3,391 results match your criteria Brain research. Developmental brain research[Journal]


Postnatal development of GFAP, connexin43 and connexin30 in cat visual cortex.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Dec 17;160(2):252-64. Epub 2005 Nov 17.

Laboratoire de Physiologie de la Perception et de l'Action, UMR CNRS/Collège de France 7152, 11 Place Marcelin Berthelot, 75005 Paris, France.

In cat visual cortex, neurons acquire progressively mature functional properties during the first postnatal months. The aim of this study was to analyze the development of astrocytes during this period. The patterns of expression of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) as well as of two gap junction proteins expressed in astrocytes, connexin43 (Cx43) and connexin30 (Cx30), were investigated by immunohistochemistry and optical density measurements, in visual cortical areas 17 and 18 at four different ages: 2 weeks (postnatal days 12 to 15, P12-15), 1 month (P27-31), 2 months (P60-62) and beyond 1 year. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.09.011DOI Listing
December 2005

Expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid B receptor subunits in hypothalamus of male and female developing rats.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Dec 16;160(2):124-9. Epub 2005 Nov 16.

Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental-CONICET, V. de Obligado 2490, (C1428ADN) Buenos Aires, Argentina.

GABA and its receptors show particular ontogenic distributions in different rat brain areas. Recently, GABAB receptors (GBR) have been described to assemble as heterodimers formed by a GBR1a/b and a GBR2 subunit. Here, the ontogeny of rat GBRs and the pattern of subunit expression in both sexes were determined in the hypothalamus, a critical area for homeostatic regulation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.06.017DOI Listing
December 2005
3 Reads

Retinal neurospheres prepared as tissue for transplantation.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Dec 14;160(2):194-202. Epub 2005 Nov 14.

Department of Ophthalmology, Lund University, Sweden.

The present work was conducted to study the cellular composition and developmental capacity of retinal neurospheres. Furthermore, the ability of grafted neurospheres to integrate into adult retinal tissue was studied in an in vitro model. Retinal progenitor cells isolated from rat embryos were expanded into neurospheres in vitro in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S016538060500254
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.09.003DOI Listing
December 2005
2 Reads

Effects of prenatal stress on anxiety and social interactions in adult rats.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Dec 14;160(2):265-74. Epub 2005 Nov 14.

Laboratoire de Neurobiologie de l'Apprentissage, UPRES PSY.CO 1780, Université de Rouen, Faculté des Sciences 76821 Mont-Saint-Aignan Cedex, France.

Deficits in social behavior are found in several neuro-psychiatric disorders with a presumed developmental origin. The aim of the present study is to determine if prenatal stress at a given day of gestation alters social behavior in adult offspring. Pregnant rats were exposed to an acute stress (presence of a cat) either at the 10th (S10), the 14th (S14) or the 19th (S19) gestational day. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.09.010DOI Listing
December 2005

Disruption of cerebellar granule cell development in the Pax6 mutant, Sey mouse.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Dec 9;160(2):176-93. Epub 2005 Nov 9.

Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Center of Excellence in Genomics and Bioinformatics, University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, 515 LINK Building, 855 Monroe Avenue, Memphis, TN 38163, USA.

The transcriptional regulator Pax6 is expressed in cerebellar granule cells and a mutation in that gene (Sey) has been shown to affect cerebellar development. We have defined novel phenotypes in the Sey/Sey cerebellum, indicating that the mutation of Pax6 alters granule cell behavior in vitro and also the interaction between granule cells and Purkinje cells in vivo. In culture, Sey/Sey granule cell precursors show the following abnormal phenotypes: enhanced proliferation, increased apoptotic cell death, and decreased number of morphologically differentiating beta-III tubulin-positive cells. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S016538060500255
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.09.005DOI Listing
December 2005
8 Reads

Cytoskeletal, synaptic, and nuclear protein changes associated with rat interface organotypic hippocampal slice culture development.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Dec 3;160(2):275-86. Epub 2005 Nov 3.

Neurobiology Program, Institute for Biological Sciences, National Research Council of Canada, 1200 Montreal Rd., Building M-54, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0R6.

Although organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) are used to study function within the hippocampus, the effect of maintenance in vitro upon protein expression is not fully understood. Therefore, we examined developmental changes in cultures prepared from P8 rats and maintained on porous membranes between medium and atmosphere. Between 7 and 28 days following explantation, altered hippocampal morphology could not be detected despite a significant decrease in both MAP-2c and a mid-range tau isoform by 21 DIV. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.09.009DOI Listing
December 2005
2 Reads

Lifespan development of pro- and anti-saccades: multiple regression models for point estimates.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Dec 2;160(2):113-23. Epub 2005 Nov 2.

School of Psychology, University of Wales, Bangor, The Brigantia Building, Penrallt Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2AS, Wales, UK.

The comparative study of anti- and pro-saccade task performance contributes to our functional understanding of the frontal lobes, their alterations in psychiatric or neurological populations, and their changes during the life span. In the present study, we apply regression analysis to model life span developmental effects on various pro- and anti-saccade task parameters, using data of a non-representative sample of 327 participants aged 9 to 88 years. Development up to the age of about 27 years was dominated by curvilinear rather than linear effects of age. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.06.011DOI Listing
December 2005
2 Reads

Imbalances emerge in cardiac autonomic cell signaling after neonatal exposure to terbutaline or chlorpyrifos, alone or in combination.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Dec 26;160(2):219-30. Epub 2005 Oct 26.

Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3813 DUMC, Durham, NC 27710, USA.

During early neonatal development, the future reactivity of the heart to cardiac autonomic stimulation is programmed by the timing and intensity of the arrival of parasympathetic and sympathetic inputs. In neonatal rats, we examined the effects of exposure to terbutaline, a beta-adrenoceptor (betaAR) agonist used to arrest preterm labor, and chlorpyrifos (CPF), a widely used organophosphate pesticide that acts in part through inhibition of cholinesterase, using scenarios mimicking the likely developmental stages corresponding to peak human exposures: postnatal days (PN) 2-5 for terbutaline and PN11-14 for CPF. Terbutaline evoked a progressive deficit in cardiac betaAR binding but did not interfere with the ability of the receptors to stimulate adenylyl cyclase (AC). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.09.006DOI Listing
December 2005

Neonatal alcohol exposure increases malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels in the developing cerebellum.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Dec 26;160(2):231-8. Epub 2005 Oct 26.

142E Reynolds Medical Building, Department of Human Anatomy and Medical Neurobiology, College of Medicine, The Texas A&M University System Health Science Center, College Station, TX 77843-1114, USA.

It has been suggested that developmental alcohol-induced brain damage is mediated through increases in oxidative stress. In this study, the concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were measured to indicate alcohol-mediated oxidative stress. In addition, the ability of two known antioxidants, melatonin (MEL) and lazaroid U-83836E (U), to attenuate alcohol-induced oxidative stress was investigated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.09.004DOI Listing
December 2005
15 Reads

The transdifferentiation potential of limbal fibroblast-like cells.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Dec 25;160(2):239-51. Epub 2005 Oct 25.

Embryonic and Ocular Stem Cell Group, Reliance Life Sciences Pvt. Ltd., Dhirubhai Ambani Life Sciences Centre, R-282, TTC Area of MIDC, Thane Belapur Road, Rabale, Navi Mumbai 400 701, India.

We report the identification and isolation of limbal fibroblast-like cells from adult corneo-limbal tissue possessing self-renewing capacity and multilineage differentiation potential. The cells form cell aggregates or clusters, which express molecular markers, specific for ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm lineages in vitro. Further, these cells mature into a myriad of cell types including neurons, corneal cells, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, adipocytes, cardiomyocytes, hepatocytes and pancreatic islet cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.09.008DOI Listing
December 2005
2 Reads

Darkness induced neuroplastic changes in the serotoninergic system of the chick retina.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Dec 20;160(2):211-8. Epub 2005 Oct 20.

Institute of Cell Biology and Neuroscience Prof. E. De Robertis, School of Medicine, University of Buenos Aires, Paraguay 2155, 2nd floor, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, C1121ABG, Argentina.

Sensory experience is critical for the formation of neuronal circuits and it is well known that neuronal activity plays a crucial role in the formation and maintenance of synapses. In the vertebrate retina, exposure to different environmental conditions results in structural, physiological, neurochemical and pharmacological changes. Serotoninergic (5HT) amacrine cells of the chicken retina are bistratified interneurons whose primary dendrites descend through the inner nuclear layer (INL) to branch in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) forming two plexi, an outer network, localized to sublamina 1, and an inner network, localized to sublamina 4 and 5 of the IPL. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.09.007DOI Listing
December 2005

Protective effects of erythropoietin against ethanol-induced apoptotic neurodegenaration and oxidative stress in the developing C57BL/6 mouse brain.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Dec 19;160(2):146-56. Epub 2005 Oct 19.

Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Dokuz Eylul, University, Inciralti, 35340 Izmir, Turkey.

The developing central nervous system is extremely sensitive to ethanol, with well-defined temporal periods of vulnerability. Recent studies have shown that administration of ethanol to infant rats during the synaptogenesis period triggers extensive apoptotic neurodegeneration throughout many regions of the developing brain. Furthermore, acute ethanol administration produces lipid peroxidation in the brain as an indicator of oxidative stress. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.08.006DOI Listing
December 2005
7 Reads

Cell proliferation in the developing and adult hindbrain and midbrain of trout and medaka (teleosts): a segmental approach.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Dec 19;160(2):157-75. Epub 2005 Oct 19.

Department of Cell Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Biology, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782-Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

We report here the histogenesis of the brainstem of the trout (Salmo trutta fario) and the medaka (Oryzias latipes) chosen as examples of teleosts with slow and fast growth, respectively. Our results reveal that the sequence of formation of brain structures is rather similar in the teleosts species examined so far, but some interspecific differences do exist in terms of brainstem maturation at particular developmental stages, such as the end of the gastrulation and hatching periods. This sequence includes the subdivision of the brainstem in different transverse segments and longitudinal zones, where morphologically discernible boundaries are observed along the caudorostral and ventrodorsal axis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.08.009DOI Listing
December 2005

Non-lethal active caspase-3 expression in Bergmann glia of postnatal rat cerebellum.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Dec 14;160(2):130-45. Epub 2005 Oct 14.

Department of Physiology, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Room 5A163, Lubbock, TX 79430, USA.

Caspase-3, an apoptotic executor, has been shown in recent years to mediate non-lethal events like cellular proliferation and differentiation, primarily in studies related to non-neural tissue. In central nervous system development, the role of active caspase-3 is still unclear. We provide the first evidence for a potential new role of active (cleaved) caspase-3 in promoting differentiation of Bergmann glia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.07.010DOI Listing
December 2005

Growth restriction and the cerebral metabolic response to acute hypoxia of chick embryos in-ovo: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Dec 11;160(2):203-10. Epub 2005 Oct 11.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College London, 86-96 Chenies Mews, London WC1E 6HX, UK.

Introduction: Perinatal brain injury is more common in growth-restricted (GR) than normally grown (NG) fetuses. This study addresses the hypothesis that chronic oxygen and substrate deprivation during pregnancy will engender an abnormal fetal cerebral metabolic response to acute hypoxia.

Method: Cerebral metabolite resonance amplitudes relative to that of creatine were measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in chick embryos on day 19 of incubation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.09.002DOI Listing
December 2005
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Activity-mediated shift in reversal potential of GABA-ergic synaptic currents in immature neurons.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Nov 3;160(1):78-84. Epub 2005 Oct 3.

Neuroscience Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, The University of British Columbia, Faculty of Medicine, 2176 Health Sciences Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z3.

Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is inhibitory in the adult central nervous system, can be excitatory in the developing brain. The change from excitatory to inhibitory action of GABA during development is caused by a negative shift in its reversal potential. Here, we report a presynaptic activity-mediated negative shift in the reversal potential of the GABA-mediated synaptic currents in immature deep cerebellar nuclei neurons. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.09.001DOI Listing
November 2005

Effects of prenatal paraquat and mancozeb exposure on amino acid synaptic transmission in developing mouse cerebellar cortex.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Nov 29;160(1):19-27. Epub 2005 Sep 29.

Electron Microscopy Center, University of Los Andes, Mérida, Venezuela.

The goal of this study was to analyze the effects of prenatal exposure to the pesticides paraquat (PQ) and mancozeb (MZ) on the development of synaptic transmission in mouse cerebellar cortex. Pregnant NMRI mice were treated with either saline, 10 mg/kg PQ, 30 mg/kg MZ or the combination of PQ + MZ, between gestational days 12 (E12) and E20. Variation in the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters was determined by HPLC, between postnatal day 1 (P1) and P30. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.08.001DOI Listing
November 2005

Switching of alpha-catenin from alphaE-catenin in the cortical ventricular zone to alphaN-catenin II in the intermediate zone.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Nov 26;160(1):106-11. Epub 2005 Sep 26.

Department of Anatomy, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan.

Although cadherins and catenins are known to play important roles during neural development, the types of alpha-catenin present in the developing telencephalon are still unknown. Here, we show that the ventricular zones (VZ) of the cortex and the ganglionic eminences express alphaE-catenin and alphaN-catenin, respectively, in a complementary manner. In the cortex, alpha-catenin is switched from alphaE-catenin in the VZ to alphaN-catenin II in the intermediate zone (IMZ). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.08.004DOI Listing
November 2005
2 Reads

Time course of auditory impairment in mice lacking the electroneutral sodium bicarbonate cotransporter NBC3 (slc4a7).

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Nov 21;160(1):63-77. Epub 2005 Sep 21.

Department of Surgery, Division of Head and Neck, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.

Mice with a targeted disruption of the gene encoding the stilbene-insensitive electroneutral sodium bicarbonate cotransporter (NBC3; slc4a7) exhibit cochlear and retinal degeneration. To establish the progressive nature of sensory cells loss in slc4a7-/- deficient mice, we studied the morphology of cochleas of slc4a7-/- and slc4a7+/+ mice from postnatal day two (P2) to ninety (P90). Cell death was evaluated in slc4a7-/- cochleas using the TUNEL technique and caspase-3 immunoreactivity. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S016538060500237
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.08.008DOI Listing
November 2005
9 Reads

Dye coupling in Purkinje cells of organotypic slice cultures.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Nov 16;160(1):101-5. Epub 2005 Sep 16.

Medizinische Fakultät, Institut für Anatomie, Abteilung für Cytologie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstrasse 150, D-44780 Bochum, Germany.

Cerebellar slice cultures of newborn rats showed poorly developed dendritic arborization of Purkinje cells, whereas cultures of 10-day-old rats revealed prominent dendritic branching. Gap junctional intercellular communication between Purkinje cells, investigated as dye transfer of microinjected neurobiotin, occurred through dendro-dendritic contacts, with decreased dye spreading in old cell cultures. These results indicate a possible correlation of gap junctional intercellular communication and the development of Purkinje cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.08.007DOI Listing
November 2005
1 Read

Germinal matrix cells associate with veins and a glial scaffold in the human fetal brain.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Nov 15;160(1):96-100. Epub 2005 Sep 15.

Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA.

Germinal matrix (GM) in the subventricular zone (SVZ) includes progenitor cells of neurons and glia, which migrate from the SVZ to regions where they become integrated into the developing brain. In the human fetal brain, GM cells pack into high density clusters that encircle GM veins producing a profile we describe as a venous cuff. Venous cuffs are, in turn, encircled by GFAP-positive astrocytes that project processes through the cuff to the venous wall. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.07.016DOI Listing
November 2005
3 Reads

Butyrate, a gut-derived environmental signal, regulates tyrosine hydroxylase gene expression via a novel promoter element.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Nov 13;160(1):53-62. Epub 2005 Sep 13.

Division of Newborn Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY 10595, USA.

Butyrate is a diet-derived, gut fermentation product with an array of effects on cultured mammalian cells including inhibition of proliferation, induction of differentiation and regulation of gene expression. We showed that physiological concentrations of butyrate can regulate transcription of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and preproenkephalin (ppEnk) gene in PC12 cells. In promoter deletion studies, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and by site-directed mutagenesis, we identified a novel butyrate response element (BRE) in the 5' upstream region of the rat TH gene, homologous to the previously mapped motif in the ppEnk promoter. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.08.005DOI Listing
November 2005

Prenatal hypoxia impairs memory function but does not result in overt structural alterations in the postnatal chick brain.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Nov 9;160(1):9-18. Epub 2005 Sep 9.

Fetal and Neonatal Research Group, Department of Physiology, Monash University, Victoria 3800, Australia.

We showed previously that hypoxia in ovo impairs memory consolidation in the chick tested 2 days after hatching. Our present aim was to investigate whether we could detect any morphological effects of the same prenatal hypoxia. Hypoxia was induced by half-wrapping the egg with an impermeable membrane from either days 10-18 (W10-18 chicks) or days 14-18 (W14-18 chicks) of incubation (hatching approximately 21 days). Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S016538060500207
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.07.015DOI Listing
November 2005
2 Reads

Embryonic cerebellar granule cells are resistant to necrosis induced by homocysteine.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Nov 9;160(1):85-9. Epub 2005 Sep 9.

School of Biology, University of St. Andrews, Bute Medical Buildings, St. Mary's Quad, St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9TS, Scotland.

Hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for a range of neurodegenerative conditions, yet its effects in the developing nervous system have been poorly elucidated. We studied the in vitro response of cerebellar granule neurons (CGCs) to homocysteine. We have shown that embryonic CGCs are resistant to homocysteine-induced neurotoxicity, whilst postnatal CGCs are not. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.07.011DOI Listing
November 2005
1 Read

Abnormal neocortical development in mice lacking cGMP-dependent protein kinase I.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Nov 8;160(1):1-8. Epub 2005 Sep 8.

Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics CB#7260, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

Cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase type I (cGKI) is a key signaling intermediate important for synaptic potentiation in the hippocampus and cerebellum, but its expression and function in cortical development have not been elucidated. The expression of cGKI in the developing mouse neocortex was evaluated by immunofluorescence labeling, and effect of cGKI deletion on cortical development was studied in adult cGKI knockout mice. cGKI was expressed at highest levels at embryonic stages in young neurons and radial glial fibers, corresponding to the major period of radial migration and laminar development of pyramidal neurons (embryonic day E13. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.07.013DOI Listing
November 2005
1 Read

Differential expression of the regulator of G protein signaling RGS9 protein in nociceptive pathways of different age rats.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Nov 8;160(1):28-39. Epub 2005 Sep 8.

University of California, San Francisco, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, 513 Parnassus Avenue, Box 0464, Room S-455, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.

Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins are GTPase-activating proteins which act as modulators of G-protein-coupled receptors. RGS9 has two alternative splicing variants. RGS9-1 is expressed in the retina. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S016538060500233
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.08.003DOI Listing
November 2005
6 Reads

Effect of NMDA on staurosporine-induced activation of caspase-3 and LDH release in mouse neocortical and hippocampal cells.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Nov 8;160(1):40-52. Epub 2005 Sep 8.

Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89061 Ulm, Germany.

To achieve a better understanding of developmentally regulated NMDA- and staurosporine-induced apoptotic processes, we investigated the concerted action of these agents on caspase-3 activity and LDH release in neocortical and hippocampal cell cultures at different stages in vitro (DIV). Hoechst 33342 and MAP-2 stainings were additionally employed to visualize apoptotic changes and cell damage. The vulnerability of neocortical cells to NMDA was more prominent at later culture stages, whereas hippocampal neurons were more susceptible to NMDA treatment at earlier stages. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.08.002DOI Listing
November 2005

Expression of GATA6 in the human and mouse central nervous system.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Nov 15;160(1):90-5. Epub 2005 Sep 15.

The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumor Research Centre, The Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 1X8.

The mammalian GATA family of transcription factors comprises of 6 members that are involved in diverse roles. The expression profile of GATA6 has been poorly defined in the central nervous system (CNS). In this report, we identify GATA6 expression in the normal mouse and human CNS, using Northern blot analyses, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and immunofluorescence (IF). Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S016538060500214
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.07.012DOI Listing
November 2005
3 Reads

Correlation of aggression with serum IgM level in autoimmune-prone NZB mice.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Oct;159(2):145-8

Department of Pathology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan.

Neurological symptoms are often found in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, an autoimmune disease. We found an enhanced aggression in young autoimmune-prone NZB mice before expression of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, which was accompanied by an increase in neural activity in the accessory olfactory bulb. The performance of aggressive behavior was correlated with serum IgM level. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.07.008DOI Listing
October 2005

Expression of a heparan sulfate remodeling enzyme, heparan sulfate 6-O-endosulfatase sulfatase FP2, in the rat nervous system.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Oct;159(2):135-43

Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577, Japan.

A new class of sulfatases, SulfFP1/sulf-1 and SulfFP2/sulf-2, has been implicated in the modulation of extracellular signaling by remodeling heparan sulfate through 6-O-endosulfatase activity. Here, we isolated rat SulfFP2 cDNA and examined its expression by in situ hybridization. SulfFP2 expression is abundant and dynamically regulated in the nervous system during development, whereas it is confined to the cerebral cortex, hippocampal CA3 region, and medial habenular nucleus in the adult brain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.07.006DOI Listing
October 2005

Ectopic HOXA5 expression results in abnormal differentiation, migration and p53-independent cell death of superficial dorsal horn neurons.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Oct;159(2):87-97

Interdepartmental Genetics, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA.

Previously, we reported a line of mice (Hoxa5SV2) that ectopically expresses HOXA5 in the developing cervical and brachial dorsal spinal cord. Animals from this line exhibited a clear loss of cells in the outer lamina of the mature dorsal horn that coincided with an adult phenotype of sensory and motor defects of the forelimb. In this report, we examined the etiology of lost dorsal horn cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.07.009DOI Listing
October 2005
8 Reads

Expression of reelin in the dorsal cochlear nucleus of the mouse.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Oct;159(2):127-34

Division of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-Ku, Kobe 650-0017, Japan.

The cytoarchitecture of dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), characterized by a distinct laminar structure similar to the cerebellar cortex of the normal mouse, is known to be disrupted in the Reelin-deficient mouse, reeler. Here, we have reexamined both the cytoarchitecture and myeloarchitecture of this nucleus and described expression pattern of Reelin protein during perinatal periods. Reelin-immunopositive granule cells were firstly recognized in the external granular layer of the DCN at embryological day 16 (E16). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.07.014DOI Listing
October 2005
3 Reads

Beneficial effects of melatonin on morphological changes in postnatal cerebellar tissue owing to epileptiform activity during pregnancy in rats: light and immunohistochemical study.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Oct;159(2):79-86

Department of Histology and Embryology, Ege University School of Medicine, TR-35100 Izmir, Turkey.

Although it has been demonstrated that maternal epilepsy has some harmful effects on newborn individuals, current data concerning the effects of epileptic phenomena in pregnant mothers on newborn pups are still limited. This study was undertaken to investigate the changes in the cerebellum of newborns of pinealectomized rats subjected to experimental epilepsy during pregnancy. In our study, the rats were randomly divided into six groups: intact control group, anesthesia control group, epilepsy group, melatonin-treated epileptic group, surgical pinealectomy group, and group of melatonin treatment following pinealectomy procedure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.07.004DOI Listing
October 2005
3 Reads

Simultaneous glutamate and GABA(A) receptor agonist administration increases calbindin levels and prevents hippocampal damage induced by either agent alone in a model of perinatal brain injury.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Oct;159(2):99-111

Departments of Physiology and Psychiatry, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA.

Perinatal brain injury is associated with the release of amino acids, principally glutamate and GABA, resulting in massive increases in intracellular calcium and eventual cell death. We have previously demonstrated that independent administration of kainic acid (KA), an AMPA/kainate receptor agonist, or muscimol, a GABA(A) receptor agonist, to newborn rats results in hippocampal damage [Hilton, G.D. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.07.007DOI Listing
October 2005

A single course of antenatal betamethasone reduces neurotrophic factor S100B concentration in the hippocampus and serum in the neonatal rat.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Oct;159(2):113-8

Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Division of Cellular Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, University of Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

The effects of a single course of antenatal betamethasone on S100B protein concentration were investigated in Fisher 344 rats. On day 20 of gestation, pregnant rats were injected twice 8 h apart with either (1) 170 microg kg(-1) body weight betamethasone ("clinically-equivalent dose", equivalent to 12 mg twice, 24 h apart in humans), (2) half of this dose (equivalent to 6 mg) or (3) vehicle. We report reference values for S100B protein in the serum and different brain regions in both genders at 1, 2, and 21 days after birth. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.07.003DOI Listing
October 2005
3 Reads

Neurochemical effects of cocaine in adolescence compared to adulthood.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Oct;159(2):119-25

Department of Psychology, University of South Florida, 4202 E. Fowler Avenue, Tampa, FL 33620, USA.

Adolescence is a time of high risk behavior and increased exploration. This developmental period is marked by a greater probability to initiate drug use and is associated with an increased risk to develop addiction and adulthood dependency. Human adolescents are predisposed toward an increased likelihood of risk taking behaviors [M. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.07.005DOI Listing
October 2005

Tau protein aggregation in the frontal and entorhinal cortices as a function of aging.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 May;156(2):127-38

Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario, Canada.

Objectives: The abnormal accumulation of tau protein is increasingly recognized as the neuropathological hallmark of a number of dementing illness in which frontotemporal lobar degeneration occurs. In this paper we examined the age-dependant deposition of tau protein in the frontal and entorhinal neocortices.

Methods: We examined autopsy records from 1997 to 2002 and selected 87 cases (10 in each decade from 0 to 79 years of age, 7 in 80-89 decade) with no history of dementia or other neurodegenerative diseases, and for which neurodegenerative diseases were excluded neuropathologically. Read More

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May 2005
2 Reads

Maternal dietary choline availability alters the balance of netrin-1 and DCC neuronal migration proteins in fetal mouse brain hippocampus.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Oct;159(2):149-54

Department of Nutrition, CB#7461, Room 2212 McGavran-Greenberg Hall, School of Public Health and School of Medicine, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

Alterations in maternal dietary choline availability during days 12-17 of pregnancy led to an increase in the level of immunoreactive netrin-1 and a decrease in the level of DCC protein in the developing fetal mouse brain hippocampus compared with controls. Changes in the expression of cell migration cues during development could account for some of the lifelong consequences of maternal dietary choline availability for cognitive and memory processes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.07.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1592522PMC
October 2005
15 Reads
20 Citations

A store-operated Ca2+ influx activated in response to the depletion of thapsigargin-sensitive Ca2+ stores is developmentally regulated in embryonic cortical neurons from mice.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Sep;159(1):64-71

Laboratoire Canaux Calciques Fonctions et Pathologies, Inserm U607, DRDC/CEA, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9, France.

Store-operated channels (SOCs) are recruited in response to the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. They allow a voltage-independent entry of Ca2+ into the cytoplasm also termed capacitative Ca2+ entry (CCE). In neurons, the functional significance of this Ca2+ route remains elusive. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.07.001DOI Listing
September 2005
8 Reads

Ontogeny of respiratory sensitivity and tolerance to the mu-opioid agonist fentanyl in rat.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 May;156(2):210-7

Developmental Respiratory Laboratory, Montreal Children's Hospital Research Institute, Montreal, QC, Canada H3H 1P3.

Whereas developmental changes in analgesic sensitivity and tolerance to the mu-opioid agonist fentanyl have been reported, knowledge of respiratory responses to that drug is lacking. Using 7- and 14-day-old (P7, P14) and adult conscious rats, we first established, using whole body plethysmography, the fentanyl dose that decreased minute ventilation by 50% (ED50) at each age. ED50 increased with postnatal age (40, 60 and 120 microg/kg sc, respectively), indicating a high sensitivity to fentanyl in the youngest rats that decreased with maturation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.03.002DOI Listing

In vivo effect of chronic hypoxia on the neurochemical profile of the developing rat hippocampus.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 May;156(2):202-9

Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.

The cognitive deficits observed in children with cyanotic congenital heart disease suggest involvement of the developing hippocampus. Chronic postnatal hypoxia present during infancy in these children may play a role in these impairments. To understand the biochemical mechanisms of hippocampal injury in chronic hypoxia, a neurochemical profile consisting of 15 metabolite concentrations and 2 metabolite ratios in the hippocampus was evaluated in a rat model of chronic postnatal hypoxia using in vivo 1H NMR spectroscopy at 9. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.02.013DOI Listing
May 2005
1 Read

Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) can act as determinant of the tyrosine hydroxylase phenotype of dopaminergic cells during retina development.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 May;156(2):193-201

Laboratórios de Neuroquímica and Neurobiologia da Retina, Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho-UFRJ, Centro de Ciências da Saúde-Bloco G, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21949-900, Brazil.

In the chick retina, dopaminergic cells are generated between embryonic days 3 and 7 (E3/E7). However, the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the first enzyme in the catecholamine synthetic pathway, is only detected after E11/E12. During the interval comprising E7 to E12, signals conveyed by cAMP are important to determine the TH phenotype. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.02.016DOI Listing
May 2005
1 Read

Tetrahydrobiopterin and nitric oxide synthase dimer levels are not changed following hypoxia-ischemia in the newborn rat.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 May;156(2):183-92

Department of Pediatrics, Divisions of Neurology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.

The effect of hypoxia-ischemia on the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and changes in the enzyme dimer state have not previously been studied. Cell-based studies have demonstrated the regulation of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis by intracellular BH4 levels. Activation of NOS requires two NOS polypeptides to form a homodimer. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01653806050005
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.02.008DOI Listing
May 2005
4 Reads

Developmental expression of cannabinoid receptors in the chick retinotectal system.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 May;156(2):176-82

Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 1524, 05508-900 São Paulo, S.P., Brazil.

The cannabinoid system has been suggested to participate in processes such as antinociception, cognition, motor control, and, more recently, development of the nervous system. This study describes the expression of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor in the developing chick retina and optic tectum by means of conventional immunoperoxidase protocols. CB1 immunoreactivity was initially detected around the embryonic day 4 (E4) in both the retina and tectum. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.02.009DOI Listing
May 2005
3 Reads

Neonatal depletion of cortical dopamine: effects on dopamine turnover and motor behavior in juvenile and adult rats.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 May;156(2):167-75

Department of Psychology, Western Washington University, 220 Miller Hall, MS 9089, Bellingham, WA 98225, USA.

Abnormal development of mesoprefrontal dopamine (DA) neurons may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Consistent with this hypothesis, DA nerve terminal density is decreased in the cortex of schizophrenic subjects [M. Akil, J. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.02.006DOI Listing
May 2005
2 Reads

Lack of experience-mediated differences in the immunohistochemical expression of blood-brain barrier markers (EBA and GluT-1) during the postnatal development of the rat visual cortex.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 May;156(2):158-66

Laboratory of Clinical and Experimental Neuroscience (LaNCE), Department of Neuroscience, School of Medicine, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea/University of the Basque Country, Leioako Campusa, Leioa E-48940, Spain.

The development of the cortical vascular tree depends on functional development. External inputs are an essential requirement in the modeling of the visual cortex, mainly during the critical period, when congruous blood supply is needed. The blood brain barrier (BBB) function regulates the passage of substances between the blood and the brain parenchyma, which is one of the main differential features of central nervous system (CNS) microvessels. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.02.007DOI Listing
May 2005
1 Read

Changes in expression of P2X purinoceptors in rat cerebellum during postnatal development.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 May;156(2):147-57

Autonomic Neuroscience Institute, Royal Free and University College London Medical School, Rowland Hill Street, London NW3 2PF, UK.

Changes in expression of P2X receptors (P2X1-7) during postnatal development of the rat cerebellum are described. At P3, immunoreactivity (ir) to all the P2X receptors, except for P2X3 receptors, was found in Purkinje cells and deep cerebellar nuclei, P2X5-ir being most prominent. Granular and microglial cells were labeled for P2X5 (weakly) and P2X4 receptors, respectively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.02.015DOI Listing

Plasminogen activators contribute to age-dependent impairment of NMDA cerebrovasodilation after brain injury.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 May;156(2):139-46

Department of Anesthesia, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

Previous studies have observed that fluid percussion brain injury (FPI) impaired NMDA induced pial artery dilation in an age-dependent manner. This study was designed to investigate the contribution of plasminogen activators to impaired NMDA dilation after FPI in newborn and juvenile pigs equipped with a closed cranial window. In the newborn pig, NMDA (10(-8), 10(-6) M) induced pial artery dilation was reversed to vasoconstriction following FPI, but pretreatment with the plasminogen activator inhibitor PAI-1 derived hexapeptide (EEIIMD) (10(-7) M) prevented post injury vasoconstriction (9 +/- 1 and 16 +/- 1, vs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.02.012DOI Listing
May 2005
4 Reads

Area-specific effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) genetic ablation on various neuronal subtypes of the mouse brain.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 May;156(2):111-26

Centre for Anatomy, Functional Cell Biology, Charité-Medical Faculty, Free University and Humboldt University, D-10115 Berlin, Germany.

The effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on the development of presynaptic terminals and of neuronal subtypes in various brain areas were studied in BDNF-knockout (BDNF-/-) mice at postnatal days 15-17. Western analysis revealed no changes in the overall amount of a variety of synaptic proteins in BDNF-/- mice as compared to wild type mice. In addition, the complex between the vesicular proteins, synaptophysin and synaptobrevin, as well as their respective homodimers were unaltered. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2004.12.012DOI Listing
May 2005
48 Reads

Identification of differentially expressed genes in the developing mouse inferior colliculus.

Brain Res Dev Brain Res 2005 Sep;159(1):29-35

EA3665, Laboratoire de Biologie Cellulaire et Moleculaire de l'Audition, Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Hopital Pellegrin, Batiment PQR 3, 33076 Bordeaux, France.

Although injured neurons of inferior colliculus (IC) display a robust axonal outgrowth through a lesion site at postnatal day six (P6) in vitro, and are capable to re-innervate their target cells, injured neurons from P10 IC are unable to regenerate their axons across the lesion site. This axonal regenerative failure has been attributed to an increase of expression of inhibitory molecules in endogenous tissue, during development. As a first step to identify such inhibitory molecules, the present study reports the isolation of molecules differentially expressed in the IC during development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devbrainres.2005.06.010DOI Listing
September 2005
2 Reads