2,241 results match your criteria Ca-a Cancer Journal For Clinicians[Journal]


Cancer screening in the United States, 2019: A review of current American Cancer Society guidelines and current issues in cancer screening.

CA Cancer J Clin 2019 Mar 15. Epub 2019 Mar 15.

Chief Cancer Control Officer, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.

Each year, the American Cancer Society publishes a summary of its guidelines for early cancer detection, data and trends in cancer screening rates, and select issues related to cancer screening. In this issue of the journal, the current American Cancer Society cancer screening guidelines are summarized, and the most current data from the National Health Interview Survey are provided on the utilization of cancer screening for men and women and on the adherence of men and women to multiple recommended screening tests. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21557DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Study aims to improve colorectal cancer screening rates.

Authors:
Mike Fillon

CA Cancer J Clin 2019 Mar 12. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.3322/caac.21472
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21472DOI Listing
March 2019
7 Reads

Implementing personalized pathways for cancer follow-up care in the United States: Proceedings from an American Cancer Society-American Society of Clinical Oncology summit.

CA Cancer J Clin 2019 Mar 8. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, and Medical Director, Childhood Cancer Survivor Center, The University of Chicago Comer Children's Hospital, Chicago, IL.

A new approach to cancer follow-up care is necessary to meet the needs of cancer survivors while dealing with increasing volume and provider shortages, knowledge gaps, and costs to both health care systems and patients. An approach that triages patients to personalized follow-up care pathways, depending on the type(s) and level(s) of resources needed for patients' long-term care, is in use in the United Kingdom and other countries and has been shown to meet patients' needs, more efficiently use the health care system, and reduce costs. Recognizing that testing and implementing a similar personalized approach to cancer follow-up care in the United States will require a multipronged strategy, the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology convened a summit in January 2018 to identify the needed steps to move this work from concept to implementation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21558DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Erratum: A blueprint for the primary prevention of cancer: Targeting established, modifiable risk factors.

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CA Cancer J Clin 2019 Mar 7;69(2):158. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21553DOI Listing

Minimizing the burden of cancer in the United States: Goals for a high-performing health care system.

CA Cancer J Clin 2019 Feb 20. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Chief Medical and Scientific Officer and Executive Vice President-Research, American Cancer Society Inc, Atlanta, GA.

Between 1991 and 2015, the cancer mortality rate declined dramatically in the United States, reflecting improvements in cancer prevention, screening, treatment, and survivorship care. However, cancer outcomes in the United States vary substantially between populations defined by race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, health insurance coverage, and geographic area of residence. Many potentially preventable cancer deaths occur in individuals who did not receive effective cancer prevention, screening, treatment, or survivorship care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21556DOI Listing
February 2019

Cancer statistics for African Americans, 2019.

CA Cancer J Clin 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Scientific Director, Surveillance Research, Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.

In the United States, African American/black individuals bear a disproportionate share of the cancer burden, having the highest death rate and the lowest survival rate of any racial or ethnic group for most cancers. To monitor progress in reducing these inequalities, every 3 years the American Cancer Society provides the estimated number of new cancer cases and deaths for blacks in the United States and the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, survival, screening, and risk factors using data from the National Cancer Institute, the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, and the National Center for Health Statistics. In 2019, approximately 202,260 new cases of cancer and 73,030 cancer deaths are expected to occur among blacks in the United States. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21555DOI Listing
February 2019
5 Reads

Artificial intelligence in cancer imaging: Clinical challenges and applications.

CA Cancer J Clin 2019 Mar 5;69(2):127-157. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Associate Professor, Departments of Radiation Oncology and Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

Judgement, as one of the core tenets of medicine, relies upon the integration of multilayered data with nuanced decision making. Cancer offers a unique context for medical decisions given not only its variegated forms with evolution of disease but also the need to take into account the individual condition of patients, their ability to receive treatment, and their responses to treatment. Challenges remain in the accurate detection, characterization, and monitoring of cancers despite improved technologies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21552DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6403009PMC
March 2019
3 Reads
99.999 Impact Factor

Low-cost online cascade test may persuade relatives to investigate their own cancer risk.

Authors:
Mike Fillon

CA Cancer J Clin 2019 Mar 15;69(2):86-87. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21469DOI Listing

Tobacco control initiatives cut the number of lung cancer deaths in California by 28.

Authors:
Mike Fillon

CA Cancer J Clin 2019 Mar 15;69(2):83-85. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21468DOI Listing

Cancer statistics, 2019.

CA Cancer J Clin 2019 Jan 8;69(1):7-34. Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Scientific Vice President, Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.

Each year, the American Cancer Society estimates the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths that will occur in the United States and compiles the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, and survival. Incidence data, available through 2015, were collected by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program; the National Program of Cancer Registries; and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. Mortality data, available through 2016, were collected by the National Center for Health Statistics. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.3322/caac.21551
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21551DOI Listing
January 2019
49 Reads

Global patterns in excess body weight and the associated cancer burden.

CA Cancer J Clin 2019 Mar 12;69(2):88-112. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Scientific Vice President, Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.

The prevalence of excess body weight and the associated cancer burden have been rising over the past several decades globally. Between 1975 and 2016, the prevalence of excess body weight in adults-defined as a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m -increased from nearly 21% in men and 24% in women to approximately 40% in both sexes. Notably, the prevalence of obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m ) quadrupled in men, from 3% to 12%, and more than doubled in women, from 7% to 16%. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.3322/caac.21499
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21499DOI Listing
March 2019
20 Reads

Perioperative management may lead to less pain after breast cancer surgery.

Authors:
Mike Fillon

CA Cancer J Clin 2019 Jan 26;69(1):5-6. Epub 2018 Nov 26.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21465DOI Listing
January 2019

Surgery remains the best solution for patients with soft-tissue sarcomas.

Authors:
Mike Fillon

CA Cancer J Clin 2019 Jan 26;69(1):3-4. Epub 2018 Nov 26.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21464DOI Listing
January 2019

Follow the trail: Using insights from the growth of palliative care to propose a roadmap for cancer rehabilitation.

CA Cancer J Clin 2019 Mar 20;69(2):113-126. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

Vice President, Survivorship, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.

Despite research explicating the benefits of cancer rehabilitation interventions to optimize physical, social, emotional, and vocational functioning, many reports document low rates of referral to and uptake of rehabilitation in oncology. Cancer rehabilitation clinicians, researchers, and policy makers could learn from the multidisciplinary specialty of palliative care, which has benefited from a growth strategy and has garnered national recognition as an important and necessary aspect of oncology care. The purpose of this article is to explore the actions that have increased the uptake and integration of palliative care to yield insights and multimodal strategies for the development and growth of cancer rehabilitation. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.3322/caac.21549
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21549DOI Listing
March 2019
12 Reads

A blueprint for cancer screening and early detection: Advancing screening's contribution to cancer control.

CA Cancer J Clin 2019 Jan 19;69(1):50-79. Epub 2018 Nov 19.

Vice-President, Cancer Screening, Cancer Control Department, and Director, Center for Quality Cancer Screening and Research, American Cancer Society Atlanta, GA.

From the mid-20th century, accumulating evidence has supported the introduction of screening for cancers of the cervix, breast, colon and rectum, prostate (via shared decisions), and lung. The opportunity to detect and treat precursor lesions and invasive disease at a more favorable stage has contributed substantially to reduced incidence, morbidity, and mortality. However, as new discoveries portend advancements in technology and risk-based screening, we fail to fulfill the greatest potential of the existing technology, in terms of both full access among the target population and the delivery of state-of-the art care at each crucial step in the cascade of events that characterize successful cancer screening. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21550DOI Listing
January 2019
8 Reads

Equitably improving outcomes for cancer survivors and supporting caregivers: A blueprint for care delivery, research, education, and policy.

CA Cancer J Clin 2019 Jan 30;69(1):35-49. Epub 2018 Oct 30.

Chief Medical Officer, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.

Cancer care delivery is being shaped by growing numbers of cancer survivors coupled with provider shortages, rising costs of primary treatment and follow-up care, significant survivorship health disparities, increased reliance on informal caregivers, and the transition to value-based care. These factors create a compelling need to provide coordinated, comprehensive, personalized care for cancer survivors in ways that meet survivors' and caregivers' unique needs while minimizing the impact of provider shortages and controlling costs for health care systems, survivors, and families. The authors reviewed research identifying and addressing the needs of cancer survivors and caregivers and used this synthesis to create a set of critical priorities for care delivery, research, education, and policy to equitably improve survivor outcomes and support caregivers. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.3322/caac.21548
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21548DOI Listing
January 2019
17 Reads

Local Cancer Recurrence: The Realities, Challenges, and Opportunities for New Therapies.

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 11 17;68(6):488-505. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

Associate Professor of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

Locoregional recurrence negatively impacts both long-term survival and quality of life for several malignancies. For appropriate-risk patients with an isolated, resectable, local recurrence, surgery represents the only potentially curative therapy. However, oncologic outcomes remain inferior for patients with locally recurrent disease even after macroscopically complete resection. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.3322/caac.21498
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21498DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6239861PMC
November 2018
11 Reads

Toward the control of cancer.

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 09 10;68(5):327-328. Epub 2018 Jul 10.

Chief Cancer Control Officer, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21461DOI Listing
September 2018

A blueprint for the primary prevention of cancer: Targeting established, modifiable risk factors.

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 11 10;68(6):446-470. Epub 2018 Oct 10.

Chief Medical and Scientific Officer and Executive Vice President of Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.

In the United States, it is estimated that more than 1.7 million people will be diagnosed with cancer, and more than 600,000 will die of the disease in 2018. The financial costs associated with cancer risk factors and cancer care are enormous. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.3322/caac.21496
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https://www.researchgate.net/publication/328206459_A_bluepri
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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.3322/caac.21496
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http://doi.wiley.com/10.3322/caac.21496
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21496DOI Listing
November 2018
15 Reads

Better Guidelines Needed for Cancer Survivorship Management.

Authors:
Mike Fillon

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 11 9;68(6):392-393. Epub 2018 Oct 9.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21435DOI Listing
November 2018

Smoking Cessation Aids Alone Do Not Help Smokers Quit.

Authors:
Mike Fillon

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 11 9;68(6):389-391. Epub 2018 Oct 9.

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.3322/caac.21434
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21434DOI Listing
November 2018
2 Reads

Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 11 8;68(6):471-487. Epub 2018 Oct 8.

Associate Professor, Department of Gastrointestinal Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida.

Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are heterogeneous malignancies arising from the diffuse neuroendocrine system. They frequently originate in the gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) tract and the bronchopulmonary tree, and their incidence has steadily increased in the last 3 decades. Fundamental biologic and genomic differences underlie the clinical heterogeneity of NETs, and distinct molecular features characterize NETs of different grades and different primary sites. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.3322/caac.21493
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21493DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Cancer Statistics for Hispanics/Latinos, 2018.

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 11 4;68(6):425-445. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

Scientific Director, Surveillance Research, Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.

Cancer is the leading cause of death among Hispanics/Latinos, who represent the largest racial/ethnic minority group in the United States, accounting for 17.8% (57.5 million) of the total population in the continental United States and Hawaii in 2016. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.3322/caac.21494
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21494DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Improving patient and caregiver outcomes in oncology: Team-based, timely, and targeted palliative care.

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 09 13;68(5):356-376. Epub 2018 Sep 13.

Department of Palliative Care, Rehabilitation, and Integrative Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX.

Over the past decade, a large body of evidence has accumulated supporting the integration of palliative care into oncology practice for patients with advanced cancer. The question is no longer whether palliative care should be offered, but what is the optimal model of delivery, when is the ideal time to refer, who is in greatest need of a referral, and how much palliative care should oncologists themselves be providing. These questions are particularly relevant given the scarcity of palliative care resources internationally. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21490DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6179926PMC
September 2018
18 Reads

Hypercalcemia and cancer: Differential diagnosis and treatment.

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 09 21;68(5):377-386. Epub 2018 Sep 21.

Professor, Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX.

Incidentally detected hypercalcemia usually presents in an indolent manner and is most likely caused by primary hyperparathyroidism. In contrast, hypercalcemia in the patient with a history of cancer presents in a wide range of clinical settings and may be severe enough to warrant hospitalization. This form of hypercalcemia is usually secondary to hypercalcemia of malignancy and can be fatal. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21489DOI Listing
September 2018
16 Reads

Frequent use of tests to monitor metastatic prostate cancer often may be unwarranted.

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CA Cancer J Clin 2018 09 19;68(5):322-323. Epub 2018 Sep 19.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21431DOI Listing
September 2018

Exercise and nutrition may prolong the lives of patients with colon cancer.

Authors:
Mike Fillon

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 09 19;68(5):319-321. Epub 2018 Sep 19.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21430DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Global cancer statistics 2018: GLOBOCAN estimates of incidence and mortality worldwide for 36 cancers in 185 countries.

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 11 12;68(6):394-424. Epub 2018 Sep 12.

Scientific Vice President, Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.

This article provides a status report on the global burden of cancer worldwide using the GLOBOCAN 2018 estimates of cancer incidence and mortality produced by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, with a focus on geographic variability across 20 world regions. There will be an estimated 18.1 million new cancer cases (17. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.3322/caac.21492
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21492DOI Listing
November 2018
47 Reads

An assessment of progress in cancer control.

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 09 10;68(5):329-339. Epub 2018 Jul 10.

Chief Medical and Scientific Officer and Executive Vice President-Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.

This article summarizes cancer mortality trends and disparities based on data from the National Center for Health Statistics. It is the first in a series of articles that will describe the American Cancer Society's vision for how cancer prevention, early detection, and treatment can be transformed to lower the cancer burden in the United States, and sets the stage for a national cancer control plan, or blueprint, for the American Cancer Society goals for reducing cancer mortality by the year 2035. Although steady progress in reducing cancer mortality has been made over the past few decades, it is clear that much more could, and should, be done to save lives through the comprehensive application of currently available evidence-based public health and clinical interventions to all segments of the population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21460DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Update on infection control practices in cancer hospitals.

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 09 9;68(5):340-355. Epub 2018 Jul 9.

Professor, Department of Infectious Diseases, Infection Control, and Employee Health, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX.

Therapies in oncology have evolved rapidly over the last years. At the same pace, supportive care for patients receiving cancer therapy has also evolved, allowing patients to safely receive the newest advances in treatment in both an inpatient and outpatient basis. The recognition of the role of infection control and prevention (ICP) in the outcomes of patients living with cancer has been such that it is now a requirement for hospitals and involves multidisciplinary groups. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21462DOI Listing
September 2018
26 Reads

Patient selection and timing of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for relapsed follicular lymphoma.

Authors:
Mike Fillon

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 07 21;68(4):235-236. Epub 2018 Jun 21.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21426DOI Listing
July 2018
1 Read

Combined physiologic and excisional therapies improve cancer-related lymphedema outcomes.

Authors:
Mike Fillon

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 07 21;68(4):237-239. Epub 2018 Jun 21.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21427DOI Listing

The American Cancer Society public health statement on eliminating combustible tobacco use in the United States.

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 07 11;68(4):240-245. Epub 2018 Jun 11.

Chief Cancer Control Officer, American Cancer Society; Professor, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University, Atlanta, GA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21455DOI Listing

Erratum: Weight Management and Physical Activity Throughout the Cancer Care Continuum.

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CA Cancer J Clin 2018 05 22;68(3):232. Epub 2018 Feb 22.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21449DOI Listing

From guideline to practice: New shared decision-making tools for colorectal cancer screening from the American Cancer Society.

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 07 30;68(4):246-249. Epub 2018 May 30.

Vice President, Cancer Screening, Cancer Control Department, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21459DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6192545PMC

Screening for colon and rectal cancer in average-risk adults.

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CA Cancer J Clin 2018 07 30;68(4):282-283. Epub 2018 May 30.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21458DOI Listing

Colorectal cancer screening for average-risk adults: 2018 guideline update from the American Cancer Society.

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 07 30;68(4):250-281. Epub 2018 May 30.

Vice President, Cancer Screening, Cancer Control Department, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.

In the United States, colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cancer diagnosed among adults and the second leading cause of death from cancer. For this guideline update, the American Cancer Society (ACS) used an existing systematic evidence review of the CRC screening literature and microsimulation modeling analyses, including a new evaluation of the age to begin screening by race and sex and additional modeling that incorporates changes in US CRC incidence. Screening with any one of multiple options is associated with a significant reduction in CRC incidence through the detection and removal of adenomatous polyps and other precancerous lesions and with a reduction in mortality through incidence reduction and early detection of CRC. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21457DOI Listing
July 2018
6 Reads

Cancer screening in the United States, 2018: A review of current American Cancer Society guidelines and current issues in cancer screening.

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 07 30;68(4):297-316. Epub 2018 May 30.

Chief Cancer Control Officer, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.

Each year, the American Cancer Society publishes a summary of its guidelines for early cancer detection, data and trends in cancer screening rates from the National Health Interview Survey, and select issues related to cancer screening. In this 2018 update, we also summarize the new American Cancer Society colorectal cancer screening guideline and include a clarification in the language of the 2013 lung cancer screening guideline. CA Cancer J Clin 2018;68:297-316. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21446DOI Listing
July 2018
7 Reads

Ovarian cancer statistics, 2018.

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 07 29;68(4):284-296. Epub 2018 May 29.

Scientific Director, Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.

In 2018, there will be approximately 22,240 new cases of ovarian cancer diagnosed and 14,070 ovarian cancer deaths in the United States. Herein, the American Cancer Society provides an overview of ovarian cancer occurrence based on incidence data from nationwide population-based cancer registries and mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics. The status of early detection strategies is also reviewed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21456DOI Listing
July 2018
16 Reads

Timely follow-up of positive cancer screening results: A systematic review and recommendations from the PROSPR Consortium.

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 05 30;68(3):199-216. Epub 2018 Mar 30.

Physician in Chief, General Medicine Division, MA General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

Timely follow-up for positive cancer screening results remains suboptimal, and the evidence base to inform decisions on optimizing the timeliness of diagnostic testing is unclear. This systematic review evaluated published studies regarding time to follow-up after a positive screening for breast, cervical, colorectal, and lung cancers. The quality of available evidence was very low or low across cancers, with potential attenuated or reversed associations from confounding by indication in most studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21452DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5980732PMC
May 2018
6 Reads

Pain management for patients with cancer.

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CA Cancer J Clin 2018 05 30;68(3):197-198. Epub 2018 Mar 30.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21454DOI Listing

Optimal pain management for patients with cancer in the modern era.

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 05 30;68(3):182-196. Epub 2018 Mar 30.

Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Brookdale Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Care, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY.

Pain is a common symptom among patients with cancer. Adequate pain assessment and management are critical to improve the quality of life and health outcomes in this population. In this review, the authors provide a framework for safely and effectively managing cancer-related pain by summarizing the evidence for the importance of controlling pain, the barriers to adequate pain management, strategies to assess and manage cancer-related pain, how to manage pain in patients at risk of substance use disorder, and considerations when managing pain in a survivorship population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21453DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5980731PMC
May 2018
2 Reads

Internet interventions help patients newly diagnosed with cancer improve their quality of life.

Authors:
Ted Gansler

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 05 25;68(3):180-181. Epub 2018 Mar 25.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21450DOI Listing

Recent progress in Lynch syndrome and other familial colorectal cancer syndromes.

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 05 27;68(3):217-231. Epub 2018 Feb 27.

Professor, Department of Medicine, University of California at San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego, CA.

The current understanding of familial colorectal cancer was limited to descriptions of affected pedigrees until the early 1990s. A series of landscape-altering discoveries revealed that there were distinct forms of familial cancer, and most were related to genes previously not known to be involved in human disease. This review largely focuses on advances in our understanding of Lynch syndrome because of the unique relationship of this disease to defective DNA mismatch repair and the clinical implications this has for diagnostics, prevention, and therapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21448DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5980692PMC
May 2018
7 Reads

Who's still smoking? Disparities in adult cigarette smoking prevalence in the United States.

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 03 31;68(2):106-115. Epub 2018 Jan 31.

Managing Director, Global Cancer Prevention and Early Detection, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.

The continuing high prevalence of cigarette smoking among specific subpopulations, many of them vulnerable, is one of the most pressing challenges facing the tobacco control community. These populations include individuals in lower education and/or socioeconomic groups; from certain racial/ethnic groups; in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community; with mental illness; and in the military, particularly among those in the lowest pay grades. Although traditional tobacco control measures are having positive health effects for most groups, the effects are not sufficient for others. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21444DOI Listing
March 2018
3 Reads

Factors influencing risk-based care of the childhood cancer survivor in the 21st century.

CA Cancer J Clin 2018 03 29;68(2):133-152. Epub 2018 Jan 29.

Member, Department of Oncology and Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN.

The population of adult survivors of childhood cancer continues to grow as survival rates improve. Although it is well established that these survivors experience various complications and comorbidities related to their malignancy and treatment, this risk is modified by many factors that are not directly linked to their cancer history. Research evaluating the influence of patient-specific demographic and genetic factors, premorbid and comorbid conditions, health behaviors, and aging has identified additional risk factors that influence cancer treatment-related toxicity and possible targets for intervention in this population. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.3322/caac.21445
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.3322/caac.21445DOI Listing
March 2018
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