1,098 results match your criteria British Journal Of Social Psychology[Journal]


A social identity perspective on COVID-19: Health risk is affected by shared group membership.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 May 31. Epub 2020 May 31.

Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.

In the face of a novel infectious disease, changing our collective behaviour is critical to saving lives. One determinant of risk perception and risk behaviour that is often overlooked is the degree to which we share psychological group membership with others. We outline, and summarize supporting evidence for, a theoretical model that articulates the role of shared group membership in attenuating health risk perception and increasing health risk behaviour. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12391DOI Listing

More positive group memberships are associated with greater resilience in Royal Air Force (RAF) personnel.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 May 20. Epub 2020 May 20.

Loughborough University, UK.

In the current project, we examined how perceived group memberships (number, and characteristics, of), social and relational identification, and social identity leadership are associated with resilience in Royal Air Force (RAF) personnel. Based on social identity theorizing, we hypothesized positive associations between the number of groups, perceptions of their characteristics (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12385DOI Listing

'They're discriminated against, but so are we': White Australian-born perceptions of ingroup and immigrant discrimination over time are not zero sum.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 May 9. Epub 2020 May 9.

School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

We examined whether zero-sum thinking explains White Australian-born people's majority-culture perceptions of discrimination towards their ingroup and an outgroup (immigrants), and the relationships among perceived discrimination and support for multiculturalism and immigration. Two correlational cross-sectional studies were conducted among self-identified White Australians (Study 1, N = 517), and White Americans (Study 2, N = 273), as well as an experiment among White Australians (Study 3, N = 121) in which we manipulated discrimination towards immigrants over time. Our findings did not support a zero-sum account but revealed that perceptions of group discrimination were positively correlated: a case of 'they're discriminated against, but so are we' rather than 'if they gain, we lose'. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12384DOI Listing

Majority group belonging without minority group distancing? Minority experiences of intergroup contact and inequality.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 May 1. Epub 2020 May 1.

University of Leuven, Belgium.

As most immigrant-origin minority youth grow up in ethnically diverse social worlds, they develop a sense of belonging to both the national majority and the ethnic minority group. Our study adds to a growing body of research on minority experiences of intergroup contact by (1) including both minority and majority group belonging as outcomes and (2) examining the interplay of majority contact with unequal treatment. We surveyed 1,200 Turkish and Moroccan-Belgian minority youth in 315 classrooms across 65 schools, using multiple measures of intergroup contact, unequal treatment in school, and minority and majority group belonging. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12382DOI Listing

Brexit: The influence of motivation to respond without prejudice, willingness to disagree, and attitudes to immigration.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Apr 29:e12383. Epub 2020 Apr 29.

Department of Psychology, Goldsmiths, University of London, UK.

Britain's unexpected vote to leave the European Union (Brexit) in June 2016 has proved divisive and damaging both within the United Kingdom and internationally. Across two correlational studies, the current research proposed a model to explain the Brexit vote, with attitudes to immigration and willingness to disagree (WD) as direct predictors of the referendum result, and internal (IMS) and external (EMS) motivation to respond without prejudice as indirect predictors. Study 1 (N = 353) and Study 2 (N = 363) both showed good fit with the model and, respectively, explained 48% and 46% of the referendum result. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12383DOI Listing

Examining the role of fundamental psychological needs in the development of metadehumanization: A multi-population approach.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Apr 28. Epub 2020 Apr 28.

Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium.

In the present paper, we investigate dehumanization processes from a victim perspective. We propose that dehumanization experiences, that is metadehumanization, arise from people's feelings that their fundamental human needs are thwarted and that such experiences influence their emotions, self-esteem, and coping strategies. Our model is put at test in three contexts involving different types of dehumanization victims: Women (Study 1a, N = 349), patients with severe alcohol use disorder (Study 1b, N = 120), and employees in organizations (Study 1c, N = 347). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12380DOI Listing

I (dis)like the way you (dis)like them: The role of extended contact on social distance and attitudes towards the ingroup.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Apr 20. Epub 2020 Apr 20.

Isik University, Turkey.

While extended intergroup contact has been commonly studied in the context of prejudice reduction, less is known about its implications for processes related to the ingroup. Through three correlational and one experimental studies (total N = 897) conducted in two different intergroup contexts (Turkey and United Kingdom), we investigated whether extended intergroup contact relates to social distance and attitudes towards ingroup members as a function of outgroup attitudes. We also investigated ingroup identification and perceived ingroup morality as potential mediators in these associations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12381DOI Listing

The Bullshitting Frequency Scale: Development and psychometric properties.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Apr 18:e12379. Epub 2020 Apr 18.

Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.

Recent psychological research has identified important individual differences associated with receptivity to bullshit, which has greatly enhanced our understanding of the processes behind susceptibility to pseudo-profound or otherwise misleading information. However, the bulk of this research attention has focused on cognitive and dispositional factors related to bullshit (the product), while largely overlooking the influences behind bullshitting (the act). Here, we present results from four studies focusing on the construction and validation of a new, reliable scale measuring the frequency with which individuals engage in two types of bullshitting (persuasive and evasive) in everyday situations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12379DOI Listing

The effects of moral/social identity threats and affirmations on psychological defensiveness following wrongdoing.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Apr 7. Epub 2020 Apr 7.

Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

Defensive responses to transgressions can have a negative impact on decision-making within government and organizations, on relationships, and even an individual's well-being. Transgressors who are defensive are less likely to acknowledge or appreciate the extent of harm caused, and their responsibility in having contributed to it or in helping to repair it. It is therefore important to understand what situational factors increase or reduce defensiveness and, thus, offer solutions for those trying to foster responsibility-taking by individuals in relationships, organizations, and society. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12378DOI Listing

Introduction to British Journal of Social Psychology special section on The bright and dark sides of empathy.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Apr 6. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12363DOI Listing

Mind perception and stereotype attribution of corporations and charities.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Apr 3:e12377. Epub 2020 Apr 3.

Institute of International Business and Governance, Lee Shau Kee School of Business and Administration, The Open University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR.

People generally attribute less mind to groups than to individuals. Previous research has also shown differences of mind perception between different types of groups, such that not-for-profit organizations were viewed as having more minds than for-profit organizations. In this paper, we ascertained this mind perception differences and further examined its underlying mechanisms and concomitant consequences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12377DOI Listing

Three strategies for doing narrative resistance: Navigating between master narratives.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Mar 31. Epub 2020 Mar 31.

School of Social Work, Sapir Academic College, Sderot, Israel.

Narrative psychology emphasizes the role of culture in shaping identities. Less attention has been paid to how individuals resist culture. Specifically, two aspects have remained understudied: the diverse forms of doing narrative resistance and the navigation between different types of master narratives involved in the process. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12376DOI Listing

'Society thinks they are cold and/or incompetent, but I do not': Stereotype content ratings depend on instructions and the social group's location in the stereotype content space.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Mar 25. Epub 2020 Mar 25.

Berlin Social Science Center, Germany.

Stereotype content researchers have grown accustomed to ask participants how 'society' views social groups to tap into culturally shared stereotype content and to reduce social desirability bias (J Person Soc Psychol, 82, 2002, 878). However, methodological and theoretical considerations raise questions about this common practice, and stereotype content researchers have also asked for participants' personal perspective on social groups in the past. Nonetheless, how and whether stereotype content model scores empirically differ as a function of the instructed perspective remains questionable and to date untested. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12375DOI Listing

Prejudice against members of a ridiculed working-class group.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Mar 9. Epub 2020 Mar 9.

Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid, Spain.

In five experiments, we examined the stereotypes, emotions, and behavioural intentions associated with a Spanish working-class group, known as chonis. We described a student (Experiments 1-3) or job candidate (Experiments 4-5) and presented participants with a picture showing a woman characterized either as choni or posh (an upper-class group, Experiments 2-4) or with no picture (Experiments 1, 3-5). Depending on the condition, explicit information about her high social class (Experiment 1), performance (Experiment 3), or category (Experiment 5) was provided. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12373DOI Listing

The breaking bad effect: Priming with an antihero increases sensation seeking.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Mar 6. Epub 2020 Mar 6.

University of Limerick, Ireland.

Antiheroes are characters that share features with both heroes and villains, typified as selfish and rule breakers, but who end up doing something good for society. In this research, we examined how priming people with antiheroes (vs. heroes) affected their sensation seeking. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12374DOI Listing

Are women more likely to wear red and pink at peak fertility? What about on cold days? Conceptual, close, and extended replications with novel clothing colour measures.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Feb 28:e12371. Epub 2020 Feb 28.

Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida, USA.

Evolutionarily minded researchers have hypothesized that women advertise their ovulatory status by wearing red or pink clothing on relatively cold days. Many of these studies have been based on samples of women who have self-reported their clothing choices, a practice that raises questions about accuracy. In two studies, we evaluated the relationship between women's fertility and their clothing choices using four methods for measuring clothing colour: self-reports; trained raters' judgements of garment coloration in outfits that women drew onto mannequins to represent what they would wear to a party with single attractive people in attendance; automated colour coding of the mannequins; and trained raters' judgements of garment coloration as evinced in photographs that women took of themselves. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12371DOI Listing
February 2020

Saving a victim from himself: The rhetoric of the learner's presence and absence in the Milgram experiments.

Authors:
David Kaposi

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Feb 27. Epub 2020 Feb 27.

The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK.

This paper contests what has remained a core assumption in social psychological and general understandings of the Milgram experiments. Analysing the learner/victim's rhetoric in experimental sessions across five conditions (N = 170), it demonstrates that what participants were exposed to was not the black-and-white scenario of being pushed towards continuation by the experimental authority and pulled towards discontinuation by the learner/victim. Instead, the traditionally posited explicit collision of 'forces' or 'identities' was at all points of the experiments undermined by an implicit collusion between them: rendering the learner/victim a divided and contradictory subject, and the experimental process a constantly shifting and paradoxical experiential-moral field. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12369DOI Listing
February 2020

Variations in subjective definitions of everyday situations as intergroup contact.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Feb 24. Epub 2020 Feb 24.

University of Exeter, UK.

Intergroup contact encompasses a wide range of contact situations. Yet, how 'contact' is conceptualized by those involved has rarely been examined. We argue that understanding the range of subjective definitions of contact is important for intergroup contact measurement and wider impact work. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12372DOI Listing
February 2020

The influence of conspiracy beliefs on conventional and unconventional forms of political participation: The mediating role of political efficacy.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Apr 20;59(2):549-569. Epub 2020 Feb 20.

Department of Cognitive, Social and Organizational Psychology, Universidad de La Laguna, Spain.

Recent approaches from social psychology lend support to conspiracy beliefs as a motivated form of social cognition, structured around and consistent with a higher-order belief system, which may have an impact on the way people understand their political environment and respond to it. Building on these accounts, this study examines the influence of conspiracism on political efficacy and, indirectly, on conventional and unconventional forms of political participation. Drawing on two-wave panel data collected in five democracies (United States, Japan, United Kingdom, Poland, and Estonia; n = 5,428), results suggest that individuals who hold conspiracy beliefs tend to regard the political system as less responsive to citizens' demands - external dimension of political efficacy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12366DOI Listing

'When the walls come tumbling down': The role of intergroup proximity, threat, and contact in shaping attitudes towards the removal of Northern Ireland's peace walls.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Feb 17. Epub 2020 Feb 17.

School of History, Anthropology, Philosophy and Politics, Queen's University, Belfast, UK.

Institutional structures of segregation typically entrench social inequality and sustain wider patterns of intergroup conflict and discrimination. However, initiatives to dismantle such structures may provoke resistance. Executive proposals to dismantle Northern Ireland's peace walls by 2023 provide a compelling case study of the nature of such resistance and may thus provide important clues about how it might be overcome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12370DOI Listing
February 2020

Superficial ingroup love? Collective narcissism predicts ingroup image defense, outgroup prejudice, and lower ingroup loyalty.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Feb 11. Epub 2020 Feb 11.

University of Warsaw, Poland.

We examined the associations between the need for personal control, different types of ingroup commitment, and group-related outcomes: (1) defensive responses to ingroup criticism, (2) ingroup disloyalty, and (3) outgroup attitudes. We assumed that collective narcissism (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12367DOI Listing
February 2020

Underdogs make an alliance: The co-experience of rejection promotes cooperation.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Feb 7:e12368. Epub 2020 Feb 7.

Department of Psychology, Ningbo University, China.

Social rejection research has largely focused on the consequences of rejection when individuals experience rejection alone. Yet little is known about the reaction of those co-experiencing rejection. We tested the hypothesis that the co-experience of rejection increases cooperation between the co-experiencers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12368DOI Listing
February 2020

We are all in this together: The role of individuals' social identities in problematic engagement with video games and the internet.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Apr 7;59(2):522-548. Epub 2020 Feb 7.

Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, South Korea.

Individuals' engagement with video games and the internet features both social and potentially pathological aspects. In this research, we draw on the social identity approach and present a novel framework to understand the linkage between these two aspects. In three samples (N  = 304, N  = 160, and N  = 782) of young Chinese people from two age groups (approximately 20 and 16 years old), we test the associations between relevant social identities and problematic engagement with video games and the internet. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12365DOI Listing

Collective directional movement and the perception of social cohesion.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Jan 3. Epub 2020 Jan 3.

Division of Psychology, Sociology & Education, Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, UK.

We argue that perceivers associate collective directional movement - groups moving from one place to the next - with higher levels of social cohesion. Study 1 shows that pairs are rated as being more cohesive when described as engaging in directional movement compared to non-directional activities. Study 2 replicates this finding using film clips. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12361DOI Listing
January 2020

How an election loss leads to a social movement: Reactions to the 2016 U.S. presidential election among liberals predict later collective action and social movement identification.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Jan 10;59(1):227-247. Epub 2019 Jun 10.

Department of Applied Psychology, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development, New York University, New York, USA.

Donald J. Trump's 2016 presidential election victory spurred strong reactions and unprecedented collective action in the American Left. Taking advantage of the political climate in the wake of the election, this study examined whether the main antecedents of collective action (anger, political identification, and efficacy beliefs) in the immediate aftermath of the election loss for the American Left predicted varying types of collective action and social movement identification one month into Trump's presidency, and whether these factors in turn fuel anger and influence efficacy beliefs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12335DOI Listing
January 2020

Editorial.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Jan;59(1):1-3

University of Bath, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12360DOI Listing
January 2020

Call for special section proposals.

Authors:

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Jan;59(1):284

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12358DOI Listing
January 2020

Group-based meta-emotion and emotion responses to intergroup threat.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Apr 27;59(2):494-521. Epub 2019 Dec 27.

School of Psychology & Neuroscience, University of St Andrews, UK.

In a secularizing world, religious groups are increasingly threatened by anti-religious groups. We present two studies investigating religious peoples' responses to anti-religious threats. We expected intergroup threats to shape group-based emotions and behavioural intentions through a novel pathway whereby threat affects group-based meta-emotions: the ingroup's perception of the outgroup's emotions towards the ingroup. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12364DOI Listing

Shared social identification in mass gatherings lowers health risk perceptions via lowered disgust.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Dec 24. Epub 2019 Dec 24.

School of Psychology, Keele University, Staffordshire, UK.

Previous research concerning mass gathering-associated health risks has focused on physical factors while largely neglecting the role of psychological factors. The present research examined the effect of experiencing shared social identification on perceptions of susceptibility to health risks in mass gatherings. Participants in Study 1 were asked to either recall a crowd in which they shared a social identity with other crowd members or a crowd in which they did not. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12362DOI Listing
December 2019

Leavers and Remainers after the Brexit referendum: More united than divided after all?

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Apr 20;59(2):470-493. Epub 2019 Dec 20.

Department of Psychology, University of Bath, UK.

Since the British 'Brexit referendum' in 2016, tensions between 'leave' and 'remain' voters have been growing. Using a novel analytical approach based on the full distribution of responses rather than their arithmetic means, Study 1 (N = 1,506) showed on average 90% of overlap among Leavers and Remainers across a range of important variables. Even on the variables that are commonly used to illustrate how Leavers and Remainers differ (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12359DOI Listing

When transgressors intend to cause harm: The empowering effects of revenge and forgiveness on victim well-being.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Apr 11;59(2):447-469. Epub 2019 Dec 11.

Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany.

When people are transgressed against, they are usually motivated to restore personal power that was threatened by the transgression. We argue and test the new idea that while revenge and forgiveness responses are typically seen as opposites, both may be empowering, depending on the offender's intent to harm. Across two studies, one experimental (N = 381) and one employing an autobiographical recall paradigm (N = 251), we tested a moderated mediation model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12357DOI Listing

What drives the (un)empathic bystander to intervene? Insights from eye tracking.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Dec 2. Epub 2019 Dec 2.

Center for Economics and Neuroscience, University of Bonn, Germany.

Norm violations (e.g., unfair transgressions) are often met with punishment even by people who are not directly affected. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12354DOI Listing
December 2019

Collectively biased representations of the past: Ingroup Bias in Wikipedia articles about intergroup conflicts.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Dec 1. Epub 2019 Dec 1.

Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien, Tübingen, Germany.

Individuals tend to present their own group (the ingroup) in a systematically more favourable way (ingroup bias). By examining socially negotiated and publicly accessible Wikipedia articles about intergroup conflicts, we investigated ingroup bias at a collective level. Specifically, we compared articles about the same intergroup conflicts (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12356DOI Listing
December 2019

Mobilizing IDEAS in the Scottish Referendum: Predicting voting intention and well-being with the Identity-Deprivation-Efficacy-Action-Subjective well-being model.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Apr 19;59(2):425-446. Epub 2019 Nov 19.

University of Kent, Canterbury, UK.

In the month approaching the 2014 Scottish Independence referendum, we tested the Identity-Deprivation-Efficacy-Action-Subjective Well-Being model using an electorally representative survey of Scottish adults (N = 1,156) to predict voting for independence and subjective well-being. Based on social identity theory, we hypothesized for voting intention that the effects of collective relative deprivation, group identification, and collective efficacy, but not personal relative deprivation (PRD), should be fully mediated by social change ideology. Well-being was predicted to be associated with PRD (negatively) and group identification (positively and, indirectly, negatively). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12355DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7186818PMC

Shaming interrogatives: Admonishments, the social psychology of emotion, and discursive practices of behaviour modification in family mealtimes.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Apr 12;59(2):347-364. Epub 2019 Nov 12.

School of Communication and Information, Rutgers-The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA.

This paper contributes to the study of admonishments, the operation of shaming in family interaction, and more broadly presses the virtue of a discursive psychological reconsideration of the social psychology of emotion. It examines the methodological basis of contemporary research on shame in experimental and qualitative social psychology, illustrated through the Test of Self-Conscious Affect (TOSCA) and qualitative work using shame narratives. Doubts are raised about how these methods can throw light on shaming practices in natural situations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12346DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7186827PMC

Whites' racial identity centrality and social dominance orientation are interactively associated with far-right extremism.

Authors:
Hui Bai

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Apr 12;59(2):387-404. Epub 2019 Nov 12.

Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, Minneapolis, USA.

This paper presents evidence from five studies (total White N = 7,209) that White American's racial identity centrality is related to self-reported levels of far-right extremism. Furthermore, evidence from two of the studies shows that social dominance orientation (SDO) is another robust predictor of far-right extremism. Results also show that SDO can moderate the relationship between White identity and extremism such that the association is stronger for Whites with a higher level of SDO. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12350DOI Listing

Editorial statement on Landmark article on Henri Tajfel's legacy.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Jan 12;59(1). Epub 2019 Nov 12.

University of Sussex, Falmer, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12352DOI Listing
January 2020

Does empathy undermine justice? Moderating the impact of empathic concern for a White policeman on responses to police interracial violence.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Nov 6. Epub 2019 Nov 6.

Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina Wilmington, North Carolina, USA.

White participants completed a measure of White guilt and read a passage describing a White police officer who shot an unarmed Black man. The victim's Facebook page information and picture indicated that he engaged in stereotypical or counterstereotypical activities in his everyday life. Participants then reported their empathic concern for the officer, perceptions of whether they thought the officer had racist motives for his actions, and their perceptions regarding the appropriate punishment for the officer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12347DOI Listing
November 2019

Rules of engagement: Reactions to internal and external criticism in public debate.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Apr 6;59(2):405-424. Epub 2019 Nov 6.

Utrecht University, The Netherlands.

Since 2014, the refugee crisis has launched a political shockwave across Europe, with consequences for the European Union, the Schengen Zone, and national politics. Within this context, we investigated how public statements about the refugee crisis are received. While debate and criticism are hallmarks of a democratic society, research demonstrates that people respond more negatively to criticism about their group from an outsider compared with an insider. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12351DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7187232PMC

The social identity approach: Appraising the Tajfellian legacy.

Authors:
Rupert Brown

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Jan 6;59(1):5-25. Epub 2019 Nov 6.

School of Psychology, University of Sussex, UK.

Since its original formulation, Tajfel's Social Identity Theory (SIT) has broadened considerably from its original focus on intergroup relations and is now applied to a wide range of phenomena. Indeed, the 'social identity approach' has become one of the most widely used perspectives in contemporary social psychology. In this article, I examine the popularity of Tajfel's writings on social identity and intergroup relations, especially over the last thirty years when they started to become more generally used. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12349DOI Listing
January 2020

A relational perspective on women's empowerment: Intimate partner violence and empowerment among women entrepreneurs in Vietnam.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Apr 30;59(2):365-386. Epub 2019 Oct 30.

Department of Social Psychology, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.

Research has mainly studied women's empowerment assessing personal (e.g., self-esteem) or relational (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12348DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7187353PMC

Participating in a new group and the identification processes: The quest for a positive social identity.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Jan 11;59(1):189-208. Epub 2019 Oct 11.

Université de Montréal, Québec, Québec, Canada.

Immigrants experience identity shifts; they can identify with the new cultural group and, sometimes, identify less with their group of origin. Previous research suggests that participation in the new cultural group predicts these two identity shifts. However, these studies have exclusively used correlational methodologies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12340DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6972616PMC
January 2020

Individual-based relative deprivation as a response to interpersonal help: The roles of status discrepancy and type of help.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Apr 9;59(2):329-346. Epub 2019 Oct 9.

Department of Psychology, Nanjing University, China.

Individual-based relative deprivation (IRD) refers to anger and resentment associated with upward interpersonal comparison. Four studies investigated whether and when IRD can be a result of receiving help. In all the studies, we found an interaction between type of help (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12345DOI Listing
April 2020
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When history becomes his story: Shifts in narrative perspective weaken the blame-mitigating force of life-history narratives.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Apr 9;59(2):311-328. Epub 2019 Oct 9.

Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, USA.

Life-history narratives describing how a transgressor developed aversive traits can mitigate blame. How is their effectiveness affected by narrative perspective? In particular, how is blame mitigation impacted when the transgressor appears to be knowledgeable of the story of his self-formation? In three experiments, we compare the effectiveness of narratives that reflect an objective perspective to those that reflect the transgressor's perspective. The experiments contrast two hypotheses. Read More

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Against the odds: Hope as an antecedent of support for climate change action.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Apr 7;59(2):289-310. Epub 2019 Oct 7.

College of Education, Psychology and Social Work, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

While individuals are often viewed as rational actors, engaging in action that promises success, sometimes they act despite low odds. We report two studies that investigate hope as a motivational resource during times when the odds of success seem low. We argue that when people are personally invested in the cause, their hope leaps with emerging possibility (low likelihood) of a positive outcome, but linearly aligns with likelihood for more probable outcomes (i. Read More

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April 2020
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Empathy choice in physicians and non-physicians.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Sep 27. Epub 2019 Sep 27.

University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Empathy in medical care has been one of the focal points in the debate over the bright and dark sides of empathy. Whereas physician empathy is sometimes considered necessary for better physician-patient interactions, and is often desired by patients, it also has been described as a potential risk for exhaustion among physicians who must cope with their professional demands of confronting acute and chronic suffering. The present study compared physicians against demographically matched non-physicians on a novel behavioural assessment of empathy, in which they choose between empathizing or remaining detached from suffering targets over a series of trials. Read More

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September 2019

Shared experiences and the social cure in the context of a stigmatized identity.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Jan 25;59(1):209-226. Epub 2019 Sep 25.

Centre for Social Issues Research, University of Limerick, Ireland.

In an attempt to combat the social isolation and stigma associated with the incarceration of a family member, increasingly efforts are made to support families affected by imprisonment. Many of these forms of support are delivered in groups. Participation in support groups generates benefits, sometimes referred to as the social cure, by enhancing a sense of belonging, social connection, and subjective identification with the group. Read More

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January 2020

The Social Interaction Model of Objectification: A process model of goal-based objectifying exchanges between men and women.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Jan 26;59(1):248-283. Epub 2019 Aug 26.

Center for Social and Cultural Psychology, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Bruxelles, Belgium.

People perceive and treat women as sex objects in social exchanges. The interaction processes through which women are objectified, however, have rarely been considered. To address this gap in the literature, we propose the Social Interaction Model of Objectification (SIMO). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12339DOI Listing
January 2020
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What really helps? Divergent implications of talking to someone with an empathic mindset versus similar experience for shame and self-evaluation in the wake of an embarrassing event.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Aug 11. Epub 2019 Aug 11.

University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

What kinds of social interactions help individuals recover from an embarrassing experience? The present experiment examined the possibility that whereas individuals do not benefit from interacting with someone who is merely trying to understand and empathize, they do benefit from interacting with someone who has undergone the same experience and thus accurately understands their feelings. The 'target' member of 142 dyads performed an embarrassing task in front of the 'perceiver', after which they had a face-to-face discussion. Unbeknownst to targets, some perceivers did the task themselves beforehand, and some perceivers adopted an empathic mindset during the exchange. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12338DOI Listing

The surprising politics of anti-immigrant prejudice: How political conservatism moderates the effect of immigrant race and religion on infrahumanization judgements.

Br J Soc Psychol 2020 Jan 30;59(1):157-170. Epub 2019 Jul 30.

Department of Psychology, Goldsmiths, University of London, UK.

Attitudes towards immigrants in the United Kingdom are worsening. It has been posited that these attitudes may reflect covert racial and religious prejudices, particularly among conservatives. To investigate this, two studies examined the role that immigrant race (Black/White; Study 1) and immigrant religion (Muslim/non-Muslim; Study 2) played in immigrant infrahumanization judgements, using political conservatism as a moderating variable. Read More

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January 2020