318 results match your criteria Bulletin of the Hospital for Joint Disease 2013[Journal]


Endoscopic Spine Surgery Past, Present, and Future.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2019 Mar;77(1):75-84

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Pediatric Medial Epicondyle Fractures Are We There Yet?

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2019 Mar;77(1):70-74

Several controversies surround the evaluation and treatment of medial epicondyle fractures of the humerus in children. As is well established, the medial epicondyle is the point of attachment for the medial collateral ligament and flexor and pronator musculature, thereby conferring a potentially important role in elbow stability and wrist strength. Traditional x-ray evaluation has been shown to be inaccurate in measuring fracture displacement. Read More

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March 2019
2 Reads

The Anterolateral Ligament (ALL) The New Ligament?

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2019 Mar;77(1):64-69

Background: Despite advances in technology, graft rupture rates reported in the literature following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery range from 1.8% to 18%. Recent anatomical studies have identified a lateral structure, the anterolateral ligament (ALL), as a potential source of residual pivoting following ACL reconstruction. Read More

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Basal Joint Arthritis A Review of Pathology, History, and Treatment.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2019 Mar;77(1):57-63

The basal joint is a collection of articulations at the base of thumb that serve an important function in the overall dexterity of the hand. The unique anatomy of the basal joint provided many evolutionary advantages to the human hand, but also made this joint susceptible to arthrosis and degenerative changes. Surgical treatment of basal joint arthritis has continued to evolve since it was first described in 1949, including excisional arthroplasty, tendon interposition, ligament reconstruction, implant arthroplasty, and arthroscopy. Read More

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March 2019
8 Reads

Varus Derotational Osteotomy.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2019 Mar;77(1):53-56

Legg-Calve-Perthes disease is a multifactorial process that can lead to debilitating femoral head deformity in children. Management can range from conservative (such as nonweightbearing protocols), bracing (such as A frames), to more invasive measures involving surgical interventions. First described by Axer in 1965, the varus derotational osteotomy (VDRO) has been a staple in the surgical management of Perthes disease. Read More

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March 2019
1 Read

Coronal and Sagittal Balancing of Total Knee Arthroplasty Old Principles and New Technologies.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2019 Mar;77(1):45-52

The number of total knee arthroplasties performed in the United States is growing, and a leading cause of failure is postoperative knee instability from suboptimal coronal or sagittal balancing. This article reviews native knee anatomy as well as several guiding principles of total knee arthroplasty such as limb axis, femoral referencing, and implant constraint. Next, techniques that can be used by the surgeon to achieve ideal sagittal balance and coronal balance are discussed in detail. Read More

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Designing Resorbable Scaffolds for Bone Defects.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2019 Mar;77(1):39-44

The next frontier of orthopedic implants are resorbable devices. Tissue engineering advances have created a demand for scaffolds that can facilitate biologic regeneration. Scaffolds that will degrade over time with the infiltration of host cells are of particular interest. Read More

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The Essex-Lopresti Injury.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2019 Mar;77(1):33-38

The Essex-Lopresti injury is caused by a high energy mechanism and consists of a characteristic triad: a comminuted radial head fracture, disruption of the distal radioulnar joint, and tearing of the interosseous membrane. These injuries are often difficult to diagnosis on initial evaluation, and the majority are missed acutely. Chronic Essex-Lopresti injuries lead to radioulnar longitudinal instability, proximal radius migration, ulnocarpal impaction, and chronic elbow pain. Read More

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March 2019
1 Read

First-Time Traumatic Anterior Shoulder Instability Management in the Young and Active Patient.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2019 Mar;77(1):21-32

Anterior instability of the glenohumeral joint is a common and functionally limiting shoulder condition, particularly in young and active patients. In this population, non-operative management has been increasingly demonstrated to be associated with recurrent instability and increased long-term morbidity. Surgical treatment options include both arthroscopic and open techniques. Read More

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The Stener Lesion and Complete Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injuries of the Thumb A Review.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2019 Mar;77(1):11-20

A Stener lesion is a complete tear of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) from the thumb proximal phalanx at the level of the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint that is displaced superficial to the adductor pollicis aponeurosis, leading to interposition of the aponeurosis between the UCL and the MCP joint. The interposition of the adductor aponeurosis distinguishes the Stener lesion from other UCL injuries and impedes healing, thereby necessitating surgery. A thorough clinical examination, including valgus stress testing of the MCP joint, is crucial to the diagnosis. Read More

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March 2019
11 Reads

Management of Type II Odontoid Fractures in Adults.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2019 Mar;77(1):4-10

Fractures of the odontoid represent as much as 20% of cervical spine fractures in adults, and they are the most common spine fracture in patients over 80 years of age. Despite their prevalence, the management of these fractures remains highly controversial. In particular, there is much debate concerning the management of type II fractures, or fractures occurring about the waist of the odontoid. Read More

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Imitating the Great Imitator The Intersection of Sarcoidosis and Hodgkin's Lymphoma A Report of Two Cases.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2018 Jun;76(2):143-148

Sarcoidosis and Hodgkin's lymphoma represent two distinct diseases with different pathogenic mechanisms, therapeutic interventions, and prognoses. Nevertheless, both diseases can have overlapping presentations, thus blurring the line between successful identification and treatment. A propensity to develop one of these diseases following diagnosis of the other has long been appreciated. Read More

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June 2018
1 Read

Autoimmune Tracheal Cartilage Inflammation Responsive to Anti-TNF-α Therapy.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2018 Jun;76(2):139-142

Tracheal inflammation, or tracheitis, is a pathologic process that can occur secondary to a number of systemic inflammatory diseases, or it may be idiopathic in nature. Regardless of the underlying etiology, tracheitis can, in its most severe form, be life-threatening, thus making its treatment an area of interest. Our case is one of a 50-year-old man with a remote history of inflammatory bowel disease achieving clinical cure following surgical resection who presented with progressive dyspnea due to tracheal stenosis that was presumed secondary to an autoimmune and inflammatory etiology. Read More

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June 2018
2 Reads

Unreported Sharps Exposures in Orthopedic Surgery Residents A Silent Majority.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2018 Jun;76(2):133-138

Sharps-related injuries represent a significant occupational hazard to orthopedic surgeons. Despite increased attention and targeted interventions, evidence suggests that the majority of incidents continue to go unreported. The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence, attitudes, and factors that affect the reporting of sharps injuries among orthopedic surgery residents at a large academic teaching hospital in an effort to increase reporting rates and design effective interventions. Read More

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June 2018
2 Reads

Approach to the Patient with Disproportionate Pain.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2018 Jun;76(2):123-132

Faced with a patient who presents with unexplained disproportionate pain, a surgeon may be tempted to diagnose a low pain threshold, malingering, poor coping, anxiety, or other emotional condition. However, a variety of conditions must be ruled out before the orthopedist can prescribe watchful waiting. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging can detect occult fractures, acute spinal conditions or vascular occlusions, but early on are inadequate to diagnose a compartment syndrome, necrotizing fasciitis, or reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD). Read More

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June 2018
6 Reads

The Impact of Anterior Glenoid Defects on Reverse Shoulder Glenoid Fixation in a Composite Scapula Model.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2018 Jun;76(2):116-122

Background: Achieving glenoid fixation with anterior bone loss can be challenging. Limited guidelines have been established for critical defect sizes that can be treated without supplemental bone graft when performing reverse shoulder arthroplasty.

Methods: We quantified the impact of two sizes of anterior glenoid defects on glenoid baseplate fixation in a composite scapula using the ASTM F 2028-14 reverse shoulder glenoid loosening test method. Read More

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June 2018
1 Read

Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire for the Evaluation of Patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2018 Jun;76(2):112-115

This study evaluates hand functioning in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) and validates the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ) as a measure of hand functioning evaluation. Patients with diagnosis of MPS between the ages of 8 and 21 years were eligible for enrolment in the study irrespective of whether they were or were not receiving treatment (enzyme replacement therapy). Individuals with mental disorders and those who had already undergone hand surgery were excluded. Read More

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Radiographic Predictors of Patient Satisfaction Following Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2018 Jun;76(2):105-111

Background: Predicting satisfaction following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) continues to be a clinical challenge. We sought to quantify radiographic variables associated with clinical improvement and satisfaction following TKA.

Methods: We reviewed a consecutive series of primary TKAs performed by a single surgeon with a minimum 2-year follow-up. Read More

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June 2018
2 Reads

Posterior Dynamic Stabilization of the Lumbar Spine Review of Biomechanical and Clinical Studies.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2018 Jun;76(2):100-104

Fusion and rigid instrumentation have been the mainstay for the surgical treatment of degenerative diseases of the spine for many years. Dynamic stabilization provides a theoretical advantage of decreased biomechanical stress on adjacent spinal segments and decreased fatigue failure of implants. Artificial discs provide an alternative treatment and have been well-studied in the literature. Read More

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Neuropathic Arthropathy of the Glenohumeral Joint A Review of the Literature.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2018 Jun;76(2):88-99

Neuropathic arthropathy, also known as Charcot arthropathy, is a degenerative disorder most commonly characterized by rapid destruction of the joint with extensive involvement of the bone and soft tissue. The underlying pathophysiology is thought to be due to loss of nociception (pain sensation), most frequently caused by diabetes mellitus, syphilitic myelopathy, or syringomyelia. A neuropathic shoulder is rare, with historic case series forming the bulk of the literature. Read More

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Importance of the Sagittal Plane in Understanding Adult Spinal Deformities.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2018 Mar;76(1):80-84

The sagittal plane is known to be important in correction of adult spinal deformity. When surgery is indicated, the surgeon is provided with several tools and techniques to restore balance. But proper use of these tools is essential to avoid harmful complications. Read More

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March 2018
2 Reads

Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) Approaches to Thoracolumbar Trauma.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2018 Mar;76(1):71-79

Minimally invasive surgical (MIS) techniques offer promising improvements in the management of thoracolumbar trauma. Recent advances in MIS techniques and instrumentation for degenerative conditions have heralded a growing interest in employing these techniques for thoracolumbar trauma. Specifically, surgeons have applied these techniques to help manage flexion- and extension-distraction injuries, neurologically intact burst fractures, and cases of damage control. Read More

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Evaluation and Management of Pediatric Bone Lesions.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2018 Mar;76(1):62-70

Bone abnormalities on pediatric radiographs are not uncommon findings for both the general orthopedist as well as the specialist. Although the majority of lesions encountered are benign, the treating physician should also be aware of more concerning diagnoses. General orthopedists and pediatric orthopedists should exhibit a basic level of comfort with working up and diagnosing these benign lesions. Read More

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March 2018
1 Read

Strategies for Management of Periprosthetic Joint Infection.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2018 Mar;76(1):55-61

Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the most catastrophic and difficult to manage complications following total hip and total knee arthroplasty. As the number of total joint arthroplasties continues to increase, the burden of PJI will continue to further strain resources. As such, orthopedic surgeons consider four principles crucial in appropriately managing difficult or complex cases of PJI: identification, debridement, antibiotics, and patience. Read More

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March 2018
4 Reads

Beyond the Scope Open Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2018 Mar;76(1):47-54

Hip arthroscopy as we know it today developed over the last 15 to 20 years, yet its true beginning is far more dated. Initially developed as a means of removing loose bodies or as a means of lavage, hip arthroscopy was not utilized to treat femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) until much later. Its usefulness as a means of treating FAI did not arise until hip impingement was understood to be causal in the development of degenerative changes of the labrum and articular surfaces. Read More

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March 2018
1 Read

Ultra-High-Molecular-Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) in Total Joint Arthroplasty.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2018 Mar;76(1):38-46

Total joint arthroplasty of the hip and knee are successful orthopedic procedures that reduce pain and improve mobility in patients. As the implanted materials used in these procedures have improved, the lifetime of the implants has now reached more than 20 years. Younger patients are undergoing total joint arthroplasty at increasing rates, which has increased the need for improvements in materials for extended implant longevity. Read More

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March 2018
1 Read

Perilunate Injuries and Dislocations Etiology, Diagnosis, and Management.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2018 Mar;76(1):33-37

Perilunate injuries most commonly occur in high energy trauma situations; however, they are rare and frequently missed. Familiarity with the complex bony and ligamentous anatomy is required to fully understand these complex injury patterns. Careful orthogonal imaging and evaluation is required to ensure timely diagnosis of a perilunate injury. Read More

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March 2018
2 Reads

Scaphoid Nonunions.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2018 Mar;76(1):27-32

Scaphoid nonunions are challenging injuries to manage and the optimal treatment algorithm continues to be debated. Most scaphoid fractures heal when appropriately treated; however, when nonunions occur, they require acute treatment to prevent future complications like scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse. Acute nonunion treatment technique depends on nonunion location, vascular status of the proximal pole, fracture malalignment, and pre-existing evidence of arthrosis. Read More

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March 2018
8 Reads

Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction Past, Present, and Future Past, Present, and Future.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2018 Mar;76(1):22-26

Shoulder and elbow injuries have been described in baseball players as early as the 1940s. Ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) tears have been recognized as a significant source of disability for baseball players and have been seen in increasing frequency as training regimens and level of play have become more intense and rigorous. Our understanding and treatment of these injuries have also evolved over time. Read More

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March 2018
26 Reads

Meniscal Root Tears Evaluation and Management.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2018 Mar;76(1):14-21

The management of meniscal root injuries has changed as biomechanical studies have demonstrated the importance of meniscal integrity in load distribution across the knee joint. Meniscal injury causes altered joint mechanics, which is postulated to be related to the onset of arthrosis. Arthroscopic meniscal root repair has been shown to restore more normal joint mechanics and is considered a treatment option in the appropriately indicated patient. Read More

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Impact of Intramedullary Nailing in the Treatment of Femur Fractures An Evolutionary Perspective.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2018 Mar;76(1):9-13

Today intramedullary nails (IMN) are the gold standard in the treatment of femur fractures. Since its inception, improved design and understanding of the surrounding anatomy has exponentially increased successful patient treatment and outcomes by promoting early mobilization and reliable union. In this review, we provide an in-depth look into the evolutionary process that has led IMN to becoming today's gold standard in femur fractures. Read More

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Management of Bone Defects in Orthopedic Trauma.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2018 Mar;76(1):278-284

Treatment of traumatic bone defects is dictated by a multitude of clinical factors including the defect size, patient comorbidities, soft tissue condition, and the possibility of infection present in the defect. With a variety of treatment strategies described, it is critical to choose the approach that will maximize outcomes in addressing this difficult problem. When addressing small-scale defects, bone grafting is the primary treatment. Read More

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March 2018
4 Reads

Single-Bone Intramedullary Nailing of Pediatric Both-Bone Forearm Fractures A Systematic Review.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2017 Dec;75(4):227-233

Traditional operative management of unstable, pediatric both-bone forearm fractures is fixation of both ulna and radius. Literature suggests single-bone fixation with intramedullary nailing obtains good results and is less technically demanding and invasive. This systematic review evaluates the efficacy of single-bone intramedullary nailing of pediatric both-bone forearm fractures. Read More

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December 2017
5 Reads

Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Following Bilateral Cemented Total Hip Replacements.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2017 Dec;75(4):286-288

Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare, serious complication caused by neuroleptic medications. It is characterized by rigidity, hyperthermia, tachycardia, leukocytosis, and an elevated creatine kinase (CK). We present a case of a 50-year-old male who underwent bilateral total hip replacements and subsequently developed NMS. Read More

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December 2017
6 Reads

Osteomyelitis After Calcium Phosphate Subchondroplasty A Case Report.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2017 Dec;75(4):282-285

Subchondroplasty is a relatively new procedure developed to treat bone marrow lesions by injecting a calcium phosphate bone substitute into the pathologic, subchondral area of bone under fluoroscopic guidance. The procedure is described as a minimally invasive strategy that provides reliable relief of pain while preserving the native joint with minimal risk of significant complications. No prospective, randomized clinical trials have reported the efficacy of the procedure. Read More

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December 2017
1 Read

Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis (DISH) as a Cause of Failure Following Distal Clavicle Excision A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2017 Dec;75(4):279-281

Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is common spinal condition characterized by increased calcification and ossification of ligaments and entheses, typically in the anterior aspect of the spine. However, extraspinal manifestations of the disease can occur and depending on the degree and location of involvement, may become symptomatic. We present the case of a 63-year-old male with a history of DISH, who failed initial open distal clavicle excision due to the postoperative development of heterotopic bone bridging across the acromioclavicular joint. Read More

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December 2017
5 Reads

Consent in Elective Hip Arthroplasty What Has Changed Over the Last 15 Years?

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2017 Dec;75(4):274-278

Purpose: It is regular practice that patients undergoing orthopaedic procedures particularly those related to arthroplasty are given both verbal and written information prior to their surgery. The aim of this study was to complete a 15 year audit cycle by assessing the patient understanding of the consent process in elective orthopaedic surgery following the introduction of patient information booklets, DVDs, web links, and "joint school."

Methods: 150 patients (50 patients in each cycle of the study) undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty were counselled about the audit and prospectively enrolled. Read More

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December 2017
2 Reads

Decreasing the Incidence of Surgical Site Infections Following Joint Replacement Surgery.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2017 Dec;75(4):268-273

Objective: Despite the generalized use of prophylactic antibiotics in orthopaedic surgery, Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) are still a major source of morbidity, mortality, and hospital cost. This is due in part to the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistant organisms.

Methods: A review of local epidemiology, the importance of an antibiotic stewardship program, patient optimization, and risk stratification options to reduce SSIs. Read More

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December 2017
4 Reads

The Role and Timing of Treatment Strategies During Two-Stage Revision for Periprosthetic Joint Infections.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2017 Dec;75(4):246-247

Introduction: Prosthetic joint infection continues to be a source of significant morbidity to patients and an economic burden to society as a whole. Two-stage revision is the current gold standard for treatment of periprosthetic joint infection in North America. Despite this, much discussion persists about treatment strategies surrounding the interim of the two-stage revision and treatment beyond reimplantation. Read More

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December 2017
1 Read

The Association Between Scholarly Impact and National Institutes of Health Funding in Orthopaedic Surgery.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2017 Dec;75(4):257-263

The assessment of scholarly productivity assumes a strong role in evaluating faculty in academic orthopaedic surgery. The investigators examine the association between scholarly impact, as measured by the h-index, and National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding in orthopaedic surgery. Orthopaedic surgery faculty from 20 randomly chosen departments that received NIH-funding were compared to non-NIH funded faculty from the same departments. Read More

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December 2017
8 Reads

Same Day Discharge After Total Joint Arthroplasty The Future May Be Now.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2017 Dec;75(4):252-256

Total joint arthroplasty has traditionally been performed as an inpatient procedure to mitigate the risks of perioperative complications, limited mobility, and pain control issues. Reducing readmissions and complications is increasingly important with the push toward outcomes based reimbursement. Nonetheless, there is a definite trend toward not only shortening postoperative length of stay but also toward considering a same day discharge arthroplasty model in appropriately selected patients. Read More

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December 2017

Risk Stratification, Triage, and Implementation of an Expedited Hip Fracture Treatment Protocol Is it Safe and Effective?

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2017 Dec;75(4):248-251

Introduction: The population of patients in the USA over the age of 65 is expected to significantly increase over the next 40 years. These patients are at increased risk for hip fractures and will pose a burden to providers in the near future. In order to provide high value care, providers will need to maintain positive outcomes, mitigate complications, and reduce overall cost burdens. Read More

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December 2017
4 Reads

Suture Anchor Repair of Complete Proximal Hamstring Ruptures A Cadaveric Biomechanical Evaluation.

Authors:

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2017 Dec;75(4):241-247

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December 2017

Sagittal Pelvic Orientation A Comparison of Two Methods of Measurement.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2017 Dec;75(4):234-240

Pelvic tilt is an essential parameter in spinal deformity surgery and in acetabular positioning for total hip arthroplasty. However, the measurement of tilt varies between the hip and spine literature. Hip surgeons measure the anterior pelvic plane tilt, whereas spine surgeons measure the spinopelvic tilt. Read More

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December 2017
3 Reads

Accelerated Degenerative Joint Disease After Staged Hip Arthroscopy and Periacetabular Osteotomy in a Patient with Hip Dysplasia.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2017 May;75(3):220-224

Hip dysplasia, when significant, is effectively treated with periacetabular osteotomy. There have been good results reported with hip arthroscopy when dysplasia is mild. However, when dysplasia is significant, hip arthroscopy with labral repair alone has led to poor results and even rapid decline to end stage arthritis. Read More

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Transient Vasospastic Response Following the Injection of Corticosteroid into the Hand.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2017 May;75(3):217-219

A sixty-year-old right hand dominant woman with longstanding left basal joint arthritis and right small trigger finger presented for corticosteroid injections to both areas. She had previously received injections with no adverse effects and good relief of symptoms. Following this most recent injection of corticosteroid, she experienced transient ischemia of the left hand and the right long and ring fingers. Read More

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May 2017
7 Reads

Knee Extension Loss Secondary to a "Cyclops-Like" Gouty Tophus A Case Report and Literature Review.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2017 May;75(3):213-216

While gouty arthritis of the knee is not uncommon, associated mechanical block to extension is a rarely seen complication. This report presents a unique case of extension loss due to a single, isolated intra-articular gouty tophus. Only a few similar reports have been described in the literature involving cases that are often initially suspected to be related to inherent structural knee pathology as opposed to a systemic condition or illness. Read More

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May 2017
8 Reads

Technique Tricks for the Gleich-Koutsogiannis Surgical Procedure for Correction of the Adult Acquired Flatfoot.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2017 05;75(3):210-212

Orthopaedics and Traumatology Department, A.S.S.T. Franciacorta, Civil Hospital of Chiari, Brescia, Italy.

Gleich-Koutsogiannis is a widely known extra-articular closing calcaneal osteotomic technique for correction of the adult flatfoot. Absolute care must be observed during each procedural step to avoid undesirable drawbacks, such as nerves and tendons lesions, incorrect fixation, and hardware painful prominence. It is the purpose of this report to introduce tricks to critical steps in order to improve the technique and minimize potential surgical complications. Read More

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May 2017
19 Reads

The Relationship Between Hospital-Specific Hip Arthroplasty Surgical Site Infection Rate and the Overall Hospital Infection Rate.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2017 May;75(3):207-209

Surgical site infections (SSIs) following hip arthroplasty are a rare but devastating complication. The New York State Health Data website was analyzed for all health care acquired infections from 2008 to 2013 in all New York hospitals. Data points were SSI rates and standardized infection ratio (SIR) for each hospital-year. Read More

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May 2017
4 Reads

An Evaluation of Patient Risk Factors to Determine Eligibility to Undergo Orthopaedic Surgery in a Freestanding Ambulatory Center A Survey of 4,242 Consecutive Patients.

Bull Hosp Jt Dis (2013) 2017 May;75(3):201-206

Introduction: The value proposition of surgery at freestanding ambulatory surgery centers (FSASCs) in terms of efficiency, safety, and patient satisfaction is well established and has led to increased FSASC utilization. However, there are comorbid conditions that disqualify certain patients from surgery at FSASCs. Understanding the percentage of patients whose comorbid conditions exclude them from FSASCs is important for the proper planning and utilization of operating room assets. Read More

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May 2017
14 Reads