11 results match your criteria Business Ethics Quarterly[Journal]

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Do firms with unique competencies for rescuing victims of human catastrophes have special obligations? Corporate responsibility and the AIDS catastrophe in sub-Saharan Africa.

Authors:
Thomas W Dunfee

Bus Ethics Q 2006 Apr;16(2):185-210

Firms possessing a unique competency to rescue the victims of a human catastrophe have a minimum moral obligation to devote substantial resources toward best efforts to aid victims. The minimum amount that firms should devote to rescue is the largest sum of their most recent year's investment in social initiatives, their five-year trend, their industry's average, or the national average. Financial exigency may justify a lower level of investment. Read More

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April 2006
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Intellectual property rights, moral imagination, and access to life-enhancing drugs.

Bus Ethics Q 2005 Oct;15(4):595-613

Although the idea of intellectual property (IP) rights--proprietary rights to what one invents, writes, paints, composes or creates--is firmly embedded in Western thinking, these rights are now being challenged across the globe in a number of areas. This paper will focus on one of those challenges: government-sanctioned copying of patented drugs without permission or license of the patent owner in the name of national security, in health emergencies, or life-threatening epidemics. After discussing standard rights-based and utilitarian arguments defending intellectual property we will present another model. Read More

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October 2005
8 Reads

The corporate social responsibility of the pharmaceutical industry: idealism without illusion and realism without resignation.

Bus Ethics Q 2005 Oct;15(4):577-94

In recent years society has come to expect more from the "socially-responsible" company and the global HIV/AIDS pandemic in particular has resulted in some critics saying that the "Big Pharma" companies have not been living up to their social responsibilities. Corporate social responsibility can be understood as the socio-economic product of the organizational division of labor in complex modern society. Global poverty and poor health conditions are in the main the responsibilities of the world's national governments and international governmental organizations, which possess society's mandate and appropriate organizational capabilities. Read More

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October 2005
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Intellectual property and pharmaceutical drugs: an ethical analysis.

Bus Ethics Q 2005 Oct;15(4):549-75

The pharmaceutical industry has in recent years come under attack from an ethical point of view concerning its patents and the non-accessibility of life-saving drugs for many of the poor in both less developed countries and in the United States. The industry has replied with economic and legal justifications for its actions. The result has been a communication gap between the industry on the one hand and poor nations and American critics on the other. Read More

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October 2005
5 Reads

Introduction: ethical responsibilities regarding drugs, patents, and health.

Authors:
Michael P Ryan

Bus Ethics Q 2005 Oct;15(4):543-7

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October 2005
3 Reads

The turn to the local: the possibility of returning health care to the community.

Authors:
Lisa H Newton

Bus Ethics Q 2002 Oct;12(4):505-26

It is not too early to suggest that the attempts to place medical cae in private hands (through group insurance arrangements) has not fulfilled its promise--or better, the promises that were made for it. Yet history has not been kind to plans to make government the single payer, and the laudable progress in medical technology has placed high-technology medical care beyond the reach of most private budgets. In this paper I suggest that the major problem of the U. Read More

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October 2002
2 Reads

Total quality management and the silent patient.

Bus Ethics Q 2002 Oct;12(4):481-504

This essay examines the impact of the imposition of businesses techniques, in particular, those associated with Total Quality Management, on the relationships of important components of the health care delivery system, including payers, managed care organizations, institutional and individual providers, enrollees, and patients. It examines structural anomalies within the delivery system and concludes that the use of Total Quality Management techniques within the health care system cannot prevent the shift of attention of other components away from the enrollee and the patient, and may even contribute to it. It speculates that the organization ethics process may serve as a quality control mechanism to prevent this shift and so help eliminate some of the ethically problematic processes and outcomes within the health care delivery system. Read More

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October 2002

Priceless goods: how should life-saving drugs be priced?

Authors:
Ian Maitland

Bus Ethics Q 2002 Oct;12(4):451-80

This article examines the ethical issues raised by the pricing of priceless goods. Priceless goods are defined as ones that are widely held to have some special non-market value that makes them unsuited for buying and selling. One subset of priceless goods is prescription drugs--particularly life-saving and life-enhancing ones. Read More

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October 2002
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Fulfilling institutional responsibilities in health care: organizational ethics and the role of mission discernment.

Bus Ethics Q 2002 Oct;12(4):433-50

In this paper we highlight the emergence of organizational ethics issues in health care as an important outcome of the changing structure of health care delivery. We emphasize three core themes related to business ethics and health care ethics: integrity, responsibility, and choice. These themes are brought together in a discussion of the process of Mission Discernment as it has been developed and implemented within an integrated health care system. Read More

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October 2002
3 Reads

Ethics and incentives: an evaluation and development of stakeholder theory in the health care industry.

Bus Ethics Q 2002 Oct;12(4):413-32

This paper utilizes a qualitative case study of the health care industry and a recent legal case to demonstrate that stakeholder theory's focus on ethics, without recognition of the effects of incentives, severely limits the theory's ability to provide managerial direction and explain managerial behavior. While ethics provide a basis for stakeholder prioritization, incentives influence whether managerial action is consistent with that prioritization. Our health care examples highlight this and other limitations of stakeholder theory and demonstrate the explanatory and directive power added by the inclusion of the interactive effects of ethics and incentives in stakeholder ordering. Read More

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October 2002

The ethics of genetic screening in the workplace.

Authors:
Joseph Kupfer

Bus Ethics Q 1993 Jan;3(1):17-25

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January 1993
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