2,119 results match your criteria Bulletin Of The History Of Medicine[Journal]


Note from the Section Editor.

Authors:
Michelle DiMeo

Bull Hist Med 2020 ;94(1):125-126

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2020.0004DOI Listing
January 2020

The Gospel of Wealth and the National Health: The Rockefeller Foundation and Social Medicine in Britain's NHS, 1945-60.

Authors:
Andrew Seaton

Bull Hist Med 2020 ;94(1):91-124

This article examines the Rockefeller Foundation's (RF) engagement with the British National Health Service (NHS) between 1945 and 1960. It argues that the organization morally invested in the success of the NHS because, to them, it offered a world-inspiring model for how to provide medical care following the tenets of social medicine. The RF administratively and financially supported two health centers, in Edinburgh and Manchester, to help realize these ambitions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2020.0003DOI Listing
January 2020

Dead or Alive? Stillbirth Registration, Premature Babies, and the Definition of Life in England and Wales, 1836-1960.

Authors:
Nadja Durbach

Bull Hist Med 2020 ;94(1):64-90

When stillbirth registration became mandatory in England and Wales in 1926, it was not to amass statistics in the service of public health. Instead, it was part of broader anxieties that victims of infanticide were being disposed of under the guise of having been stillborn. But because it necessitated distinguishing between the living and the dead, the legislation that introduced stillbirth registration generated debate about the definition of life itself. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2020.0002DOI Listing
January 2020

Blowing Smoke Up Your Arse: Drowning, Resuscitation, and Public Health in Eighteenth-Century Venice.

Authors:
Alexandra Bamji

Bull Hist Med 2020 ;94(1):29-63

This article examines resuscitation practices in the second half of the eighteenth century, especially the new use of tobacco smoke enema machines on people who had been extracted from water with no signs of life. Drownings accounted for a small number and proportion of urban deaths, yet governments promoted resuscitation techniques at considerable expense in order to prevent such deaths. The visibility of drowning in religious, urban, and civic life encouraged engagement with new approaches. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2020.0001DOI Listing
January 2020

The Neglected Role of Buddhism in the Development of Medicine in Late Imperial China Viewed through the Life and Work of Yu Chang (1585-1664).

Authors:
Volker Scheid

Bull Hist Med 2020 ;94(1):1-28

Despite significant revisions over recent decades, the field of medicine in late imperial China continues to be defined by a number of problematic boundaries such as that between medicine and religion. In this article I challenge the validity of this boundary through a detailed examination of the life and work of the hugely influential seventeenth-century physician Yu Chang (1585-1664), whose openly Buddhist critique of literati medicine has hitherto largely escaped the attention of medical historians. I argue that Yu Chang's case, read against the more widespread revival of Buddhism at the time, the important historical role of literati-Buddhist networks, and evidence of many other late imperial physicians' interest in Buddhism, was not exceptional. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2020.0000DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7335307PMC
January 2020

Erratum.

Authors:

Bull Hist Med 2020 ;94(1):vi

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2020.0033DOI Listing
January 2020

Husbands' Hearts and Women's Health: Gender, Age, and Heart Disease in Twentieth-Century America.

Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(4):577-609

The medical community and broader public have historically focused on heart disease as a concern for men, even though it has been the leading cause of death in women for decades. Through an analysis of medical publications, women's health literature, and mainstream media, this article traces the interactions of gender and age on perceptions of heart disease during the twentieth century. I argue that attention to middle-age mortality rates accentuated men's susceptibility to heart disease over women's, even as these differences diminished at older ages, when the majority of deaths occurred. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0073DOI Listing

Our Doctors, Ourselves: Barbara Seaman and Popular Health Feminism in the 1970s.

Authors:
Kelly O'Donnell

Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(4):550-576

This essay examines the career of feminist journalist Barbara Seaman and her contribution to the circulation of health feminist ideas in the 1970s. Seaman, author of the influential exposé The Doctors' Case Against the Pill (1969), became a noted critic of women's health care and of gynecologists in particular. In her next book, Free and Female (1972), and in newspaper articles, interviews, and television appearances, she implored women to "liberate" themselves from their gynecologists and empower themselves in the arena of health care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0072DOI Listing

"¡Viva La Clinica!": The United Farm Workers' Fight for Medical Care.

Authors:
Beatrix Hoffman

Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(4):518-549

Farm work is among the most dangerous and unhealthy occupations in the United States, but efforts to address farm workers' health needs have been sporadic and inadequate. In the 1960s and 1970s, the United Farm Workers of America (UFW) famously organized workers in California's grape and lettuce fields and won national and international recognition through its boycott tactics. The UFW also opened several medical clinics, staffed by volunteer nurses and physicians, and created the Robert F. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0071DOI Listing

Rethinking Private-Public Partnership in the Health Care Sector: The Case of Municipal Hospital affiliation.

Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(4):483-517

By the late 1950s, New York City's public hospital system-more extensive than any in the nation-was falling apart, with dilapidated buildings and personnel shortages. In response, Mayor Robert Wagner authorized an affiliation plan whereby the city paid private academic medical centers to oversee training programs, administrative tasks, and resource procurement. Affiliation sparked vigorous protest from critics, who saw it as both an incursion on the autonomy of community-oriented public hospitals and the steamrolling of private interests over public ones. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0070DOI Listing

Editors' Note.

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Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(4):vi

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0069DOI Listing
January 2019

Erratum.

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Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(4)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0068DOI Listing
January 2019

News and Events.

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Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(3):446-450

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0051DOI Listing
January 2019

International Health Research and the Emergence of Global Health in the Late Twentieth Century.

Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(3):365-400

An influential policy network emerged from two overlapping developments of the 1970s and 1980s: new research programs focusing on tropical diseases and debates about how to implement the concept of primary health care at the World Health Organization. Participating actors came together in an informal network that, by the late 1980s, expanded advocacy to include the promotion and reorganization of all forms of research that might improve health in the Global South. This goal became associated with a search for new research methods for determining priorities, a quest that reached a peak in the early 1990s when the World Bank entered the picture. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0049DOI Listing
January 2020

Population Control, Family Planning, and Maternal Health Networks in the 1960s/70s: Diary of an International Consultant.

Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(3):335-364

Over the past decade historians have explored the rise of the mid-twentieth-century population/family planning movement on both the international and the local levels. This article bridges the gap between these studies by exploring the work diaries of Dr. Adaline Pendleton ("Penny") Satterthwaite, a midlevel technical advisor who traveled to over two dozen countries for the Population Council from 1965 to 1974. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0048DOI Listing
January 2020

Medical Compromise and Its Limits: Religious Concerns and the Postmortem Caesarean Section in Nineteenth-Century Belgium.

Authors:
Jolien Gijbels

Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(3):305-334

Situated on the intersection of medicine and religion, postmortem caesarean sections exposed ideological boundaries in nineteenth-century medicine. According to clerical guidelines circulating in Catholic territories, Catholics who had not necessarily received medical training had to perform operations on deceased women in the absence of medical staff. Most doctors, on the other hand, objected to surgical interventions by unqualified Catholics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0029DOI Listing
January 2020
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Moving Away from the "Medical Model": The Development and Revision of the World Health Organization's Classification of Disability.

Authors:
Andrew J Hogan

Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(2):241-269

Recently, there has been a prominent call in the history of medicine for greater engagement with disability perspectives. In this article, I suggest that critiques of the so-called medical model have been an important vehicle by which alternative narratives of disability entered the clinical arena. Historians of medicine have rarely engaged with the medical model beyond descriptive accounts of it. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0028DOI Listing
November 2019

Designing Penfield: Inside the Montreal Neurological Institute.

Authors:
Annmarie Adams

Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(2):207-240

Neurosurgeon Wilder Penfield (1891-1976) envisioned hospital architecture as a powerful medical tool. Focusing on two key interiors in the 1934 Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI)-the operating room and the foyer-this article engages newly accessible textual and material evidence to show Penfield's intense involvement in the design of the building. A unique, tri-level surgical room, with a sophisticated setup for photography, made the MNI's surgery interactive. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0027DOI Listing
November 2019

Between Defectological Narratives and Institutional Realities: The "Mentally Retarded" Child in the Soviet Union of the 1930s.

Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(2):180-206

This article analyzes the gap between the defectological narrative of care and the reality of institutional life for children with learning disabilities in the Soviet Union of the 1930s. It shows that, under Stalin, the Soviet discipline of defectology entailed a promise of correction and social integration that aligned well with the official rhetoric of triumphant socialism and that incorporated new, specific ideological meanings into its long-standing narrative of care. I also show that the defectological narrative was rarely realized in practice due to not only scarce material resources but also a profound reversal of defectological and Marxist conceptions of labor. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0026DOI Listing
November 2019

Plague before the Pandemics: The Greek Medical Evidence for Bubonic Plague before the Sixth Century.

Authors:
John Mulhall

Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(2):151-179

Recent biomolecular evidence has proven that Yersinia pestis, the pathogen that causes bubonic plague, was infecting human hosts in Eurasia as early as the Bronze Age, far earlier than previously believed. It remains an open question, however, whether bubonic plague was affecting Mediterranean populations of classical antiquity. This article evaluates the textual evidence for bubonic plague in classical antiquity from medical sources and discusses methodologies for "retrospective diagnosis" in light of new developments in microbiology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0025DOI Listing
November 2019
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"Something Wasn't Clean": Black Midwifery, Birth, and Postwar Medical Education in All My Babies.

Authors:
Wangui Muigai

Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(1):82-113

Set in rural Georgia, the 1953 health film All My Babies: A Midwife's Own Story was a government-sponsored project intended as a training tool for midwives. The film was unique to feature a black midwife and a live birth at a time when southern health officials blamed midwives for the region's infant mortality rates. Produced by the young filmmaker George Stoney, All My Babies was praised for its educational value and, as this article demonstrates, was a popular feature in postwar medical education. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0003DOI Listing
June 2019
1 Read

Pestis Minor: The History of a Contested Plague Pathology.

Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(1):55-81

Pestis minor is a pathological category that at the height of the third plague pandemic (1894-1959) fueled extensive debate and research among medical scientists. Referring to an attenuated or benign form of plague, evidence of pestis minor or pestis ambulans was produced in medical reports across the world so as to raise the question of whether the disease could survive measures against it by means of temporary transformation. Afflicting its victims only by the slightest lymphatic swellings, this theory went, the disease could thus lurk in the human body until conditions allowed it to break out again in its true, malignant form. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0002DOI Listing
June 2019
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Skills, Knowledge, and Status: The Career of an Early Modern Italian Surgeon.

Authors:
Paolo Savoia

Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(1):27-54

This article analyzes the career of Giovanni Battista Cortesi (1552-1643)-the son of a poor tailor who started his career as barber and steam bath attendant and became university professor at Bologna and Messina-and places it in the context of the profession of surgery in early modern Italy. The article investigates how a surgeon had to establish close relationships with universities, civic authorities, wealthy upper-class patients, hospitals as sites of clinical education and acquisition of manual skills, the printing industry and the book market, and students. Moreover, the article explores the fluidity of professional and cultural boundaries between learned and empirical knowledge from the perspective of a graduate surgeon who was not supposed to be. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6458849PMC
June 2019
1 Read

Why Was "Custom a Second Nature" in Early Modern Medicine?

Authors:
Steven Shapin

Bull Hist Med 2019 ;93(1):1-26

"Custom is a second nature" is a saying that circulated long before the early modern period and in many different cultural settings. But the maxim had special salience, reference, and force in dietetic medicine from the late medieval period through the eighteenth century. What did that saying mean in the early modern medical setting? What presumptions about the body, about habitual ways of life, and about the authority of medical knowledge were inscribed within it? And what was the historical career of the saying as views of the body, its transactions with the environment, and the hereditary process changed through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries? Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2019.0000DOI Listing
June 2019
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The Origins of Family Planning in Tunisia: Reform, Public Health, and International Aid.

Authors:
Jennifer Johnson

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(4):664-693

This article explores the origins of the national family planning program in Tunisia during the 1960s. It moves beyond previous interpretations of the global population control movement that emphasized external intervention at the hands of international organizations. Instead it analyzes the mutually beneficial partnership between Tunisian president Habib Bourguiba and the Population Council, an American organization committed to reducing population growth. Read More

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https://muse.jhu.edu/article/713342
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0075DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

The Mist Tent: An Analysis of Therapeutic Change in the History of Cystic Fibrosis Care.

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(4):634-663

Mist tent therapy for cystic fibrosis went through a rise and fall in popularity between the 1950s and 1970s, providing an opportunity to explore the nature of therapeutic change in medicine. The therapy "worked" in the context of a particularly grim life expectancy in the early 1950s and in the setting of a comprehensive therapeutic program that began in Cleveland in 1957. Although clinical studies published in the 1970s provided evidence that mist tents were ineffective or even harmful, these later studies were not necessarily more robust than earlier studies that provided evidence of mist tent efficacy, suggesting that other factors may have also contributed to mist tent abandonment. Read More

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https://muse.jhu.edu/article/713341
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0074DOI Listing
April 2019
21 Reads

Gender and Cortisone: Clinical Practice and Transatlantic Exchange in the Medical Management of Intersex in the 1950s.

Authors:
Sandra Eder

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(4):604-633

This article complicates the history of the standardization of intersex case management developed at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in the 1950s by focusing on clinical practices and logics and the transatlantic circulation of knowledge. Using patient records and published studies, I follow the exchanges between pediatric endocrinologists Lawson Wilkins (Pediatric Endocrinology Clinic, Baltimore) and Andrea Prader (University Children's Hospital, Zürich) on cortisone treatment for children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), on psychosexuality and gender role, on choosing and changing the sex of intersex children, and on genital surgery. I argue that a focus on the transatlantic exchanges between these two clinics illuminates a more complex genealogy of modern intersex case management. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0073DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

John Houghton and Medical Practice in London c. 1700.

Authors:
Jonathan Barry

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(4):575-603

This article considers the evidence for medical practice in London c. 1700 provided by A Collection for the Improvement of Husbandry and Trade (1692-1703) by the apothecary and Fellow of the Royal Society, John Houghton (1645-1705). Houghton discusses how products are used medicinally, as well as the necessary qualifications for a physician, and reports his own experiments and health experiences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0072DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6369514PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Editors' Note.

Authors:

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(4):vi

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0071DOI Listing
January 2018
1 Read

American Association for the History of Medicine Awards and Prizes, 2019.

Authors:

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(3):545-549

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0058DOI Listing
January 2018

Group Weight Loss and Multiple Screening: A Tale of Two Heart Disease Programs in Postwar American Public Health.

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(3):474-505

In the late 1940s, amid elevated concern about heart disease and new funding to fight it, multiple screening emerged alongside group psychotherapy for weight loss as two innovative responses of the American public health community. I describe the early trajectory and fate in the 1950s of both programs as shaped by the ongoing political controversy about national health insurance. Group weight loss became the main de facto American response to a perceived obesity-driven heart disease crisis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0056DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Drawing Damaged Bodies: British Medical Art in the Early Twentieth Century.

Authors:
Samuel J Alberti

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(3):439-473

Historians are acutely aware of the role of art in medicine. Elaborate early modern works catch our eye; technical innovations attract analysis. This paper beats a different path by examining three little-known artists in early twentieth-century Britain who deployed what may seem like an outdated method: drawing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0055DOI Listing
January 2019

"I Was Doctor": White Settler Women's Amateur Medical Practice in East and South-Central African Communities, 1890-1939.

Authors:
Julia Wells

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(3):413-438

Professional medicine in colonial British Africa has been extensively examined by historians. Few scholars, however, have adequately considered the role that white settlers without medical training played in the provision of colonial health care in local African communities. This article addresses the gap by exploring amateur medical treatment by white settler women in East and South-Central African communities between 1890 and 1939, primarily in highland areas of Kenya and Southern Rhodesia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0054DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Memento Mütter.

Authors:
Paula A Summerly

Bull Hist Med 2018;92(2):370-371

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0032DOI Listing
January 2018

News And Events.

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Bull Hist Med 2018;92(2):368-369

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0031DOI Listing
January 2018
1 Read

Some Notes on Papyrus Ebers, Ancient Egyptian Treatments of Migraine, and a Crocodile on the Patient's Head.

Authors:
Lutz Popko

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(2):352-366

Modern literature about the history of migraine treatments often starts with an ancient Egyptian remedy said to be from Papyrus Ebers that involves crocodiles that should be wrapped around the head. A fresh look on this treatment shows the need for revision on many points, including the source of the remedy, its content and meaning, and further implications for the history of Papyrus Ebers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0030DOI Listing
January 2019

Swann Song: Antibiotic Regulation in British Livestock Production (1953-2006).

Authors:
Claas Kirchhelle

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(2):317-350

Antibiotics have played a significant yet ambivalent role in Western livestock husbandry. Mass introduced to agriculture to boost animal production and reduce feed consumption in the early 1950s, agricultural antibiotics were soon accused of selecting for bacterial resistance, causing residues and enabling bad animal welfare. The dilemma posed by agricultural antibiotic regulation persists to this day. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0029DOI Listing
January 2019
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Religion, Medicine, and Politics: Catholic Physicians' Guilds in America,1909-32.

Authors:
Jessica Martucci

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(2):287-316

In 1909 the first Catholic physicians' guild formed in New York City. By 1911 guilds could be found in Philadelphia and Boston. They acted as professional organizations as well as brotherhoods built on a set of shared religious and moral convictions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0028DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Leprosy's Untainted Child.

Authors:
Jo Robertson

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(2):261-286

In the face of an obdurate disease, the Mission to Lepers made a virtue out of "saving" children from leprosy and from paganism by separating them from their parents so that they became a source of publicity, sponsorship, and fund-raising. This policy transformed a benevolent work of mercy into a professional one, for it soon became clear that children separated from their parents did not develop leprosy. Consequently, the asylum became a site where scientific conclusions were made about the transmission of the disease, and the authority of the mission was enhanced at international medical conferences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0027DOI Listing
January 2019
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"This Fathom-Long Body": Bodily Materiality and Ascetic Ideology in Medieval Chinese Buddhist Scriptures.

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(2):237-260

An outside observer might be excused for assuming that Buddhists, being focused on transcendence, would have little interest in investigating the body's structure or constituent parts in any detail. However, nothing could be further from the truth. Bodies and body parts have in fact long been ubiquitous subjects of contemplation, speculation, and veneration in Buddhist circles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0026DOI Listing
January 2019

Editors' Note.

Authors:

Bull Hist Med 2018;92(2):vi

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0025DOI Listing
January 2018
1 Read

A Research Enclave in 1940s Nigeria: The Rockefeller Foundation Yellow Fever Research Institute at Yaba, Lagos, 1943-49.

Authors:
Megan Vaughan

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(1):172-205

This article examines the history of yellow fever research carried out in West Africa in the 1940s by Rockefeller Foundation scientists. It engages with a number of debates in the history of medical research in colonial Africa, including experimentation, the construction of the "field," and biosecurity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0007DOI Listing
January 2019

The Radicalization of Breast Cancer Surgery: Joseph Colt Bloodgood's Role in William Stewart Halsted's Legacy.

Authors:
James R Wright

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(1):141-171

Johns Hopkins's surgeon William Stewart Halsted is renowned for popularizing the radical mastectomy, a disfiguring procedure that was overutilized during the 1900s. Cancer historians have questioned why Halsted, a meticulous surgical investigator, became more aggressive in his approach to breast cancer surgery when his own data failed to show prolonged patient survival. Joseph Colt Bloodgood, one of Halsted's early surgical residents, Hopkins's head of surgical pathology, and Halsted's primary outcome data analyst, played previously unrecognized roles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0006DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

The Cowpox Controversy: Memory and the Politics of Public Health in Cuba.

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(1):110-140

Vaccination played an important role in the formation of a national consciousness in Cuba, and vaccination's earliest promoters dominate nationalist narratives of medical achievement on the island. This article investigates the intense hostility exhibited by the creole medical elite toward a pivotal figure in the history of smallpox vaccination in Cuba, Spanish physician Dr. Vicente Ferrer (1823-83), the first in the Americas to mass produce smallpox vaccine using calf vaccinifiers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0005DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

"He Must Die or Go Mad in This Place": Prisoners, Insanity, and the Pentonville Model Prison Experiment, 1842-52.

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(1):78-109

The relationship between prisons and mental illness has preoccupied prison administrators, physicians, and reformers from the establishment of the modern prison service in the nineteenth century to the current day. Here we take the case of Pentonville Model Prison, established in 1842 with the aim of reforming convicts through religious exhortation, rigorous discipline and training, and the imposition of separate confinement in its most extreme form. Our article demonstrates how following the introduction of separate confinement, the prison chaplains rather than the medical officers took a lead role in managing the minds of convicts. Read More

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https://muse.jhu.edu/article/691233
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5944833PMC
January 2019
1 Read

The Fielding H. Garrison Lecture: Great Doctor History.

Authors:
Barron H Lerner

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(1):55-77

For decades, physicians wrote much of the history of medicine, often "great man" histories that celebrated their colleagues' accomplishments as part of a celebratory historical narrative. Beginning in the 1970s, social historians challenged this type of scholarship, arguing that it was Whiggish, omitted the flaws of the medical profession, left patients out of the story, and ignored issues of gender, race, and class. This Garrison Lecture revisits this history through the prism of my recent book, The Good Doctor: A Father, a Son, and the Evolution of Medical Ethics, which is essentially a biography of my physician father, Phillip Lerner, and an autobiography. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0003DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Comment: Materia Medica.

Authors:
Linda Nash

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(1):50-54

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0002DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Climate Change?: The Environment, Physicians, and Historians.

Authors:
Barron H Lerner

Bull Hist Med 2018 ;92(1):46-49

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/bhm.2018.0001DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read