5 results match your criteria California Management Review[Journal]

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Health care costs: saving in the private sector.

Authors:
F E Robeson

Calif Manage Rev 1979 ;21(4):49-56

Robeson offers a number of options to employers to help reduce the impact of increasing health care costs. He points out that large organizations which employ hundreds of people have considerable market power which can be exerted to contain costs. It is suggested that the risk management departments assume the responsibility for managing the effort to reduce the costs of medical care and of the health insurance programs of these organizations since that staff is experienced at evaluating premiums and negotiating with third-party payors. Read More

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October 1980
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Problem defining and the consulting/intervention process.

Authors:
R Kilmann I Mitroff

Calif Manage Rev 1979 ;21(3):26-33

Although many different approaches are currently being used to create planned change in organizations, Kilmann and Mitroff feel that too little attention has been paid to determining the effectiveness of these different methods in solving the organizations' problems. Based on intervention theory and the consulting process, the authors offer a method of evaluating an organization's approach to change to determine if it is well-suited to the types of problems being experienced. The process of change is diagrammed as a five-step cycle: 1) sensing problems; 2) defining problems; 3) deriving solutions; 4) implementing solutions; and 5) evaluating outcomes. Read More

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December 1979

A new approach to design and use of management information.

Calif Manage Rev 1978 ;21(1):82-92

Information, that is both accurate and timely, is probably the most important resource needed by managers to make sound decisions regarding the problems and issues facing their organizations. Unfortunately, sophisticated information systems often fail to meet this need. Managers complain that the data produced by information systems arrive too late, are too general and lack accuracy. Read More

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December 1979

"Conflict management" and "conflict resolution" are not synonymous terms.

Authors:
S P Robbins

Calif Manage Rev 1978 ;21(2):67-75

Robbins sees functional conflict as an absolute necessity within organizations and explicitly encourages it. He explains: "Survival can result only when an organization is able to adapt to constant changes in the environment. Adaption is possible only through change, and change is stimulated by conflict. Read More

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December 1979

Managing organizational conflict.

Authors:
C B Derr

Calif Manage Rev 1978 ;21(2):76-83

This article suggests three ways to manage organizational conflicts. The first is the collaboration theory which maintains that people should air their differences and work for mutually satisfactory solutions. Collaboration requires that members of the organization be interdependent, capable of interacting candidly, and sufficiently committed to the organization to justify the time and energy required to develop and preserve mutually beneficial relationships. Read More

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December 1979
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