7 results match your criteria Business Horizons[Journal]

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Applications of Business Analytics in Healthcare.

Bus Horiz 2014 Sep;57(5):571-582

University of Cincinnati, Carl H. Lindner College of Business, 2925 Campus Green Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0130, 513-556-7174, University of Cincinnati, College of Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, James M. Anderson Center for Health Systems Excellence.

The American healthcare system is at a crossroads, and analytics, as an organizational skill, figures to play a pivotal role in its future. As more healthcare systems capture information electronically and as they begin to collect more novel forms of data, such as human DNA, how will we leverage these resources and use them to improve human health at a manageable cost? In this article, we argue that analytics will play a fundamental role in the transformation of the American healthcare system. However, there are numerous challenges to the application and use of analytics, namely the lack of data standards, barriers to the collection of high-quality data, and a shortage of qualified personnel to conduct such analyses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bushor.2014.06.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4242091PMC
September 2014
6 Reads

The normalization of deviance in healthcare delivery.

Authors:
John Banja

Bus Horiz 2010 ;53(2):139

Center for Ethics, Emory University, 1531 Dickey Drive, Atlanta, GA 30322 U.S.A,

Many serious medical errors result from violations of recognized standards of practice. Over time, even egregious violations of standards of practice may become "normalized" in healthcare delivery systems. This article describes what leads to this normalization and explains why flagrant practice deviations can persist for years, despite the importance of the standards at issue. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bushor.2009.10.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2821100PMC
January 2010
1 Read

The overburdened manager and decision making.

Authors:
P D Olson

Bus Horiz 1979 Oct:28-32

This article discusses three methods managers can use to make decisions: intuition, management analysis, and Type 1 and Type 2 error analysis. Olson identifies studies that have shown that top managers work at an unrelenting pace and jump from one activity to another. He claims that managers do not have time to plan in a reflective, systematic manner. Read More

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October 1979
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Change: the name of the game.

Authors:
W J Altier

Bus Horiz 1979 Jun;22(3):25-7

The purpose of this article is to argue that the game of management involves dealing fundamentally with the element of change and that the key to winning the game is to keep it as simple as possible. The author divides change into four basic categories: 1) Planned Past Change, where everything went as expected; 2) Unplanned Past Change, where something happened that was not anticipated; 3) Planned Future Change, meaning indications show that some action should be taken; and 4) Unplanned Future Change, where the possibility of the unplanned exists. He feels that managing tools exist to deal specifically with the last three types of change, and they are useful only to the extent that they simplify the tasks of management. Read More

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Fitting in the management science specialist.

Authors:
J Fuller R Atherton

Bus Horiz 1979 Apr;22(2):14-7

Fuller and Atherton discuss the relationship between management science specialists and managers. Management science specialists have developed expertise in the complex quantitative techniques available to aid in decision-making. Managers on the other hand, are expected to have a good understanding of the total organizational picture. Read More

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Strategic planning for marketers.

Authors:
I Wilson

Bus Horiz 1978 Dec;21(6):65-73

The merits of strategic planning as a marketing tool are discussed in this article which takes the view that although marketers claim to be future-oriented, they focus too little attention on long-term planning and forecasting. Strategic planning, as defined by these authors, usually encompasses periods of between five and twenty-five years and places less emphasis on the past as an absolute predictor of the future. It takes a more probabilistic view of the future than conventional marketing strategy and looks at the corporation as but one component interacting with the total environment. Read More

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December 1978

Managing change: a psychologist's perspective.

Authors:
K R Student

Bus Horiz 1978 Dec;21(6):28-33

The uncertainty of today's economic, social and political climate requires that managers cope with a variety of forces beyond their operating control. To meet the challenges of these new demands, many organizational changes are required. This article identifies five human factors involved in change: (1) "Influence" makes work more meaningful and contributes to the feelings of satisfaction; (2) "Familiarity" reduces the feelings of resistence to change; (3) "Testing" allows individuals to evaluate the feasibility and seriousness of the proposed change; (4) "Stress" is caused by the apprehension of change; and (5) "Chance" describes elements that can send the change process in some unanticipated direction. Read More

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December 1978
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