17 results match your criteria Botanical Journal Of The Linnean Society[Journal]

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Can (Poaceae) be identified by pollen analysis? Implications for detecting the ancestor of the extinct two-grained einkorn-like wheat.

Bot J Linn Soc 2015 Feb 29;177(2):278-289. Epub 2015 Jan 29.

Experimental Techniques Centre, Brunel University London Uxbridge, UB8 3PH, UK.

The domestication of the one-grained einkorn () in the Near East is relatively well known. However, an independent two-grained einkorn-like domestication has been archaeobotanically detected and scarce information is available. , a wild wheat, was not fully described until the 1970s because the phenology does not allow it to be distinguished easily from wild einkorn ( subsp. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boj.12238DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4373158PMC
February 2015

Recurrent polymorphic mating type variation in Madagascan species (Orchidaceae) exemplifies a high incidence of auto-pollination in tropical orchids.

Bot J Linn Soc 2014 Jun 20;175(2):242-258. Epub 2014 May 20.

Department of Organismic Biology, University of Salzburg A-5020, Salzburg, Austria.

The transition from outcrossing to self-fertilization is one of the most common evolutionary changes in angiosperms. The orchid family exemplifies this evolutionary trend but, because of a general lack of large-scale surveys on auto-pollination in orchid taxa, the incidence and modes of auto-pollination among (sub)tropical orchids remain poorly known. In the present study, we assessed the frequency and mode of auto-pollination within and among species of a largely monophyletic group of Madagascan . Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boj.12168DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4373168PMC
June 2014
13 Reads

Interpretation of patterns of genetic variation in endemic plant species of oceanic islands.

Bot J Linn Soc 2014 Mar 24;174(3):276-288. Epub 2013 Sep 24.

Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology and the Biodiversity Institute, University of Kansas Lawrence, KS, 66045, USA.

Oceanic islands offer special opportunities for understanding the patterns and processes of evolution. The availability of molecular markers in recent decades has enhanced these opportunities, facilitating the use of population genetics to reveal divergence and speciation in island systems. A common pattern seen in taxa on oceanic islands is a decreased level of genetic variation within and among populations, and the founder effect has often been invoked to explain this observation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boj.12088DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4459035PMC
March 2014
5 Reads

Correlates of hyperdiversity in southern African ice plants (Aizoaceae).

Bot J Linn Soc 2014 Jan 3;174(1):110-129. Epub 2013 Dec 3.

Imperial College London Silwood Park Campus, Buckhurst Road, Ascot, Berkshire, SL5 7PY, UK ; Jodrell Laboratory, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 3DS, UK.

The exceptionally high plant diversity of the Greater Cape Floristic Region (GCFR) comprises a combination of ancient lineages and young radiations. A previous phylogenetic study of Aizoaceae subfamily Ruschioideae dated the radiation of this clade of > 1500 species in the GCFR to 3.8-8. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boj.12117DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4373134PMC
January 2014
4 Reads

The design of trapping devices in pollination traps of the genus (Araceae) is related to insect type.

Bot J Linn Soc 2013 Jul 3;172(3):385-397. Epub 2013 Jun 3.

School of Applied Sciences, Bournemouth University Dorset House, Talbot Campus, Fern-Barrow, Poole, BH12 5BB, UK.

Pollinators have long been known to select for floral traits, but the nature of this relationship has been little investigated in trap pollination systems. We investigated the trapping devices of 15 spp. and compared them with the types of insects trapped. Read More

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https://academic.oup.com/botlinnean/article-lookup/doi/10.11
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boj.12054DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4373131PMC
July 2013
3 Reads

Definition and insertion of the GSPC in the political context of Mexico.

Bot J Linn Soc 2011 ;166(3):326-30

UNAM.

Mexico as a megadiverse country houses between 6 and 8% of the world's flora. However, the Mexican flora is facing challenges, including the presence of at least 981 threatened plant species and 618 exotic plant species, habitat loss, pollution, overexploitation of natural resources and the adverse effects of climate change, which are compromising its conservation and sustainable use. Mexico has been actively involved in the development and update of the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation (GSPC) adopted by the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). Read More

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October 2012

How has government policy post-Global Strategy for Plant Conservation impacted on science? The Ethiopian perspective.

Authors:
Sebsebe Demissew

Bot J Linn Soc 2011 ;166(3):310-25

In this paper, existing relevant Ethiopian government biodiversity-related policies and strategies, and mandates of various institutions prior to GSPC targets, are reviewed. Response to whether or not institutions responded to GSPC targets as the result of new policies or rebranded their work to fit within the context of existing policies and adjust their outcomes to fit into the GSPC targets is provided. The Ethiopian national report of 2009 submitted to the Convention of Biological Diversity Secretariat is reviewed and gaps analysed. Read More

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October 2012

Informing and influencing the interface between biodiversity science and biodiversity policy in South Africa.

Bot J Linn Soc 2011 ;166(3):301-09

South African National Biodiversity Institute, and University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban.

South Africa, as a megadiverse country (±21 700 vascular plants, 4800 vertebrates and 68 900 invertebrates described), is presently engaged with an extended, modified Global Strategy for Plant Conservation (GSPC). The country is fortunate in having a strong tradition of systematics research and, inter alia, houses several million preserved plant specimens (±1 million databased and georeferenced), allowing taxonomists and conservationists to track both the occurrence and distribution of indigenous and naturalized plant species. These rich local resources have been extensively drawn upon to deliver, with varying degrees of success, the 16 outcome-oriented GSPC 2010 Targets. Read More

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October 2012

Plant diversity and conservation in China: planning a strategic bioresource for a sustainable future.

Authors:
Hongwen Huang

Bot J Linn Soc 2011 ;166(3):282-300

China is one of the richest countries for plant diversity with approximately 33 000 vascular plant species, ranking second in the world. However, the plant diversity in China is increasingly threatened, with an estimated 4000–5000 plant species being threatened or on the verge of extinction, making China, proportionally, one of the highest priorities for global plant biodiversity conservation. Coming in the face of the current ecological crisis, it is timely that China has launched China's Strategy for Plant Conservation (CSPC). Read More

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October 2012
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Strengthening the scientific contribution of botanic gardens to the second phase of the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation.

Bot J Linn Soc 2011 ;166(3):267-81

Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh.

The need for action on the global environment is now well understood and governments, agencies, non-governmental organizations and botanic gardens have all been working in their various ways to promote environmental sustainability and reduce species and habitat loss for at least 10–20 years. The Global Strategy for Plant Conservation (GSPC) has been widely adopted, particularly by the botanic garden community, and has resulted in many successes despite failing to achieve its ultimate goal of halting the loss of plant biodiversity. The objectives and targets for Phase 2 of the GSPC, running from 2010 to 2020, mirror those of Phase 1 and had been largely agreed prior to their formal adoption at the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity in Nagoya in October 2010. Read More

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October 2012
3 Reads

What more can plant scientists do to help save the green stuff?

Bot J Linn Soc 2011 ;166(3):233-39

The Global Strategy for Plant Conservation (GSPC) was the first such effort under the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), and had gone through a 3-year process to reach the level of maturity that enabled it to be approved by consensus by all Governments present at the key session in The Hague in April 2002. It provided a model for subsequent CBD workplans, with targets, and undoubtedly contributed to the 2010 target of reducing the rate of biodiversity loss. In the event, few of the targets were achieved, because of numerous constraints at both policy and implementation levels. Read More

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October 2012
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The context and development of a global framework for plant conservation.

Bot J Linn Soc 2011 ;166(3):227-32

Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis.

A new international initiative for plant conservation was first called for as a resolution of the International Botanical Congress in 1999. The natural home for such an initiative was considered to be the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), and the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the CBD agreed to consider a Global Strategy for Plant Conservation (GSPC) at its 5th meeting in 2000. It was proposed that the GSPC could provide an innovative model approach for target setting within the CBD and, prior to COP5, a series of inter-sessional papers on proposed targets and their justification were developed by plant conservation experts. Read More

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October 2012
2 Reads

Science and policy: valuing framing, language and listening.

Authors:
Stephen Forbes

Bot J Linn Soc 2011 ;166(3):217-26

This paper considers the context for science contributing to policy development and explores some critical issues that should inform science advocacy and influence with policy makers. The paper argues that the key challenges are at least as much in educating conservation scientists and science communicators about society and policy making as they are in educating society and policy makers about science. The importance of developing processes to ensure that scientists and science communicators invest in the development of relationships based on respect and understanding of their audience in both communities and amongst policy makers provides a critical first step. Read More

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October 2012

J. M. Despréaux' lichens from the Canary Islands and West Africa: an account of a 19th century collection found in an English archive.

Bot J Linn Soc 2011 ;166(2):185-211

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, UK.

This is an historical and descriptive account of 28 herbarium specimens, 27 lichens and an alga, found in the archives of Charles Chalcraft, a descendant of the Bedford family, who were dye manufacturers in Leeds, England, in the 19th century. The lichens comprise 13 different morphotypes collected in the Canary Islands and West Africa by the French botanist J. M. Read More

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September 2011
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Phylogenetic relationships in the genus Leontopodium (Asteraceae: Gnaphalieae) based on AFLP data.

Bot J Linn Soc 2011 Apr;165(4):364-377

Institute of Pharmacy/Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Chemistry and Pharmacy, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52c, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria.

The genus Leontopodium comprises 30-41 species. The centre of diversity is the Sino-Himalayan region in south-western China, where about 15 species occur. The two species native to Europe, L. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8339.2011.01117.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3524420PMC
April 2011
5 Reads

The female reproductive unit of ephedra (Gnetales): comparative morphology and evolutionary perspectives.

Bot J Linn Soc 2010 ;163(4):387-430

Institute of Systematic Botany, University of Zurich, Switzerland.

Morphological variation in Ephedra (Gnetales) is limited and confusing from an evolutionary perspective, with parallelisms and intraspecific variation. However, recent analyses of molecular data provide a phylogenetic framework for investigations of morphological traits, albeit with few informative characters in the investigated gene regions. We document morphological, anatomical and histological variation patterns in the female reproductive unit and test the hypothesis that some Early Cretaceous fossils, which share synapomorphies with Ephedra, are members of the extant clade. Read More

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September 2010
8 Reads
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