2,849 results match your criteria British journal of community nursing[Journal]


Patient satisfaction with a hospital-in-the-home service.

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Apr;24(4):179-185

Reader in Advanced Clinical Practice, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Palliative Care, King's College London.

The hospital-in-the-home (HitH) model is an alternative model of healthcare that allows patients to return home and receive short-term treatment in a familiar environment. The objective of the present study was to evaluate patient satisfaction with the GSTT@home service in the London boroughs of Southwark and Lambeth. A questionnaire comprising 20 questions was developed with 5-point Likert response and free text options. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.4.179DOI Listing

The power of placebo.

Authors:
Aysha Mendes

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Apr;24(4):196-197

Freelance journalist specialising in healthcare and psychology.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.4.196DOI Listing

Managing the skin manifestations of systemic conditions.

Authors:
Jill Peters

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Apr;24(4):174-178

Dermatology Nurse Practitioner and Nurse Supplementary Independent Prescriber, East Suffolk and North Essex NHS Foundation Trust.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.4.174DOI Listing

Supporting the district nurse to consolidate advanced clinical skills.

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Apr;24(4):153

Nurse Consultant Primary Care, NHS Grampian, Aberdeen.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.4.153DOI Listing

Caseload management: a district nursing challenge.

Authors:
Victoria McCrory

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Apr;24(4):186-190

District Nursing Sister, Northern Health and Social Care Trust.

The district nurse is accountable for the standard of nursing care that is delivered by the team they lead. One of the key challenges in ensuring the provision of a high standard of care is effective caseload management, and caseload management is a core component of the district nursing role. This article highlights the strategic drivers behind community care, outlines the challenges that impact effective caseload management and discusses why effective caseload management is significant in the delivery of community care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.4.186DOI Listing

Are you IT savvy?

Authors:
Alison While

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Apr;24(4):198

Emeritus Professor of Community Nursing, King's College London, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery and Fellow of the QNI.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.4.198DOI Listing

Post-prostatectomy incontinence: multimodal modern-day management.

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Apr;24(4):154-159

Department of Urology, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital, London.

As the rate of prostate cancer detection increases, so does the rate at which radical prostatectomy is performed. Post-prostatectomy incontinence (PPI) or urine leakage affects around 20% of men who undergo this procedure. Although affected individuals must be supported in maintaining hygiene with the use of urine capture devices, definitive treatment should also be offered if appropriate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.4.154DOI Listing

Are district nurses well placed to provide equitable end-of-life care to individuals who are homeless?

Authors:
Rebecca Traynor

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Apr;24(4):165-172

District Nurse, Berkshire Healthcare Foundation Trust.

This literature review aimed to answer the focus question: are district nurses well placed to provide equitable end of life care (EOL) for homeless individuals? It focused on 10 primary research studies, from which two themes emerged and subsequently formed the basis of the discussion: (1) the difficulty in predicting disease trajectory in people who are homeless and (2) the gaps in existing systems. The main findings from these themes were a lack of education on the recognition of the dying and a general lack of knowledge of the complex challenges faced by and health needs of homeless people, which cause stigma from both the general public and health professionals towards these marginalised individuals. Further, there is certainly a lack of suitable places to deliver palliative and EOL care for people who are homeless. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.4.165DOI Listing

Shifting perspectives in palliative and end-of-life care: a personal view.

Authors:
Brian Nyatanga

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Apr;24(4):191

Academic Lead for Centre for Palliative Care, University of Worcester.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.4.191DOI Listing

Duty of candour and community nursing.

Authors:
Roz Hooper

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Apr;24(4):192-194

Head of Legal (Regulatory), Legal Services, Royal College of Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.4.192DOI Listing

The older person with diabetes: considerations for care.

Authors:
Jill Hill

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Apr;24(4):160-164

Independent Nurse Consultant, TREND-UK.

With the increasingly ageing population worldwide, more older people are living with diabetes. The conditions that often accompany older age, such as dementia, renal impairment, visual impairment and manual dexterity difficulties, can make diabetes management complex and self-care challenging. However, the status of older people varies considerably, and so choice of glucose-lowering agents and clinical targets should be individualised to maximise safety and ensure that the risks of treatments do not outweigh the benefits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.4.160DOI Listing

Importance of a collaborative approach to lymphoedema management.

Authors:
Stacy Pugh

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Apr;24(Sup4):S30-S31

Lymphoedema Clinical Nurse Manager, Compton Care, Wolverhampton Associate Lecturer, University of Wolverhampton.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.Sup4.S30DOI Listing

Management in the absence of a specialist service.

Authors:
Tracy Green

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Apr;24(Sup4):S3

Clinical Advisor, Sigvaris Britain Ltd; Honorary Lymphoedema Clinical Nurse Specialist, University Hospitals of North Midlands.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.Sup4.S3DOI Listing

2018 BLS Annual Conference review.

Authors:
Natalie Kruger

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Apr;24(Sup4):S32-S33

Physiotherapist, Honorary Standing up for legs Member, BLS Scientific Committee.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.Sup4.S32DOI Listing

British Lymphology Society update.

Authors:
Katie Riches

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Apr;24(Sup4):S34

Chair, British Lymphology Society.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.Sup4.S34DOI Listing

Flat knit hosiery: purpose, selection and application in chronic oedema and lipoedema.

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Apr;24(Sup4):S12-S16

Senior Lecturer (Adult Nursing)/Senior Teaching Fellow/Queen's Nurse, University of Wolverhampton.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.Sup4.S12DOI Listing

Haddenham Easywrap: an alternative to compression bandaging in chronic oedema and wound care.

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Apr;24(Sup4):S22-S28

Lymphoedema Nurse Specialist, Florence Nightingale Hospice.

Haddenham Easywrap has been available since 2016 and since then case studies have been presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the product in clinical practice. The aim of the article is to demonstrate how its use in chronic oedema, and wound care is beneficial and cost effective and how versatile one product can be in treating both of these conditions. Information gained from the evaluation of easywrap in wound care and management of chronic oedema, demonstrates that easywrap can be a suitable cost effective alternative to traditional compression therapy modalities, whilst improving concordance and quality of life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.Sup4.S22DOI Listing

BLS Lymphoedema Awareness Week 3-9 March 2019 and beyond!

Authors:
Margaret Sneddon

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Apr;24(Sup4):S36

Interim Vice Chair, British Lymphology Society.

#LymphoedemaAwareness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.Sup4.S36DOI Listing

Patient concordance in the management of chronic oedema: role of the independent prescriber.

Authors:
Vivienne Murdoch

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Apr;24(Sup4):S6-S10

Chronic Oedema Liaison Nurse, South Eastern Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.Sup4.S6DOI Listing

Lymphoedema Support Network update.

Authors:
Karen Friett

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Apr;24(Sup4):S38

Is the chief executive of the lymphoedema support network. For more information about any aspect of our work, please contact us on 0207 351 0990.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.Sup4.S38DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Smoking cessation in 2019.

Authors:
Aysha Mendes

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Mar;24(3):144-145

Freelance journalist specialising in healthcare and psychology.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.3.144DOI Listing

Assessment and management of eczema in adults in the community setting.

Authors:
Sara Burr

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Mar;24(3):110-115

Community Dermatology Specialist Nurse, Norfolk Community Health and Care NHS Trust.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.3.110DOI Listing

Establishing a structured plan to provide high-quality end-of-life care in community settings.

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Mar;24(3):120-127

District Nurse, East Suffolk and North Essex NHS Foundation Trust.

The purpose of this project was to explore how registered community nurses experienced providing holistic end-of-life care and how having a structured end-of-life care pathway plan would help develop their knowledge and skills, particularly in respect of communication and their ability and confidence in providing evidence-based compassionate care. For some practitioners there exists a lack of confidence surrounding end of life care, which can result in nurses' reluctance to become involved and avoid engaging in those 'difficult conversations'. Following implementation, early reviews from practice suggest that incorporating the 19 steps of the plan into the delivery of community-based care at end of life has enhanced practice and patient experience. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.3.120DOI Listing

Improving service delivery.

Authors:
Alison While

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Mar;24(3):146

Emeritus Professor of Community Nursing, King's College London Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery and Fellow of the QNI.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.3.146DOI Listing

Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in the home setting.

Authors:
Sandy Rolfe

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Mar;24(3):102-109

Respiratory Nurse Specialist, NHS Tayside and Clinical Academic Lecturer, School of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Dundee.

Noninvasive ventilation is becoming a more commonly used long-term treatment for various conditions in which the patient experiences chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure (type 2 respiratory failure). This article aims to discuss why patients require long-term noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV), and to describe some of the care considerations required for this patient group, in addition to challenges that nurses in the home care environment face when supporting these patients at home. The article provides a brief pathophysiological overview, while also discussing the use of NPPV as symptom support for patients with severe disease in the later stages of their lives. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.3.102DOI Listing
March 2019
7 Reads

Carer support: time for a rethink?

Authors:
Catriona Kennedy

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Mar;24(3):101

QNI (Scotland) Professor of Community Nursing, Robert Gordon University.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.3.101DOI Listing

Causes of and factors that exacerbate faecal incontinence in older people.

Authors:
Lesley Butcher

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Mar;24(3):134-138

Lecturer in Adult Nursing, School of Healthcare Sciences, College of Biomedical and Life Sciences, Cardiff University.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.3.134DOI Listing

Dignity in death: implementing the NHS Long Term Plan.

Authors:
Brian Nyatanga

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Mar;24(3):139

Academic Lead for Centre for Palliative Care, University of Worcester.

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http://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.3.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.3.139DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Alcohol use by people in their seventies is not an exception: a preliminary prospective study.

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Mar;24(3):128-133

EA SPURBO, Addiction Disorders Department, Université Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France.

The ageing population is rapidly increasing worldwide, and the alcohol-related disease burden in most Western countries is on the rise. However, very few studies assess alcohol use in older people. Here, a self-reported questionnaire was administered to all individuals aged 70 years or more who visited a social centre for older people in western France. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.3.128DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Alternative to antibiotics for managing asymptomatic and non-symptomatic bacteriuria in older persons: a review.

Authors:
Debbie Duncan

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Mar;24(3):116-119

Lecturer (Education), School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queens University, Belfast.

Recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common reasons for long-term antibiotic use in frail older people, and these individuals often have non-symptomatic bacteriuria. This article reviews the literature and recommendations for the treatment of UTIs particularly in the older population (>65 years). It considers the question: is there an alternative for antibiotics for asymptomatic and non-symptomatic bacteriuria in older adults? D-mannose powder has been recommended for the treatment of UTIs, as when applied locally, it reduces the adherence of Escherichia coli. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.3.116DOI Listing

Employment cases of note (February 2019).

Authors:
Gareth Edwards

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Mar;24(3):140-143

Partner and Head of Employment Law at VWV.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.3.140DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

Having a voice and raising the profile of lower limb healthcare!

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Mar;24(Sup3):S39-S40

Consultant Venous Surgeon and Consultant Phlebologist, Executive Chairman of The Whiteley Clinic, Visiting Professor University of Surrey, Founder of The College of Phlebology.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.Sup3.S39DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

A review of the effects of ageing on skin integrity and wound healing.

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Mar;24(Sup3):S28-S33

Reader, Centre for Medical Education Programme Director, MSc in Wound Healing and Tissue Repair, Cardiff University School of Medicine, College of Biomedical and Life Sciences.

It is well known that advancing age is a factor that affects the normal course of wound healing. The population over the age of 65 years is increasing globally, and this may be accompanied by an increase in the number of individuals experiencing delayed wound healing. There is a breadth of research to show that age-related changes in the epidermis and dermis change the skin's ability to resist damage and injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.Sup3.S28DOI Listing

FUNdraise for Woundcare4Heroes: putting the FUN back into FUNdraising.

Authors:
Rachel Masker

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Mar;24(Sup3):S36-S37

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.Sup3.S36DOI Listing

Management of diabetic foot ulcers in the community: an update.

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Mar;24(Sup3):S14-S19

School of Human and Health Sciences, University of Huddersfield.

Diabetic foot ulceration is costly, both in terms of NHS expenditure and quality of life for the patient. This article reviews the guidelines for assessment and management of the diabetic foot ulcer and provides instruction on undertaking vascular and neurological assessments of the diabetic foot. Wound assessment, with an overview of the TEXAS and SINBAD wound classification systems, is also explored, as is the importance of the 1 working day referral for expert assessment for any new diabetic foot ulcer in order to reduce wound complications, length of hospital stay and, ultimately, amputation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.Sup3.S14DOI Listing

Challenges in wound care for community nurses: a case review.

Authors:
Melanie Lumbers

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Mar;24(Sup3):S25-S27

Freelance tissue viability nurse and health visitor.

Wound care in primary settings can be complex if patients are discharged early and have comorbidities. With community nurses often working alone, it is imperative that support is available to guide clinical decision making, for example, through both senior or specialist nurses, guidelines, protocols, wound care formularies, care pathways and care plans. Unfortunately some patients try to dictate their care when at home. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.Sup3.S25DOI Listing

T.I.M.E. to improve patient outcomes: use of a clinical decision support tool to optimise wound care.

Authors:
Caroline Dowsett

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Mar;24(Sup3):S6-S11

Clinical Nurse Specialist Tissue Viability, East London NHS Foundation Trust and Independent Nurse Consultant in Tissue Viability.

Patients with wounds pose an important healthcare challenge. Many of these wounds are managed in community care and can take weeks or months to resolve. Delays in wound healing can be perpetuated by clinicians who make poor treatment choices, fail to recognise complications and/or do not seek timely advice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.Sup3.S6DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Is it time for a national wound registry across primary settings?

Authors:
Mark Collier

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Mar;24(Sup3):S5

Nurse Consultant and Associate Lecturer, Tissue Viability (UK) and Chair of the Leg Ulcer Forum (UK).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.Sup3.S5DOI Listing

Foot pain: its effects on leg ulcer development and challenges it poses for the Leg Club.

Authors:
Sylvie Hampton

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Mar;24(Sup3):S42

Independent Tissue Viability Consultant Nurse.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.Sup3.S42DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Turning black or yellow wounds red using a hydroresponsive dressing.

Authors:
Sylvie Hampton

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Mar;24(Sup3):S20-S24

Tissue Viability Consultant Nurse.

Wounds can be found anywhere on the wound healing continuum, which can be used to select appropriate dressings. With the exception of black toes or arterial heels, some simple rules of thumb to use for dressing selection would be as follows: a wet dressing for a dry wound; a dry dressing for a wet wound; an antibacterial dressing for one that is odorous; a superabsorbent dressing for high exudate loss; and a foam dressing to cover as a secondary dressing or as a primary dressing when the wound is healing. This article seeks to outline a method for changing black or yellow wounds on the healing continuum into a red and then pink wound. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.Sup3.S20DOI Listing
March 2019
13 Reads

Reflections on cold weather and older age.

Authors:
Jane Griffiths

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Feb;24(2):49

Senior Lecturer, Division of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Manchester.

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http://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.2.49DOI Listing
February 2019
19 Reads

Follow-up visits to older patients after a hospital stay: nurses' perspectives.

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Feb;24(2):80-86

Capio Läkarhus Almö, Myggenäs, Sweden.

Older patients with multimorbidity and extensive healthcare needs are at risk of frequent readmission to hospital after discharge. With a Swedish report entitled 'Follow-up 48-72' as its basis, the present study aimed to describe nurses' experiences of follow-up visits to older patients with multimorbidity 48 to 72 hours after discharge from hospital. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 nurses experienced with such home visits to older patients, and the material was analysed by qualitative content analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.2.80DOI Listing
February 2019
10 Reads

Recent noteworthy cases related to employment law.

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Feb;24(2):89-91

Partner, Employment Team, Walker Morris LLP.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.2.89DOI Listing
February 2019

Administering intravenous therapy in patients' homes.

Authors:
Drew Payne

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Feb;24(2):67-71

Community staff nurse, Whittington Hospital NHS Trust, London, UK Member of the Royal College of Nursing.

Intravenous therapy in patients' homes is a relatively new procedure in the community nursing practice. This article looks at the practicalities of administering home IV therapy from the following aspects: hand hygiene; how to adjust IV therapy practices to the home environment; care of the IV access site including appropriate dressings; identifying and reacting to problems; maintaining a safe environment when performing IV therapy in a patient's home; anaphylaxis and how to identify and manage it; and the need for training to perform home IV therapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.2.67DOI Listing
February 2019
5 Reads

Managing deterioration in older adults in care homes: a quality improvement project to introduce an early warning tool.

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Feb;24(2):58-66

Reader in Older People's Healthcare, Department of Adult Nursing, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery & Palliative Care, King's College London.

Many older adults living in care homes have complex health needs requiring comprehensive care. Early warning tools can help identify deterioration, but currently they are less often used in care homes. The aim of this quality improvement project was to introduce an early warning tool, the Significant 7, to facilitate identification and management of deterioration in care home residents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.2.58DOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads

Professional, structural and organisational interventions in primary care for reducing medication errors.

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Feb;24(2):77-79

National Nurse Manager, Sonic HealthPlus, Osborne Park, Western Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.2.77DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Using the PEAS technique to communicate in palliative care.

Authors:
Brian Nyatanga

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Feb;24(2):87

Academic Lead, Centre for Palliative Care, University of Worcester.

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http://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.2.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.2.87DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

How will a no-deal Brexit impact medicines in the UK?

Authors:
Aysha Mendes

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Feb;24(2):92-93

Freelance journalist specialising in healthcare, psychology and nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.2.92DOI Listing
February 2019

A 'long-term plan'.

Authors:
Alison While

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Feb;24(2):94

Emeritus Professor of Community Nursing, King's College London, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery and Fellow of the QNI.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.2.94DOI Listing
February 2019

Understanding incontinence in the older person in community settings.

Authors:
Ann Yates

Br J Community Nurs 2019 Feb;24(2):72-76

Director of Continence Services, Cardiff and Vale University Health Board, Wales.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2019.24.2.72DOI Listing
February 2019