10 results match your criteria Business History[Journal]

  • Page 1 of 1

Oil on the water: Government regulation of a carcinogen in the twentieth-century Lancashire cotton spinning industry.

Bus Hist 2010 ;52(5):695-712

The York Management School, University of York, York, UK.

In the Lancashire cotton textile industry, mule spinners were prone to a chronic and sometimes fatal skin cancer (often affecting the groin). The disease had reached epidemic proportions by the 1920s, which necessitated action by the government, employers, and trade unions. In contrast to previous accounts, this article focuses on the government's reaction to mule spinners' cancer. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2010.499430DOI Listing
September 2010
3 Reads

Improving the public house in Britain, 1920-40: Sir Sydney Nevile and "social work".

Authors:
Alistair Mutch

Bus Hist 2010 ;52(4):517-35

Nottingham Business School, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK.

The "improved public house" movement in the inter-war years was a central part of the shift towards retailing by the brewing industry. An important part of the reform movement was the alliance between certain brewers, notably Whitbread, and "social workers", particularly those associated with the University Settlement movement in London. Using the papers of Sydney Nevile, the importance of a particular social milieu is outlined, calling into question attempts to align the movement to improve public houses with transatlantic Progressivism. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00076791003763987DOI Listing
September 2010
1 Read

The sources of innovation in the woollen and worsted industry of eighteenth-century Yorkshire.

Authors:
J Smail

Bus Hist 1999 ;41(1):1-15

University of North Carolina at Charlotte.

This article examines the economic developments that induced producers to seek our innovations during a transformative period in the Yorkshire woollen industry. The analysis examines both the increase in the scale of the typical operation and the tremendous effect that fashion had on the industry. Particular attention is given to the ways in which the workings of real markets and product innovation focused entrepreneurial energy on the production process, and what that tells us about the origins of the Industrial Revolution. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00076799900000199DOI Listing

Compensating the workers: industrial injury and compensation in the British asbestos industry, 1930s-60s.

Bus Hist 1999 ;41(2):102-20

Manchester Metropolitan University.

In 1931 the British government introduced pioneering legislation to combat occupational disease in the asbestos industry. A key feature was an Asbestosis Scheme for compensating workers for industrial injury and death. This article examines the implementation of the Scheme at Turner & Newall, the leading UK asbestos producer. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00076799900000259DOI Listing

Culture as metaphor: company culture and business strategy at Raleigh Industries, c. 1945-60.

Bus Hist 1999 ;41(3):93-133

Sheffield Hallam University.

This study of Raleigh Industries, one of the leading bicycle manufactures in the world in the immediate post-war years, argues that its business strategy was in part shaped by a managerial commitment to a dominant company culture which was deeply embedded in Raleigh's history. Using the notion of culture as metaphor, the paper examines the way that core values in the company acted as a guide in the setting of organisational goals and, intended or unintended, impinged upon company performance. In many respects, the culture guided the company well, but our study shows a number of ambiguities, tensions and contradictions between culture and strategy which had negative effects on company behaviour. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00076799900000309DOI Listing

"Productivity on the cheap"? The "more looms" experiment and the Lancashire weaving industry during the inter-war years.

Bus Hist 1999 ;41(3):21-41

The University of Sheffield.

Two major debates in the literature, productivity performance and the decline of the cotton industry, are joined in the analysis presented in this article on the attempts to raise productivity through the introduction of the more looms per weaver system in cotton weaving in the inter-war years. We find that the limited resultant changes were the outcome of understandable predisposition to maintain co-operative behaviour which meant that productivity enhancing schemes with long term potential were sacrificed for more modest schemes which preserved consensus in the short term. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00076799900000343DOI Listing
July 2009
3 Reads

Francesco Saverio Amman: an Austrian cotton entrepreneur in Lombardy,1838-82.

Authors:
S Licini

Bus Hist 1999 ;41(3):1-20

Universit Luigi Bocconi, Milan.

This article examines the cotton manufacturing industry in Lombardy during the period when Austrian rule was being restored in the wake of the Congress of Vienna. It adopts Pollard's emphasis on the regional nature of industrialisation, drawing on the surviving accounts of Francesco Saverio Amman - the Austrian-born founder of a major cotton-mill - and attempts to identify differences and similarities between his career and achievements and those of his many counterparts in the rest of Europe. The article begins by looking at Amman's economic and social advancement, and then discusses the development of his business interests. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00076799900000305DOI Listing

The historical development of business philanthropy: social responsibility in the new corporate economy.

Authors:
M Marinetto

Bus Hist 1999 ;41(4):1-20

University of Wales, Swansea.

According to neo-liberal economists such as Friedman and Hayek, the prime function of any business enterprise is to generate profits; its central responsibility is to shareholders. The idea that business owners should also seek to perform social tasks is regarded as completely erroneous. Historical evidence suggests that not all business leaders have been content simply to perform a commercial role in society. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00076799900000342DOI Listing
July 2009
1 Read

The early expansion of the Norwich Union Life Insurance Society, 1808-37.

Authors:
R Ryan

Bus Hist 1985 ;27(2):166-96

Southport College of Art and Technology.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00076798500000025DOI Listing
  • Page 1 of 1