9 results match your criteria Cambridge Journal Of Economics[Journal]

  • Page 1 of 1

A trivariate model of participation, fertility and wages: the Italian case.

Authors:
M L Di Tommaso

Cambridge J Econ 1999 Sep;23(5):623-40

Italy has unusually low fertility by Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development standards, accompanied by unusually low female participation in paid work. This paper addresses the issue of the empirical relationship between fertility, female participation in the labor market and wages with these Italian "peculiarities" as a backcloth. A trivariate model of participation, fertility and wages has been constructed and estimated using three pooled cross-sections of Italian micro data, allowing for the identification of cohort effects. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 1999

Keynes on population and economic growth.

Authors:
J Toye

Cambridge J Econ 1997 Jan;21(1):1-26

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 1997

The increase in death and disease under "katstroika".

Authors:
M Ellman

Cambridge J Econ 1994 Aug;18(4):329-55

The author describes recent trends in mortality and morbidity in the successor states to the former Soviet Union. Separate consideration is given to mortality under late perestroika (1987-1991) and subsequent mortality trends. The author concludes that "the collapse of the USSR and the problems of the successor states have had severe adverse affects not only on macroeconomic indices but also on the mortality and morbidity of the population. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

Aid and the growth of income in aid-favoured developing countries: policy issues.

Authors:
H Brewster D Yeboah

Cambridge J Econ 1994 Apr;18(2):145-62

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

"Bread and a pennyworth of treacle": excess female mortality in England in the 1840s.

Authors:
J Humphries

Cambridge J Econ 1991 Dec;15(4):451-73

The author analyzes excess female mortality in nineteenth-century England. She concludes that such mortality was affected by the economic environment and that "much literary evidence points to unequal access to food and a resulting susceptibility to epidemic and respiratory diseases as the transmission mechanism converting dependence and discrimination into relatively high death rates." Women were also adversely affected by harsh labor conditions, in addition to the heavy duties involved in motherhood and housework. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 1991

Gender, differential mortality and development: the experience of Kerala.

Authors:
G Kumar

Cambridge J Econ 1989 Dec;13(4):517-39

This study examines aspects of sex differentials in mortality in India. "The general question of sex bias and excess female mortality is first discussed.. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
December 1989

Indian women: well-being and survival.

Authors:
J Kynch A Sen

Cambridge J Econ 1983 Sep-Dec;7(3-4):363-80

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source

Reproduction, production and the sexual division of labour.

Authors:
L Beneria

Cambridge J Econ 1979 Sep;3(3):203-25

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
September 1979
  • Page 1 of 1