69 results match your criteria CNS Imaging in Cysticercosis


Next generation sequencing based pathogen analysis in a patient with neurocysticercosis: a case report.

BMC Infect Dis 2018 03 6;18(1):113. Epub 2018 Mar 6.

Department of Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, 79 Qingchun Road, Hangzhou, 310003, China.

Background: Accurate and early diagnosis of neurocysticercosis (NCC) remains a challenge due to the heterogeneity of its clinical, immunological and imaging characteristics. The presence of cysticercus DNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of NCC patients has been previously detected via conventional PCR assays. To the best of our knowledge, the use of CSF Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) based pathogen analysis in patients with NCC infection has never been reported. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12879-018-3015-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5840791PMC
March 2018
14 Reads

[Intracranial cystic lesions].

Radiologe 2018 Feb;58(2):120-131

Klinik für Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Deutschland.

Clinical Problem: Intracerebral cysts are common findings in imaging of the neurocranium and are not always clinically significant. The pathological spectrum of intracerebral cysts is, however, very broad and in addition to incidental findings includes developmental disorders, malformation tumors, primary and secondary neoplasms and infectious etiologies, such as cerebral abscess formation, cysticercosis or residuals after congenital cytomegalovirus infections. Intracerebral cystic defects may be caused by inflammatory central nervous system (CNS) diseases, such as multiple sclerosis as well as by mitochondriopathies, leukodystrophy, electrolyte disturbances or osmotic demyelination syndrome or brain infarctions, e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00117-017-0322-zDOI Listing
February 2018
5 Reads

Antibody Banding Patterns of the Enzyme-Linked Immunoelectrotransfer Blot and Brain Imaging Findings in Patients With Neurocysticercosis.

Clin Infect Dis 2018 Jan;66(2):282-288

School of Public Health and Management, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru.

Background: The enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB) assay is the reference serological test for neurocysticercosis (NCC). A positive result on EITB does not always correlate with the presence of active infections in the central nervous system (CNS), and patients with a single viable brain cyst may be EITB negative. Nonetheless, EITB antibody banding patterns appears to be related with the expression of 3 protein families of Taenia solium, and in turn with the characteristics of NCC in the CNS (type, stage, and burden of viable cysts). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/cix774DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5850523PMC
January 2018
77 Reads
2 Citations
8.890 Impact Factor

De novo cystic brain lesions mimicking neurocysticercosis in ALK-positive lung cancer.

Lung Cancer 2017 08 12;110:53-55. Epub 2017 Jun 12.

Center for Lung Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital of National Cancer Center, Goyang, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

Cystic brain metastases (CBM) have been recently reported in a minority of patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). All previously reported ALK-positive CBM developed during crizotinib treatment and were often asymptomatic and indolent, even without CNS-directed therapy. Thus, crizotinib was suggested as an etiologic agent for the development of CBM. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01695002173035
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lungcan.2017.06.003DOI Listing
August 2017
20 Reads

Time trend of neurocysticercosis in children with seizures in a tertiary hospital of western Nepal.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2017 May 10;11(5):e0005605. Epub 2017 May 10.

Dept of Pediatrics, Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal.

Introduction: Neurocysticercosis is a common cause of seizure disorders in children of Western Nepal. The clinical presentation is variable. The incidence varies depending on the food habits and ethnicity of the population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0005605DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5440051PMC
May 2017
44 Reads

Multiple calcifying pseudoneoplasms of the neuraxis (MCAPNON): Distinct entity, CAPNON variant, or old neurocysticercosis?

Neuropathology 2017 Jun 10;37(3):233-240. Epub 2016 Nov 10.

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (Neuropathology), University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

We report a case of multiple calcifying pseudoneoplasms of the neuraxis (MCAPNON) with associated multifocal perivascular microcalcifications and vascular calcinosis. Calcifying pseudoneoplasm of the neuraxis (CAPNON) is a very rare condition that may arise in extra-axial and occasionally, in intra-axial locations. Moreover, it is nearly always a solitary mass with only one case with two lesions reported. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/neup.12349DOI Listing
June 2017
17 Reads
1.800 Impact Factor

Cysticercosis of Soleus muscle presenting as isolated calf pain.

J Clin Orthop Trauma 2015 Mar 1;6(1):39-41. Epub 2014 Dec 1.

Assistant Professor, Department of Radio-Diagnosis, Moti Lal Nehru Medical College, Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh, India.

CNS is the most common site of involvement by cysticercosis. Symptomatic involvement of isolated skeletal muscle by solitary cysticercosis cyst is extremely rare. We report a rare and unusual case of cysticercosis presenting as acute calf pain, which is a diagnostic challenge. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcot.2014.11.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4551142PMC
March 2015
3 Reads

Reversible dementia due to neurocysticercosis: Improvement of the racemose type with antihistamines.

Dement Neuropsychol 2015 Jan-Mar;9(1):85-90

MD, PhD, Full Professor, Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology Unit, Department of Neurology Cognitive Disorders Reference Center (CEREDIC), HC/FMUSP, São Paulo SP, Brazil.

Infection of the human central nervous system (CNS) by the larvae of , termed neurocysticercosis (NCC), is endemic in most developing countries, where it is a major cause of acquired seizures and other neurological morbidity, including neuropsychiatric symptoms. However, despite its frequent manifestation, some findings, such as cognitive impairment and dementia, remain poorly understood. Less commonly, NCC may affect the ventricular system and subarachnoid spaces and this form is known as extraparenchymal neurocysticercosis. Read More

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http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S1980-57642015DN91000014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5618997PMC
December 2017
8 Reads

Parasitoses with central nervous system involvement.

Wien Med Wochenschr 2014 Oct 9;164(19-20):400-4. Epub 2014 Oct 9.

Krankenanstalt Rudolfstiftung, Juchgasse 25, 1030, Vienna, Austria,

Most of the parasitoses manifest systemically, including the central nervous system (CNS). Among the most prevalent parasitoses in Central Europe (cysticercosis, toxocarosis, echinococcosis, and toxoplasmosis), cerebral involvement is well recognized and part of the clinical presentation, which cannot be neglected. CNS involvement results from invasion of larvae of these parasites via the blood stream or by direct migration into the CNS. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10354-014-0307-8
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10354-014-0307-8DOI Listing
October 2014
4 Reads

Immune responses to viable and degenerative metacestodes of Taenia solium in naturally infected swine.

Int J Parasitol 2013 Dec 31;43(14):1101-7. Epub 2013 Oct 31.

Department of Microbiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow 226014, UP, India.

Neurocysticercosis, caused by the larvae of the pork tapeworm Taenia solium, is the most common helminth infection of the CNS in humans worldwide. There is no existing animal model of neurocysticercosis that resembles human infection. To overcome this limitation, swine (the natural intermediate host of the parasite) may be a suitable model. Read More

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http://14.139.245.149:8080/jspui/bitstream/1/6063/1/Immune%2
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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S002075191300249
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpara.2013.07.009DOI Listing
December 2013
9 Reads

Profile of children admitted with seizures in a tertiary care hospital of Western Nepal.

BMC Pediatr 2013 Mar 27;13:43. Epub 2013 Mar 27.

Department of Pediatrics, Manipal College of Medical Sciences, Pokhara, Nepal.

Background: Seizure is one of the common causes of childhood hospitalization with significant mortality and morbidity. There is limited data regarding acute seizures episodes form the developing countries. Current study aims to find the common etiology of seizure and classify seizure types in various age groups presenting to tertiary center in Western Nepal. Read More

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http://www.iosrjournals.org/iosr-jdms/papers/Vol11-issue4/M0
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http://bmcpediatr.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-24
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2431-13-43DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3626715PMC
March 2013
5 Reads
5 Citations
1.920 Impact Factor

Neurocysticercosis.

Continuum (Minneap Minn) 2012 Dec;18(6 Infectious Disease):1392-416

Air Center 3542, PO Box 522970, Miami, FL 33152-2970, USA.

Purpose Of Review: Neurocysticercosis occurs when humans become intermediate hosts in the life cycle of Taenia solium by ingesting its eggs directly from a taenia carrier or, less often, by contaminated food. Within the nervous system, cysticerci may lodge in the brain parenchyma, subarachnoid space, ventricular system, or spinal cord, causing a number of pathologic changes that are responsible for the pleomorphism of neurocysticercosis. This article discusses the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of neurocysticercosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/01.CON.0000423853.47770.90DOI Listing
December 2012
3 Reads

Neurocysticercosis: the enigmatic disease.

Cent Nerv Syst Agents Med Chem 2011 Dec;11(4):261-84

Botucatu Medical School, São Paulo State University (UNESP), 18618-970, Botucatu, São Paulo, Brazil.

Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is an infection of the central nervous system (CNS) caused by the metacestode larval form of the parasite Taenia sp. Many factors can contribute to the endemic nature of cysticercosis. The inflammatory process that occurs in the tissue surrounding the parasite and/or distal from it can result from several associated mechanisms and may be disproportionate with the number of cysts. Read More

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December 2011
5 Reads

Spinal intramedullary cysticercosis: a case report and literature review.

Int J Med Sci 2011 6;8(5):420-3. Epub 2011 Jul 6.

Department of Neurosurgery, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021, China.

Neurocysticercosis, involvement of the central nervous system by taenia solium, is one of the most common parasitic diseases of the CNS. However, spinal involvement by neurocysticercosis is uncommon. Here, we reported a 40-year-old woman with intramedullary cysticercosis in the thoracic spinal cord. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3149420PMC
October 2011
5 Reads

CT Ventriculography for diagnosis of occult ventricular cysticerci.

Surg Neurol Int 2010 Dec 23;1:92. Epub 2010 Dec 23.

Department of Neurosurgery, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612.

Background: Neurocysticercosis is the most common parasitic infection of the central nervous system (CNS). Intraventricular lesions are seen in 7-20% of CNS cysticercosis. Intraventricular lesions can be missed by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as they are typically isodense/isointense to the cerebrospinal fluid. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/2152-7806.74188DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3019360PMC
December 2010
3 Reads

Helminth infections of the central nervous system occurring in Southeast Asia and the Far East.

Adv Parasitol 2010 ;72:351-408

National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.

Although helminth infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are rare, their public health implications must not be neglected. Indeed, several helminth species can cause cerebrospinal infections, especially if humans serve as intermediate or non-permissive host. The diagnosis of cerebrospinal helminthiases is difficult, and the detection of parasites in cerebrospinal fluid is rarely successful. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0065-308X(10)72012-1DOI Listing
October 2010
2 Reads

Cognitive impairment and dementia in neurocysticercosis: a cross-sectional controlled study.

Neurology 2010 Apr;74(16):1288-95

Department of Neurology, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, Brazil.

Objectives: Neurocysticercosis (NCYST) is the most frequent CNS parasitic disease worldwide, affecting more than 50 million people. However, some of its clinical findings, such as cognitive impairment and dementia, remain poorly characterized, with no controlled studies conducted so far. We investigated the frequency and the clinical profile of cognitive impairment and dementia in a sample of patients with NCYST in comparison with cognitively healthy controls (HC) and patients with cryptogenic epilepsy (CE). Read More

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http://www.neurology.org/content/74/16/1288.full.pdf
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e3181d9eda6DOI Listing
April 2010
2 Reads

Neurocysticercosis: relationship between Taenia antigen levels in CSF and MRI.

Arq Neuropsiquiatr 2010 Feb;68(1):7-11

Medicine Department, University of Taubaté, Taubaté, SP, Brazil.

Objective: To determine the relationship between Taenia antigen (TA) detection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with definite diagnosis of neurocysticercosis (NC).

Method: Sixty-three patients with definite diagnosis of NC were submitted to a MRI of the brain, and to a CSF examination, with a meticulous search for TA by ELISA.

Results: TA detection was positive in 36 patients (57. Read More

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February 2010
7 Reads

Isolated primary intradural extramedullary spinal neurocysticercosis: a case report and review of literature.

Acta Neurol Taiwan 2009 Sep;18(3):187-92

GTB Hospital, New Delhi.

Background: In spite of being the most common parasitic infestation of central nervous system (CNS), spinal cysticercosis remains a rare entity.

Case Report: We report an unusual case of a 45-year-old-male with primary isolated localization of spinal intradural extramedullary cysticercosis at thoracic 3/4 level. The lesion was surgically addressed to decompress the cord in combination with administration of oral albendazole. Read More

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September 2009
5 Reads

Cystic choroid plexus papilloma in the cavum septum pellucidum.

J Neurosurg Pediatr 2009 Dec;4(6):580-3

Department of Neurosurgery, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York, USA.

A choroid plexus papilloma is a rare CNS neoplasm arising from the neuroepithelial lining of the choroid plexus. A third ventricular location of a choroid plexus papilloma is rare compared with the more common sites in the lateral and fourth ventricles. Cystic choroid plexus papilloma represents an infrequent subtype that may present diagnostic ambiguity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2009.7.PEDS08484DOI Listing
December 2009
4 Reads

[Pediatric neurocysticercosis].

Medicina (B Aires) 2009 ;69(1 Pt 1):114-20

Clínica para la Atención del Neurodesarrollo, Aguascalientes, México.

Cysticercosis: parasitic disease which affects 3% of the population in Mexico. It is considered that there are more than 50 million infected people in the world, endemic in Mexico, Central and South America, Africa, Asia and India. It is considered the most important neurological infectious disease world-wide for its clinical manifestations. Read More

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February 2010
3 Reads

Intraventricular neurocysticercosis.

Indian J Pediatr 2009 Apr 10;76(4):420-3. Epub 2009 Feb 10.

Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi, India.

Neurocysticercosis is the commonest CNS parasitic disease worldwide but cysticercal meningitis and intraventricular lesions are relatively rare, especially in Indian patients. We herein report a girl with cysticercal meningitis that remained undiagnosed and the patient later presented with unilateral hydrocephalous due to Foramen of Monroe block by an intraventricular cyst. The need for CSF examination with Wright-Giemsa staining to avoid missing CSF eosinophilia is discussed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12098-009-0023-3DOI Listing
April 2009
2 Reads

Diagnosis of neurocysticercosis by detection of Taenia solium DNA using a global DNA screening platform.

Clin Infect Dis 2009 Jan;48(1):86-90

Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

Neurocysticercosis is caused by Taenia solium infection of the brain. Diagnosis is most often made by visualization of the parasitic scolex by magnetic resonance imaging of the brain or by characteristic neuroimaging findings with serologic test results positive for T. solium. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/594128DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2678049PMC
January 2009
6 Reads

The effects of antimicrobial and antiepileptic treatment on the outcome of epilepsy associated with central nervous system (CNS) infections.

Epilepsia 2008 Aug;49 Suppl 6:42-6

Department of Neurology, Dayanand Medical College & Hospital, Ludhiana, India.

The course and outcome of epilepsy following central nervous system (CNS) infections has been poorly characterized. Likewise, the impact of antimicrobial treatment as well as other preventative and therapeutic interventions on the development of epilepsy following neurological infectious disorders has been insufficiently studied. The CNS infections that can cause epilepsy may be either acute or chronic-recurrent. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1528-1167.2008.01755.xDOI Listing
August 2008
5 Reads

Spinal intramedullary cysticercosis of the conus medullaris.

WMJ 2008 Feb;107(1):37-9

University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Department of Neurological Surgery, Madison, WI 53792, USA.

Neurocysticercosis is the most common central nervous system (CNS) parasitic disease worldwide, but spinal cysticercal infection is relatively rare, especially in the United States. Because of increased immigration to the United States from endemic areas, the incidence of neurocysticercosis has risen, especially in California, Texas, Arizona, and other southwestern states, but not in Wisconsin. Spinal intramedullary cysticercosis involving the conus medullaris is an uncommon clinical condition that can lead to irreversible neurological deficits if untreated. Read More

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February 2008
5 Reads

Cysticercosis of temporalis muscle: an unusual cause of temporal headaches. A case report.

J Headache Pain 2007 Oct 23;8(5):315-6. Epub 2007 Oct 23.

Department of Neurology, Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, New Delhi, India.

Cysticercosis is a common parasitic infection caused by encysted larvae of the helminth Taenia solium (pork tapeworm). The central nervous system (CNS) is the most important primary site of infection and the disease can present with solitary or multiple space occupying lesions. Less common presentations in the CNS include the racemose variety with macroscopic groups of cysticerci in the subarachnoid space giving the appearance of a cluster of grapes and basal or ventricular cysticercosis causing obstructive hydrocephalus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10194-007-0410-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3476153PMC
October 2007
4 Reads

Second case of neurocysticercosis in a patient with liver transplantation (first case in Spain): a case report.

Transplant Proc 2007 Sep;39(7):2454-7

General, Digestive and Abdominal Organs Transplantation Surgical Department, 12 Octubre Universitary Hospital, Madrid, Spain.

Background: Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a disorder caused by the Taenia solium larva. It is the most common parasitosis of the central nervous system (CNS). Its distribution is universal, but it is endemic in many developing countries and in the third world. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.transproceed.2007.07.049DOI Listing
September 2007
1 Read

Intraventricular cryptococcal cysts masquerading as racemose neurocysticercosis.

Surg Neurol 2007 Jun;67(6):647-9

Department of Neurosurgery, University of California, Irvine, Orange, CA 92868.

Background: Cryptococcal infections of the CNS are infrequent in immunocompetent hosts. When present, they usually present as meningitis and hydrocephalus or as fungal masses called cryptococcomas. We report a case in which intraventricular cryptococcal cysts clinically and radiologically simulated the racemose form of neurocysticercosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.surneu.2006.10.049DOI Listing
June 2007
8 Reads

Pitfalls in the diagnosis of brain tumours.

Lancet Neurol 2006 Nov;5(11):937-48

AP-HP Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, Service de Neurologie Mazarin, Universite Paris VI Pierre et Marie Curie, IFR 70, Unite Inserm U711, Paris, France.

Establishing the diagnosis of a brain tumour is not always a straightforward process. Many non-neoplastic neurological diseases can mimic brain neoplasms on neuroimaging or on histological examination, including multiple sclerosis, stroke, pyogenic abscess, toxoplasmosis, tuberculosis, cysticercosis, fungal infections, syphilis, sarcoidosis, Behçet disease, radiation necrosis, venous thrombosis, and others. Conversely, several types of brain neoplasms, such as glioblastomas, low-grade gliomas, CNS lymphomas, and brain metastases, can present in the absence of typical tumefactive lesions, posing significant diagnostic challenges. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1474-4422(06)70597-XDOI Listing
November 2006
2 Reads

Taenia solium DNA is present in the cerebrospinal fluid of neurocysticercosis patients and can be used for diagnosis.

Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci 2006 Aug 10;256(5):307-10. Epub 2006 Jul 10.

Laboratório de Neurociências (LIM27), Instituto e Departamento de Psiquiatria, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo (FMUSP), R. Dr.Ovídio Pires de Campos, s/n - 3o andar, 05403-010 São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Neurocysticercosis is the most frequent parasitic infection of the CNS and the main cause of acquired epilepsy worldwide. Seizures are the most common symptoms of the disease, together with headache, involuntary movements, psychosis and a global mental deterioration. Absolute diagnostic criteria include the identification of cysticerci, with scolex, in the brain by MRI imaging. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00406-006-0612-3DOI Listing
August 2006
3 Reads

Neurocysticercosis an uncommon intra-cerebral infection in Malaysia.

Med J Malaysia 2005 Oct;60(4):514-6

Division of Neurosurgery, University Malaya Medical Centre, Lembah Pantai 50603, Kuala Lumpur.

Neurocysticercosis, infection of the central nervous system (CNS) by larvae of the pork tapeworm Taenia solium, is the commonest neuroparasitic infection in humans. However in countries as in Malaysia it poses a diagnostic problem as the disease in not seen amongst the local population; however with the arrival of immigrant workers, a number of cases have recently been diagnosed. There were 3 cases of neurocysticercosis reported in our centre over the last 5 years. Read More

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October 2005
6 Reads

Tuberculous meningitis with multiple intracranial tuberculomas mimicking neurocysticercosis clinical and radiological findings.

Jpn J Infect Dis 2005 Dec;58(6):387-9

Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Haydarpasa Training Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis (TB), the most dangerous form of TB, remains a public health problem, particularly in developing countries. In the differential diagnosis of intracranial tuberculomas (ICTs), images on radiological findings should be differentiated from other causes of space-occupying lesions. These lesions include malignant diseases such as glioma or lymphoma, pyogenic abscess, toxoplasmosis, neurocysticercosis (NC), sarcoidosis, hydatidosis and late syphilitic involvement of CNS. Read More

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December 2005
7 Reads

Neurocysticercosis: association between seizures, serology, and brain CT in rural Peru.

Neurology 2005 Jul;65(2):229-33

School of Public Health and Administration, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru.

Background: Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the commonest helminthic CNS infection and the main cause of adult-onset seizures in developing countries, also frequent in industrialized countries because of immigration from endemic zones. Although NCC is commonly seen in individuals with seizures in endemic areas, its role as a cause of epilepsy has been questioned on the basis of the poor methodology of published studies.

Objective: To determine, in a cysticercosis-endemic area of the northern Peruvian coast, the frequency of 1) epileptic seizures, 2) serum antibodies to Taenia solium, 3) NCC-compatible findings on brain CT, and 4) the associations between these variables. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/01.wnl.0000168828.83461.09DOI Listing
July 2005
1 Read

Diagnostic criteria for neurocysticercosis: some modifications are needed for Indian patients.

Neurol India 2004 Jun;52(2):171-7

Department of Neurology, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, India.

In India and other less developed countries the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis is frequently difficult because several other prevalent neurological disorders can present with a similar clinical and neuroimaging picture. Currently available international criteria seem to be helpful for the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis, however, these criteria have been criticized for not being effective in differentiating several other infective and neoplastic diseases of central nervous system (CNS), like CNS tuberculosis, from neurocysticercosis. In this article, modifications in the recent diagnostic criteria given by Del Brutto et al (2001) are being suggested, so, it can become more suitable for Indian patients. Read More

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June 2004
2 Reads

Cysticercosis: imported and autochthonous infections in Kuwait.

Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 2004 Apr;98(4):233-9

Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, PO Box 24923, Safat 13110, Kuwait.

Intracerebral and non-central nervous system (non-CNS) cysticercosis caused by the larval pork tapeworm Taenia solium was diagnosed in patients in an Islamic state. The mode of transmission and challenges in diagnosis are highlighted. Sixteen patients with neurocysticercosis and six with non-CNS lesions were diagnosed by imaging studies (computerized tomography [CT]/magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) and serology (ELISA and/or enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot assay [EITB]). Read More

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April 2004
6 Reads
8 Citations
1.931 Impact Factor

[Non neoplastic space occupying lesions mimicking central nervous system tumors].

Rev Neurol 2004 Mar 1-15;38(5):427-30

Hospital General del Sur Dr. Pedro Iturbe, Maracaibo, Zulia, Venezuela.

Objective: To establish the frequency and nature of space occupying lesions of the central nervous system (CNS) that mimic neoplastic growths.

Patients And Methods: We reviewed the clinical records, imaging and neuropathological studies of patients operated in different hospitals of Maracaibo, Venezuela during the period January 1 1996 July 31 2002. These patients had a pre operative diagnosis of CNS tumor, and their definitive diagnosis was non neoplastic disease. Read More

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July 2004
3 Reads

Pyruvate: an in vivo marker of cestodal infestation of the human brain on proton MR spectroscopy.

J Magn Reson Imaging 2003 Dec;18(6):675-80

Department of Neuroimaging and Interventional Radiology, National Institute of Mental Health and NeuroSciences, Bangalore, India.

Purpose: To study intracranial cestodal cysts using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) in an effort to identify metabolite(s) that may help in recognizing the parasitic etiology and, perhaps, viability of such tapeworm cysts. Cestodal infestations of the human central nervous system (CNS)-cysticercosis and hydatidosis-are not rare. Identification of a scolex is considered diagnostic of cysticercosis on imaging. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/jmri.10409
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jmri.10409DOI Listing
December 2003
4 Reads

[Cysticercosis as a rare cause of a tumor of the tongue].

Laryngorhinootologie 2003 Aug;82(8):564-7

Klinik und Poliklinik für Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenkrankheiten des Universitätsklinikums Hamburg-Eppendorf.

This article presents the case of a 19-year-old male patient with cysticercosis in the tongue and the CNS. It also presents images of histological sections of the cysticercus parasite situated in the tongue muscles and CT and MRI images of cerebral clusters. Cysticercosis is a disease caused by the hydatid of the porcine tapeworm (cysticercus). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2003-41232DOI Listing
August 2003
1 Read

[Diagnosis of periventricular ependymal enhancement in MRI in adults].

J Neuroradiol 2003 Jan;30(1):46-56

Service d'imagerie médicale, Hôpital Ambroise Paré, Boulogne.

Periventricular enhancement in adults at MRI is a significant finding since it often indicates the presence of an underlying disease requiring prompt medical attention. From a review of patients with periventricular enhancement, the main imaging features based on the underlying infectious or tumoral etiology will be described. The presented differential diagnosis is based on the immune status of the patient, type of enhancement, and response to a trial therapy. Read More

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January 2003
4 Reads

Parasitic worms of the central nervous system: an Australian perspective.

Intern Med J 2002 Nov;32(11):541-53

University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

The diagnosis and management of parasitic diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) is difficult, even for infectious diseases physicians and neurologists. Furthermore, few overviews of the spectrum of causative helminths and clinical syndromes have been published. In the present study, we review the seven most common parasitic diseases of the CNS: (i) cysticercosis, (ii) neuroschistosomiasis, (iii) paragonimiasis, (iv) angiostrongyliasis, (v) hydatid disease, (vi) sparganosis and (vii) gnathostomiasis. Read More

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November 2002
3 Reads

[Hydrocepahlia and subarachnoid cyst due to neurocysticercosis. A new case from rural Extremadura].

Rev Neurol 2002 Feb 16-28;34(4):348-51

Hospital Virgen del Puerto, Plasencia, 10600, España.

Introduction: Neurocystercicosis (NCC) is a disorder caused by the Taenia solium larva. It is the commonest parasitosis of the CNS. In Spain most patients are from countries where the condition is endemic. Read More

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September 2002
2 Reads

Neurocysticercosis: migration of a parasite.

Authors:
H W Bales

J Am Acad Nurse Pract 2000 Jun;12(6):240-8; quiz 249-51

Washington State University, USA.

Neurocysticercosis is the most common parasitic infection of the central nervous system (CNS). Infection occurs following oral ingestion of eggs of the porcine tapeworm, Taenia solium. Eggs migrate to distal tissue sites via the bloodstream, and develop into larval cysts. Read More

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June 2000
3 Reads

Psychiatric presentations of non-HIV infectious diseases. Neurocysticercosis, Lyme disease, and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with streptococcal infection.

Psychiatr Clin North Am 2002 Mar;25(1):1-16

Departments of Psychiatry and Internal Medicine, Division of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry, Medical College of Virginia, Campus of Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA.

Infectious diseases can cause an array of symptoms, including psychiatric symptoms. Psychiatrists serving the medically ill need to be aware not only of classic infectious diseases (e.g. Read More

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March 2002
5 Reads

Proposed diagnostic criteria for neurocysticercosis.

Neurology 2001 Jul;57(2):177-83

Department of Neurology, Hospital-Clinica Kennedy, Guayaquil, Ecuador.

Neurocysticercosis is the most common helminthic infection of the CNS but its diagnosis remains difficult. Clinical manifestations are nonspecific, most neuroimaging findings are not pathognomonic, and some serologic tests have low sensitivity and specificity. The authors provide diagnostic criteria for neurocysticercosis based on objective clinical, imaging, immunologic, and epidemiologic data. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2912527PMC
July 2001
3 Reads

Neurocysticercosis. Case report.

J Neurosurg Sci 2001 Mar;45(1):43-6

Department of Neurosurgery and Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurosurgery, University of Naples, Italy.

In the present review we report a case of a 53-year-old woman affected with a cyst solitary cerebral hemispheric lesion causing acute generalized seizure. Clinical and neuroradiologic diagnosis of cystic astrocytoma was performed and the patient was operated. Microscopic analysis of the surgical specimen led to a diagnosis of parasitic infection, consistent with neurocysticercosis (NCC). Read More

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March 2001
3 Reads

[Neurocysticercosis: an imported disease?].

Med Clin (Barc) 2001 Feb;116(7):261-3

Sección de Medicina Tropical. Servicio de Enfermedades Infecciosas. IDIBAPS.

Background: Neurocysticercosis is the CNS involvement caused by Taenia solium larvae and the most frequent cerebral parasitation. It has a cosmopolitan distribution but endemic in the low income countries. The paper analizes the geographic origin, clinical characteristics of patients and the diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. Read More

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February 2001
1 Read

Neurocysticercosis like presentation in a case of CNS tuberculosis.

Neurol India 2000 Sep;48(3):260-2

Department of Neurology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, 221005, India.

A clinical picture consisting of seizures, multiple non-tender subcutaneous nodules, and multiple 'nodular or ring' enhancing lesions in computed tomography of the brain is considered characteristic of neurocysticercosis in an endemic area. 1,2 A case with a similar clinical picture, in whom serological tests and histopathological examination of subcutaneous nodule established tuberculosis as a cause, is presented. Read More

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September 2000
2 Reads

Subcutaneous cysticercosis involving the eyelid: sonographic diagnosis.

J Dermatol 2000 Jan;27(1):35-9

Department of Dermatology and STD, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rohtak, Haryana, India.

A 25-year-old man and a 14-year-old boy presented with neurocutaneous cysticercosis involving the eyelid. Both patients had hundreds of scattered subcutaneous cysticerci. They were arranged in clusters over the sternocleidomastoid muscle in the neck. Read More

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January 2000
1 Read

Heavy nonencephalitic cerebral cysticercosis in tapeworm carriers. The Cysticercosis Working Group in Perú.

Neurology 1999 Oct;53(7):1582-4

Department of Microbiology, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Perú.

We describe 11 patients with massive brain infection with viable cysticerci, undetectable inflammatory reaction on CNS imaging, and an unexpectedly high (82%) prevalence of tapeworm infection. With the exception of two individuals with heavy parasite loads, patients had a relatively benign clinical course and tolerated the use of cysticidal drugs. This group of patients represents a particular presentation of neurocysticercosis, different from the previously described syndromes of cysticercotic encephalitis and disseminated systemic cysticercosis. Read More

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October 1999
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[Neurocysticercosis. Current review of the literature based on a long-term study of 2 clinically distinct German cases].

Nervenarzt 1999 Apr;70(4):298-305

Neurologische Universitätsklinik, Essen.

Neurocysticercosis, caused by Taenia solium larvae (cysticerci), is the most common parasitic infection of the human CNS Worldwide. In Germany its appearance is rare. Here we report two cases of neurocysticercosis which we followed over a period of 4-6 years. Read More

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April 1999
7 Reads