10,161 results match your criteria Bulimia


Using internet-based self-help to bridge waiting time for face-to-face outpatient treatment for Bulimia Nervosa, Binge Eating Disorder and related disorders: Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

Internet Interv 2019 Apr 26;16:26-34. Epub 2018 Feb 26.

Technische Universität Dresden, Institut für Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie, Chemnitzer Str. 46, D-01187 Dresden, Germany.

Background: Eating disorders are serious conditions associated with an impaired health-related quality of life and increased healthcare utilization and costs. Despite the existence of evidence-based treatments, access to treatment is often delayed due to insufficient health care resources. Internet-based self-help interventions may have the potential to successfully bridge waiting time for face-to-face outpatient treatment and, thus, contribute to overcoming treatment gaps. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.invent.2018.02.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6364326PMC

Paucisymptomatic pulmonary and right ear tuberculosis in young woman suffering from anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

Radiol Case Rep 2019 Mar 29;14(3):423-426. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Tor Vergata University, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Department of Radiology, Viale Montpellier, 1, postal code 00133, Rome, Italy.

Nowadays tuberculosis has become a reemerging infectious disease due to the many forms of immunodeficiency. Patients with eating disorders like anorexia nervosa and bulimia are a susceptible group due to the immune impairment correlated with severe malnutrition and their prevalence and incidence is growing. We describe the case of a 31-year-old woman, with long-standing history of anorexia nervosa and bulimia, diagnosed with advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S19300433183039
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.radcr.2018.10.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6354621PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Care experiences of young people with eating disorders and their parents: qualitative study.

BJPsych Open 2019 Jan;5(1):e6

Professor of Health Economics, King's Health Economics, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience,King's College London,UK.

Background: Perspectives of young people with eating disorders and their parents on helpful aspects of care should be incorporated into evidence-based practice and service design, but data are limited.AimsTo explore patient and parent perspectives on positive and negative aspects of care for young people with eating disorders.

Method: Six online focus groups with 19 young people aged 16-25 years with existing or past eating disorders and 11 parents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1192/bjo.2018.78DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6343117PMC
January 2019

Psychiatric and medical correlates of DSM-5 eating disorders in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan;52(1):42-50

Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

Objective: To examine psychiatric and somatic correlates of DSM-5 eating disorders (EDs)-anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge-eating disorder (BED)-in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States.

Method: A national sample of 36,309 adult participants in the national epidemiologic survey on alcohol and related conditions III (NESARC-III) completed structured diagnostic interviews (AUDADIS-5) to determine psychiatric disorders, including EDs, and reported 12-month diagnosis of chronic somatic conditions. Prevalence of lifetime psychiatric disorders and somatic conditions were calculated across the AN, BN, and BED groups and a fourth group without specific ED; multiple logistic regression models compared the likelihood of psychiatric/somatic conditions with each specific ED relative to the no-specific ED group. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23004DOI Listing
January 2019

Psychiatric comorbidity as a risk factor for the mortality of people with bulimia nervosa.

Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Psychological Medicine, King's College London, London, UK.

Background: Bulimia nervosa (BN) is associated with increased mortality. Frequent comorbidities of BN include substance use disorders, affective disorders and personality disorders (PD). These comorbidities may add an additional risk for mortality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00127-019-01667-0DOI Listing
February 2019

Immunoglobulin G modulation of the melanocortin 4 receptor signaling in obesity and eating disorders.

Transl Psychiatry 2019 Feb 12;9(1):87. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

Inserm UMR1073, Nutrition, Gut and Brain Laboratory, 76183, Rouen, France.

Melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) plays a key role in regulation of appetite activated by its main ligand α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) in both central and peripheral targets. α-MSH also binds to circulating immunoglobulins (Igs) but the functional significance of such immune complexes (ICs) in MC4R signaling in normal and pathological conditions of altered appetite has remained unknown. To address this question, we analyzed plasma levels, affinity kinetics, and binding epitopes of α-MSH-reactive IgG extracted from plasma samples of female patients with hyperphagic obesity, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge-eating disorder, and healthy controls. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41398-019-0422-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6372612PMC
February 2019

Patients' experiences of brief cognitive behavioral therapy for eating disorders: A qualitative investigation.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Eating Disorders Service, Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom.

Objective: Although it is important to analyze the effectiveness of new therapies, it is also necessary to consider how patients experience them. This is particularly important if we are to maximize treatment acceptability and reduce attrition. This study examined patient experiences of a new 10-session cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT-T), using a qualitative approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23039DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Increased Functional Connectivity Between Ventral Attention and Default Mode Networks in Adolescents With Bulimia Nervosa.

J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2019 Feb 29;58(2):232-241. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, and the Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY.

Objective: Bulimia nervosa (BN) is characterized by excessive attention to self and specifically to body shape and weight, but the ventral attention (VAN) and default mode (DMN) networks that support attentional and self-referential processes are understudied in BN. This study assessed whether altered functional connectivity within and between these networks contributes to such excessive concerns in adolescents with BN early the course of the disorder.

Method: Resting-state functional magnetic resonance images were acquired from 33 adolescents with BN and 37 healthy control adolescents (12-21 years) group matched by age and body mass index. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08908567183190
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2018.09.433DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Developmental Premorbid Body Mass Index Trajectories of Adolescents With Eating Disorders in a Longitudinal Population Cohort.

J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2019 Feb 13;58(2):191-199. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY; the University of Geneva, Switzerland; and the Institute of Child Health, University College London, UK. Electronic address:

Objective: To examine whether childhood body mass index (BMI) trajectories are prospectively associated with later eating disorder (ED) diagnoses.

Method: Using a subsample from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (N = 1,502), random-coefficient growth models were used to compare premorbid BMI trajectories of individuals who later developed anorexia nervosa (n = 243), bulimia nervosa (n = 69), binge-eating disorder (n = 114), and purging disorder (n = 133) and a control group without EDs or ED symptoms (n = 966). BMI was tracked longitudinally from birth to 12. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2018.11.008DOI Listing
February 2019
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Editorial: Connecting the Nodes of Altered Brain Network Organization in Eating Disorders.

J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2019 Feb 4;58(2):156-158. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Division of Psychological and Social Medicine and Developmental Neurosciences, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.

Two prevalent eating disorders (ED) in adolescence are anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). AN is characterized primarily by an extensive restriction of energy intake leading to significantly low body weight. In contrast, the cardinal symptom of BN is uncontrolled eating of an abnormally large amount of food, followed by compensatory behavior to avoid weight gain (eg, self-induced vomiting or laxative abuse). Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08908567183202
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2018.11.005DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Rituals and preoccupations associated with bulimia nervosa in adolescents: Does motivation to change matter?

Eur Eat Disord Rev 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.

This study evaluated the effects of two treatments for adolescent bulimia nervosa (BN), family-based treatment (FBT-BN), and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT-A), on both attitudinal and behavioural outcomes at end-of-treatment. These associations were examined specifically relative to motivation for change in obsessive-compulsive (OC) features of eating disorder (ED) symptoms. Adolescents (N = 110) were randomly assigned to FBT-BN or CBT-A and completed assessments of eating pathology and OC-ED behaviour. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/erv.2664DOI Listing
February 2019
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Parental bonding, childhood maltreatment and eating disorder psychopathology: an investigation of their interactions.

Eat Weight Disord 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Department of Psychiatry, University of Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", Largo Madonna delle Grazie, 80138, Naples, Italy.

Purpose: Childhood trauma and parental bonding have been widely recognized as risk factors for eating disorders (EDs). However, their interplay in determining ED psychopathology has been poorly investigated. Consequently, we have assessed their interaction with core ED psychopathological symptoms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40519-019-00649-0DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Etiological influences on continuity and co-occurrence of eating disorders symptoms across adolescence and emerging adulthood.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 6. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

Objective: The role of common and symptom-specific genetic and environmental influences in maintaining eating disorder symptoms across development remains unclear. This study investigates the continuity and change of etiological influences on drive for thinness, bulimia, and body dissatisfaction symptoms and their co-occurrence, across adolescence and emerging adulthood.

Method: In total, 2,629 adolescent twins (mean age = 15. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23040DOI Listing
February 2019

Adverse Birth Outcomes Associated with Types of Eating Disorders: A Review.

Can J Diet Pract Res 2019 02 7:1-6. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

a School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, Brescia University College, London, ON.

At least 5% of women have an eating disorder (ED) during pregnancy. These EDs affect prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and weight gain during pregnancy, factors associated with birth complications and adverse neonatal outcomes. This review contributes to the literature by examining several adverse birth outcomes associated with EDs and differentiates between past and present EDs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3148/cjdpr-2018-044DOI Listing
February 2019
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Internet-based aftercare for women with bulimia nervosa following inpatient treatment: The role of adherence.

Internet Interv 2019 Mar 14;15:67-75. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Chair of Clinical Psychology, E-Mental-Health, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden, Germany.

Facing poor long-term outcome and high relapse rates in the treatment of bulimia nervosa, we developed an Internet-based aftercare program for women with severe and chronic bulimia nervosa following inpatient treatment based on previous experiences with self-directed targeted prevention and early intervention programs delivered online. The aim of the present study was to examine adherence to the program in detail, to explore potential variables that predict adherence and to analyze whether adherence affects outcomes. We analyzed data from 126 women in the intervention group of a randomized controlled trial. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.invent.2018.11.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6350217PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Is bullying and teasing associated with eating disorders? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 1. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Regional Department for Eating Disorders, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.

Objective: Involvement in bullying and teasing has been associated with adverse health outcomes, including eating disorders (EDs). The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to examine the association between bullying/teasing and EDs.

Method: A systematic search was conducted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23035DOI Listing
February 2019
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The Cognitive Drivers of Compulsive Eating Behavior.

Front Behav Neurosci 2018 17;12:338. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Monash Institute for Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences (MICCN), School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Compulsivity is a central feature of obsessive-compulsive and addictive disorders, which share considerable overlap with excessive eating in terms of repetitive behavior despite negative consequences. Excessive eating behavior is characteristic of several eating-related conditions, including eating disorders [bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED)], obesity, and food addiction (FA). Compulsivity is proposed to be driven by four distinct cognitive components, namely, contingency-related cognitive flexibility, task/attentional set-shifting, attentional bias/disengagement and habit learning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnbeh.2018.00338DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6344462PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Cognitive Neuroscience of Eating Disorders.

Psychiatr Clin North Am 2019 03 3;42(1):75-91. Epub 2018 Dec 3.

Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, 1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 98, New York, NY 10032, USA.

Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are characterized by severely restricted intake, binge eating, and compensatory behaviors like self-induced vomiting. The neurobiological underpinnings of these maladaptive behaviors are poorly understood, but the application of cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging to eating disorders has begun to elucidate their pathophysiology. Specifically, this review focuses on 3 areas that suggest paths forward: reward, cognitive and behavioral control, and decision making. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psc.2018.10.008DOI Listing
March 2019
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Genetics of Eating Disorders: What the Clinician Needs to Know.

Psychiatr Clin North Am 2019 03;42(1):59-73

Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Translational Lab Building Room a3-112 - 3rd Floor, 938 West 28th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4H4, Canada; Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Translational Lab Building Room a3-112 - 3rd Floor, 938 West 28th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4H4, Canada.

Anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge-eating disorder (BED) are heritable conditions that are influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of AN have identified specific genetic loci implicated in AN, and genetic correlations have implicated both psychiatric and metabolic factors in its origin. No GWAS have been performed for BN or BED. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0193953X183115
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psc.2018.10.007DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

Recent Research on Bulimia Nervosa.

Authors:
Tracey D Wade

Psychiatr Clin North Am 2019 03 3;42(1):21-32. Epub 2018 Dec 3.

School of Psychology, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001, Australia. Electronic address:

Estimates of lifetime bulimia nervosa (BN) range from 4% to 6.7% across studies. There has been a decrease in the presentation of BN in primary care but an increase in disordered eating not meeting full diagnostic criteria. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psc.2018.10.002DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Feeding and Eating Disorders in Children.

Psychiatr Clin North Am 2019 03;42(1):157-167

Department of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Great Ormond Street, London, WC1N 3JH, UK; Population, Policy and Practice Programme, University College London Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, WC1N 1EH, London, UK. Electronic address:

This article provides an update based on recently published literature and expert consensus on the current state of knowledge regarding feeding and eating disorders in children aged 2 to 12 years. It covers the 6 main diagnostic categories-pica, rumination disorder, avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder-discussing issues and findings specific to this age group. It highlights the need for ongoing research in a number of key areas, to include improved understanding of etiologic pathways, characterization of presenting disorders, and the development of standardized evidence-based assessment tools and treatment interventions. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0193953X183115
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psc.2018.10.005DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Personality Variables and Eating Pathology.

Psychiatr Clin North Am 2019 03 17;42(1):105-119. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Department of Psychology, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, 2530 Dole Street, Sakamaki C400, Honolulu, HI 96826, USA.

Personality variables have long been implicated in the onset and maintenance of eating disorders, as well as in symptom divergence between anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. Clinical observations are broadly supported by the data, with restricting anorexia nervosa associated with higher levels of constraint and Persistence, and binge-purge behaviors linked to the tendency to take impulsive action when emotionally distressed. Considerable heterogeneity is found within diagnostic categories, however, suggesting that different personality structures may predispose individuals to develop disordered eating through alternative pathways. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psc.2018.10.012DOI Listing
March 2019
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Diagnostic Categories for Eating Disorders: Current Status and What Lies Ahead.

Authors:
B Timothy Walsh

Psychiatr Clin North Am 2019 03 3;42(1):1-10. Epub 2018 Dec 3.

New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University Medical Center, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address:

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fifth Edition) for 6 feeding and eating disorders were published in 2013 and were notable for officially recognizing binge-eating disorder and for articulating criteria for avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder. The criteria and the rationale for them are briefly described, and current and future challenges are discussed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psc.2018.10.001DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Facial Emotion Recognition Abilities in Women Experiencing Eating Disorders.

Psychosom Med 2019 Feb/Mar;81(2):155-164

From the Departments of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy (Wyssen, Humbel, Munsch) and Visual and Social Neuroscience (Lao, Rodger, Caldara), University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland; Faculty of Psychology, Mental Health Research and Treatment Center (Lennertz, Schuck, Teismann, Margraf, Schneider), Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum, Germany; Kompetenzzentrum für Essverhalten (Isenschmid), Adipositas und Psyche Spital Zofingen; Departement of Consulation-Liaison Psychiatry and Psychosomatic Medicine (Milos), University Clinic Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland; Privatklinik Aadorf (Trier), Aadorf; Klinik Schützen (Whinyates), Rheinfelden, Switzerland; Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatic Medicine (Assion, Ueberberg), LWL-Klinik Dortmund; Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, Psychosomatic and Preventive Medicine (Juckel, Kossmann), LWL-Klinik Bochum, Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum, Germany; and Christoph-Dornier-Clinic for Psychotherapy (Müller, Klauke), Münster, Germany.

Objective: Impairments in facial emotion recognition are an underlying factor of deficits in emotion regulation and interpersonal difficulties in mental disorders and are evident in eating disorders (EDs).

Methods: We used a computerized psychophysical paradigm to manipulate parametrically the quantity of signal in facial expressions of emotion (QUEST threshold seeking algorithm). This was used to measure emotion recognition in 308 adult women (anorexia nervosa [n = 61], bulimia nervosa [n = 58], healthy controls [n = 130], and mixed mental disorders [mixed, n = 59]). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PSY.0000000000000664DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

A test of the DSM-5 severity specifier for bulimia nervosa in adolescents: Can we anticipate clinical treatment outcomes?

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 30. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, California.

Objective: This study tested clinical utility of the DSM-5 severity specifier for bulimia nervosa (BN) in predicting treatment response among adolescents (N = 110) within a randomized clinical trial of two psychosocial treatments.

Method: Analyses grouped individuals meeting criteria for BN diagnosis by baseline severity, per DSM-5. Associations among baseline severity classification and BN behavior (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23034DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Approach bias modification training in bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder: A pilot randomized controlled trial.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Section of Eating Disorders, Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.

Objective: Bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge-eating disorder (BED) are associated with poorly controlled approach behavior toward food resulting in binge eating. Approach bias modification (ABM) may reduce these automatic action tendencies (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23024DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Transcultural aspects of eating disorders and body image disturbance.

Authors:
Julian M Stern

Nord J Psychiatry 2018 Sep;72(sup1):S23-S26

a Tavistock Centre , London , UK.

Background: Unlike the majority of 'culture-bound syndromes', eating disorders are one of the few mental disorders initially conceptualized as 'culture-bound' to North America/Europe. Social norms vary massively within cultures-class, ethnicity and gender. Over time there have been substantial changes in body shape preferences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08039488.2018.1525642DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Eating disorder recovery is associated with absence of major depressive disorder and substance use disorders at 22-year longitudinal follow-up.

Compr Psychiatry 2019 Jan 11;90:49-51. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Eating Disorders Clinical and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, USA.

Background: Psychiatric comorbidity is common in eating disorders (EDs) and associated with poor outcomes, including increased risk for relapse and premature death. Yet little is known about comorbidity following ED recovery.

Methods: We examined two common comorbidities, major depressive disorder (MDD) and substance use disorder (SUD), in adult women with intake diagnoses of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa who participated in a 22-year longitudinal study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.comppsych.2019.01.002DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Impact of comorbid borderline personality disorder on inpatient treatment for bulimia nervosa: analysis of routine data.

Borderline Personal Disord Emot Dysregul 2019 16;6. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

Schoen Clinic Roseneck, Am Roseneck 6, D-83209, Prien am Chiemsee, Germany.

Background: A substantial rate of patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) also suffer from Borderline personality disorder (BN + BPD). It is widely unknown how these comorbid patients with BN + BPD present and respond to inpatient treatment. Aims of the study were to examine (1) specific characteristics of patients with BN + BPD at admission, discharge, and during treatment, and (2) differential effects of inpatient treatment for BN vs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40479-018-0098-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6335811PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Association study of variants in genes FTO, SLC6A4, DRD2, BDNF and GHRL with binge eating disorder (BED) in Portuguese women.

Psychiatry Res 2019 Jan 15;273:309-311. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Research Centre for Anthropology and Health (CIAS), Department of Life Sciences, University of Coimbra, 3000-456 Coimbra, Portugal. Electronic address:

A population based case-control study was conducted in Portuguese women with overweight/obesity to investigate the possible association of variants in genes FTO, SLC6A4, DRD2, BDNF and GHRL with binge eating disorder (BED). The distribution of seven polymorphisms was evaluated in 31 BED patients and 62 controls. No significant associations were found between polymorphisms and BED. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2019.01.047DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Why is premorbid BMI consistently elevated in clinical samples, but not in risk factor samples, of individuals with eating disorders?

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 24;52(2):117-120. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Department of Psychology, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Body image disturbance is widely viewed as contributing to the development and maintenance of disordered eating. Yet this perspective is not inconsistent with the possibility that elevated premorbid BMIs also increase the risk of developing eating disorders. Research examining whether actual body size may play a role in eating disorder development reveals a curious pattern of findings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23029DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Applying a multidimensional model of craving to disordered eating behaviors: Development of the Food Approach and Avoidance Questionnaire.

Psychol Assess 2019 Jan 21. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Department of Psychology.

Despite revisions to the DSM-5, current diagnostic criteria poorly capture the phenomena of eating disorders. The construct of food craving may help to explain the range of disordered eating and compensatory behaviors, but current measures do not fully capture the construct. Borrowing from the substance use literature and emphasizing both approach and avoidance craving inclinations, the ambivalence model of craving (AMC) provides a useful framework for predicting broad patterns of disordered eating behaviors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pas0000697DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

The Cash effect: Shaping the research conversation on body image and eating disorders.

Body Image 2019 Jan 18. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Kenyon College, Samuel Mather Hall, Psychology Department Ohio, Gambier, OH, 43022, United States.

Cash and Deagle (1997) examined the associations between body image disturbance (BID) and the eating disorders (EDs) of anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) in a meta-analytic review. They found almost twice as many studies employing perceptual measures of body size evaluation compared to cognitive-evaluative measures of body dissatisfaction, even though effect sizes were larger for studies with cognitive-evaluative measurement. We examined 109 "influential" (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bodyim.2019.01.001DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Patients' views on a new treatment for Bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder combining physical exercise and dietary therapy (the PED-t). A qualitative study.

Eat Disord 2019 Jan 21:1-18. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

a Department of Health and Care Science , UiT - The Artic University of Norway , Tromsø , Norway.

A new group based treatment for patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED), combining guided Physical Exercise and Dietary therapy (PED-t), has shown the capacity to alleviate BN and BED symptoms. The PED-t is run by therapists with a professional background in sport sciences and nutrition, which in many clinical settings is an uncommon group of professionals. The symptom reduction effects using the PED-t need validation from patients who have been given this kind of treatment, as negative experiences may impinge further clinical implementation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10640266.2018.1560847DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Inpatient versus outpatient care, partial hospitalisation and waiting list for people with eating disorders.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2019 Jan 21;1:CD010827. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Translational Health Research Institute, Western Sydney University, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia, 2751.

Background: Clinical guidelines recommend outpatient care for the majority of people with an eating disorder. The optimal use of inpatient treatment or combination of inpatient and partial hospital care is disputed and practice varies widely.

Objectives: To assess the effects of treatment setting (inpatient, partial hospitalisation, or outpatient) on the reduction of symptoms and increase in remission rates in people with:1. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/14651858.CD010827.pub2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD010827.pub2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6353082PMC
January 2019
6 Reads

Altered functional connectivity in binge eating disorder and bulimia nervosa: A resting-state fMRI study.

Brain Behav 2019 Jan 15:e01207. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Department of General Internal Medicine and Psychosomatics, Centre for Psychosocial Medicine, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.

Introduction: The etiology of bulimic-type eating (BTE) disorders such as binge eating disorder (BED) and bulimia nervosa (BN) is still largely unknown. Brain networks subserving the processing of rewards, emotions, and cognitive control seem to play a crucial role in the development and maintenance of eating disorders. Therefore, further investigations into the neurobiological underpinnings are needed to discern abnormal connectivity patterns in BTE disorders. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/brb3.1207
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/brb3.1207DOI Listing
January 2019
12 Reads

Transdiagnostic neuroimaging in psychiatry: A review.

Authors:
Serge A Mitelman

Psychiatry Res 2019 Jan 8. Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, NY 10029, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Elmhurst Hospital Center, 79-01 Broadway, Elmhurst, NY 11373, USA. Electronic address:

Transdiagnostic approach has a long history in neuroimaging, predating its recent ascendance as a paradigm for new psychiatric nosology. Various psychiatric disorders have been compared for commonalities and differences in neuroanatomical features and activation patterns, with different aims and rationales. This review covers both structural and functional neuroimaging publications with direct comparison of different psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, autism spectrum disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, anorexia nervosa, and bulimia nervosa. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01651781183208
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2019.01.026DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

Eating disorders and substance use in adolescents: How substance users differ from nonsubstance users in an outpatient eating disorders treatment clinic.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 14;52(2):175-182. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Division of Child and Youth Psychiatry, Kingston Health Sciences Centre, Hotel Dieu Hospital Site, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

Objective: The relationship between eating disorders (EDs) and substance use (SU) has only been briefly described in literature using mainly adult populations. This study examined the prevalence and characteristics of SU among patients of an adolescent ED outpatient treatment program.

Method: A retrospective chart analysis was conducted to determine and subsequently compare medical status, psychosocial factors, treatment course and outcome between patients with and without SU. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23017
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23017DOI Listing
February 2019
8 Reads

Relationship between three factor eating questionnaire-restraint subscale and food intake.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 14. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York.

Objective: Dietary restraint refers to an individual's intention to restrict food intake, measured via self-report questionnaires, whereas dietary restriction refers to actual reduction in caloric intake. The aim of this research was to investigate the association between dietary restraint scales and actual caloric restriction.

Method: Data were collected from six previously published or two ongoing eating behavior studies in which participants (n = 183) completed the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) and Eating Disorders Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) and participated in a laboratory-based research lunch meal. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23014
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23014DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Sex Differences in Adolescent Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa: Beyond the Signs and Symptoms.

Curr Psychiatry Rep 2019 Jan 12;21(1). Epub 2019 Jan 12.

Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milano Bicocca, Cadore 48, 20900, Monza, Italy.

Purpose Of Review: We review research related to sex differences in eating disorders (EDs) in adolescents. Prior work has explored clinical differences; thus, we examine literature in areas identified as playing an etiological or maintenance role in EDs including: genetics, hormones, neurocognitive inefficiencies, and reward circuitry.

Recent Findings: Sex steroids appear to a play role in the unmasking of genetic risk for development of EDs and puberty may be a heightened period of risk for females. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11920-019-0988-1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11920-019-0988-1DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads
3.238 Impact Factor

Anorexia nervosa and perfectionism: A meta-analysis.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Jan 11. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

Objective: Despite the multitude of research surrounding anorexia nervosa (AN) and perfectionism, there is yet to be a thorough investigation comparing perfectionism in those diagnosed with AN and other eating disorders, and other psychiatric diagnoses. The current meta-analysis aimed to explore these comparisons.

Method: Following the Preferred Reporting Items or Systematic Reviews Meta Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we identified empirical studies that compared maladaptive and/or adaptive perfectionism scores in those diagnosed with AN and either a non-clinical comparison group, people diagnosed with a non-AN ED, or people diagnosed with another psychological disorder (i. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.23009
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.23009DOI Listing
January 2019
11 Reads

Comparison of in vitro erosion protocols in bovine teeth to simulate natural erosion lesion: analysis of mechanical properties and surface gloss.

J Appl Oral Sci 2019 Jan 7;27:e20180107. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Univ. Estadual Paulista, Faculdade de Odontologia de Araçatuba, Departamento de Materiais Odontológicos e Prótese, Araçatuba, São Paulo, Brasil.

Objective: The aim of this study was to compare two in vitro erosion protocols, in which one simulates in vivo conditions experienced by patients with gastroesophageal disorders or bulimia (HCl-pepsin protocol), and the other simulates the diet of an individual who consumes a high volume of erosive beverages (citric acid protocol). In addition, the mechanical properties and surface gloss of eroded human dentin were compared with those of sound human dentin.

Materials And Methods: Blocks of cervical dentin were used: sound human dentin (n=10), human dentin with erosive lesions (n=10), and bovine dentin (n=30). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1678-7757-2018-0107DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6322721PMC
January 2019

Efficacy of psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder on self-esteem improvement: Meta-analysis.

Eur Eat Disord Rev 2019 03 9;27(2):109-123. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

School of Psychology, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria, Australia.

Objectives: This meta-analysis examined the effects of psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge-eating disorder (BED) on self-esteem improvement.

Method: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of psychological treatments that assessed self-esteem change in eating disorders were included. Thirty-four RCTs were included; most sampled BED and then BN. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/erv.2662DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Subclinical eating disorder traits are correlated with cortical thickness in regions associated with food reward and perception.

Brain Imaging Behav 2019 Jan 8. Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Laboratory of NeuroGenetics, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.

Behavioral traits associated with various forms of psychopathology are conceptualized as dimensional, varying from those present in a frank disorder to subclinical expression. Demonstrating links between these behavioral traits and neurobiological indicators, such as brain structure, provides one form of validation for this view. However, unlike behavioral dimensions associated with other forms of psychopathology (e. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11682-018-0007-x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11682-018-0007-xDOI Listing
January 2019
8 Reads

Eating disorders and academic performance among college students.

J Am Coll Health 2019 Jan 7:1-6. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

a Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, West Virginia University School of Public Health, Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center , West Virginia University , Morgantown , West Virgina , USA.

Objective: There is a paucity of research exploring eating disorders (EDs) and academic performance (AP). This study aimed to understand the effect of ED treatment on AP, hypothesizing that students receiving treatment for EDs would have a higher GPA.

Participants: The Spring 2010 - Spring 2011 National College Health Assessment data (N = 231,586) was utilized. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07448481.2018.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07448481.2018.1549556DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Facial Emotion Recognition Abilities in Women Suffering from Eating Disorders.

Psychosom Med 2019 Jan 4. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Fribourg, Rue de Faucigny 2, 1700 Fribourg, Switzerland.

Objective: Impairments in facial emotion recognition are an underlying factor of deficits in emotion regulation and interpersonal difficulties in mental disorders, and are evident in eating disorders (EDs).

Methods: We used a computerized psychophysical paradigm to manipulate parametrically the quantity of signal in facial expressions of emotion (QUEST threshold seeking algorithm). This was used to measure emotion recognition in 311 adult women (anorexia nervosa (AN,n=61), bulimia nervosa (BN,n=58), healthy controls (HC,n=130) and mixed mental disorders (mixed,n=59)). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PSY.0000000000000664DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

Affect and worry during a checking episode: A comparison of individuals with symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, body dysmorphic disorder, illness anxiety disorder, and panic disorder.

Psychiatry Res 2018 Dec 25;272:349-358. Epub 2018 Dec 25.

Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology, Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Osnabrück University, Knollstr. 15, 49069 Osnabrück, Germany.

Checking behavior (CB) occurs in a variety of disorders such as obsessive-compulsive (OCD), body dysmorphic (BDD), illness anxiety (IA), and panic disorder (PD), as well as anorexia (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Etiological models of these disorders - with the exception of those for PD - postulate that CB mainly occurs in situations characterized by negative affect and serves to regulate it. We aimed to test these assumptions: N = 386 individuals with a self-reported diagnosis of one of the disorders rated their affect at baseline, directly before a remembered CB episode, during, immediately afterwards, and 15 and 60 minutes afterwards, and rated their endorsement of different functions of CB. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2018.12.132DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Imagery rescripting in individuals with binge-eating behavior: An experimental proof-of-concept study.

Int J Eat Disord 2019 Feb 31;52(2):183-188. Epub 2018 Dec 31.

Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Freiburg, Germany.

Objective: Mental imagery is more strongly related to emotions than verbal cognitions. Binge eating is associated with dysfunctional emotional regulation. However, cognitive therapy techniques have focused on verbal cognitions. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/eat.22995
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eat.22995DOI Listing
February 2019
13 Reads

The vulnerability to interpersonal stress in eating disorders: The role of insecure attachment in the emotional and cortisol responses to the trier social stress test.

Psychoneuroendocrinology 2019 Mar 24;101:278-285. Epub 2018 Dec 24.

Department of Psychiatry, University of Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", Naples, Italy.

Background: Vulnerability to interpersonal stress is an important risk factor for Eating Disorders (EDs). Adult insecure attachment involves different emotional, biological and behavioural strategies to cope with social stressors. However, although attachment has proved to play a pivotal role in EDs, no study has yet explored the effects of attachment on the emotional and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responses to a psychosocial stressor in EDs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2018.12.232DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read