14 results match your criteria Breast Cancer Manag[Journal]

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S1P promotes breast cancer progression by angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis.

Breast Cancer Manag 2015 Oct;4(5):241-244

Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine & Massey Cancer Center, PO Box 980011, West Hospital 7-402, 1200 East Broad Street, Richmond, VA 23298-0011, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/bmt.15.20DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4900461PMC
October 2015

How can we best respect patient autonomy in breast cancer treatment decisions?

Breast Cancer Manag 2015 ;4(1):53-64

Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 E Medical Center Dr, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.

Helping patients to maximize their autonomy in breast cancer decision-making is an important aspect of patient-centered care. Shared decision-making is a strategy that aims to maximize patient autonomy by integrating the values and preferences of the patient with the biomedical expertise of the physician. Application of this approach in breast cancer decision-making has not been uniform across cancer-specific interventions (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/bmt.14.47DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4342843PMC
January 2015
2 Reads

Molecular breast imaging: an emerging modality for breast cancer screening.

Breast Cancer Manag 2015 Jan;4(1):33-40

Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 1st Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA; Tel.: +1 507 284 7083;

Screening mammography is recognized as an imperfect imaging tool that performs poorly in women with dense breast tissue - a limitation which has driven demand for supplemental screening techniques. One potential supplemental technique is molecular breast imaging (MBI). Significant improvements in gamma camera technology allow MBI to be performed at low radiation doses, comparable with those of tomosynthesis and mammography. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/BMT.14.49DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4303579PMC
January 2015

Resistance to HER2-targeted therapies: a potential role for FOXM1.

Breast Cancer Manag 2014;3(5):423-431

Molecular & Systems Pharmacology Program, Graduate Division of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Emory University ; Cancer Biology Program, Graduate Division of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Emory University ; Department of Pharmacology, Emory University ; Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University ; Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University.

Despite the tremendous efficacy of trastuzumab against HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancers, a significant fraction of women demonstrate progressive disease during treatment. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to mediate trastuzumab resistance. In this mini-review, we discuss the evidence supporting FOXM1 as a mediator of resistance and potential new therapeutic target in trastuzumab-refractory breast cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/bmt.14.33DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4294221PMC
January 2014
3 Reads

Current and Future Methods for Measuring Breast Density: A Brief Comparative Review.

Breast Cancer Manag 2015 28;4(4):209-221. Epub 2015 Aug 28.

Hormonal and Reproductive Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Breast density is one of the strongest predictors of breast cancer risk. Women with the densest breasts are 4 to 6 times more likely to develop cancer compared with those with the lowest densities. Breast density is generally assessed using mammographic imaging; however, this approach has limitations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/bmt.15.13DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5609705PMC
August 2015
52 Reads

Understanding susceptibility to breast cancer metastasis: the genetic approach.

Breast Cancer Manag 2014 Mar;3(2):165-172

Laboratory of Cancer Biology & Genetics, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

Metastasis is a complex phenotype that is not discrete, is polygenic, varies in range over the entire population and follows non-Mendelian inheritance. Recent evidence indicates that inherited susceptibility affects not only the development of the primary tumor, but is also an important factor in progression and metastasis. Since metastasis accounts for the majority of breast cancer deaths, identification and understanding of the genetic modifiers of metastasis underlies success of personalized therapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/bmt.14.1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4157690PMC
March 2014
2 Reads

Mimicking pregnancy as a strategy for breast cancer prevention.

Breast Cancer Manag 2013 Jul;2(4):283-294

Breast Cancer Research Laboratory, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA 19111, USA.

Pregnancy and its effects on breast cancer risk have been widely investigated; there is consensus among researchers that early pregnancy confers protection against breast cancer later in life, whereas nulliparity and late-age parity have been associated with increased risk of developing breast cancer. The answer to the question of how pregnancy reduces breast cancer risk has been elusive; however, pregnancy, like breast cancer, is a similar hormone-dependent entity under direct control of estrogen, progesterone and, of particular importance, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). In this report, we emphasize the main changes, previously described by our laboratory, in morphology and gene expression levels of the mammary gland of Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to known cancer-preventative conditions (pregnancy, hCG and progesterone + estrogen). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/bmt.13.16DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3984583PMC
July 2013
4 Reads

Immune aspects of the breast tumor microenvironment.

Breast Cancer Manag 2013 May;2(3):231-244

Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1400 Pressler St, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

The immune response in the tumor microenvironment is complex, consisting of cells from both the adaptive and innate immune systems. The phenotype and function of these cells are dictated by cytokines present in the microenvironment, as well as by the interactions of these cells with the tumor cells and each other. Technological advances have allowed investigators to better identify the specific immune cells present and immune-related gene signatures overexpressed in the tumor microenvironment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/bmt.13.15DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3917569PMC

Nurturing Advocacy Inclusion to Bring Health Equity in Breast Cancer among African American Women.

Breast Cancer Manag 2014;3(6):487-495

Health Services, University of Trinidad and Tobago.

This paper will present the multiple roles and the impact of cancer advocates. The emerging literature provides evidence for the consideration and integration of African American BC survivors as advocates in practice, policy and research relevant to cancer prevention and control. We present a practical outline for organizational assessment for the inclusion of advocates in these arenas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/bmt.14.41DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4762369PMC
January 2014
4 Reads

Chemotherapeutic Targeting of the Transforming Growth Factor-β Pathway in Breast Cancers.

Breast Cancer Manag 2014;3(1):73-85

Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Division of General Medical Sciences-Oncology, Case Western Reserve University, Wolstein Research Building, 2103 Cornell Road Cleveland, OH 44106.

Transforming growth factor (TGF-β) is a multifunctional cytokine that plays essential roles in regulating mammary gland development, morphogenesis, differentiation, and involution. TGF-β also regulates mammary gland homeostasis and prevents its transformation by prohibiting dysregulated cell cycle progression, and by inducing apoptosis; it also creates cell microenvironments that readily inhibit cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Interestingly, while early-stage mammary tumors remain sensitive to the tumor suppressing activities of TGF-β, late-stage breast cancers become insensitive to the anticancer functions of this cytokine and instead rely upon TGF-β to drive disease and metastatic progression. Read More

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https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/bmt.13.74
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/bmt.13.74DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4403665PMC
January 2014
5 Reads

Breast cancer survivorship symptom management: current perspective and future development.

Breast Cancer Manag 2013 Jan;2(1):71-81

University of Pittsburgh, Department of Medicine (Hematology-Oncology, Geriatric Medicine) & Clinical & Translational Science Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Increasing numbers and longevity of cancer survivors has furthered our insight into the factors affecting their health outcomes, suggesting that multiple factors play a role (e.g., effects of cancer treatments and health behaviors). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/bmt.12.63DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3693468PMC
January 2013

The role of radiotherapy-resistant stem cells in breast cancer recurrence.

Breast Cancer Manag 2013;2(2):89-92

Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, NCI-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/bmt.13.5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4295787PMC
January 2013
5 Reads

Using large-scale molecular data sets to improve breast cancer treatment.

Authors:
Chad J Creighton

Breast Cancer Manag 2012 May;1(1):57-64

Department of Medicine & Dan L Duncan Cancer Center Division of Biostatistics, Baylor College of Medicine, 1 Baylor Plaza, BCM 600, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

The treatment of breast cancer patients could potentially be advanced by having a more complete understanding of breast cancer biology, including a catalog of recurrently altered genes. Over the last decade, thousands of human breast tumors have been profiled for gene expression and DNA copy number alterations, and ongoing efforts in DNA sequencing are establishing the set of somatically mutated genes. Much of the molecular data being generated resides in the public domain, available as a resource for further research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/BMT.12.14DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3712532PMC
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