2,098 results match your criteria Bulletin Of The History Of Medicine[Journal]


"Something Wasn't Clean": Black Midwifery, Birth, and Postwar Medical Education in All My Babies.

Authors:
Wangui Muigai

Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(1):82-113

Set in rural Georgia, the 1953 health film All My Babies: A Midwife's Own Story was a government-sponsored project intended as a training tool for midwives. The film was unique to feature a black midwife and a live birth at a time when southern health officials blamed midwives for the region's infant mortality rates. Produced by the young filmmaker George Stoney, All My Babies was praised for its educational value and, as this article demonstrates, was a popular feature in postwar medical education. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0003DOI Listing
January 2019

Pestis Minor: The History of a Contested Plague Pathology.

Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(1):55-81

Pestis minor is a pathological category that at the height of the third plague pandemic (1894-1959) fueled extensive debate and research among medical scientists. Referring to an attenuated or benign form of plague, evidence of pestis minor or pestis ambulans was produced in medical reports across the world so as to raise the question of whether the disease could survive measures against it by means of temporary transformation. Afflicting its victims only by the slightest lymphatic swellings, this theory went, the disease could thus lurk in the human body until conditions allowed it to break out again in its true, malignant form. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0002DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Skills, Knowledge, and Status: The Career of an Early Modern Italian Surgeon.

Authors:
Paolo Savoia

Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(1):27-54

This article analyzes the career of Giovanni Battista Cortesi (1552-1643)-the son of a poor tailor who started his career as barber and steam bath attendant and became university professor at Bologna and Messina-and places it in the context of the profession of surgery in early modern Italy. The article investigates how a surgeon had to establish close relationships with universities, civic authorities, wealthy upper-class patients, hospitals as sites of clinical education and acquisition of manual skills, the printing industry and the book market, and students. Moreover, the article explores the fluidity of professional and cultural boundaries between learned and empirical knowledge from the perspective of a graduate surgeon who was not supposed to be. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6458849PMC
January 2019

Why Was "Custom a Second Nature" in Early Modern Medicine?

Authors:
Steven Shapin

Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(1):1-26

"Custom is a second nature" is a saying that circulated long before the early modern period and in many different cultural settings. But the maxim had special salience, reference, and force in dietetic medicine from the late medieval period through the eighteenth century. What did that saying mean in the early modern medical setting? What presumptions about the body, about habitual ways of life, and about the authority of medical knowledge were inscribed within it? And what was the historical career of the saying as views of the body, its transactions with the environment, and the hereditary process changed through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries? Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0000DOI Listing
January 2019

The Origins of Family Planning in Tunisia: Reform, Public Health, and International Aid.

Authors:
Jennifer Johnson

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(4):664-693

This article explores the origins of the national family planning program in Tunisia during the 1960s. It moves beyond previous interpretations of the global population control movement that emphasized external intervention at the hands of international organizations. Instead it analyzes the mutually beneficial partnership between Tunisian president Habib Bourguiba and the Population Council, an American organization committed to reducing population growth. Read More

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https://muse.jhu.edu/article/713342
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0075DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

The Mist Tent: An Analysis of Therapeutic Change in the History of Cystic Fibrosis Care.

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(4):634-663

Mist tent therapy for cystic fibrosis went through a rise and fall in popularity between the 1950s and 1970s, providing an opportunity to explore the nature of therapeutic change in medicine. The therapy "worked" in the context of a particularly grim life expectancy in the early 1950s and in the setting of a comprehensive therapeutic program that began in Cleveland in 1957. Although clinical studies published in the 1970s provided evidence that mist tents were ineffective or even harmful, these later studies were not necessarily more robust than earlier studies that provided evidence of mist tent efficacy, suggesting that other factors may have also contributed to mist tent abandonment. Read More

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https://muse.jhu.edu/article/713341
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0074DOI Listing
April 2019
8 Reads

Gender and Cortisone: Clinical Practice and Transatlantic Exchange in the Medical Management of Intersex in the 1950s.

Authors:
Sandra Eder

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(4):604-633

This article complicates the history of the standardization of intersex case management developed at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in the 1950s by focusing on clinical practices and logics and the transatlantic circulation of knowledge. Using patient records and published studies, I follow the exchanges between pediatric endocrinologists Lawson Wilkins (Pediatric Endocrinology Clinic, Baltimore) and Andrea Prader (University Children's Hospital, Zürich) on cortisone treatment for children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), on psychosexuality and gender role, on choosing and changing the sex of intersex children, and on genital surgery. I argue that a focus on the transatlantic exchanges between these two clinics illuminates a more complex genealogy of modern intersex case management. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0073DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

John Houghton and Medical Practice in London c. 1700.

Authors:
Jonathan Barry

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(4):575-603

This article considers the evidence for medical practice in London c. 1700 provided by A Collection for the Improvement of Husbandry and Trade (1692-1703) by the apothecary and Fellow of the Royal Society, John Houghton (1645-1705). Houghton discusses how products are used medicinally, as well as the necessary qualifications for a physician, and reports his own experiments and health experiences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0072DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6369514PMC

Editors' Note.

Authors:

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(4):vi

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0071DOI Listing
January 2018

American Association for the History of Medicine Awards and Prizes, 2019.

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Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(3):545-549

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0058DOI Listing
January 2018

Group Weight Loss and Multiple Screening: A Tale of Two Heart Disease Programs in Postwar American Public Health.

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(3):474-505

In the late 1940s, amid elevated concern about heart disease and new funding to fight it, multiple screening emerged alongside group psychotherapy for weight loss as two innovative responses of the American public health community. I describe the early trajectory and fate in the 1950s of both programs as shaped by the ongoing political controversy about national health insurance. Group weight loss became the main de facto American response to a perceived obesity-driven heart disease crisis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0056DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Drawing Damaged Bodies: British Medical Art in the Early Twentieth Century.

Authors:
Samuel J Alberti

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(3):439-473

Historians are acutely aware of the role of art in medicine. Elaborate early modern works catch our eye; technical innovations attract analysis. This paper beats a different path by examining three little-known artists in early twentieth-century Britain who deployed what may seem like an outdated method: drawing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0055DOI Listing
January 2019

"I Was Doctor": White Settler Women's Amateur Medical Practice in East and South-Central African Communities, 1890-1939.

Authors:
Julia Wells

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(3):413-438

Professional medicine in colonial British Africa has been extensively examined by historians. Few scholars, however, have adequately considered the role that white settlers without medical training played in the provision of colonial health care in local African communities. This article addresses the gap by exploring amateur medical treatment by white settler women in East and South-Central African communities between 1890 and 1939, primarily in highland areas of Kenya and Southern Rhodesia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0054DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Memento Mütter.

Authors:
Paula A Summerly

Bull Hist Med 2018;92(2):370-371

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0032DOI Listing
January 2018

News And Events.

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Bull Hist Med 2018;92(2):368-369

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0031DOI Listing
January 2018

Some Notes on Papyrus Ebers, Ancient Egyptian Treatments of Migraine, and a Crocodile on the Patient's Head.

Authors:
Lutz Popko

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(2):352-366

Modern literature about the history of migraine treatments often starts with an ancient Egyptian remedy said to be from Papyrus Ebers that involves crocodiles that should be wrapped around the head. A fresh look on this treatment shows the need for revision on many points, including the source of the remedy, its content and meaning, and further implications for the history of Papyrus Ebers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0030DOI Listing
January 2019

Swann Song: Antibiotic Regulation in British Livestock Production (1953-2006).

Authors:
Claas Kirchhelle

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(2):317-350

Antibiotics have played a significant yet ambivalent role in Western livestock husbandry. Mass introduced to agriculture to boost animal production and reduce feed consumption in the early 1950s, agricultural antibiotics were soon accused of selecting for bacterial resistance, causing residues and enabling bad animal welfare. The dilemma posed by agricultural antibiotic regulation persists to this day. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0029DOI Listing
January 2019

Religion, Medicine, and Politics: Catholic Physicians' Guilds in America,1909-32.

Authors:
Jessica Martucci

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(2):287-316

In 1909 the first Catholic physicians' guild formed in New York City. By 1911 guilds could be found in Philadelphia and Boston. They acted as professional organizations as well as brotherhoods built on a set of shared religious and moral convictions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0028DOI Listing
January 2019
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Leprosy's Untainted Child.

Authors:
Jo Robertson

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(2):261-286

In the face of an obdurate disease, the Mission to Lepers made a virtue out of "saving" children from leprosy and from paganism by separating them from their parents so that they became a source of publicity, sponsorship, and fund-raising. This policy transformed a benevolent work of mercy into a professional one, for it soon became clear that children separated from their parents did not develop leprosy. Consequently, the asylum became a site where scientific conclusions were made about the transmission of the disease, and the authority of the mission was enhanced at international medical conferences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0027DOI Listing
January 2019

"This Fathom-Long Body": Bodily Materiality and Ascetic Ideology in Medieval Chinese Buddhist Scriptures.

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(2):237-260

An outside observer might be excused for assuming that Buddhists, being focused on transcendence, would have little interest in investigating the body's structure or constituent parts in any detail. However, nothing could be further from the truth. Bodies and body parts have in fact long been ubiquitous subjects of contemplation, speculation, and veneration in Buddhist circles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0026DOI Listing
January 2019

Editors' Note.

Authors:

Bull Hist Med 2018;92(2):vi

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0025DOI Listing
January 2018

A Research Enclave in 1940s Nigeria: The Rockefeller Foundation Yellow Fever Research Institute at Yaba, Lagos, 1943-49.

Authors:
Megan Vaughan

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(1):172-205

This article examines the history of yellow fever research carried out in West Africa in the 1940s by Rockefeller Foundation scientists. It engages with a number of debates in the history of medical research in colonial Africa, including experimentation, the construction of the "field," and biosecurity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0007DOI Listing
January 2019

The Radicalization of Breast Cancer Surgery: Joseph Colt Bloodgood's Role in William Stewart Halsted's Legacy.

Authors:
James R Wright

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(1):141-171

Johns Hopkins's surgeon William Stewart Halsted is renowned for popularizing the radical mastectomy, a disfiguring procedure that was overutilized during the 1900s. Cancer historians have questioned why Halsted, a meticulous surgical investigator, became more aggressive in his approach to breast cancer surgery when his own data failed to show prolonged patient survival. Joseph Colt Bloodgood, one of Halsted's early surgical residents, Hopkins's head of surgical pathology, and Halsted's primary outcome data analyst, played previously unrecognized roles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0006DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

The Cowpox Controversy: Memory and the Politics of Public Health in Cuba.

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(1):110-140

Vaccination played an important role in the formation of a national consciousness in Cuba, and vaccination's earliest promoters dominate nationalist narratives of medical achievement on the island. This article investigates the intense hostility exhibited by the creole medical elite toward a pivotal figure in the history of smallpox vaccination in Cuba, Spanish physician Dr. Vicente Ferrer (1823-83), the first in the Americas to mass produce smallpox vaccine using calf vaccinifiers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0005DOI Listing
January 2019

"He Must Die or Go Mad in This Place": Prisoners, Insanity, and the Pentonville Model Prison Experiment, 1842-52.

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(1):78-109

The relationship between prisons and mental illness has preoccupied prison administrators, physicians, and reformers from the establishment of the modern prison service in the nineteenth century to the current day. Here we take the case of Pentonville Model Prison, established in 1842 with the aim of reforming convicts through religious exhortation, rigorous discipline and training, and the imposition of separate confinement in its most extreme form. Our article demonstrates how following the introduction of separate confinement, the prison chaplains rather than the medical officers took a lead role in managing the minds of convicts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5944833PMC
January 2019

The Fielding H. Garrison Lecture: Great Doctor History.

Authors:
Barron H Lerner

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(1):55-77

For decades, physicians wrote much of the history of medicine, often "great man" histories that celebrated their colleagues' accomplishments as part of a celebratory historical narrative. Beginning in the 1970s, social historians challenged this type of scholarship, arguing that it was Whiggish, omitted the flaws of the medical profession, left patients out of the story, and ignored issues of gender, race, and class. This Garrison Lecture revisits this history through the prism of my recent book, The Good Doctor: A Father, a Son, and the Evolution of Medical Ethics, which is essentially a biography of my physician father, Phillip Lerner, and an autobiography. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0003DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Comment: Materia Medica.

Authors:
Linda Nash

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(1):50-54

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0002DOI Listing
October 2018

Climate Change?: The Environment, Physicians, and Historians.

Authors:
Barron H Lerner

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(1):46-49

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0001DOI Listing
October 2018
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To Place or Not to Place: Toward an Environmental History of Modern Medicine.

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(1):1-45

Reviewing recent, overlapping work by historians of medicine and health and of environmental history, this article proposes a further agenda upon which scholars in both fields may converge. Both environmental and medical historians can seek to understand the past two centuries of medical history in terms of a seesaw dialogue over the ways and means by which physicians and other health professionals did, and did not, consider the influence of place-airs and waters included-on disease. Modernizing and professionalizing as well as new styles of science nourished attendant aspirations for a clinical place neutrality, for a medicine in which patients' own places didn't matter to what doctors thought or did. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0000DOI Listing
January 2019

American Women Physicians in World War I.

Authors:
Janet Golden

Bull Hist Med 2017 ;91(4):805

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2017.0083DOI Listing
January 2017
1 Read

Plagued by Politics: Cuba's National Sanatorium Project, 1936-59.

Authors:
Kelly Urban

Bull Hist Med 2017 ;91(4):772-801

In 1936, Fulgencio Batista, the head of the Cuban military (and the de facto ruler of Cuba), founded the National Tuberculosis Council (CNT) to lead a state-directed anti-tuberculosis campaign. While most national and colonial governments neglected tuberculosis until the postwar period, populist politics pushed Batista to prioritize a disease of poverty by the mid-1930s. However, national politics also undermined efforts to control the disease in Cuba. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2017.0081DOI Listing
December 2018
6 Reads

Between Colonial, National, and International Medicine: The Case of Bejel.

Authors:
Liat Kozma

Bull Hist Med 2017 ;91(4):744-771

In the 1920s and 1930s, doctors stationed in the Middle East and North Africa debated whether bejel, a form of endemic syphilis, was an Arab version of syphilis, or a separate disease altogether. Using their clinical experience in the region, they tried to weave this unfamiliar phenomenon into a civilizational narrative, which placed European civilization at the top of a hierarchy. The assumption was that there was something inherent to Islamic societies and their hygienic habits that accounted for this difference. Read More

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https://muse.jhu.edu/article/680779
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2017.0080DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Managing the "Obscene M.D.": Medical Publishing, the Medical Profession, and the Changing Definition of Obscenity in Mid-Victorian England.

Authors:
Sarah Bull

Bull Hist Med 2017 ;91(4):713-743

This article examines links between mid-Victorian opposition to commerce in popular works on sexual health and the introduction of a legal test of obscenity, in the 1868 trial R. v. Hicklin, that opened the public distribution of any work that contained sexual information to prosecution. Read More

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https://muse.jhu.edu/article/680778
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2017.0079DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5788327PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Treating the Secret Disease: Sex, Sin, and Authority in Eighteenth-Century Venereal Cases.

Authors:
Olivia Weisser

Bull Hist Med 2017 ;91(4):685-712

This article looks at cases of venereal disease from the early 1700s and how healers presented themselves as shrewd interpreters of patients' bodies and souls. Because the disease was so stigmatizing, patients were said to be unreliable narrators of their own symptoms and health histories. Practitioners, in turn, exhibited diagnostic expertise by sagely navigating such constraints. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2017.0078DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

News and Events.

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Bull Hist Med 2017 ;91(3):658-662

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2017.0063DOI Listing
January 2017

Entitled to Addiction?: Pharmaceuticals, Race, and America's First Drug War.

Authors:
David Herzberg

Bull Hist Med 2017 ;91(3):586-623

This article rethinks the formative decades of American drug wars through a social history of addiction to pharmaceutical narcotics, sedatives, and stimulants in the first half of the twentieth century. It argues, first, that addiction to pharmaceutical drugs is no recent aberration; it has historically been more extensive than "street" or illicit drug use. Second, it argues that access to psychoactive pharmaceuticals was a problematic social entitlement constructed as distinctively medical amid the racialized reforms of the Progressive Era. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2017.0061DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5679069PMC
May 2018
1 Read

Vernacularizing the Body: Informational Egalitarianism, Hindu Divine Design, and Race in Physiology Schoolbooks, Bengal 1859-1877.

Bull Hist Med 2017 ;91(3):554-585

Government-aided vernacular schools introduced "human physiology" as a subject in 1859. I use the first couple of schoolbooks and the debate running up to the introduction of the subject to open up the particular and specific histories through which modern anatomo-physiological knowledge was vernacularized in colonial Bengal. In so doing I have two interconnected goals in this article. Read More

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https://muse.jhu.edu/article/674945
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2017.0060DOI Listing
May 2018
2 Reads

"A Little Seasoning Would Aid in the Digestion of Our Factums": Wit, Evidence, and the Evolving Form of Medical Debate in New Orleans, 1853-1868.

Authors:
Amy Forbes

Bull Hist Med 2017 ;91(3):524-552

This history of the categorization of yellow fever explores the interchange between rhetoric and evidence in understanding the disease. Eighteenth-century models of medicine relied on rhetorical manipulation to convince readers of accuracy, unlike modern medicine, which claims objective evidence as the professional standard. But how did the physician as intellectual give way to the physician as scientist? This article analyzes the transition through a case study: J. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2017.0059DOI Listing

From One Medicine to Two: The Evolving Relationship between Human and Veterinary Medicine in England, 1791-1835.

Authors:
Abigail Woods

Bull Hist Med 2017 ;91(3):494-523

This article offers a novel perspective on the evolving identities and relationships of human medicine and veterinary medicine in England during the decades that followed the 1791 foundation of the London Veterinary College. Contrary to the impressions conveyed by both medical and veterinary historians, it reveals that veterinary medicine, as initially defined, taught and studied at the college, was not a domain apart from human medicine but rather was continuous with it. It then shows how this social, cultural, and epistemological continuity fractured over the period 1815 to 1835. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2017.0058DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5788326PMC
May 2018
2 Reads

Erratum.

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Bull Hist Med 2017 ;91(3)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2017.0056DOI Listing
January 2017

The Osler Library Prints Collection.

Authors:
Shelley McKellar

Bull Hist Med 2017 ;91(2):435-437

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2017.0036DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Popular Medicine in America 1800-1900.

Authors:
Wendy Kline

Bull Hist Med 2017 ;91(2):432-434

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2017.0034DOI Listing
January 2019

Playing God: Testing, Modeling, and Imitating Blood Miracles in Eighteenth-Century Europe.

Bull Hist Med 2017 ;91(2):391-419

In the late Middle Ages, rumors began to spread throughout Europe regarding blood miracles associated with the relics of martyrs. Centuries-old blood, pulverized or solidified and black in color, was said to return to its original bright red color, or else to liquefy or bubble under certain circumstances or on certain dates in the liturgical calendar. With the Reformation, in Protestant countries most of these relics were either destroyed or forgotten. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2017.0031DOI Listing
January 2018

Testing Drugs and Attesting Cures: Pharmaceutical Monopolies and Military Contracts in Eighteenth-Century France.

Authors:
Justin Rivest

Bull Hist Med 2017 ;91(2):362-390

This article explores the role of testing in the allocation of royal monopoly privileges for drugs in eighteenth-century France by following the multi-generational fortunes of a single "secret remedy" from 1713 to 1776: the poudre fébrifuge of the Chevalier de Guiller. On at least five occasions, this drug was tested on patients in order to decide whether it should be protected by a privilege and whether or not its vendors should be awarded lucrative contracts to supply it in bulk to the French military. Although efforts were made early in the century to test the drug through large-scale hospital trials and to relegate privilege granting to a bureaucratic commission, the case of the poudre fébrifuge instead suggests that military expediency and relatively small-scale trials administered personally by royal practitioners remained decisive in determining whether or not a drug received a monopoly privilege or a military contract. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2017.0030DOI Listing
January 2018
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Experimental Clinical Medicine and Drug Action in Mid-Seventeenth-Century Leiden.

Authors:
Evan R Ragland

Bull Hist Med 2017 ;91(2):331-361

Leiden University boasted one of the most popular and influential medical schools of the mid-seventeenth century, drawing hundreds of students from across Europe. These students participated in the revival of frequent clinical instruction, anatomical and chymical experiments, and even tests of supposed disease-causing substances and remedies on living animals and humans. Comparing records of cases from the hospital clinic with the professors' treatises and student-authored disputations shows that old and new theories of disease and drug action were hotly contested and often tested, including the claims of the leading professors at the school. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2017.0029DOI Listing
January 2018
1 Read

Iatrochemistry and the Evaluation of Mineral Waters in France, 1600-1750.

Authors:
Michael Bycroft

Bull Hist Med 2017 ;91(2):303-330

Existing literature on mineral springs in early modern France suggests that composition played a minor role in the evaluation of those springs. In fact it played a major role from at least the beginning of the seventeenth century. Composition was studied by a wide range of actors, from physicians in the provinces to chemists at the Paris Academy of Science, with a view to establishing the efficacy of particular springs against particular diseases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2017.0028DOI Listing
January 2018