3,869 results match your criteria Brain and Language [Journal]


Effects of age and left hemisphere lesions on audiovisual integration of speech.

Brain Lang 2020 May 21;206:104812. Epub 2020 May 21.

Neurology Department and Center for Brain Plasticity and Recovery, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington DC, USA; Research Division, MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital, Washington DC, USA. Electronic address:

Neuroimaging studies have implicated left temporal lobe regions in audiovisual integration of speech and inferior parietal regions in temporal binding of incoming signals. However, it remains unclear which regions are necessary for audiovisual integration, especially when the auditory and visual signals are offset in time. Aging also influences integration, but the nature of this influence is unresolved. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104812DOI Listing

A domain-general perspective on the role of the basal ganglia in language and music: Benefits of music therapy for the treatment of aphasia.

Brain Lang 2020 May 19;206:104811. Epub 2020 May 19.

Department of Psychology, Sun Yat-Sen Universtiy, Waihuan East Road, No. 132, Guangzhou 510006, China. Electronic address:

In addition to cortical lesions, mounting evidence on the links between language and the subcortical regions suggests that subcortical lesions may also lead to the emergence of aphasic symptoms. In this paper, by emphasizing the domain-general function of the basal ganglia in both language and music, we highlight that rhythm processing, the function of temporal prediction, motor programming and execution, is an important shared mechanism underlying the treatment of non-fluent aphasia with music therapy. In support of this, we conduct a literature review on the music therapy treating aphasia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104811DOI Listing

Articulation lost in space. The effects of local orobuccal anesthesia on articulation and intelligibility of phonemes.

Brain Lang 2020 May 19;207:104813. Epub 2020 May 19.

Department of Neurology, Ghent University Hospital, Corneel Heymanslaan 10, 9000 Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address:

Motor speech requires numerous neural computations including feedforward and feedback control mechanisms. A reduction of auditory or somatosensory feedback may be implicated in disorders of speech, as predicted by various models of speech control. In this paper the effects of reduced somatosensory feedback on articulation and intelligibility of individual phonemes was evaluated by using topical anesthesia of orobuccal structures in 24 healthy subjects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104813DOI Listing

Neuromodulation of cursing in American English: A combined tDCS and pupillometry study.

Brain Lang 2020 Apr 24;206:104791. Epub 2020 Apr 24.

Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, PA, USA.

Many neurological disorders are associated with excessive and/or uncontrolled cursing. The right prefrontal cortex has long been implicated in a diverse range of cognitive processes that underlie the propensity for cursing, including non-propositional language representation, emotion regulation, theory of mind, and affective arousal. Neurogenic cursing often poses significant negative social consequences, and there is no known behavioral intervention for this communicative disorder. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104791DOI Listing

Set focus and anaphoric reference: An ERP study.

Brain Lang 2020 Apr 23;206:104808. Epub 2020 Apr 23.

Lund University, Sweden.

This article reports the results from an ERP study on the processing of anaphoric reference to quantifying expressions in Swedish (e.g. Many students attended the lecture and that they were present was noted). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104808DOI Listing

Stronger right hemisphere functional connectivity supports executive aspects of language in older adults.

Brain Lang 2020 Apr 10;206:104771. Epub 2020 Apr 10.

Department of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University, USA; Social, Life, and Engineering Sciences Imaging Center, The Pennsylvania State University, USA. Electronic address:

Healthy older adults commonly report increased difficulties with language production. This could reflect decline in the language network, or age-related declines in other cognitive abilities that support language production, such as executive function. To examine this possibility, we conducted a whole-brain resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) analysis in older and younger adults using two seed regions-the left posterior superior temporal gyrus and left inferior frontal gyrus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104771DOI Listing

The role of semantics and repair processes in article-noun gender disagreement in Italian: An ERP study.

Brain Lang 2020 Mar 31;206:104787. Epub 2020 Mar 31.

Center for Language and Cognition Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands; Center for Language and Brain, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Russian Federation.

In this sentence reading study, we used event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate the processing mechanism of article-noun gender disagreement in two kinds of nouns in Italian. The first are nouns with syntactic gender (il treno 'train'; la sedia 'chair') for which the processing and repair of gender disagreement entails only one repair option, namely for the article (morphosyntactic repair). The second kind are nouns with semantic gender (il bambino 'boy', la bambina 'girl'). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104787DOI Listing

Procedural and declarative memory brain systems in developmental language disorder (DLD).

Brain Lang 2020 Jun 30;205:104789. Epub 2020 Mar 30.

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, United States.

The aim of the current study was to examine microstructural differences in white matter relevant to procedural and declarative memory between adolescents/young adults with and without Developmental Language Disorder (DLD) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The findings showed atypical age-related changes in white matter structures in the corticostriatal system, in the corticocerebellar system, and in the medial temporal region in individuals with DLD. Results highlight the importance of considering the age factor in research on DLD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104789DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7161705PMC

Introduction to special issue on neurodevelopmental and computational underpinnings of bilingualism.

Brain Lang 2020 Jun 25;205:104790. Epub 2020 Mar 25.

Department of Psychology, University of Houston, United States. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104790DOI Listing

The right visual field advantage for word processing is stronger in older adults.

Brain Lang 2020 Jun 19;205:104786. Epub 2020 Mar 19.

Ghent University, Henri Dunantlaan 2, 9000 Gent, Belgium. Electronic address:

The human brain is functionally asymmetric. Producing and understanding language, for instance, engages the left hemisphere to a larger extent than the right in most people. Recent research showed that lateralization for auditory word processing increases with age. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104786DOI Listing

Multisession transcranial direct current stimulation facilitates verbal learning and memory consolidation in young and older adults.

Brain Lang 2020 Jun 19;205:104788. Epub 2020 Mar 19.

The University of Queensland, Centre for Clinical Research, Brisbane, Australia; University Medicine Greifswald, Department of Neurology, Greifswald, Germany. Electronic address:

This study investigated effects of multisession transcranial direct-current stimulation on learning and maintenance of novel memory content and scrutinised effects of baseline cognitive status and the role of multi-session tDCS on overnight memory consolidation. In a prospective, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, sham-tDCS controlled design, 101 healthy young and older adults completed a five-day verbal associative learning paradigm while receiving multisession tDCS to the task-relevant left prefrontal cortex. In older adults, active multisession tDCS enhanced recall performance after each daily training session. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104788DOI Listing

Effects of theta burst stimulation over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex on language switching - A behavioral and ERP study.

Brain Lang 2020 Jun 9;205:104775. Epub 2020 Mar 9.

Neurology Unit, Medicine Section, Department of Neuroscience and Movement Science, Faculty of Science and Medicine, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg, Switzerland. Electronic address:

This study investigated the role of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in language switching using theta burst stimulation (TBS) and electroencephalography in late bilinguals. After a sham-controlled baseline, participants received either excitatory or inhibitory TBS over the left DLPFC before conducting picture naming tasks in pure language blocks and a language switching block, as well as a nonverbal switching task. On the behavioral level, we found no effect of TBS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104775DOI Listing
June 2020
3.215 Impact Factor

Effect of muscular activation on surrounding motor networks in developmental stuttering: A TMS study.

Brain Lang 2020 Jun 2;205:104774. Epub 2020 Mar 2.

Department of Life Sciences, University of Trieste, via Fleming 22, 34100 Trieste, Italy. Electronic address:

Previous studies regarding developmental stuttering (DS) suggest that motor neural networks are strongly affected. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to investigate neural activation of the primary motor cortex in DS during movement execution, and the influence of muscle representations involved in movements on "surrounding" ones. TMS was applied over the contralateral abductor digiti minimi (ADM) motor representation, at rest and during the movement of homologue first dorsal interosseous muscles (tonic contraction, phasic movements cued by acoustic signalling, and "self-paced" movements). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104774DOI Listing

Metaphor processing is supramodal semantic processing: The role of the bilateral lateral temporal regions in multimodal communication.

Brain Lang 2020 Jun 29;205:104772. Epub 2020 Feb 29.

Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, School of Medicine, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen, Germany.

This paper presents an fMRI study on healthy adult understanding of metaphors in multimodal communication. We investigated metaphors expressed either only in coverbal gestures ("monomodal metaphors") or in speech with accompanying gestures ("multimodal metaphors"). Monomodal metaphoric gestures convey metaphoric information not expressed in the accompanying speech (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104772DOI Listing

Growing Random Forests reveals that exposure and proficiency best account for individual variability in L2 (and L1) brain potentials for syntax and semantics.

Brain Lang 2020 May 27;204:104770. Epub 2020 Feb 27.

Centre for Research on Brain, Language and Music, Montreal, Canada; School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. Electronic address:

Late second language (L2) learners report difficulties in specific linguistic areas such as syntactic processing, presumably because brain plasticity declines with age (following the critical period hypothesis). While there is also evidence that L2 learners can achieve native-like online-processing with sufficient proficiency (following the convergence hypothesis), considering multiple mediating factors and their impact on language processing has proven challenging. We recorded EEG while native (n = 36) and L2-speakers of French (n = 40) read sentences that were either well-formed or contained a syntactic-category error. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104770DOI Listing

Neuroanatomical correlates of phonologic errors in logopenic progressive aphasia.

Brain Lang 2020 May 27;204:104773. Epub 2020 Feb 27.

Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Electronic address:

While phonologic errors may be one of the salient features of the logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia (lvPPA), sparse data are available on their neuroimaging correlates. The purpose of this study was to identify brain regions associated with different types of phonologic errors across several tasks for participants with lvPPA. Correlational analyses between phonologic errors across tasks most likely to elicit such errors and specific left hemisphere gray matter volume regions were conducted for 20 participants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104773DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7219283PMC

Cognitive control regions are recruited in bilinguals' silent reading of mixed-language paragraphs.

Brain Lang 2020 May 26;204:104754. Epub 2020 Feb 26.

Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, United States.

When switching languages, bilinguals recruit a language control network that overlaps with brain regions known to support general cognitive control, but it is unclear whether these same regions are recruited in passive comprehension of language switches. Using fMRI with a blocked design, 24 Spanish-English bilinguals silently read 36 paragraphs in which the default language was Spanish or English, and that had either (1) no switches, (2) function word switches or (3) content word switches. Relative to no switches, function switches activated the right IFG, bilateral MFG, and left IPL/SMG. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104754DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7205452PMC
May 2020
3.215 Impact Factor

Long-term discourse outcomes and their relationship to white matter damage in moderate to severe adulthood traumatic brain injury.

Brain Lang 2020 May 17;204:104769. Epub 2020 Feb 17.

Centre de recherche du Centre intégré universitaire de santé et de services sociaux du Nord-de-l'Île-de-Montréal (Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal), Montréal, Québec, Canada; Département de psychologie, Faculté des arts et Sciences, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104769DOI Listing

Mind the stimulation site: Enhancing and diminishing sentence comprehension with anodal tDCS.

Brain Lang 2020 May 7;204:104757. Epub 2020 Feb 7.

Department of Psychology, University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy; Milan Center for Neuroscience, Neuromi, Italy. Electronic address:

In a previous sham-controlled study, we showed the feasibility of increasing language comprehension in healthy participants by applying anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (atDCS) over the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG). In the present work, we present a follow-up experiment targeting with atDCS the left inferior parietal cortex (LIPC) while participants performed the same auditory comprehension task used in our previous experiment. Both neural sites (LIFG and LIPC) are crucial hubs of Baddeley's model of verbal short-term memory (vSTM). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104757DOI Listing

Effects of prosody on the cognitive and neural resources supporting sentence comprehension: A behavioral and lesion-symptom mapping study.

Brain Lang 2020 Apr 4;203:104756. Epub 2020 Feb 4.

College of Health Solutions, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA. Electronic address:

Non-canonical sentence comprehension impairments are well-documented in aphasia. Studies of neurotypical controls indicate that prosody can aid comprehension by facilitating attention towards critical pitch inflections and phrase boundaries. However, no studies have examined how prosody may engage specific cognitive and neural resources during non-canonical sentence comprehension in persons with left hemisphere damage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104756DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7064294PMC

Language and motor processing in reading and typing: Insights from beta-frequency band power modulations.

Brain Lang 2020 May 5;204:104758. Epub 2020 Feb 5.

Dipartimento di Psicologia dello Sviluppo e della Socializzazione, Università degli Studi di Padova, Via Venezia 8, 35131 Padova, PD, Italy. Electronic address:

Power modulations of the EEG activity within the beta-frequency band were investigated across silent-reading and copy-typing tasks featuring emotionally negative and neutral words in order to clarify the interplay between language and motor processing. In reading, a single desynchronization surfaced 200-600 ms after target presentation, with a stronger power-decrease in lower beta frequencies for neutral compared to negative words. The typing task revealed two distinct desynchronizations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104758DOI Listing

Spatiotemporal dynamics of predictive brain mechanisms during speech processing: an MEG study.

Brain Lang 2020 Apr 30;203:104755. Epub 2020 Jan 30.

Beijing City Key Lab for Medical Physics and Engineering, Institution of Heavy Ion Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing, China; Center for MRI Research, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing, China; McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Peking University, Beijing, China. Electronic address:

Rapid and efficient speech processing benefits from the prediction derived from prior expectations based on the identification of individual words. It is known that speech processing is carried out within a distributed frontotemporal network. However, the spatiotemporal causal dynamics of predictive brain mechanisms in sound-to-meaning mapping within this network remain unclear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104755DOI Listing

Altered efficiency of white matter connections for language function in children with language disorder.

Brain Lang 2020 Apr 28;203:104743. Epub 2020 Jan 28.

Translational Imaging Laboratory, Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI, USA; Carman and Ann Adams Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA; Department of Neurology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA; Translational Neuroscience Program, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA. Electronic address:

To characterize structural white matter substrates associated with language functions in children with language disorders (LD), a psychometry-driven diffusion tractography network was investigated with canonical correlation analysis (CCA), which can reliably predict expressive and receptive language scores from the nodal efficiency (NE) of the obtained network. The CCA found that the NE values of six regions: left inferior-frontal-opercular, left insular, left angular gyrus, left superior-temporal-gyrus, right hippocampus, and right cerebellar-lobule were highly correlated with language scores (ρ/ρ = 0.609/0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104743DOI Listing

Neural dynamics of speech and non-speech motor planning.

Brain Lang 2020 Apr 24;203:104742. Epub 2020 Jan 24.

Faculty of Psychology and Educational Science, University of Geneva, Switzerland.

As the speech apparatus is also involved in producing non-speech movements, understanding whether speech and non-speech planning are controlled by the same brain mechanisms is central to the comprehension of motor speech planning. A crucial issue is whether a specialized motor planning/control system is dedicated to speech or if the motor planning/control system is shared across oromotor behaviors. We investigated the EEG/ERP spatio-temporal dynamics of the motor planning processes preceding articulation by comparing the production of non-speech gestures matched to monosyllabic words and non-words. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2020.104742DOI Listing

Earlier second language acquisition is associated with greater neural pattern dissimilarity between the first and second languages.

Brain Lang 2020 Apr 23;203:104740. Epub 2020 Jan 23.

Center for Brain Disorders and Cognitive Science, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060, China; Center for Language and Brain, Shenzhen Institute of Neuroscience, Shenzhen 518057, China. Electronic address:

It is controversial as to how age of acquisition (AoA) and proficiency level of the second language influence the similarities and differences between the first (L1) and the second (L2) language brain networks. In this functional MRI study, we used representational similarity analysis to quantify the degree of neural similarity between L1 and L2 during sentence comprehension tasks in 26 adult Chinese-English bilinguals, who learned English as L2 at different ages and had different proficiency levels. We found that although L1 and L2 processing activated similar brain regions, greater neural pattern dissimilarity between L1 and L2 was associated with earlier AoA in the left inferior and middle frontal gyri after the effect of proficiency level was controlled. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104740DOI Listing
April 2020
3.215 Impact Factor

Subthalamic nucleus activity in the processing of body and mental action verbs in people with Parkinson's disease.

Brain Lang 2020 03 22;202:104738. Epub 2020 Jan 22.

Department of Neurology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address:

Local field potentials evoked by body action and mental action verbs were recorded in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) of 18 patients with Parkinson's disease through the electrodes implanted for deep brain stimulation. Compared with the medication on-condition, the medication off-condition showed a difference in activity in the early time segments, mainly in the right STN, with larger amplitudes for body action verbs. In the on-condition a similar pattern was detected in the left STN. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104738DOI Listing
March 2020
3.215 Impact Factor

An fMRI study of English and Spanish word reading in bilingual adults.

Brain Lang 2020 03 21;202:104725. Epub 2020 Jan 21.

Interdisciplinary Program in Neuroscience, Georgetown University Medical Center, 4000 Reservoir Road NW, Washington, DC 20057, United States; Center for the Study of Learning, Georgetown University Medical Center, 4000 Reservoir Road NW, Washington, DC 20057, United States. Electronic address:

Reading relies on a left-lateralized brain system, including occipito-temporal (OTC), temporo-parietal, and inferior frontal (IFC) cortices. Neuroimaging studies have investigated whether activation in these cortices is modulated by a language's orthographic depth (consistency of grapheme-to-phoneme conversion). In Spanish-English bilinguals, some but not all studies have reported activation differences between the two languages during reading. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104725DOI Listing

Co-activation of the L2 during L1 auditory processing: An ERP cross-modal priming study.

Brain Lang 2020 Apr 21;203:104739. Epub 2020 Jan 21.

Basque Center on Cognition, Brain and Language, Mikeletegi Pasealekua, 69, 20009 Donostia, Gipuzkoa, Spain; Ikerbasque. Basque Foundation for Science, Maria Diaz de Haro 3, 6 solairua, 48013 Bilbao, Bizkaia, Spain; Departamento de Lengua Vasca y Comunicación, UPV/EHU, University of the Basque Country, Barrio Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa, Bizkaia, Spain.

Several studies have shown that unbalanced bilinguals activate both of their languages simultaneously during L2 processing; however, evidence for L2 activation while participants are tested exclusively in their L1 has been more tenuous. Here, we investigate whether bilingual participants implicitly activate the label for a picture in their two languages, and whether labels activated in L2 can prime activation of cross-linguistically related L1 lexical targets. We tested highly proficient early Spanish-Basque bilinguals on an ERP cross-modal priming task conducted only in their L1, Spanish. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104739DOI Listing

Spatiotemporal dynamics of postoperative functional plasticity in patients with brain tumors in language areas.

Brain Lang 2020 03 10;202:104741. Epub 2020 Jan 10.

BCBL, Basque Center on Cognition, Brain and Language, Donostia/San Sebastián, Spain; Ikerbasque, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao, Spain; University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, Bilbao, Spain.

Postoperative functional neuroimaging provides a unique opportunity to investigate the neural mechanisms that facilitate language network reorganization. Previous studies in patients with low grade gliomas (LGGs) in language areas suggest that postoperative recovery is likely due to functional neuroplasticity in peritumoral and contra-tumoral healthy regions, but have attributed varying degrees of importance to specific regions. In this study, we used Magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate functional connectivity changes in peritumoral and contra-tumoral regions after brain tumor resection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104741DOI Listing

The noise-resilient brain: Resting-state oscillatory activity predicts words-in-noise recognition.

Brain Lang 2020 03 6;202:104727. Epub 2020 Jan 6.

Neurolinguistics, Department of Psychology, University of Zürich, Binzmühlestrasse 14, 8050 Zürich, Switzerland.

The role of neuronal oscillations in the processing of speech has recently come to prominence. Since resting-state (RS) brain activity has been shown to predict both task-related brain activation and behavioural performance, we set out to establish whether inter-individual differences in spectrally-resolved RS-MEG power are associated with variations in words-in-noise recognition in a sample of 88 participants made available by the Human Connectome Project. Positive associations with resilience to noise were observed with power in the range 21 and 29 Hz in a number of areas along the left temporal gyrus and temporo-parietal association areas peaking in left posterior superior temporal gyrus (pSTG). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104727DOI Listing

Auditory cortex sensitivity to the loudness attribute of verbs.

Brain Lang 2020 03 27;202:104726. Epub 2019 Dec 27.

Institute of Clinical Neuroscience and Medical Psychology, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf, Germany.

The auditory cortex was shown to be activated during the processing of words describing actions with acoustic features. The present study further examines whether processing visually presented action words characterized by different levels of loudness, i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104726DOI Listing

The effects of thalamic and posterior subthalamic deep brain stimulation on speech in patients with essential tremor - A prospective, randomized, doubleblind crossover study.

Brain Lang 2020 03 26;202:104724. Epub 2019 Dec 26.

University of Cologne, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Cologne, Department of Neurology, Kerpener Str. 62, 50937 Cologne, Germany. Electronic address:

Objective: To prospectively evaluate the effect of PSA- and VIM DBS on speech in ET patients.

Methods: Leads were implanted bilaterally with contacts placed in both VIM and PSA. Thirteen patients were analyzed pre- and postoperatively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104724DOI Listing

The left inferior longitudinal fasciculus supports orthographic processing: Evidence from a lesion-behavior mapping analysis.

Brain Lang 2020 02 20;201:104721. Epub 2019 Dec 20.

State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning & IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China. Electronic address:

Orthographic processing is a critical stage in visual word recognition. However, the white-matter pathways that support this processing are unclear, as prior findings might have been confounded by impure behavioral measures, potential structural reorganization of the brain, and limited sample sizes. To address this issue, we investigated the correlations between the integrity of 20 major tracts in the whole brain and the pure orthographic index across 67 patients with short-term brain damage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104721DOI Listing
February 2020

Baseline MRI associates with later naming status in primary progressive aphasia.

Brain Lang 2020 02 24;201:104723. Epub 2019 Dec 24.

Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; Department of Cognitive Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Advanced imaging studies in neurodegenerative disease have yielded new insights into subtypes of disease, progression of disease in various brain regions, and changes in structural and functional connectivity between brain regions related to symptom progression. However, few studies have revealed imaging markers at baseline that correlate with rate or degree of decline in function. Here we tested the hypothesis that imaging features at baseline correlate with outcome of naming in primary progressive aphasia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104723DOI Listing
February 2020

Cortical mechanisms of talker normalization in fluent sentences.

Brain Lang 2020 02 10;201:104722. Epub 2019 Dec 10.

Department of Psychology, The University of Chicago, 5848 S. University Ave., Chicago, IL 60637, United States.

Adjusting to the vocal characteristics of a new talker is important for speech recognition. Previous research has indicated that adjusting to talker differences is an active cognitive process that depends on attention and working memory (WM). These studies have not examined how talker variability affects perception and neural responses in fluent speech. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104722DOI Listing
February 2020
3.215 Impact Factor

The role of motor system in action-related language comprehension in L1 and L2: An fMRI study.

Brain Lang 2020 02 29;201:104714. Epub 2019 Nov 29.

Department of Psychology, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä 40014, Finland; Centre for Interdisciplinary Brain Research, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä 40014, Finland. Electronic address:

The framework of embodied cognition has challenged the modular view of a language-cognition divide by suggesting that meaning-retrieval critically involves the sensory-motor system. Despite extensive research into the neural mechanisms underlying language-motor coupling, it remains unclear how the motor system might be differentially engaged by different levels of linguistic abstraction and language proficiency. To address this issue, we used fMRI to quantify neural activations in brain regions underlying motor and language processing in Chinese-English speakers' processing of literal, metaphorical, and abstract language in their L1 and L2. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104714DOI Listing
February 2020

Aging-related differences in the cortical network subserving intelligible speech.

Brain Lang 2020 02 20;201:104713. Epub 2019 Nov 20.

Beijing City Key Lab for Medical Physics and Engineering, Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing, China; Center for MRI Research, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing, China; McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Peking University, Beijing, China. Electronic address:

Language communication is crucial throughout the lifespan. The current study investigated how aging affects the brain network subserving intelligible speech. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we compared brain responses to intelligible and unintelligible speech between older and young adults. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104713DOI Listing
February 2020

Mapping eloquent cortex: A voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping study of core speech production capacities in brain tumour patients.

Brain Lang 2020 01 15;200:104710. Epub 2019 Nov 15.

School of Psychology, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. Electronic address:

This study used voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping to examine the cortical and white matter regions associated with language production impairments in a sample of 63 preoperative tumour patients. We identified four cognitive functions considered crucial for spoken language production: semantic-to-lexical mapping (selecting the appropriate lexical label for the intended concept); phonological encoding (retrieving the word's phonological form); articulatory-motor planning (programming the articulatory motor movements); and goal-driven language selection (exerting top-down control over the words selected for production). Each participant received a score estimating their competence on each function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104710DOI Listing
January 2020

The hippocampus and semantic memory over time.

Brain Lang 2020 02 15;201:104711. Epub 2019 Nov 15.

Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, United States.

We previously reported impoverished semantic memory in patients with hippocampal amnesia (Klooster & Duff, 2015). Here, we test whether this disruption results from the patients not updating semantic representations since the onset of their amnesia. We extend previous work by comparing performance of hippocampal patients and their current age (CA) comparisons (M = 58. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104711DOI Listing
February 2020

Monitoring of attentional oscillations through Spectral Similarity Analysis predicts reading comprehension.

Brain Lang 2020 01 10;200:104709. Epub 2019 Nov 10.

Department of Psychology and Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences, University of Washington, United States.

Deviations of attention from the task at hand are often associated with worse reading performance (Schooler, Reichle, & Halpern, 2004). Ironically, current methods for detecting these shifts of attention typically generate task interruptions and further disrupt performance. In the current study, we developed a method to (1) track shifts of attention away from the reading task by examining the similarity between 5 min of eyes-closed-resting-state EEG and 5 min reading EEG; and (2) investigate, during reading, how the ratio between attention shifts and focused reading relates to readers' comprehension. Read More

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January 2020

Brain volumes as predictors of tDCS effects in primary progressive aphasia.

Brain Lang 2020 01 5;200:104707. Epub 2019 Nov 5.

Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States; Department of Cognitive Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States.

The current study aims to determine the brain areas critical for response to anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in PPA. Anodal tDCS and sham were administered over the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), combined with written naming/spelling therapy. Thirty people with PPA were included in this study, and assessed immediately, 2 weeks, and 2 months post-therapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104707DOI Listing
January 2020

Enhanced left inferior frontal to left superior temporal effective connectivity for complex sentence comprehension: fMRI evidence from Chinese relative clause processing.

Brain Lang 2020 01 6;200:104712. Epub 2019 Nov 6.

Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, National Central University, Taoyuan 32001, Taiwan; Institute for Neural Computation, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA.

Previous studies investigating the processing of complex sentences have demonstrated the involvement of the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) and left superior temporal gyrus (LSTG), which might subserve ordering and storage of linguistic components, respectively, for sentence comprehension. However, how these brain regions are interconnected, especially during the processing of Chinese sentences, need to be further explored. In this study, the neural network supporting the comprehension of Chinese relative clause was identified. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104712DOI Listing
January 2020

Age of acquisition effects differ across linguistic domains in sign language: EEG evidence.

Brain Lang 2020 01 4;200:104708. Epub 2019 Nov 4.

Department of Linguistics, Purdue University, Lyles-Porter Hall, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2122, USA; Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, Lyles-Porter Hall, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2122, USA.

One of the key questions in the study of human language acquisition is the extent to which the development of neural processing networks for different components of language are modulated by exposure to linguistic stimuli. Sign languages offer a unique perspective on this issue, because prelingually Deaf children who receive access to complex linguistic input later in life provide a window into brain maturation in the absence of language, and subsequent neuroplasticity of neurolinguistic networks during late language learning. While the duration of sensitive periods of acquisition of linguistic subsystems (sound, vocabulary, and syntactic structure) is well established on the basis of L2 acquisition in spoken language, for sign languages, the relative timelines for development of neural processing networks for linguistic sub-domains are unknown. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104708DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6934356PMC
January 2020

Morphological processing in Chinese engages left temporal regions.

Brain Lang 2019 12 23;199:104696. Epub 2019 Oct 23.

Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, 530 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States; Center for Human Growth and Development, University of Michigan, 300 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, United States. Electronic address:

Morphological awareness, the ability to manipulate the smallest units of meaning, is critical for Chinese literacy. This is because Chinese characters typically reflect the morphemic, or morpho-syllabic units of language. Yet, the neurocognitive mechanisms underlying Chinese speakers' morphological processing remain understudied. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6876548PMC
December 2019

Dynamic effects of habituation and novelty detection on newborn event-related potentials.

Brain Lang 2019 12 11;199:104695. Epub 2019 Oct 11.

Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 238 Burnett Hall, Lincoln NE 68588, USA; University of Nebraska-Lincoln Center for Brain, Biology and Behavior, C89 East Stadium, Lincoln NE 68588, USA.

Newborns habituate to repeated auditory stimuli, and discriminate syllables, generating opportunities for early language learning. This study investigated trial-by-trial changes in newborn electrophysiological responses to auditory speech syllables as an index of habituation and novelty detection. Auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from 16 term newborn infants, aged 1-3 days, in response to monosyllabic speech syllables presented during habituation and novelty detection tasks. Read More

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December 2019

Written sentence context effects on acoustic-phonetic perception: fMRI reveals cross-modal semantic-perceptual interactions.

Brain Lang 2019 12 3;199:104698. Epub 2019 Oct 3.

Department of Cognitive, Linguistic & Psychological Sciences, Brown University, United States; Brown Institute for Brain Science, Brown University, United States.

This study examines cross-modality effects of a semantically-biased written sentence context on the perception of an acoustically-ambiguous word target identifying neural areas sensitive to interactions between sentential bias and phonetic ambiguity. Of interest is whether the locus or nature of the interactions resembles those previously demonstrated for auditory-only effects. FMRI results show significant interaction effects in right mid-middle temporal gyrus (RmMTG) and bilateral anterior superior temporal gyri (aSTG), regions along the ventral language comprehension stream that map sound onto meaning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104698DOI Listing
December 2019

Top-down and bottom-up mechanisms as reflected by beta and gamma oscillations in speech perception: An individual-difference approach.

Brain Lang 2019 12 3;199:104700. Epub 2019 Oct 3.

Unit of Human Communication, Development, and Information Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.

Recent neurophysiological studies have proposed distinct roles of β and γ oscillations in implementing top-down and bottom-up processes. The present study aims to test this hypothesis in the domain of speech perception. We examined β and γ oscillations elicited to a tone contrast in a passive oddball paradigm, and their relationships with discrimination sensitivity d' and RT from two groups of healthy adults who showed high and low discrimination sensitivity to the contrast. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104700DOI Listing
December 2019

Shared premotor activity in spoken and written communication.

Brain Lang 2019 12 3;199:104694. Epub 2019 Oct 3.

CNRS, Aix-Marseille Univ, LPL, Aix-en-Provence, France.

The aim of the present study was to uncover a possible common neural organizing principle in spoken and written communication, through the coupling of perceptual and motor representations. In order to identify possible shared neural substrates for processing the basic units of spoken and written language, a sparse sampling fMRI acquisition protocol was performed on the same subjects in two experimental sessions with similar sets of letters being read and written and of phonemes being heard and orally produced. We found evidence of common premotor regions activated in spoken and written language, both in perception and in production. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104694DOI Listing
December 2019

fMRI evidence that left posterior temporal cortex contributes to N400 effects of predictability independent of congruity.

Brain Lang 2019 12 1;199:104697. Epub 2019 Oct 1.

University of Maryland, Department of Linguistics, College Park, MD, United States; NIMH MEG Core Facility, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, United States. Electronic address:

Previous electrophysiological work argues that predictability and semantic incongruity rapidly impact comprehension, as indicated by modulation of the N400 component between ~300 and 500 ms. An ongoing question is whether effects of predictability in fact reflect pre-activation in long-term memory as opposed to modulating the kind of integration processes triggered by incongruity. Using fMRI, we compared the impact of predictability and incongruity in adjective-noun phrases, in regions identified with lexical and phrasal localizer scans. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104697DOI Listing
December 2019