3,071 results match your criteria British journal of community nursing[Journal]


COVID-19 pandemic: changing the way we live and die.

Authors:
Brian Nyatanga

Br J Community Nurs 2020 May;25(5):254

Senior Lecturer, Three Counties School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Worcester.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.5.254DOI Listing

Dermatological conditions in older adults: clinical overview.

Br J Community Nurs 2020 May;25(5):222-226

Registered nurse and freelance writer, based at the Department of Work and Pensions as a disability analyst.

The skin is one of the most important parts of the human body. It protects the underlying tissue from injury and is a valuable part of the homeostatic processes. The skin is delicate, and, therefore, dermatological intervention is an important part of patient care in the case of skin problems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.5.222DOI Listing

Refreshing the way we approach cancer therapy.

Authors:
Aysha Mendes

Br J Community Nurs 2020 May;25(5):256-257

Freelance journalist specialising in healthcare and psychology.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.5.256DOI Listing

COVID-19 and district and community nursing.

Br J Community Nurs 2020 May;25(5):213

District Nurse Team Manager, Chiswick.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.5.213DOI Listing

The COVID-19 challenge.

Br J Community Nurs 2020 May;25(5):258

Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery and Fellow of the QNI.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.5.258DOI Listing

Being conductor of the orchestra: an exploration of district nursing leadership.

Br J Community Nurs 2020 May;25(5):214-221

Senior Lecturer, Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh; Member Centre for Person-centred Practice Research/Centre for Applied Social Sciences.

The purpose of the present study was to gain insight into how district nurses understand their leadership role. Data were generated through interviews and audio-journals and analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis. Findings suggested that district nurses managing teams and caseloads experienced a burden of responsibility. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.5.214DOI Listing

Long-term conditions and severe acute respiratory syndrome SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19).

Br J Community Nurs 2020 May;25(5):247-251

Senior Lecturer, Community Health Team, University of Brighton.

Observation of infection trends through the course of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has indicated that those with certain pre-existing chronic conditions, such as hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obesity, are particularly likely to develop severe infection and experience disastrous sequelae, including near-fatal pneumonia. This article aims to outline how SARS-CoV-2 affects people and to consider why individuals living with long-term conditions are at increased risk from infection caused by this virus. A summary of available clinical guidelines with recommendations is presented, to provide community nurses with the up-to-date information required for protecting individuals living with a number of long-term conditions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.5.247DOI Listing

Verification of expected death in the community: role of the community specialist practitioner.

Br J Community Nurs 2020 May;25(5):227-230

Student Community Specialist Practitioner, Lancashire and South Cumbria Foundation Trust.

In 2019, the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) and Queen's Nursing Institute (QNI) recognised a significant reduction in the number of qualified district nurses (those who hold the Community Specialist Practitioner (CSP) qualification). Community nursing is an evolving role, and, with the role of community nurse expanding, the role of the CSP in supporting teams to adapt to the development of the role is more important than ever. As a leader, the CSP possesses skills in leadership and co-ordination of the team, alongside specialist knowledge of the provision of nursing care in community settings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.5.227DOI Listing

Strategies to reduce Gram-negative infections: a community perspective.

Authors:
Ann-Marie Aziz

Br J Community Nurs 2020 May;25(5):240-246

Nurse, Pennine Care NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester.

Infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria continue to be on the rise, despite efforts by the Government and health service to curb their numbers. Most of these infections arise in the community. The case for targeting community-onset healthcare-associated infections is stark and requires a shift in focus from traditionally providing increased efforts in the hospital setting to a diversion of attention to the community. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.5.240DOI Listing

Pharmacotherapy for hypertension in adults aged 60 years or older.

Authors:
Terri D Kane

Br J Community Nurs 2020 May;25(5):252-253

Associate Professor, Texas Wesleyan University, Fort Worth, Texas, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.5.252DOI Listing

Biopsychopharmacosocial approach to assess impact of social distancing and isolation on mental health in older adults.

Br J Community Nurs 2020 May;25(5):231-238

Senior Teaching Fellow in Mental Health and Learning Disability Nursing, King's College London.

It is impossible to predict or comprehend the impact of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The UK Government's advice for vulnerable people, including older adults, to move towards self-isolation and social distancing is likely to reduce rates of transmission, the risk of severe illness and the impact on the acute health services. Although justified and necessary, this process of isolation is likely to have a negative impact on the mental health of these vulnerable groups, especially older people. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.5.231DOI Listing

Survey of lipoedema symptoms and experience with compression garments.

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Apr;25(Sup4):S17-S22

Principle Investigator, both at the School of Textiles and Design, Heriot-Watt University, Netherdale, Scotland.

Lipoedema is an incurable chronic disease causing limb deformity, painful skin and excessive ecchymosis. Compression garments are frequently recommended to manage symptoms, but the existing products are not designed specifically for lipoedema, and are for other medical conditions. A structured questionnaire was prepared in Online Surveys in October 2018 to investigate lipoedema symptoms and the use of compression garments to manage them. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.Sup4.S17DOI Listing

Corona, conferences and continuing development points.

Authors:
Karen Friett

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Apr;25(Sup4):S38

Chief Executive, Lymphoedema Support Network.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.Sup4.S38DOI Listing

Haddenham Comfiwave: a unique compression device for lymphoedema treatment.

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Apr;25(Sup4):S23-S30

Clinical Nurse Specialist, Florence Nightingale Hospice; Trainer, Haddenham Healthcare Ltd and Lymphoedema Training Academy.

Compression therapy is the mainstay of treatment in venous and lymphatic diseases. Optimisation of compression therapy is not a new concept, but, in the UK, the use of 24-hour compression therapy as part of the maintenance phase of treatment has not been standard practice and, until recently, has only been adopted by certain specialist centres. One such modality in the process of optimisation is the use of products that are classed as 'reduced compression' or 'night-time garments'. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.Sup4.S23DOI Listing

Chronic Oedema: Paradigm shift in lipoedema.

Authors:
Rucha Kurtkoti

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Apr;25(Sup4):S5

Editor-British Journal of Community Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.Sup4.S5DOI Listing

Women in dire need: the far-reaching impact of lipoedema on women's lives.

Authors:
Amy Fetzer

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Apr;25(Sup4):S6-S9

Editorial consultant, Lipoedema UK; Freelance journalist and consultant specialising in health and sustainability.

Lipoedema, an adipose tissue disorder, is a poorly visible, often unrecognised condition. To foster a greater understanding of the significant and debilitating impacts faced by women living with lipoedema, the charity Lipoedema UK conducted four focus group interviews, the findings of which were published in a series of reports under the umbrella title 'Women in dire need'. The reports identified the substantial and numerous negative effects of lipoedema on the women's everyday lives, including the patients' experiences with compression garments, the effects of liposuction surgery (many of which were not positive), the everyday impacts ranging from pain and reduced mobility to poor self-esteem and working prospects, and the considerable challenges faced by women with late-stage lipoedema which can render them immobile. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.Sup4.S6DOI Listing

British Lymphology Society update.

Authors:
Margaret Sneddon

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Apr;25(Sup4):S36-S37

Vice Chair, BLS.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.Sup4.S36DOI Listing

Chronic oedema and lymphoedema: what is the difference?

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Apr;25(Sup4):S31-S35

Clinical Nurse Specialist, Walsall Lymphoedema Service; Queen's Nurse; Adult Nurse Lecturer, University of Birmingham.

Chronic oedema is a term that encompasses several causes that lead to oedema formation in any part of the body. This includes lymphoedema and its subcategories. Despite the assumption that these are different, there are more commonalities amongst them. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.Sup4.S31DOI Listing

Two-layer reduced compression system for lower limb wounds: a non-comparative evaluation.

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Apr;25(Sup4):S10-S16

Member of the Cardiff and Vale University Health Board.

Leg ulceration is a debilitating condition in which various factors play a role in determining patients' quality of life (QoL), and compression therapy has been shown to improve QoL. The 3M Coban 2 Lite Compression System provides reduced compression (25-30 mmHg) ideal for patients with painful venous leg ulcers (VLU) who are unable to tolerate high-strength compression or those with mixed-aetiology leg ulcers (MLU) who have an ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI)≥0.5. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.Sup4.S10DOI Listing

Catheter-associated urinary tract infections in the community.

Authors:
Linda Nazarko

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Apr;25(4):188-192

Nurse Consultant at West London NHS Trust, London, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.4.188DOI Listing

Legal aspects of COVID-19 pandemic management for community nurses.

Authors:
John Finch

Br J Community Nurs 2020 04;25(4):196-199

Freelance journalist specialising in legal and ethical issues in healthcare.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.4.196DOI Listing

COVID-19 and emergency planning.

Authors:
George Winter

Br J Community Nurs 2020 04;25(4):184-186

Institute of Biomedical Sciences, London, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.4.184DOI Listing

Improving access to primary care services for those on low income: voluntary advocacy.

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Apr;25(4):162-166

Principal Lecturer for Student Experience, Senior Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy, Oxford Institute of Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Research (OxINMAHR), Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University.

Nurses in primary care are often the first point of access for those seeking health care, and it is well known that accessing health services can be difficult for some, especially those on a low income. A charity initiative has been developed in a low-income area in England to help such individuals, wherein volunteers help local residents to access local services and support. This study explores the experiences of service users in order to understand their perceptions and feelings about the service, using an instrumental case study method with semi-structured interviews. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.4.162DOI Listing

Falls and older people: understanding why people fall.

Authors:
Alison E While

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Apr;25(4):173-177

Emeritus Professor of Community Nursing, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Palliative Care King's College, London; Fellow of the Queen's Nursing Institute.

Falls are common among older people and a major public health challenge. This article describes why falls are more common among older people, the potential causes of falls and what assessments should be undertaken to inform preventive interventions. District nurses are well placed to contribute to the understanding of why an older person has had a fall as part of a falls risk assessment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.4.173DOI Listing

COVID-19 in the community.

Authors:
Rucha Kurtkoti

Br J Community Nurs 2020 04;25(4):161

Editor-British Journal of Community Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.4.161DOI Listing

Malnutrition in community-dwelling older people: lessons learnt using a new procedure.

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Apr;25(4):193-195

Professor, Faculty of Public Health and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London.

This article reports the implementation of a new procedure for screening and treatment of malnutrition in a community NHS trust in England. The barriers and facilitators to implementation were assessed with staff from Integrated Community and Older People's Mental Health teams. Data from interviews and surveys were collected at baseline, 2 months after initial training and 16 months after initial training as well as following deployment of a nutrition lead to embed new developments for nutritional care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.4.193DOI Listing

Managing heart failure.

Authors:
Alison While

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Apr;25(4):206

Emeritus Professor of Community Nursing, King's College London, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery and Fellow of the QNI.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.4.206DOI Listing

Research towards treating COVID-19.

Authors:
Aysha Mendes

Br J Community Nurs 2020 04;25(4):204-205

Freelance journalist specialising in psychology and healthcare.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.4.204DOI Listing

Compression therapy for treating post-thrombotic syndrome.

Authors:
Jill Campbell

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Apr;25(4):202-203

Clinical Nurse and Early Career Research Fellow, Skin Integrity Service, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane Australia Joint Appointment with School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Australia.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.4.202DOI Listing

Social prescribing: combating loneliness is everyone's business.

Authors:
Brian Nyatanga

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Apr;25(4):200

Senior Lecturer, Three Counties School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Worcester.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.4.200DOI Listing

Urge incontinence in postmenopausal women.

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Apr;25(4):168-172

Registered nurse and freelance writer, based at the Department of Work and Pensions as a disability analyst.

This article explores the social and physical issue of urge incontinence among postmenopausal women. This condition can severely inhibit the activities of the affected individual on a daily basis for fear of embarrassment due to its unpredictability. Urge incontinence is usually of mixed aetiology, and the symptoms are primarily the sudden onset of micturition unexpectedly in any situation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.4.168DOI Listing

Improving the experience of patients who receive home enteral tube feeding.

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Apr;25(4):178-183

Community Nutrition Nurse, West Cheshire Integrated Care Partnership, Countess of Chester Hospital, Chester.

Home enteral tube feeding is an increasingly common intervention for patients who are unable to meet their full nutritional requirements. These patients require specialist support to enable them to live as normal a life as possible at home. An integrated acute and community nutrition service developed a new role of community nutrition nurse (CNN) in 2016, with the goal of reducing the number of unplanned hospital attendances relating to enteral tube feeding issues. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.4.178DOI Listing

Treating and healing a leg ulcer in a diabetic patient in Wyke Regis Leg Club.

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Mar;25(3):S30-S31

Independent Tissue Viability Consultant Nurse; Director of Wound Care Consultants Ltd.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.Sup3.S30DOI Listing

Moisture-associated skin damage: an overview of its diagnosis and management.

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Mar;25(3):S12-S18

Director of Employability, Nursing, Midwifery and Health; Programme Leader, Adult Nursing, Northumbria University.

This educational article introduces an explores moisture-associated skin damage (MASD) and the four forms it manifests as, namely, incontinence-associated dermatitis; intertriginous dermatitis; peristomal moisture-associated dermatitis; and peri-wound moisture-associated dermatitis. The aetiology and predisposing factors of each form are critically discussed, in addition to the treatments and interventions that can be used by nurses to support patient recovery. Nurses and other health professionals working with patients who are at risk of skin damage or who already require wound care, must be knowledgeable about all aspects of MASD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.Sup3.S12DOI Listing

Prioritising lower limb health.

Authors:
Georgina Ritchie

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Mar;25(3):S5

Principal Lecturer, Family, Community and Public Health Team, University of Central Lancashire.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.Sup3.S5DOI Listing

Management of time: reflection and positivity!

Authors:
Ellie Lindsay

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Mar;25(3):S32-S33

OBE, Queen's Nursing Institute Fellow Life President, Lindsay Leg Club Foundation.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.Sup3.S32DOI Listing

Primary care networks: an opportunity to improve community wound care.

Authors:
Liam Benison

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Mar;25(3):S20-S25

Freelance writer.

Primary care networks (PCNs) were introduced in England in 2019 to bring about closer collaboration between general practice and community health services. The ambition is that greater collaboration between services will achieve better patient outcomes and reduce costs through more effective sharing of staff and resources. Wound care might be considered an ideal focus for PCNs, since general practice and community health services not only have a predominant role in the management of wounds, but variable and suboptimal practice continues and poor outcomes persist. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.Sup3.S20DOI Listing

New tools in wound care to support evidence-based best practice.

Authors:
Melanie Lumbers

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Mar;25(3):S26-S29

Freelance Tissue Viability Nurse and Health Visitor.

Throughout history, various wound healing and management concepts have been recorded, with some approaches such as honey, silver and larvae still in use and others such as blood-letting completely dismissed. In more recent times, dressing products have begun evolving, moving on from basic first-aid supplies to products that support positive healing by addressing the needs of the wound bed and considering underlying factors that impact healing. With an ageing population, the incidence of chronic wounds is predicted to rise, and chronic wounds can negatively impact the lives of patients physically, emotionally and financially. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.Sup3.S26DOI Listing

Deal with heels: a pressure ulcer prevention initiative.

Authors:
Karen Birkill

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Mar;25(3):S6-S10

Tissue Viability Nurse Specialist, Dorset Healthcare University Foundation Trust.

Pressure ulcers/injuries are well known for being a common problem in healthcare and are a key indicator of the quality and experience of patient care. This article discusses how one NHS trust reduced the incidence of heel pressure ulcers within adult inpatient settings. In 2016/17, the trust identified 14 avoidable category 3 and above pressure ulcers/injuries in inpatient settings, of which 10 had developed on the heels. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.Sup3.S6DOI Listing

Hand and other hygiene practices.

Authors:
Alison While

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Mar;25(3):154

Emeritus Professor of Community Nursing, King's College London, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery and Fellow of the QNI.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.3.154DOI Listing

Palliative care for chronic respiratory disease: integrated care in outpatient settings.

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Mar;25(3):132-138

Consultant Respiratory Physician, Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust.

Chronic respiratory diseases are progressive and often life-limiting illnesses. Patients experience debilitating and troubling symptoms that impact on their quality of life. Despite this, there is under-recognition of patients who may be entering the final year of their life and require palliative care services. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.3.132DOI Listing

Recruiting older people from the Pakistani community in Community Ageing Research 75.

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Mar;25(3):110-113

Professor of Geriatric Medicine, University of Leeds; Honorary Consultant Geriatrician Theme Lead, NIHR Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care Yorkshire and Humber Older People's Theme.

Older people from a South Asian background, particularly Pakistanis, are under-represented in health research, possibly because their recruitment to studies is hampered by language barriers and cultural differences. This article describes the observations of two bi-lingual researchers (FM and IJ) who successfully recruited older people (≥75 years) from Bradford's South Asian population to the Community Ageing Research 75+ Study (CARE 75+), a longitudinal cohort study collecting an extensive range of health, social and economic outcome data. The researchers recruited non-English-speaking Pakistani participants, ensuring they were flexible with appointments to accommodate the wishes of family members, who were often present during consent and assessment visits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.3.110DOI Listing

Support for unpaid carers: the working carers' passport.

Authors:
Fatima Khan-Shah

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Mar;25(3):144-147

Programme Lead, Unpaid Carers Programme, West Yorkshire and Harrogate Health and Care Partnership; Member of the NHS Assembly.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.3.144DOI Listing

Tavistock Neighbourhood Nursing Network: collaboration across settings.

Authors:
Joanne Beniston

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Mar;25(3):122-125

Modern Matron, Tavistock Neighbourhood, Tavistock, West Devon.

The modern matron role in Tavistock has been developed to extend beyond the community hospital to oversee the provision of high-quality care across community nursing services by promoting a collaborative approach to learning and development, via the establishment of a Neighbourhood Nursing Network (NNN). The Tavistock NNN helps nurses to support each other to improve practice and work collaboratively. The aim is to target health promotion and ill health prevention where it will be most effective in order to make services sustainable for the future, including engaging with young people for the purpose of preventing illness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.3.122DOI Listing

The profile of place of death.

Authors:
Brian Nyatanga

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Mar;25(3):150

Senior Lecturer, Three Counties School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Worcester.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.3.150DOI Listing

Shifting pain management in the community.

Authors:
Aysha Mendes

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Mar;25(3):152-153

Freelance journalist specialising in healthcare and psychology.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.3.152DOI Listing

Life is for living: the contribution of the arts and gardens.

Authors:
Alison E While

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Mar;25(3):140-143

Emeritus Professor of Community Nursing, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Palliative Care, King's College, London; Fellow of the Queen's Nursing Institute.

Quality of life and life enrichment are important throughout the lifespan and no less during ill-health or later life. The role of the arts and gardens and their potential benefits are not prominent within healthcare practice. This paper outlines the evidence reported in two literature reviews, one addressing the arts and the other focusing on gardens and gardening so that district nurses can understand what art-based and gardening opportunities they may offer their clients and their carers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.3.140DOI Listing

DNACPR: don't leave it until too late to talk.

Authors:
Clare Fuller

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Mar;25(3):109

Lead Practitioner, Palliative and End of Life Care, Kent Community Health NHS Foundation Trust; Care Quality Commission Specialist Advisor.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.3.109DOI Listing

Infection prevention and control challenges in Flemish homecare nursing: a pilot study.

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Mar;25(3):114-121

Microbiologist and Infection Control Specialist, Laboratory Medicine, Medical Microbiology, AZ Sint Jan, Bruges.

Home nursing is evolving towards more invasive care. Nevertheless, no national data are available on the prevalence of HAI in this setting. The aim of this pilot study is to explore the Flemish home care setting as a first step toward a national surveillance program. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.3.114DOI Listing

Donepezil for dementia due to Alzheimer's disease.

Authors:
Natalie Govind

Br J Community Nurs 2020 Mar;25(3):148-149

Lecturer, Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2020.25.3.148DOI Listing