1,043 results match your criteria British Journal Of Social Psychology[Journal]


Attitudes towards redistribution and the interplay between perceptions and beliefs about inequality.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Apr 12. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

University of Granada, Spain.

Although economic inequality has increased over the last few decades, support for redistributive policies is not widely accepted by the public. In this paper, we examine whether attitudes towards redistribution are a product of both perceptions of, and beliefs about, inequality. Specifically, we argue that the association between perceived inequality and support for redistribution varies by beliefs that justify inequality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12326DOI Listing

Television exposure, consumer culture values, and lower well-being among preadolescent children: The mediating role of consumer-focused coping strategies.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Apr 3. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

Department of Psychology Politics and Sociology, Canterbury Christ Church University, UK.

Previous research has linked materialism to lower well-being in children, and recent findings suggest that this link is heightened among those exposed to high levels of advertising. One proposal is that children may be pursuing consumer culture ideals (CCIs) - orienting to material possessions and physical appearance - as a maladaptive coping strategy for dealing with underlying distress. The present work offers the first direct evaluation of this theoretically plausible hypothesis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12325DOI Listing

Is a system motive really necessary to explain the system justification effect? A response to Jost (2019) and Jost, Badaan, Goudarzi, Hoffarth, and Mogami (2019).

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Mar 28. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

The debate between the proponents of SIMSA and SJT does not pivot on whether system justification occurs - we all agree that system justification does occur. The issue is why it occurs? System justification theory (SJT; Jost & Banaji, 1994, British Journal of Social Psychology, 33, 1) assumes that system justification is motivated by a special system justification motive. In contrast, the social identity model of system attitudes (SIMSA; Owuamalam, Rubin, & Spears, , Current Directions in Psychological Science, 27, 2) argues that there is insufficient conclusive evidence for this special system motive, and that system justification can be explained in terms of social identity motives, including the motivation to accurately reflect social reality and the search for a positive social identity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12323DOI Listing

Identity threat and identity multiplicity among minority youth: Longitudinal relations of perceived discrimination with ethnic, religious, and national identification in Germany.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Mar 28. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

MZES, Mannheim University, Germany.

The notion that ethnic and religious minority identities are inherently incompatible with the national identities of European immigrant-receiving societies is popular in public discourse. Although findings documenting such negative associations seemingly support this claim, other research shows that the intergroup context matters for the extent to which minorities' ethnic and religious identities are conflicting (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12324DOI Listing

Parental competitive victimhood and interethnic discrimination among their children: The mediating role of ethnic socialization and symbolic threat to the in-group.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Mar 18. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Department of Psychology, University of Notre Dame, Indiana, USA.

Links between competitive victimhood and discrimination are well documented. However, the mechanisms how victimhood beliefs remain relevant for decades and how conflict survivors can shape attitudes and behaviours of the post-conflict generations are little understood. Following the Transgenerational Transmission Hypothesis and the Integrated Threat Theory, we propose that the link between parental competitive victimhood and discrimination among their children is mediated through family ethnic socialization and symbolic threat to the in-group. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12321DOI Listing
March 2019
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Whatever it takes: Attitude alignment in close relationships following third-party rejection.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Mar 13. Epub 2019 Mar 13.

Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA.

Individuals seek to affirm their belonging in many ways, but will they change even strongly held attitudes to do so? Attitude alignment is one mechanism by which individuals maintain ongoing relationships. We tested whether individuals would engage in greater attitude alignment (shifting their attitudes to match a romantic partner's attitudes) following rejection. Participants (N = 190) and their dating partners reported their attitudes about 51 social issues and received feedback that a third party (confederate) did or did not reject them. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12322DOI Listing

Reactions to offenders: Psychological differences between beliefs versus punishment.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Mar 7. Epub 2019 Mar 7.

Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

In the present research, we examined a discrepancy between people's beliefs about, versus punitive reactions towards, offenders. Particularly, appraisals of offenders along the dimension of communion (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12320DOI Listing

Still a matter of dialogue: A response to Potter's, Augoustinos's, and Jovchelovitch's commentaries.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Mar 2. Epub 2019 Mar 2.

Instituto Universitário de Lisboa (ISCTE-IUL), Cis-IUL, Lisboa, Portugal.

In their insightful and challenging commentaries, Potter, Augoustinos, and Jovchelovitch interestingly contributed to the debate we sought to promote. They allowed us to further reflect on our proposal of bringing together some strands of theory of social representations and discursive psychology for forging a stronger social psychology, that is, one more prepared to understand social change by better comprehending how meaning is constructed and transformed in discourse and communication. Through the present commentary, we attempt to better clarify this proposal in dialogue with their observations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12319DOI Listing

Whose tweets? The rhetorical functions of social media use in developing the Black Lives Matter movement.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Mar 1. Epub 2019 Mar 1.

University of Exeter, UK.

Research on collective action frequently characterizes social media as a tool for mobilization. However, social media activity can fulfil a variety of different functions for social change. In particular, the rhetorical functions of social media use by social movements are not well understood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12318DOI Listing

Explaining different orientations to the 2013 Gezi Park demonstrations in Istanbul, Turkey.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut.

Although a notable minority orient to real-world demonstrations by actively participating, other less involved, safer, orientations are more frequent. Thus, in the context of anti-government demonstrations in Gezi Park/Taksim Square in Istanbul, Turkey, in 2013, we distinguished between the orientations of participating, visiting, and watching. Study 1 (N = 359) and Study 2 (N = 327) confirmed that participating was characterized by greater experience of police violence and feelings of collective empowerment (Drury & Reicher, European Journal of Social Psychology, 35, 2005, 35) than visiting and watching the demonstrations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12316DOI Listing
February 2019
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Unpacking the relationship between religiosity and conspiracy beliefs in Australia.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Feb 1. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

We examined the interrelation between religiosity, anti-intellectualism, and political mistrust in predicting belief in conspiracy theories. Improving on previous psychological research on the link between religiosity and societal and political attitudes, we assessed the predictive power of religious self-categorization and the importance attached to one's own (non)religious worldview predicting belief in conspiracy theories separately. Applying quota sampling in a study in Australia (N = 515), the sample consisted of 48. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12314DOI Listing
February 2019

Dirty jobs and dehumanization of workers.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Feb 1. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy.

The present study aims at expanding research on dehumanization in the work domain by exploring laypeople's dehumanizing perceptions towards stigmatized workers. Starting from Hughes' (1951, Social psychology at the crossroads, Harper & Brothers, New York; Ashforth & Kreiner, 1999, Academy of Management Review, 24, 413) concept of 'dirty work', the present research aims to demonstrate that the different types of occupational taint elicit distinct dehumanizing images of certain occupational groups. Employing a cluster analysis, the results showed that workers in the physical taint cluster were most strongly associated with biological metaphors, workers in the social taint cluster were perceived as most similar to objects, and workers in the moral taint cluster were perceived as most similar to animals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12315DOI Listing
February 2019

Contextual factors influence the selection of specific and broad types of emotion regulation strategies.

Authors:
Ying Tang Yun Huang

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Jan 30. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

School of Information Studies, Syracuse University, New York, USA.

An emerging focus in the emotion regulation (ER) literature is to consider the importance of context for people's ER strategy choice, given that ER responses that adapt to situational demands have been found to be highly beneficial. However, it remains unclear what (and in what way) contextual factors impact people's ER strategy selections. Also, only a limited number of ER strategies have been extensively studied and little is known about people's selection of broad ER strategy categories (we focus on covert vs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12313DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Solving the paradox - (further) evidence for a quadratic relationship between in-group centrality and group-based guilt.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Department of Social Psychology, University of Leipzig, Germany.

Previous research on the relationship between strength of in-group identification and collective guilt about an in-group's wrongdoing is mixed, providing evidence for both a negative and a positive relationship. One possible way to reconcile these findings is to explore non-linear (quadratic) functions. Correlational data (Study 1) and experimental data (Study 2) from two questionnaire studies (Ntotal = 311) were in line with a quadratic relationship between self-centrality of the in-group and collective guilt (inverted U-shaped function). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12310DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Belief in conspiracy theories and intentions to engage in everyday crime.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Jan 19. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

Staffordshire University, UK.

Belief in conspiracy theories is associated with negative outcomes such as political disengagement, prejudice, and environmental inaction. The current studies - one cross-sectional (N = 253) and one experimental (N = 120) - tested the hypothesis that belief in conspiracy theories would increase intentions to engage in everyday crime. Study 1 demonstrated that belief in conspiracy theories predicted everyday crime behaviours when controlling for other known predictors of everyday crime (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12311DOI Listing
January 2019
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Justice reactions to deviant ingroup members: Ingroup identity threat motivates utilitarian punishments.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Jan 16. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

Faculté de psychologie et des sciences de l'éducation, Université catholique de Louvain-La-Neuve, Belgium.

To maintain a positive overall view of their group, people judge likeable ingroup members more favourably and deviant ingroup members more harshly than comparable outgroup members. Research suggests that such derogation of deviant ingroup members aims to restore the image of the group by symbolically excluding so-called 'black sheeps'. We hypothesized that information about a harm-doer's group membership influences observers' justice-seeking reactions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12312DOI Listing
January 2019

The future of system justification theory.

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Dec 29. Epub 2018 Dec 29.

New York University, USA.

In this article, we respond to commentaries by Friesen et al. (2018, Br. J. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12309DOI Listing
December 2018

Exploring the mechanisms underlying the social identity-ill-health link: Longitudinal and experimental evidence.

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Dec 18. Epub 2018 Dec 18.

University of Hildesheim, Germany.

There is strong and consistent evidence that identification with social groups is an important predictor of (ill-)health-related outcomes. However, the mediating mechanisms of the social identification-health link remain unclear. We present results from two studies, which aimed to test how perceived social support and collective self-efficacy mediate the effect of social identification on emotional exhaustion, chronic stress, and depressive symptoms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12308DOI Listing
December 2018

Politicization as an antecedent of polarization: Evidence from two different political and national contexts.

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Dec 17. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Institute of Psychology, Kiel University, Germany.

Using longitudinal research designs, we examine the role of politicization in the development of polarization. We conducted research in two different political and national contexts. In Study 1, we employ a panel sample of supporters of the Tea Party movement in the United States and examine the relationship between the strength of their politicization and their subsequent feelings towards conservatives versus liberals (affective polarization) as well as their subsequent perceptions of commonalities with conservatives versus liberals (cognitive polarization). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12307DOI Listing
December 2018

'Names will never hurt us': A qualitative exploration of çapulcu identity through the eyes of Gezi Park protesters.

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Dec 13. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Özyeğin University, Turkey.

While there is a wealth of literature on how and why people engage in collective action, there has been comparably less focus on the way identities that have emerged (as compared to how they are consolidated or politicized) through crowd action are understood and explained by those who carry those identities, as well as the particular importance of norm formation and adherence in this process. The Gezi Park protests in Turkey allowed studying exactly how a newly created identity - çapulcu identity [Turkish for looters] - can be perceived by the protesters. The present study utilizes a qualitative approach to explore how the çapulcu identity was understood by people who participated in the Gezi Park protests, as well as the norms and prototypes associated with that identity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12305DOI Listing
December 2018

Revisiting the difference between instrumental and terminal values to predict (stimulating) prosocial behaviours: The transcendental-change profile.

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Dec 12. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Past research suggests that the connection between values and people's behaviour may not be as straightforward and robust as has been claimed. We propose that a more holistic and discriminative view that acknowledges the influence of a specific combination of values on specific kinds of behaviour is needed. In the current project, we test two hypotheses regarding the transcendental-change profile (TCP). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12306DOI Listing
December 2018

System justification theory at 25: Evaluating a paradigm shift in psychology and looking towards the future.

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Dec 7. Epub 2018 Dec 7.

School of Psychology, University of Auckland, New Zealand.

Since first being proposed 25 years ago, system justification theory has become a paradigm-shifting framework for understanding intergroup relations and political psychology. Based on the thesis that people are motivated to defend and bolster the societal status quo, system justification theory helps to explain varied phenomena, including resistance to change, outgroup favouritism, and other instances of false consciousness. This paper summarizes four tenets of the theory including the following: (1) antecedents to system justification, (2) palliative effects of system justification, (3) status-based asymmetries in conflict between justification motives, and (4) societal consequences of system justification. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12302DOI Listing
December 2018
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Managing a moral identity in debt advice conversations.

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Dec 5. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

Queen's University Belfast, UK.

Previous research has found that stigma can be a barrier to service use but there has been little work examining actual service encounters involving members of stigmatized groups. One such group are those with problematic or unmanageable debts. Providing advice to members of this group is likely to be particularly difficult due to the stigma associated with being in debt. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/bjso.12303
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12303DOI Listing
December 2018
10 Reads

Discourse and representation: A comment on Batel and Castro 'Re-opening the dialogue between the theory of social representations and discursive psychology'.

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Dec 4. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science, London School of Economics and Political Science, UK.

Batel and Castro propose to integrate conceptually and empirically the theory of social representations (TSR) and discursive psychology (DP). This comment emphasizes the importance of debates between different traditions of social psychology, focusing on the status of psychological entities and methodological pluralism as two areas in which fruitful tensions between DP and TSR are still evident. It critiques DP's disavowal of psychological entities and reaffirms the insights of sociocultural traditions that see intrapsychological phenomena as internalized sociality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12296DOI Listing
December 2018

Meeting a nice asylum seeker: Intergroup contact changes stereotype content perceptions and associated emotional prejudices, and encourages solidarity-based collective action intentions.

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Dec 4. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Department of Psychology, Philipps-University, Marburg, Germany.

Intergroup contact can improve majority members' perception of minorities. Integrating the intergroup contact hypothesis with the stereotype content model and BIAS-Map, we hypothesized that positive intergroup contact improves German majority members' evaluations of asylum seekers on the warmth and competence dimensions. Using cross-sectional survey data and structural equation modelling, we found support for this hypothesis (Study 1a, N = 182). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12304DOI Listing
December 2018

The effects of social exclusion on processing of social information - A cognitive psychology perspective.

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Nov 27. Epub 2018 Nov 27.

Tampere University, Finland.

In this article, we review the research investigating the effects of social exclusion on processing of social information. We look into this topic from the point of view of cognitive psychology aiming to provide a systematic description of the effects of exclusion on workings of different cognitive mechanisms involved in social information processing. We focus on four lines of inquiry. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12299DOI Listing
November 2018

Parliamentary identity and the management of the far-right: A discursive analysis of Dutch parliamentary debates.

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Nov 26. Epub 2018 Nov 26.

Ercomer, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.

In many Western democratic societies, the far-right has considerable popular support and is often perceived as the winner of political debates. This raises the important question of how other politicians try to manage the far-right. We use parliamentary debates to examine how politicians define the identity of Member of Parliament (MP) in response to Geert Wilders, leader of the far-right Party for Freedom in the Netherlands. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12300DOI Listing
November 2018

Women's stereotype threat-based performance motivation and prepotent inhibitory ability.

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Nov 24. Epub 2018 Nov 24.

School of Psychology, University of Leeds, UK.

According to the mere effort account of performance, stereotype threat motivates disproval of the negative performance stereotype, which in turn potentiates the overproduction of prepotent responses. In mathematics (maths), prepotent responding facilitates solve type question (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12298DOI Listing
November 2018

Where did inaction go? Towards a broader and more refined perspective on collective actions.

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Nov 21. Epub 2018 Nov 21.

University of Groningen, The Netherlands.

While injustice is widespread, collective action against it appears to be rare. This paper argues that this may be because research often focuses on a narrow range of outgroup-oriented actions, such as demonstrating, signing petitions, that are symbolic of a collective response to injustice. The present work takes a bottom-up approach to study a broad range of collective and individual actions that people undertake in response to collective injustice. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/bjso.12295
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12295DOI Listing
November 2018
5 Reads

Advancing the social psychology of rapid societal change.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Jan 20;58(1):33-44. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

Flinders University, Australia.

In this introduction to the special section on rapid societal change, we highlight the challenges posed by rapid societal changes for social psychology and introduce the seven papers brought together in this special section. Rapid societal changes are qualitative transformations within a society that alter the prevailing societal state. Recent such changes include the election of right-wing populist governments, the Arab Spring revolutions, and devastating civil wars in the Middle East. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12292DOI Listing
January 2019
22 Reads

Social psychological research on prejudice as collective action supporting emergent ingroup members.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Jan 17;58(1):1-32. Epub 2018 Nov 17.

Research School of Psychology, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia.

Why does social psychological research on prejudice change across time? We argue that scientific change is not simply a result of empirical evidence, technological developments, or social controversies, but rather emerges out of social change-driven shifts in how researchers categorize themselves and others within their larger societies. As mainstream researchers increasingly recategorize former outgroup members as part of a novel ingroup, prejudice research shifts in support of emergent ingroup members against their emergent outgroup opponents. Although social change-driven science results in valuable opportunities for researchers, it also results in significant risks for research - collective, scientific biases in the inclusion and exclusion of social groups in prejudice research that are not readily detected or managed by traditional controls. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12294DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Beyond accessing information: Claiming to understand in child social welfare interviews.

Authors:
Clara Iversen

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Nov 15. Epub 2018 Nov 15.

Department of Sociology, Uppsala University, Sweden.

The present article investigates how people manage understanding of personal experiences in an institutional setting in which shared understanding of one party's experience can become an issue at stake: social welfare interviews with child victims of abuse. New recommendations on how to respond to child interviewees limit interviewers' support to experiences of which they have direct access. Using conversation analysis and discursive psychology to examine cases in which interviewers respond to children's reports of experiences by claiming to understand, the current article shows that interviewers primarily use such claims after interviewees have indicated that the interviewer may not understand. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/bjso.12289
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12289DOI Listing
November 2018
10 Reads

Dialoguing the difference: A reply to Batel and Castro's 'Re-opening the dialogue between the Theory of Social Representations and Discursive Psychology'.

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Nov 8. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

School of Psychology, University of Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.

Batel and Castro's call for reopening the dialogue between the theory of social representations and discursive psychology is to be welcomed and indeed, somewhat long overdue. Despite the case that many scholars are engaging in the kind of rapprochement being advocated for by Batel and Castro, I argue here that the intellectual trajectory discursive psychology has taken during the last thirty years makes it less amenable to the kind of reconciliation called for by Batel and Castro. Two enduring tensions between the two theories that require resolution remain: (1) how we define discursive psychology as it is practised today and (2) the epistemological and ontological status of cognition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12293DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Perceiving time through group-based glasses: Collective temporal orientation.

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Nov 8. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

People differ in the extent to which they focus on their personal future, past, or present. Across four studies (using both correlation and experimental designs), we explore whether people also have a temporal orientation when thinking about the social groups to which they belong (i.e. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/bjso.12291
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12291DOI Listing
November 2018
15 Reads

My way or the highway: High narcissism and low self-esteem predict decreased support for democracy.

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Nov 3. Epub 2018 Nov 3.

School of Psychology, University of Kent, Canterbury, UK.

In two studies, we analysed the relationships between different types of self-evaluation (i.e., narcissism and self-esteem) and support for democracy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12290DOI Listing
November 2018

The experience of deprivation: Does relative more than absolute status predict hostility?

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Oct 30. Epub 2018 Oct 30.

University of Innsbruck, Austria.

The present research examined the causal effects of absolute and relative status on experienced deprivation and hostility. On the basis of the theory of relative deprivation, we reasoned that the subjective experience of being worse off than others is a better predictor for hostility than is the absolute level of how well-off people are. Indeed, three experiments showed that relative more than absolute status has an impact on aggressive affect. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12288DOI Listing
October 2018
29 Reads

A cross-national analysis of sex differences in prisoner's dilemma games.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Jan 17;58(1):225-240. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods, Bonn, Germany.

In a comprehensive cross-national study involving samples from 12 different countries that were representative for the adult populations in terms of age and sex (N = 2,429), we found that women cooperate significantly less overall than men in fully incentivized one-shot prisoner's dilemma games. This gender gap in cooperation can be explained by the fact that women hold lower expectations regarding the cooperativeness of their anonymous interaction partners. These results contradict both the common stereotype that women are more communal, caring, emotionally expressive, and warm than men and substantial empirical evidence showing that women act more prosocially in many contexts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12287DOI Listing
January 2019

Revisiting 25 years of system motivation explanation for system justification from the perspective of social identity model of system attitudes.

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Oct 17. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Do the disadvantaged have an autonomous system justification motivation that operates against their personal and group interests? System justification theory (SJT; Jost & Banaji, 1994, Br. J. Soc. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12285DOI Listing
October 2018

'We fight for a better future for our country': Understanding the Ukrainian Euromaidan movement as the emergence of a social competition strategy.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Jan 15;58(1):45-65. Epub 2018 Oct 15.

Western Sydney University, New South Wales, Australia.

The current research seeks to develop an analysis of Ukraine's Euromaidan social movement in psychological terms. Building on the classic understanding of social competition strategies, we argue that Euromaidan protests can be conceived as an attempt of pro-European Union (EU) Ukrainians to realign the boundaries of the Ukrainian national identity by defeating the alternative pro-Russia integration project championed by the government. In particular, building on the encapsulated model of social identity in collective action, we suggest that Euromaidan is an emergent opinion-based group identity, formed in response to injustice through two self-categorical processes - group-level self-investment into the shared entity (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12283DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

The triple-filter bubble: Using agent-based modelling to test a meta-theoretical framework for the emergence of filter bubbles and echo chambers.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Jan 12;58(1):129-149. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

Leibniz-Institut für Wissensmedien IWM (Knowledge Media Research Center), Tübingen, Germany.

Filter bubbles and echo chambers have both been linked recently by commentators to rapid societal changes such as Brexit and the polarization of the US American society in the course of Donald Trump's election campaign. We hypothesize that information filtering processes take place on the individual, the social, and the technological levels (triple-filter-bubble framework). We constructed an agent-based modelling (ABM) and analysed twelve different information filtering scenarios to answer the question under which circumstances social media and recommender algorithms contribute to fragmentation of modern society into distinct echo chambers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12286DOI Listing
January 2019

Responding to natural disasters: Examining identity and prosociality in the context of a major earthquake.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Jan 8;58(1):66-87. Epub 2018 Oct 8.

Centro de Medición MIDE UC, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.

How does a major natural disaster relate to individuals' orientation towards society? We collected repeated cross-sectional surveys before (n = 644) and after the 2010 Chile earthquake (n = 1,389) to examine levels of national identity, prosocial values, helping motivations, and prosocial behaviours in the context of such a calamitous societal event. Our research questions, derived from the literature on helping in times of crisis, considered how natural disasters may implicate identity and prosociality, as well as how identity, prosocial values, and motivations are linked to prosocial action after a disaster. Higher levels of national identity, helping motivations, and disaster-related helping were found after the earthquake, suggesting that in the aftermath of a disaster, people unite under a common national identity and are motivated to take action related to disaster relief. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/bjso.12281
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12281DOI Listing
January 2019
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To accept or not to accept: Level of moral concern impacts on tolerance of Muslim minority practices.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Jan 3;58(1):196-210. Epub 2018 Oct 3.

University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Living with diversity requires that we sometimes accept outgroup practices that we personally disapprove of (i.e., tolerance). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12284DOI Listing
January 2019

The polarizing effects of group discussion in a negative normative context: Integrating societal-, group-, and individual-level factors.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Jan 24;58(1):150-174. Epub 2018 Sep 24.

Department of Social and Organizational Psychology, University of Leiden, The Netherlands.

In this research, we investigate how a negative (or hostile) norm regarding minorities at the societal level can fuel polarization between majority subgroups at the local level. We hypothesize that rapid social change in the form of polarization results from the interplay between small group processes and perceptions of society at large. By employing a novel analytic approach that uses variances to capture non-linear societal change, we were able to study polarization processes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12282DOI Listing
January 2019
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Team-level identification predicts perceived and actual team performance: Longitudinal multilevel analyses with sports teams.

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Sep 21. Epub 2018 Sep 21.

Centre for Team Excellence, Steyning, UK.

Social identification and team performance literatures typically focus on the relationship between individual differences in identification and individual-level performance. By using a longitudinal multilevel approach, involving 369 members of 45 sports teams across England and Italy, we compared how team-level and individual-level variance in social identification together predicted team and individual performance outcomes. As hypothesized, team-level variance in identification significantly predicted subsequent levels of both perceived and actual team performance in cross-lagged analyses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12277DOI Listing
September 2018

System justification: Experimental evidence, its contextual nature, and implications for social change.

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Sep 19. Epub 2018 Sep 19.

Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.

We review conceptual and empirical contributions to system justification theory over the last fifteen years, emphasizing the importance of an experimental approach and consideration of context. First, we review the indirect evidence of the system justification motive via complimentary stereotyping. Second, we describe injunctification as direct evidence of a tendency to view the extant status quo (the way things are) as the way things should be. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12278DOI Listing
September 2018

Inglorious glorification and attachment: National and European identities as predictors of anti- and pro-immigrant attitudes.

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Sep 17. Epub 2018 Sep 17.

Institute of Psychology, ELTE Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary.

Anti-immigrant attitudes are not only widespread among Eurosceptic nationalists, but also among people who feel that immigration threatens European values and identity. We therefore assumed that the connection between nationalism and xenophobia can only partially explain the rise of hostile attitudes in the post-2015 period. In two online surveys (N = 1,160), we compared how (a) glorification versus attachment and (b) national versus European identity can predict anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim attitudes in Hungary. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12280DOI Listing
September 2018

The transformative and informative nature of elections: Representation, schism, and exit.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Jan 17;58(1):88-104. Epub 2018 Sep 17.

Department of Psychological Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, USA.

In democratic elections, constituents may view unconventional or non-prototypical candidates as attempting to reshape their national identity in the wrong direction. When a non-prototypical candidate actually steps into a leadership role, the group's consensual view of their prototype may shift to position this new leader as prototypical. This process should be bound in member consensus, evidenced by the leader's successful election. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12279DOI Listing
January 2019

Rethinking current models in social psychology: A Bayesian framework to understand dramatic social change.

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Jan 4;58(1):175-195. Epub 2018 Sep 4.

ERCOMER, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.

Dramatic social change (DSC) is the new normal, affecting millions of people around the world. However, not all events plunge societies into DSC. According to de la Sablonnière (2017, Front. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12273DOI Listing
January 2019

Power matters: The role of power and morality needs in competitive victimhood among advantaged and disadvantaged groups.

Br J Soc Psychol 2018 Aug 29. Epub 2018 Aug 29.

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beersheba, Israel.

Competitive victimhood denotes group members' efforts to establish that their ingroup has suffered greater injustice than an adversarial outgroup. Previous research in contexts of structural inequality has stressed the role of the need to defend the ingroup's moral identity, rather than the need for power, in leading advantaged and disadvantaged group members to engage in competitive victimhood. Focusing on the structural inequality between Jewish and Arab citizens of Israel (Study 1) and Israeli women and men (Study 2), we found that across all groups and contexts, power needs predicted competitive victimhood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12276DOI Listing

Obedience without orders: Expanding social psychology's conception of 'obedience'.

Authors:
Stephen Gibson

Br J Soc Psychol 2019 Jan 29;58(1):241-259. Epub 2018 Aug 29.

School of Psychological & Social Sciences, York St John University, UK.

Psychologists have typically defined obedience as a form of social influence elicited in response to direct orders from an authority figure. In the most influential set of studies of obedience, conducted by Stanley Milgram in the early 1960s, the orders at the disposal of the authority figure were a series of verbal prods. However, recent research has suggested that Milgram's experiments do not show people following orders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12272DOI Listing
January 2019
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