northern India is reported to be between 2. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094938PMC

T cell costimulatory molecules in anti-viral immunity: Potential role in immunotherapeutic vaccines.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Jul;14(4):221-9

T lymphocyte activation is required to eliminate or control intracellular viruses. The activation of T cells requires both an antigen specific signal, involving the recognition of a peptide/major histocompatibility protein complex by the T cell receptor, as well as additional costimulatory signals. In chronic viral diseases, T cell responses, although present, are unable to eliminate the infection. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094939PMC
July 2003
1 Read

Epidemiological and economic burden of pneumococcal diseases in Canadian children.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Jul;14(4):215-20

Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec.

Background: With the arrival of a new conjugate pneumococcal vaccine, it is important to estimate the burden of pneumococcal diseases in Canadian children. The epidemiological data and the economic cost of these diseases are crucial elements in evaluating the relevance of a vaccination program.

Methods: Using provincial databases, ad hoc surveys and published data, age-specific incidence rates of pneumococcal infections were estimated in a cohort of 340,000 children between six months and nine years of age. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094937PMC

Predictors of a positive duplex scan in patients with a clinical presentation compatible with deep vein thrombosis or cellulitis.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Jul;14(4):210-4

Emergency Medicine Department, Sir Mortimer B Davis Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec.

Background: Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and cellulitis are common conditions whose symptoms lead patients to seek medical attention in the emergency department (ED). Distinguishing between these two conditions quickly and accurately is important.

Objectives: To determine the yield of duplex scanning among ED patients whose clinical presentation is compatible with DVT or cellulitis. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094940PMC

An outbreak of foodborne botulism in Ontario.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Jul;14(4):206-9

Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario.

Botulism is a rare paralytic illness resulting from a potent neurotoxin produced by Clostridium botulinum. Botulism in Canada is predominately due to C botulinum type E and affects mainly the First Nations and Inuit populations. The most recent outbreak of botulism in Ontario was in Ottawa in 1991 and was caused by C botulinum type A. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094941PMC
July 2003
5 Reads

Nelfinavir and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based salvage regimens in heavily HIV pretreated patients.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Jul;14(4):201-5

Clinique Médicale du Quartier Latin, Montreal, Quebec.

Objective: To assess the efficacy of nelfinavir mesylate (NFV) in combination with delavirdine mesylate (DLV) or efavirenz (EFV) and other antiretroviral agents following virological failure on other protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimens.

Design: Multicentre, retrospective chart review.

Methods: One hundred-one patients who were naive to both NFV and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) and who initiated NFV plus DLV or EFV-based salvage regimens were reviewed. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094943PMC
July 2003
10 Reads

Nosocomial transmission of bloodborne viruses from infected health care workers to patients.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Jul;14(4):192-6

Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre and Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094936PMC
July 2003
2 Reads

An opinion paper: Strengthening the weakest link in food safety.

Authors:
Shawna Bourne

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Jul;14(4):190-1

Canadian Institute of Public Health Inspectors, White Rock, British Columbia.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094942PMC

Pyo-mediastinitis: A complication of pulmonary coccidioidomycosis.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 May;14(3):170-2

Department of Critical Care Medicine, Mayo Clinic Hospital, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Phoenix, Arizona, USA.

A rare fatal case of pulmonary coccidioidomycosis complicated by mediastinal and visceral abscesses treated with antifungal medications is described. The case report discusses the potential need for early surgical intervention to drain mediastinal and visceral abscesses as a primary mode of therapy in disseminated coccidioidomycosis for a successful control of infection and clinical outcome. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094931PMC
May 2003
4 Reads

Chest wall hydatidosis as the unique location of the disease: Case report and review of the literature.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 May;14(3):167-9

Athens Chest Diseases Hospital "Sotiria", 2nd Department of General Thoracic Surgery, Athens, Greece.

The chest wall is a rare location of secondary hydatidosis, but secondary hydatidosis may occur from the rupture of a lung cyst, from a liver cyst invading the diaphragm into the pleural cavity, following previous thoracic surgery for hydatidosis, or by hematogenous spread. This report describes a case of chest wall hydatidosis, which was the primary disease site in the patient, who had no previous history or current disease (hydatidosis) at other sites. The cyst invaded and partially destroyed the 9th and 10th ribs and the 10th thoracic vertebra, and protruded outside the pleural cavity through the 9th intercostal space. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094934PMC
May 2003
2 Reads

Necrotizing lung infection caused by the protozoan Balantidium coli.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 May;14(3):163-6

Respirology Department of Medicine and Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Balantidium coli, a ciliated protozoan, is well known to cause intestinal infection in humans. Extraintestinal spread to the peritoneal cavity and genitourinary tract has rarely been reported. There have also been a few cases of lung involvement from this parasite. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094932PMC
May 2003
3 Reads

A cross-sectional study of intestinal parasitic infections in a rural district of west China.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 May;14(3):159-62

Health and Anti-epidemic station (Centre for Disease Control and Prevention), Beibei, Chongqing, China.

Background: Parasitic infections are widespread in rural areas of West China. The remote and humid environment, traditional ways of life, contaminated potable water and limited health services all contribute to the transmission and persistence of fecal parasites.

Objective: To describe the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in an area of West China, including its associations with demographic variables. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094929PMC

Legionnaires' disease - Results of a multicentre Canadian study.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 May;14(3):154-8

Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta.

Background: There has never been a cross-Canada surveillance project to determine the rate of Legionella species as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization and to determine whether there are any regional differences in the rates of Legionnaires' disease in Canada. Anecdotally, Legionnaires' disease is thought to be uncommon in Western Canada.

Methods: From January, 1996 through to October 31, 1997, a prospective study of the etiology of community acquired pneumonia requiring admission to 15 tertiary care hospitals in eight Canadian provinces was conducted. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094927PMC
May 2003
9 Reads

SARS : A Tale of Two Epidemics.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 May;14(3):147-9

Departments of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medicine, and Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094926PMC
May 2003
4 Reads

A SARS commentary.

Authors:
Lindsay Nicolle

Can J Infect Dis 2003 May;14(3):145-6

Health Sciences Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094928PMC
May 2003
8 Reads

Tropical travel and life-threatening disease: preventing malaria misadventures.

Authors:
Anne E McCarthy

Can J Infect Dis 2003 May;14(3):143-4

Tropical Medicine and International Health Clinic, Division of Infectious Disease, Ottawa Hospital General Campus.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094933PMC

Headache, fever and back pain in a 16-year-old boy.

Can J Infect Dis 2004 Jan;15(1):53-4

Department of Pediatrics and Stollery Children's Hospital, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094917PMC
January 2004
3 Reads

Myiasis in an urban setting: A case report.

Can J Infect Dis 2004 Jan;15(1):51-2

Public Health Division, Capital Health, Edmonton, Alberta.

Myiasis is considered to be a condition only found in tropical, developing countries. However, this paper reports a case identified in an urban, North American setting. The clinical presentation is discussed along with the underlying comorbidities and social determinants. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094924PMC
January 2004
2 Reads

The management of infection and colonization due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A CIDS/CAMM position paper.

Can J Infect Dis 2004 Jan;15(1):39-48

Departments of Medicine and Microbiology, Sunnybrook and Womens College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is being seen with greater frequency in most hospitals and other health care facilities across Canada. The organism may cause life-threatening infections and has been associated with institutional outbreaks. Several studies have confirmed that MRSA infection is associated with increased morbidity and mortality compared with infections caused by susceptible strains, even when the presence of comorbidities is accounted for. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094920PMC
January 2004
1 Read

Measurement of antibiotic consumption: A practical guide to the use of the Anatomical Thgerapeutic Chemical classification and Definied Daily Dose system methodology in Canada.

Can J Infect Dis 2004 Jan;15(1):29-35

Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's, Newfoundland.

Despite the global public health importance of resistance of microorganisms to the effects of antibiotics, and the direct relationship of consumption to resistance, little information is available concerning levels of consumption in Canadian hospitals and out-patient settings. The present paper provides practical advice on the use of administrative pharmacy data to address this need. Focus is made on the use of the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification and Defined Daily Dose system. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094921PMC
January 2004
3 Reads

Should university students be vaccinated against meningococcal disease in Canada?

Authors:
Philippe De Wals

Can J Infect Dis 2004 Jan;15(1):25-8

Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University and National Institute of Public Health, Quebec City, Quebec.

Objective: To evaluate the benefit and costs of vaccination of university students against invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in Canada.

Methods: Published studies were reviewed and a simulation model was used.

Results: IMD risk seems to be of low magnitude, but consequences can be dramatic. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094918PMC
January 2004

Blood cultures in ambulatory patients who are discharged from emergency with community-acquired pneumonia.

Authors:
Thomas J Marrie

Can J Infect Dis 2004 Jan;15(1):21-4

Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta.

Objectives: To determine the factors that predict whether or not ambulatory patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) treated in an emergency room (ER) setting will have blood cultures drawn and the factors that predict a positive blood culture.

Methods: Prospective observational study of all patients with a diagnosis of CAP, as made by an ER physician, who presented to any of seven Edmonton-area ERs over a two-year period.

Results: Seven hundred ninety-three (19. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094922PMC
January 2004
5 Reads

Routine immunization schedule: Update 2004.

Authors:

Can J Infect Dis 2004 Jan;15(1):17-20

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094923PMC
January 2004

Influenza - Expect the unexpected.

Can J Infect Dis 2004 Jan;15(1):13-6

Departments of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medicine, and Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta;

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094919PMC
January 2004
3 Reads

Residential water heater temperature: 49 or 60 degrees Celsius?

Can J Infect Dis 2004 Jan;15(1):11-2

Institut National de Publique du Québec, Direction des risques biologiques, environnementaux et occupationnels;

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094925PMC
January 2004

Cepacia-like syndrome caused by Burkholderia multivorans.

Can J Infect Dis 2003 Mar;14(2):123-5

Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Washington and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle.

The variable severity of Burkholderia cepacia complex infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) has recently been ascribed to differences in the virulence between genomovars. Specifically, genomovar III isolates have been associated with higher transmission rates and adverse outcomes compared to other B cepacia genomovars, and consequently further segregation between genomovar III and non-genomovar III B cepacia infected patients is advocated in some centres. The important role of non-genomovar III isolates is presented in the context of a clinical case whereby a patient with long-standing pulmonary infection with B multiovorans developed bacteremic infection reminiscent of the fatal 'cepacia syndrome'. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2094916PMC
March 2003
1 Read