494 results match your criteria Brain connectivity[Journal]


Functional connectome from phase synchrony at resting state is a neural fingerprint.

Brain Connect 2019 Apr 18. Epub 2019 Apr 18.

University of Hong Kong, 25809, Department of Psychology , Hong Kong, Hong Kong ;

Coherent oscillatory activity across brain regions provides a variety of individual-specific characteristics, sometimes referred to as a neural fingerprint. This information, however, may not be directly retrieved from raw fMRI time series. In this study, we examined the data of 205 participants who completed two resting-state fMRI scanning sessions, separated by an average of 2. Read More

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https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/brain.2018.0657
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0657DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Dynamic Functional Network Analysis in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

Brain Connect 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

University of Maryland School of Medicine, Diagnostic Radiology & Nuclear Medicine , 22 S Greene St , Baltimore, United States , 21043 ;

Mild traumatic brain Injury (mTBI) is one of the most common neurological disorders for which a subset of patients develops persistent post concussive symptoms. Previous studies discovered abnormalities and disruptions in the brain functional networks of mTBI patients principally using static functional connectivity measures which assume that neural communication across the brain is static during resting state conditions. In this study, we examine the differences in dynamic neural communication between mTBI and control participants through the application of a combination of dynamic functional analysis and graph theoretic algorithms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0629DOI Listing

Functional connectivity of cognitive control and visual regions during verb generation is related to improved reading in children.

Brain Connect 2019 Apr 8. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

Technion Israel Institute of Technology, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering Faculty of Education in Science and Technology , Mt Carmel, Haifa , Haifa, Israel , 45229-3026 ;

Reading is a complex cognitive ability which relies on visual and language processing as well as on executive functions (EF). Recent studies have demonstrated that increased reading ability in children ages 7-17, is related to greater activation of cognitive control regions during verb generation, a task which merges linguistic and cognitive control ability. The aim of the current study is to determine the relations between neural circuits specifically related to EF and reading ability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0655DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Predicting Task and Subject Differences with Functional Connectivity and BOLD Variability.

Brain Connect 2019 Apr 8. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

University of California, Irvine, Cognitive Science , 2316 Social & Behavioral Sciences Gateway Building , Irvine, California, United States , 92697-5100 ;

Previous research has found that functional connectivity (FC) can accurately predict the identity of a subject performing a task and the type of task being performed. These results are replicated using a large dataset collected at the OSU Center for Cognitive and Behavioral Brain Imaging. This work introduces a novel perspective on task and subject identity prediction: BOLD Variability (BV). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0632DOI Listing

Atypical Functional Connectivity Associated with Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR): An Examination of Five Resting-State Networks.

Brain Connect 2019 Mar 30. Epub 2019 Mar 30.

University of Manitoba College of Medicine, 12359, Radiology , 820 Sherbrook St , GA216 , Winnipeg, Canada , R3T 2N2.

Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) is a perceptual phenomenon in which specific auditory and/or visual stimuli consistently elicit tingling sensations on the neck, scalp, and shoulders, as well as a positive and relaxed emotional state. The 'ASMR triggers' that initiate these responses generally consist of soft sounds (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0618DOI Listing

EEG functional networks reveal global effects of Methylphenidate in youth with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

Brain Connect 2019 Mar 28. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya, 42727 , 1 Knafei Nesharim st. , Herzliya, Israel , 46150 ;

Methylphenidate is the leading drug for treatment of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), yet its underlying neuronal mechanisms are still unclear. Here we use a dynamical brain networks approach to explore the effects of cognitive effort and Methylphenidate on ADHD subjects. Electroencephalography data were recorded from 19 ADHD subjects and 18 controls during a Go/No-Go Task. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0630DOI Listing
March 2019
7 Reads

Comparing coordinated networks across the brainstem and spinal cord in the resting state and altered cognitive state.

Brain Connect 2019 Mar 26. Epub 2019 Mar 26.

Queen's University, 4257, Centre for Neuroscience Studies , 228 Botterell Hall , 18 Stuart Street , Kingston, Ontario, Canada , K7L 3N6 ;

Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging has been used to investigate networks of activity within the brain, as well as the brainstem (BS) and spinal cord (SC). While previous research has shown coordinated resting state networks (RSNs) in the BS/SC, their function is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the function of RSNs across these regions, by examining how these networks change when participants are experiencing different cognitive states (resting state, listening to an audio presentation or watching a video). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0659DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Children with ASD demonstrate regionally specific altered resting-state phase-amplitude coupling.

Brain Connect 2019 Mar 22. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Radiology , 34th and Civic Center Blvd. , Suite 2115 , Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States , 19104 ;

Studies suggest that individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibit altered electrophysiological alpha to gamma phase-amplitude coupling (PAC). Preliminary reports with small samples report conflicting findings regarding the directionality of the alpha to gamma PAC alterations in ASD. The present study examined resting-state activity throughout the brain in a relatively large sample of 119 children with ASD and 47 typically developing (TD) children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0653DOI Listing

A novel method for extracting hierarchical functional subnetworks based on a multi-subject spectral clustering approach.

Brain Connect 2019 Mar 18. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia.

Brain network modularity analysis has attracted increasing interest due to its capability in measuring the level of integration and segregation across subnetworks. Most studies have focused on extracting modules at a single level, although brain network modules are known to be organized in a hierarchical manner. A few techniques have been developed to extract hierarchical modularity in human functional brain networks using resting-state functional MRI data; however, the focus of those methods is binary networks produced by applying arbitrary thresholds of correlation coefficients to the connectivity matrices. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2019.0668DOI Listing

Association between fractional amplitude of low-frequency spontaneous fluctuation and degree centrality in children and adolescents.

Brain Connect 2019 Mar 18. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, 28105, Department of Psychiatry , Rua Pedro de Toledo 669 , Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil , 04043200 ;

The fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (fALFFs) of the BOLD signal have been successfully applied as exploratory tools in neuroimaging. This metric has been useful in mapping brain functional changes in many clinical populations. However, little is known about the neurophysiological correlates of fALFF. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0628DOI Listing

Intrinsic Functional Brain Connectivity Predicts Onset of Major Depression Disorder in Adolescence: A Pilot Study.

Brain Connect 2019 Apr 11. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

6 Division of Cognitive Neurology/Neuropsychology, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

Children with familial risk for major depressive disorder (MDD) have elevated risk for developing depression as adolescents. Here, we investigated longitudinally whether resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) could predict the onset of MDD. In this pilot study, we followed a group of never-depressed children with familial risk for MDD and a group of age-matched controls without familial risk who had undergone an MRI study at 8-14 years of age. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0646DOI Listing

Using Low-Frequency Oscillations to Detect Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with Machine Learning.

Brain Connect 2019 03;9(2):184-193

1 Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin.

The National Institutes of Health-sponsored Epilepsy Connectome Project aims to characterize connectivity changes in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients. The magnetic resonance imaging protocol follows that used in the Human Connectome Project, and includes 20 min of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging acquired at 3T using 8-band multiband imaging. Glasser parcellation atlas was combined with the FreeSurfer subcortical regions to generate resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC), amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFFs), and fractional ALFF measures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0601DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

Multimodal Imaging of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Effect on Brain Network: A Combined Electroencephalogram and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

Brain Connect 2019 Apr 8. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

1 Stephenson School of Biomedical Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma.

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been increasingly used to treat many neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. However, the clinical response is heterogeneous mainly due to our inability to predict the effect of rTMS on the human brain. Our previous investigation based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) suggested that neuroimaging-guided navigation for rTMS could be informed by understanding connectivity patterns that correlate with treatment response. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0647DOI Listing

Lower Limb Task-Based Functional Connectivity is Altered in Stroke.

Brain Connect 2019 Mar 23. Epub 2019 Mar 23.

2 Department of Physical Therapy, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

The goal of this work was to examine task-dependent functional connectivity of the brain in people with stroke. The work was motivated by prior observations indicating that, during pedaling, cortical activation volume is lower in people with stroke than controls. During paretic foot tapping, activation volume tends to be higher in people with stroke than controls. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0640DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Regional Dynamics of the Resting Brain in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Using Fractional Amplitude of Low-Frequency Fluctuations and Regional Homogeneity Analyses.

Brain Connect 2019 Mar 20. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

1 Center of Mathematics, Computing and Cognition, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, Brazil.

Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging has been playing an important role in the study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Although functional connectivity is widely studied, the patterns of spontaneous neural activity of the resting brain are important mechanisms that have been used recently to study a variety of conditions but remain less explored in ALS. Here we have used fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) and regional homogeneity (ReHo) to study the regional dynamics of the resting brain of nondemented ALS patients compared with healthy controls. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2019.0663DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Introduction to the Special Issue on Connectomics.

Authors:
Bharat Biswal

Brain Connect 2019 02;9(1)

University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, New Jersey.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2019.29001.bbiDOI Listing
February 2019

Increased Functional Connectivity Within and Between Cognitive-Control Networks from Early Infancy to Nine Years During Story Listening.

Brain Connect 2019 Apr 23;9(3):285-295. Epub 2019 Mar 23.

1 Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Educational Neuroimaging Center, Technion, Haifa, Israel.

The cingulo-opercular (CO) and frontoparietal (FP) networks are part of the cognitive-control system of the brain. Evidence suggests that over the course of development, brain regions supporting cognitive-control functions become more integrated within their networks (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0625DOI Listing
April 2019
14 Reads

Low- and High-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Effects on Resting-State Functional Connectivity Between the Postcentral Gyrus and the Insula.

Brain Connect 2019 Apr 2. Epub 2019 Apr 2.

3 Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina.

The insular cortex supports the conscious awareness of physical and emotional sensations, and the ability to modulate the insula could have important clinical applications in psychiatry. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) uses transient magnetic fields to induce electrical currents in the superficial cortex. Given its deep location in the brain, the insula may not be directly stimulated by rTMS; however, rTMS may modulate the insula via its functional connections with superficial cortical regions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0652DOI Listing

Predicting BOLD activity in FFA from the activity in other visual areas.

Brain Connect 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology McGovern Institute for Brain Research, 167631 , 77 Massachusetts Ave , Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States , 02139 ;

Neuroimaging studies have shown that discrete regions in ventral visual pathway respond selectively to specific object categories. For example, the fusiform face area (FFA) in humans is consistently more responsive to face than non-face images. However, it is not clear how other cortical regions contribute to this preferential response in FFA. Read More

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https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/brain.2018.0624
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0624DOI Listing
February 2019
6 Reads

Estimation of Functional Connectivity Modulations During Task Engagement and Their Neurovascular Underpinnings Through Hemodynamic Reorganization Method.

Brain Connect 2019 Mar 7. Epub 2019 Mar 7.

1 NMR Research Centre, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Delhi, India.

This study proposes an approach to understand the effect of task engagement through integrated analysis of modulations in functional networks and associated changes in their neurovascular underpinnings at every voxel. For this purpose, a novel approach that brings reorganization in acquired task-functional magnetic resonance imaging information based on hemodynamic characteristics of every task stimulus is proposed and validated. At first, modulations in functional networks of visual target detection task were estimated at every voxel through proposed methodology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0656DOI Listing

White Matter Connectome Edge Density in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Potential Imaging Biomarkers Using Machine-Learning Models.

Brain Connect 2019 03;9(2):209-220

1 Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.

Prior neuroimaging studies have reported white matter network underconnectivity as a potential mechanism for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In this study, we examined the structural connectome of children with ASD using edge density imaging (EDI), and then applied machine-learning algorithms to identify children with ASD based on tract-based connectivity metrics. Boys aged 8-12 years were included: 14 with ASD and 33 typically developing children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0658DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6444925PMC
March 2019
5 Reads

Dynamic Functional Network Connectivity in Schizophrenia with Magnetoencephalography and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Do Different Timescales Tell a Different Story?

Brain Connect 2019 Apr;9(3):251-262

1 The Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

The importance of how brain networks function together to create brain states has become increasingly recognized. Therefore, an investigation of eyes-open resting-state dynamic functional network connectivity (dFNC) of healthy controls (HC) versus that of schizophrenia patients (SP) via both functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a novel magnetoencephalography (MEG) pipeline was completed. The fMRI analysis used a spatial independent component analysis (ICA) to determine the networks on which the dFNC was based. Read More

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https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/brain.2018.0608
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0608DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Higher Node Activity with Less Functional Connectivity During Musical Improvisation.

Brain Connect 2019 Apr 7;9(3):296-309. Epub 2019 Mar 7.

1 Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia.

Musical improvisation is one of the most complex forms of creative behavior, which offers a realistic task paradigm for the investigation of real-time creativity where revision is not possible. Despite some previous studies on musical improvisation and brain activity, what and how brain areas are involved during musical improvisation are not clearly understood. In this article, we designed a new functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, in which, while being in the MRI scanner, advanced jazz improvisers performed improvisatory vocalization and imagery as main tasks and performed a prelearned melody as a control task. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2017.0566DOI Listing

Parvalbumin Cell Ablation of NMDA-R1 Leads to Altered Phase, But Not Amplitude, of Gamma-Band Cross-Frequency Coupling.

Brain Connect 2019 Apr 15;9(3):263-272. Epub 2019 Mar 15.

3 Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California.

Altered gamma-band electrophysiological activity in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is well documented, and analogous gamma-band alterations are recapitulated in several preclinical murine models relevant to ASD. Such gamma-band activity is hypothesized to underlie local circuit processes. Gamma-band cross-frequency coupling (CFC), a related though distinct metric, interrogates local neural circuit signal integration. Read More

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https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/brain.2018.0639
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0639DOI Listing
April 2019
12 Reads

Eyes Closed Elevates Brain Intrinsic Activity of Sensory Dominance Networks: A Classifier Discrimination Analysis.

Brain Connect 2019 03;9(2):221-230

1 Center for the Study of Applied Psychology, Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science of Guangdong Province, School of Psychology, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, China.

Brain neocortex is usually dominated by visual input (with eyes open [EO]), whereas this visual predominance could be reduced by closing eyes. Cutting off visual input from the eyes (with eyes closed [EC]) would also benefit other sensory performance; however, the neural basis underlying the state-switching remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the brain intrinsic activity of either the EO or EC states by using the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 22 healthy participants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0644DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Activation Optimization in the Setting of Brain Tumor-Induced Neurovascular Uncoupling Using Resting-State Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuations.

Brain Connect 2019 Apr 28;9(3):241-250. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

1 Divisions of Neuroradiology and Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

The goal of this study was to demonstrate that a novel resting state BOLD ALFF (amplitude of low frequency fluctuations)-based correction method can substantially enhance the detectability of motor task activation in the presence of tumor-induced neurovascular uncoupling (NVU). Twelve de novo brain tumor patients who underwent comprehensive clinical BOLD fMRI exams including task fMRI and resting state fMRI (rsfMRI) were evaluated. Each patient displayed decreased/absent task fMRI activation in the ipsilesional primary motor cortex in the absence of corresponding motor deficit or suboptimal task performance, consistent with NVU. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2017.0562DOI Listing

Revisiting Abnormalities in Brain Network Architecture Underlying Autism Using Topology-Inspired Statistical Inference.

Brain Connect 2019 02;9(1):13-21

1 Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah.

A large body of evidence relates autism with abnormal structural and functional brain connectivity. Structural covariance magnetic resonance imaging (scMRI) is a technique that maps brain regions with covarying gray matter densities across subjects. It provides a way to probe the anatomical structure underlying intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) through analysis of gray matter signal covariance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0604DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6390667PMC
February 2019
1 Read

Comparison of Methods to Identify Modules in Noisy or Incomplete Brain Networks.

Brain Connect 2019 03 28;9(2):128-143. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

1 Neuroscience Center, Helsinki Institute of Life Science, University of Helsinki, Finland.

Community structure, or "modularity," is a fundamentally important aspect in the organization of structural and functional brain networks, but their identification with community detection methods is confounded by noisy or missing connections. Although several methods have been used to account for missing data, the performance of these methods has not been compared quantitatively so far. In this study, we compared four different approaches to account for missing connections when identifying modules in binary and weighted networks using both Louvain and Infomap community detection algorithms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0603DOI Listing

The Effects of Global Signal Regression on Estimates of Resting-State Blood Oxygen-Level-Dependent Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Electroencephalogram Vigilance Correlations.

Brain Connect 2018 12;8(10):618-627

1 Center for Functional MRI, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California.

Global signal regression (GSR) is a commonly used although controversial preprocessing approach in the analysis of resting-state blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Although the effects of GSR on resting-state functional connectivity measures have received much attention, there has been relatively little attention devoted to its effects on studies looking at the relationship between resting-state BOLD measures and independent measures of brain activity. In this study, we used simultaneously acquired electroencephalogram (EEG)-fMRI data in humans to examine the effects of GSR on the correlation between resting-state BOLD fluctuations and EEG vigilance measures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0645DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6338459PMC
December 2018
1 Read

The Brain Network in a Model of Thalamocortical Dysrhythmia.

Brain Connect 2019 Apr 7;9(3):273-284. Epub 2019 Mar 7.

3 Saratov State University, Saratov, Russia.

Sensory information processing and higher cognitive functions rely on the interactions between thalamus and cortex. Many types of neurological and psychiatric disorders are accompanied or driven by alterations in the brain connectivity. In this study, putative changes in functional and effective corticocortical (CC), thalamocortical (TC), and corticothalamic (CT) connectivity during wakefulness and slow-wave sleep (SWS) in a model of thalamocortical dysrhythmia, TRIP8b mice, and in control (wild-type or WT) mice are described. Read More

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https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/brain.2018.0621
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0621DOI Listing
April 2019
29 Reads

Asymmetric Insular Connectomics Revealed by Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Analysis of Healthy Brain Development.

Brain Connect 2019 02;9(1):2-12

1 Division of Newborn Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

The insula has been implicated in playing important roles in various brain functions including consciousness, homeostasis, perception, self-awareness, language processing, and interpersonal experience. Abnormalities of the insula have been observed in patients suffering from addiction, deteriorating language function, anorexia, and emotional dysregulation. We analyzed typical development of insular connections in a large-scale pediatric population using 642 magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0582DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6390666PMC
February 2019
1 Read

Multimodal Brain Parcellation Based on Functional and Anatomical Connectivity.

Brain Connect 2018 Nov 30. Epub 2018 Nov 30.

University of British Columbia, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada ;

Brain parcellation is often a prerequisite for network analysis due to the statistical challenges, computational burdens, and interpretation difficulties arising from the high dimensionality of neuroimaging data. Predominant approaches are largely unimodal with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) being the primary modality used. These approaches thus neglect other brain attributes that relate to brain organization. Read More

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https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/brain.2017.0576
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2017.0576DOI Listing
November 2018
16 Reads

Tracking the Development of Functional Connectomes for Face Processing.

Brain Connect 2019 03 25;9(2):231-239. Epub 2019 Feb 25.

5 Division of Computer Science, School of Computing, Clemson, South Carolina.

Face processing capacities become more specialized and advanced during development, but neural underpinnings of these processes are not fully understood. The present study applied graph theory-based network analysis to task-negative (resting blocks) and task-positive (viewing faces) functional magnetic resonance imaging data in children (5-17 years) and adults (18-42 years) to test the hypothesis that the development of a specialized network for face processing is driven by task-positive processing (face viewing) more than by task-negative processing (visual fixation) and by both progressive and regressive changes in network properties. Predictive modeling was used to predict age from node-based network properties derived from task-positive and task-negative states in a whole-brain network (WBN) and a canonical face network (FN). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0607DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6444905PMC
March 2019
3 Reads

Cross-Species Evidence of Interplay Between Neural Connectivity at the Micro- and Macroscale of Connectome Organization in Human, Mouse, and Rat Brain.

Brain Connect 2018 12;8(10):595-603

1 Connectome Lab, Department of Complex Trait Genetics, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive Research, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

The mammalian brain describes a multiscale system. At the microscale, axonal, dendritic, and synaptic elements ensure neuron-to-neuron communication, and at the macroscale, large-scale projections form the anatomical wiring for communication between cortical areas. Although it is clear that both levels of neural organization play a crucial role in brain functioning, their interaction is not extensively studied. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0622DOI Listing
December 2018

Performance and Function Meet Structure: A White Matter Connection Tuned for Vocal Production.

Brain Connect 2018 12;8(10):628-636

1 Brain and Behavior Laboratory, Geriatrics Department, The Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, New York.

Contemporary imaging techniques have increased the potential for establishing how brain regions interact during spoken language. Some imaging methods report bilateral changes in brain activity during speech, whereas another approach finds that the relationship between individual variability in speech measures and individual variability in brain activity more closely resembles clinical observations. This approach has repeatedly demonstrated that speaking rate for phonological and lexical items can be predicted by an inverse relationship between cerebral blood flow in the left inferior frontal region and the right caudate nucleus. Read More

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https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/brain.2018.0627
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0627DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6308290PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

Quantifying differences between passive and task-evoked intrinsic functional connectivity in a large-scale brain simulation.

Brain Connect 2018 Nov 15. Epub 2018 Nov 15.

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, 35041, Section on Brain Imaging and Modeling, Bethesda, Maryland, United States ;

Establishing a connection between intrinsic and task-evoked brain activity is critical because it would provide a way to map task-related brain regions in patients unable to comply with such tasks. A crucial question within this realm is to what extent the execution of a cognitive task affects the intrinsic activity of brain regions not involved in the task. Computational models can be useful to answer this question because they allow us to distinguish task from non-task neural elements while giving us the effects of task execution on non-task regions of interest at the neuroimaging level. Read More

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https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/brain.2018.0620
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0620DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6308294PMC
November 2018
10 Reads

Microstructural Findings in White Matter Associated with Cannabis and Alcohol Use in Early-Phase Psychosis: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Relaxometry Study.

Brain Connect 2018 11;8(9):567-576

1 Department of Psychiatry, Dalhousie University , Halifax, Canada .

Accumulating evidence suggests that brain white matter (WM) abnormalities may be central to the pathophysiology of psychotic disorders. In addition, there is evidence that cannabis use and alcohol use each is associated with WM abnormalities. However, there are very limited data on the effects of these substances on WM microstructure in patients with psychosis, especially for those at the early phase of illness. Read More

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https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/brain.2018.0611
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0611DOI Listing
November 2018
9 Reads

Predictors of Attrition in Longitudinal Neuroimaging Research: Inhibitory Control, Head Movement, and Resting-State Functional Connectivity.

Brain Connect 2018 11;8(9):527-536

1 Department of Psychiatry, University of Illinois at Chicago , Chicago, Illinois.

Attrition is a major problem in longitudinal neuroimaging studies, as it may lead to unreliable estimates of the stability of trait-like processes over time, of the identification of risk factors for clinical outcomes, and of the effects of treatment. Identification of characteristics associated with attrition has implications for participant recruitment and participant retention to achieve representative longitudinal samples. We investigated inhibitory control deficits, head motion, and resting-state functional connectivity within the cognitive control network (CCN) as predictors of attrition. Read More

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https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/brain.2018.0619
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0619DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6249664PMC
November 2018
5 Reads

Somatosensory Regions Show Limited Functional Connectivity Differences in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Brain Connect 2018 11;8(9):558-566

2 Child and Adolescent Imaging Research (CAIR) Program, University of Calgary , Calgary, Canada .

An estimated 70-90% of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have sensory symptoms, which may present as hyper- or hyporesponsivity in one or more sensory modalities. These sensitivities correlate with social symptoms, activity, and social interaction levels. Interestingly, sensory symptoms appear to be most prevalent in late childhood, suggesting a developmental component. Read More

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https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/brain.2018.0614
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0614DOI Listing
November 2018
20 Reads

Network Functional Architecture and Aberrant Functional Connectivity in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: A Clinical Application of Network Convergence.

Brain Connect 2018 11;8(9):549-557

1 Center for Neurorestoration and Neurotechnology, Providence VA Medical Center , Providence, Rhode Island.

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with disrupted functional connectivity in multiple neural networks. Multinetwork models of PTSD hypothesize that aberrant regional connectivity emerges from broad network-level disruptions. However, few studies have tested how characteristics of network-level organization influence regional functional connectivity in PTSD. Read More

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https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/brain.2018.0634
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0634DOI Listing
November 2018
20 Reads

Identification of Subclinical Language Deficit Using Machine Learning Classification Based on Poststroke Functional Connectivity Derived from Low Frequency Oscillations.

Brain Connect 2019 03 7;9(2):194-208. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

1 Department of Radiology, Wisconsin Institute of Medical Research (WIMR), University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin.

Post-stroke neuropsychological evaluation is time-intensive in assessing impairments in subjects without overt clinical deficits. We utilized functional connectivity (FC) from ten-minute non-invasive resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) to identify stroke subjects at risk for subclinical language deficit (SLD) using machine learning. Discriminative ability of FC derived from slow-5 (0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0597DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6445059PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Commute Time as a Method to Explore Brain Functional Connectomes.

Brain Connect 2019 03 26;9(2):155-161. Epub 2018 Dec 26.

1 Center of Mathematics, Computing and Cognition, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, Brazil.

Graph theory has been extensively applied to investigate complex brain networks in current neuroscience research. Many metrics derived from graph theory, such as local and global efficiencies, are based on the path length between nodes. These approaches are commonly used in analyses of brain networks assessed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, although relying on the strong assumption that information flow throughout the network is restricted to the shortest paths. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0598DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Test-Retest Reliability of Graph Theoretic Metrics in Adolescent Brains.

Brain Connect 2019 03 26;9(2):144-154. Epub 2018 Dec 26.

1 Department of Radiology & Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.

Graph theory analysis of structural brain networks derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has become a popular analytical method in neuroscience, enabling advanced investigations of neurological and psychiatric disorders. The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) the effects of edge weighting schemes and (2) the effects of varying interscan periods on graph metrics within the adolescent brain. We compared a binary (B) network definition with three weighting schemes: fractional anisotropy (FA), streamline count, and streamline count with density and length correction (SDL). Read More

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https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/brain.2018.0580
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0580DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6444894PMC
March 2019
14 Reads

Effective Connectivity Within the Default Mode Network in Left Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Findings from the Epilepsy Connectome Project.

Brain Connect 2019 03;9(2):174-183

1 Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin.

The Epilepsy Connectome Project examines the differences in connectomes between temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients and healthy controls. Using these data, the effective connectivity of the default mode network (DMN) in patients with left TLE compared with healthy controls was investigated using spectral dynamic causal modeling (spDCM) of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data. Group comparisons were made using two parametric empirical Bayes (PEB) models. Read More

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https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/brain.2018.0600
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0600DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6444922PMC
March 2019
23 Reads

Dynamic Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Connectivity Tensor Decomposition: A New Approach to Analyze and Interpret Dynamic Brain Connectivity.

Brain Connect 2019 02 26;9(1):95-112. Epub 2018 Dec 26.

5 Department of Computer Science, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

There is a growing interest in using so-called dynamic functional connectivity, as the conventional static brain connectivity models are being questioned. Brain network analyses yield complex network data that are difficult to analyze and interpret. To deal with the complex structures, decomposition/factorization techniques that simplify the data are often used. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0605DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6390668PMC
February 2019

Altered Functional Connectivity Observed at Rest in Children and Adolescents Prenatally Exposed to Alcohol.

Brain Connect 2018 10;8(8):503-515

1 Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Alberta , Edmonton, Canada .

Studies of brain structure in fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) have shown the global and focal effects that prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) has on the brain, suggesting but not measuring altered function in FASD. This study aimed to (1) identify resting-state functional networks in children and adolescents with FASD, (2) investigate functional connectivity differences compared with healthy controls, and (3) assess the links to cognitive deficits. Participants included 66 children/adolescents with FASD (aged 5. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2017.0572DOI Listing
October 2018

Altered Functional Connectivity of the Executive Functions Network During a Stroop Task in Children with Reading Difficulties.

Brain Connect 2018 10;8(8):516-525

1 Faculty of Education in Science and Technology, Educational Neuroimaging Center , Technion, Haifa, Israel .

Children with reading difficulties (RDs) often receive related accommodations in schools, such as additional time for examinations and reading aloud written material. Existing data suggest that these readers share challenges in executive functions (EFs). Our study was designed to determine whether children with RDs have specific challenges in EFs and define neurobiological signatures for such difficulties using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0595DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6207146PMC
October 2018
3 Reads

Topology of the Structural Social Brain Network in Typical Adults.

Brain Connect 2018 11;8(9):537-548

1 Marcus Autism Center , Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia .

Although a large body of research has identified discrete neuroanatomical regions involved in social cognition and behavior (the "social brain"), the existing findings are based largely on studies of specific brain structures defined within the context of particular tasks or for specific types of social behavior. The objective of the current work was to view these regions as nodes of a larger collective network and to quantitatively characterize both the topology of that network and the relative criticality of its many nodes. Large-scale data mining was performed to generate seed regions of the social brain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0592DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6249672PMC
November 2018

Quantifying and Visualizing Intraregional Connectivity in Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Correlation Densities.

Brain Connect 2019 02 28;9(1):37-47. Epub 2018 Sep 28.

2 Department of Statistics, University of California Davis, Davis, California.

The use of correlation densities is introduced to quantify and provide visual interpretation for intraregional functional connectivity in the brain. For each brain region, pairwise correlations are computed between a seed voxel and other gray matter voxels within the region, and the distribution of the ensemble of these correlation values is represented as a probability density, the correlation density. The correlation density can be estimated by kernel smoothing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/brain.2018.0591DOI Listing
February 2019