148 results match your criteria Botanical Dermatology


Cytoprotective effects of a proprietary red maple leaf extract and its major polyphenol, ginnalin A, against hydrogen peroxide and methylglyoxal induced oxidative stress in human keratinocytes.

Food Funct 2020 May 1. Epub 2020 May 1.

Bioactive Botanical Research Laboratory, Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881, USA. and School of Biotechnology and Health Sciences, Wuyi University, International Healthcare Innovation Institute (Jiangmen), Jiangmen 529020, Guangdong, China.

Phytochemicals from functional foods are common ingredients in dietary supplements and cosmetic products for anti-skin aging effects due to their antioxidant activities. A proprietary red maple (Acer rubrum) leaf extract (Maplifa™) and its major phenolic compound, ginnalin A (GA), have been reported to show antioxidant, anti-melanogenesis, and anti-glycation effects but their protective effects against oxidative stress in human skin cells remain unknown. Herein, we investigated the cytoprotective effects of Maplifa™ and GA against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and methylglyoxal (MGO)-induced oxidative stress in human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/d0fo00359jDOI Listing

Phenolic-enriched maple syrup extract protects human keratinocytes against hydrogen peroxide and methylglyoxal induced cytotoxicity.

Dermatol Ther 2020 Apr 16:e13426. Epub 2020 Apr 16.

Bioactive Botanical Research Laboratory, Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode Island, USA.

Reactive carbonyl species including methylglyoxal (MGO) are oxidation metabolites of glucose and precursors of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). They are important mediators of cellular oxidative stress and exacerbate skin complications. Published data supports that certain phenolic compounds can exert cellular protective effects by their antioxidant activity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dth.13426DOI Listing

Trichloroacetic acid model to accurately capture the efficacy of treatments for postinflammatory hyperpigmentation.

Arch Dermatol Res 2020 Apr 6. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, 3031 West Grand Blvd, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA.

Postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) occurs following cutaneous injury and is common following resolution of acne especially in patients with skin of color. The objective of this study was to further validate a trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-induced PIH model and compare it to acne-induced PIH using topical bakuchiol, a botanical extract that has been shown to have antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiacne properties. A prospective, non-randomized clinical trial was conducted on subjects with skin phototypes IV-VI with a history of acne-induced PIH. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00403-020-02071-4DOI Listing

Anti-aging and brightening effects of a topical treatment containing vitamin C, vitamin E, and raspberry leaf cell culture extract: A split-face, randomized controlled trial.

J Cosmet Dermatol 2020 Mar 24;19(3):671-676. Epub 2020 Jan 24.

Master of Science Program in Anti-Aging & Regenerative Medicine, College of Integrative Medicine, Dhurakij Pundit University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Background: Skin aging has many manifestations such as wrinkles, uneven skin tone, and dryness. Both intrinsic and extrinsic factors, especially ultraviolet light-induced oxidative radicals, contribute to the etiology of aging. Human skin requires both water- and lipid-soluble nutrient components, including hydrophilic and lipophilic antioxidants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocd.13305DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7027822PMC

Human T cell response to CD1a and contact dermatitis allergens in botanical extracts and commercial skin care products.

Sci Immunol 2020 01 3;5(43). Epub 2020 Jan 3.

Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Dermatology, New York, NY 10032, USA.

During industrialization, humans have been exposed to increasing numbers of foreign chemicals. Failure of the immune system to tolerate drugs, cosmetics, and other skin products causes allergic contact dermatitis, a T cell-mediated disease with rising prevalence. Models of αβ T cell response emphasize T cell receptor (TCR) contact with peptide-MHC complexes, but this model cannot readily explain activation by most contact dermatitis allergens, which are nonpeptidic molecules. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciimmunol.aax5430DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7247771PMC
January 2020

Skin lightening effect of natural extracts coming from Senegal botanical biodiversity.

Int J Dermatol 2020 Feb 4;59(2):178-183. Epub 2019 Nov 4.

Unité de Technologie et Valorisation Alimentaire, Centre d'Analyses et de Recherche, Université Saint-Joseph, Beirut, Lebanon.

Background: Skin depigmentation is increasingly oriented toward plant extracts because of harmfulness of depigmenting active ingredients used in cosmetics and dermatology. Reconstructed human pigmented epidermis (RHPE) is the closest in vitro model to human skin and offers the possibility to test the global depigmenting effect of a plant extract. These co-cultures of keratinocytes and melanocytes are the most advanced and newest models for testing depigmentation, and until now very few studies have been done with these cultures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijd.14699DOI Listing
February 2020
5 Reads

Comparative analysis of amplicon and metagenomic sequencing methods reveals key features in the evolution of animal metaorganisms.

Microbiome 2019 09 14;7(1):133. Epub 2019 Sep 14.

Evolutionary Genomics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Plön, Germany.

Background: The interplay between hosts and their associated microbiome is now recognized as a fundamental basis of the ecology, evolution, and development of both players. These interdependencies inspired a new view of multicellular organisms as "metaorganisms." The goal of the Collaborative Research Center "Origin and Function of Metaorganisms" is to understand why and how microbial communities form long-term associations with hosts from diverse taxonomic groups, ranging from sponges to humans in addition to plants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40168-019-0743-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6744666PMC
September 2019
3 Reads

Correction: Artocarpin, an isoprenyl flavonoid, induces p53-dependent or independent apoptosis via ROS-mediated MAPKs and Akt activation in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

Oncotarget 2019 May 21;10(36):3430. Epub 2019 May 21.

Department of Nursing, Division of Basic Medical Sciences, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Chia-Yi, Taiwan.

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.18632/oncotarget.16058. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.26990DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6688706PMC
May 2019
2 Reads

Complementary and alternative therapy for pediatric acne: A review of botanical extracts, dietary interventions, and oral supplements.

Pediatr Dermatol 2019 Sep 23;36(5):596-601. Epub 2019 Jun 23.

Division of Dermatology, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.

Many supplements and products containing botanical extracts are marketed to patients for the treatment of acne vulgaris. Additionally, increasing attention has been paid to the role of diet in acne vulgaris. Studies on this topic including pediatric patients are limited, with variable efficacy data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pde.13904DOI Listing
September 2019
14 Reads

Wound healing with botanicals: A review and future perspectives.

Curr Dermatol Rep 2018 Dec 25;7(4):287-295. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

Department of Dermatology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, United States.

Purpose Of Review: Botanicals have long played a crucial role in the management of chronic and infected wounds, yet the mechanistic basis of these therapies remains largely poorly understood by modern science.

Recent Findings: Studies have begun to unveil the mechanistic bases of botanical therapies for wound healing, but more work is necessary. Most notably, investigation into the growing conditions, postharvest treatment and pharmacological preparation of these botanicals has demonstrated their importance in terms of the chemical makeup and pharmacological activity of the final product used in pre-clinical and clinical studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13671-018-0247-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6519724PMC
December 2018
9 Reads

Extract Protects Mouse Skin from UVB Radiation via Attenuating Collagen Disruption and Inflammation.

Int J Mol Sci 2019 Mar 21;20(6). Epub 2019 Mar 21.

Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Gangwon 24252, Korea.

In recent years, the use of botanical agents to prevent skin damage from solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiation has received considerable attention. is known to exert anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. This study investigated photoprotective properties of an extract (OJE) against UVB-induced skin damage in ICR mice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms20061435DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6470913PMC
March 2019
8 Reads

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by a Brazilian exotic hardwood.

Contact Dermatitis 2019 Aug 2;81(2):136-137. Epub 2019 Apr 2.

Department of Dermatology, Hospital das Clínicas of the University of São Paulo Medical School, São Paulo, Brazil.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cod.13259DOI Listing
August 2019
13 Reads

Blighia sapida K.D. Koenig: A review on its phytochemistry, pharmacological and nutritional properties.

J Ethnopharmacol 2019 May 24;235:446-459. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Dept of Pharmaceutics & Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lagos, Nigeria.

Ethnopharmacological Relevance: Ackee plant (Blighia sapida K. D. Koenig) (Sapindaceae) is used in Sub-Saharan Africa (where it has its origin) and in different parts of the world (The Caribbean, North and South America, Europe). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2019.01.017DOI Listing
May 2019
20 Reads

Review of the Efficacy and Safety of Topical for the Treatment of Psoriasis and Atopic Dermatitis.

J Clin Aesthet Dermatol 2018 Dec 1;11(12):42-47. Epub 2018 Dec 1.

Ms. Janeczek is with the Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago in Maywood, Illinos.

Due to the emerging trend of alternative medicine, patients inquire about natural remedies to alleviate their symptoms. Dermatologists should be aware of the efficacy and safety of topical botanical treatments available on the market. native to the United States, has been recently shown to have anti-inflammatory properties useful in cutaneous disorders. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6334833PMC
December 2018
7 Reads

Common allergens present in personal care products: identification, diagnosis, and management.

Semin Cutan Med Surg 2018 Dec;37(4):254-262

Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, New York, USA.

The incidence of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) reactions to personal care products has progressively increased, affecting women more so than men. Fragrances and preservatives are the major sensitizers behind cosmetic-induced ACD, due to their ubiquitous presence in these products, though emulsifiers, ultraviolet filters, and botanical allergens have been implicated as well. While patch testing is the standard for diagnosing ACD, many cosmetic-specific antigens are not currently included within the commercially available kits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/j.sder.2018.029DOI Listing
December 2018
20 Reads

A case of recalcitrant face eczema.

Contact Dermatitis 2019 Apr 19;80(4):242-243. Epub 2018 Dec 19.

Department of Dermatology, CHU St Pierre, Brugmann and Huderf, Brussels, Belgium.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cod.13180DOI Listing
April 2019
41 Reads

Efficacy and Safety of a Topical Botanical in Female Androgenetic Alopecia: A Randomized, Single-Blinded, Vehicle-Controlled Study.

Skin Appendage Disord 2018 Aug 16;4(3):160-165. Epub 2017 Nov 16.

2nd Department of Dermatology and Venereology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens Medical School, "Attikon" General University Hospital, Athens, Greece.

Introduction: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) in females is a difficult to treat skin disorder. A novel topical botanical lotion has been approved for its treatment. It acts by increasing Bcl-2, perifollicular Langerhans and mast cells, and perifollicular collagen. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000480024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6120395PMC
August 2018
12 Reads

Review of Common Alternative Herbal "Remedies" for Skin Cancer.

Dermatol Surg 2019 01;45(1):58-67

Both authors are associated with the Department of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington.

Background: Alternative herbal remedies for skin cancer are commonly found on the Internet. Many websites contain inaccurate or false information regarding side effects and efficacy.

Objective: To review the evidence behind several commonly advertised herbal remedies that claim to cure skin cancer: black salve, eggplant, frankincense, cannabis, black raspberry, milk thistle, St. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DSS.0000000000001622DOI Listing
January 2019
42 Reads

Effect of a botanical cleansing lotion on skin sebum and erythema of the face: A randomized controlled blinded half-side comparison.

J Cosmet Dermatol 2019 Jun 18;18(3):821-826. Epub 2018 Jul 18.

Department of Dermatology, Research Center skinitial, University Medical Center, Freiburg, Germany.

Background: Elevated levels of skin sebum are associated with the growth of Propionibacterium acnes. Intensive degreasing of the skin reduces Propionibacterium acnes but also may cause skin irritation.

Aims: We assessed the degreasing effect and skin tolerability of a botanical face cleanser with hops and willow bark extract and disodium cocoyl glutamate as mild cleansing agent compared to a standard face cleanser with sodium laureth sulfate (SLES). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocd.12680DOI Listing
June 2019
16 Reads

Oral Photoprotection: Effective Agents and Potential Candidates.

Front Med (Lausanne) 2018 26;5:188. Epub 2018 Jun 26.

Medicine and Medical Specialties Department, Instituto Ramón y Cajal de Investigación Sanitaria, Alcalá University Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

Electromagnetic radiation in the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared ranges produces biologic effects in humans. Where some of these effects are beneficial, others are harmful to the skin, particularly those stemming from ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Pharmacological photoprotection can be topical or systemic. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmed.2018.00188DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6028556PMC
June 2018
5 Reads

Medicinal plants with traditional use: Ethnobotany in the Indian subcontinent.

Clin Dermatol 2018 May - Jun;36(3):306-309. Epub 2018 Mar 10.

Department of Dermatology, Warren Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University, Providence, RI.

Traditional medicine uses cultural knowledge and practices to promote health maintenance as well as diagnose and treat disease. In developing countries, the majority of people rely on traditional medicines; however, many of these practices have not been rigorously and systematically studied or reported. We review the current understanding and research behind traditional therapies prevalent in the Indian subcontinent, including mind-body and energy-based healing, botanical medicine, and herbal remedies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.03.005DOI Listing
November 2018
58 Reads

Natural Antioxidants: Multiple Mechanisms to Protect Skin From Solar Radiation.

Front Pharmacol 2018 24;9:392. Epub 2018 Apr 24.

Department of Dermatology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, United States.

Human skin exposed to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) results in a dramatic increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The sudden increase in ROS shifts the natural balance toward a pro-oxidative state, resulting in oxidative stress. The detrimental effects of oxidative stress occur through multiple mechanisms that involve alterations to proteins and lipids, induction of inflammation, immunosuppression, DNA damage, and activation of signaling pathways that affect gene transcription, cell cycle, proliferation, and apoptosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2018.00392DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5928335PMC
April 2018
7 Reads

Are Natural Ingredients Effective in the Management of Hyperpigmentation? A Systematic Review.

J Clin Aesthet Dermatol 2018 Feb 1;11(2):28-37. Epub 2018 Feb 1.

Dr. Hollinger is with the Department of Dermatology, University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, Mississippi.

Hyperpigmentation disorders are commonly encountered in dermatology clinics. Botanical and natural ingredients have gained popularity as alternative depigmenting products. We sought to review clinical studies evaluating the use of different natural products in treating hyperpigmentation so clinicians are better equipped to educate their patients. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5843359PMC
February 2018
49 Reads

Protective effects of fermented honeybush (Cyclopia intermedia) extract (HU-018) against skin aging: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study.

J Cosmet Laser Ther 2018 Oct 1;20(5):313-318. Epub 2018 Feb 1.

e Botanical Drug Research Team , Huons Co., Ltd ., Gyeonggi-do , Korea.

Background: Oxidative stress and photodamage resulting from ultraviolet radiation exposure play key roles in skin aging. Fermented Cyclopia intermedia, which is used to brew honeybush tea, exerts antioxidant and anti-wrinkle effects by inhibiting reactive oxygen species production and downregulating matrix metalloproteinase activity.

Objectives: This randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of fermented honeybush (Cyclopia intermedia) extract (HU-018) for skin rejuvenation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14764172.2017.1418512DOI Listing
October 2018
112 Reads

The use of natural ingredients in innovative Korean cosmeceuticals.

J Cosmet Dermatol 2018 Jun 24;17(3):305-312. Epub 2018 Jan 24.

Marmur Medical, New York, NY, USA.

Background: The cosmeceutical industry is an ever-growing and in demand market, especially in Asia. Korea has been on the forefront of creating the newest generation and most innovative cosmeceuticals products including ingredients such as snail secretions, starfish powder, botanical extracts, green tea, and red ginseng. Given their increasing prevalence in the cosmeceutical industry, scientists have been conducting investigations into these extracts and their properties. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocd.12492DOI Listing
June 2018
13 Reads

Sandalwood Album Oil as a Botanical Therapeutic in Dermatology.

J Clin Aesthet Dermatol 2017 Oct 1;10(10):34-39. Epub 2017 Oct 1.

Dr. Moy is from Facial Cosmetic Surgery in Beverly Hills, California.

Many skin conditions and diseases are characterized by inflammation, infection, and hyperplasia. Safe and effective topical treatment options that can be used long-term are needed. Traditional botanical medicines, which are often complex mixtures that exert their biological activities via multiple mechanisms of action, are being studied as potential new active ingredients in dermatology. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5749697PMC
October 2017
12 Reads

The science behind skin care: Moisturizers.

Authors:
Zoe D Draelos

J Cosmet Dermatol 2018 Apr 10;17(2):138-144. Epub 2018 Jan 10.

Dermatology Consulting Services, PLLC, High Point, NC, USA.

Moisturizers provide functional skin benefits, such as making the skin smooth and soft, increasing skin hydration, and improving skin optical characteristics; however, moisturizers also function as vehicles to deliver ingredients to the skin. These ingredients may be vitamins, botanical antioxidants, peptides, skin-lightening agents, botanical anti-inflammatories, or exfoliants. This discussion covers the science of moisturizers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocd.12490DOI Listing
April 2018
19 Reads

Medical Management of Melasma: A Review with Consensus Recommendations by Indian Pigmentary Expert Group.

Indian J Dermatol 2017 Nov-Dec;62(6):558-577

Consultant Dermatologist, Solapur, Maharashtra, India.

Melasma is one of the most common hyperpigmentary disorders found mainly in women and dark-skinned patients. Sunlight, hormones, pregnancy, and genetics remain the most implicated in the causation of melasma. Although rather recalcitrant to treatment, topical agents such as hydroquinone, modified Kligman's Regime, azelaic acid, kojic acid, Vitamin C, and arbutin still remain the mainstay of therapy with sun protection being a cornerstone of therapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijd.IJD_489_17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5724303PMC
December 2017
17 Reads

Medicinal bioactivites and allergenic properties of pumpkin seeds: review upon a pediatric food anaphylaxis case report.

Eur Ann Allergy Clin Immunol 2017 Nov;49(6):244-251

Department of Dermatology, Allergology and Photobiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Grenoble, Grenoble, France.

Summary: Food allergy to pumpkin seed is considered very rare, and only some isolated case reports have so far been published. We report here a case of food anaphylaxis to pumpkin seed in an eight-year-old boy, who tolerated all other edible seeds, peanut and tree nuts, as well as pulp of different kinds of pumpkins and other fruits of the Cucurbitaceae family. From this observation, a review of the botanical, historical, medicinal and allergenic aspects of pumpkin and its seeds is proposed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.23822/EurAnnACI.1764-1489.19DOI Listing
November 2017
13 Reads

Allergic contact dermatitis caused by topical herbal remedies: importance of patch testing with the patients' own products.

Contact Dermatitis 2018 Mar 7;78(3):177-184. Epub 2017 Dec 7.

Department of Dermatology, University Hospitals KU Leuven, 3000, Leuven, Belgium.

Background: Natural ingredients have variable compositions, so their allergenic potencies may differ.

Objectives: To retrospectively analyse subjects reacting to herbal remedies over the past 27 years, with the aim of (i) evaluating demographic characteristics and lesion locations, (ii) describing the frequencies of positive patch test reactions, (iii) identifing sensitization sources, and (iv) studying concomitant sensitivity.

Patients And Methods: In total, 15980 patients were patch tested between 1990 and 2016 with the European baseline series and/or other series, product(s) used, and, whenever possible, the respective ingredients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cod.12939DOI Listing
March 2018
12 Reads

Postinflammatory hyperpigmentation: A comprehensive overview: Treatment options and prevention.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2017 Oct;77(4):607-621

Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. Electronic address:

Postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) occurs after various dermatoses, exogenous stimuli, and dermatologic procedures. The clinical course of PIH is chronic and unpredictable, although the probability of resolution of epidermal hyperpigmentation is better than those of dermal hyperpigmentation. PIH can be prevented or alleviated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2017.01.036DOI Listing
October 2017
34 Reads

Consumer Preferences, Product Characteristics, and Potentially Allergenic Ingredients in Best-selling Moisturizers.

JAMA Dermatol 2017 11;153(11):1099-1105

Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

Importance: Because moisturizer use is critical for the prevention and treatment of numerous dermatological conditions, patients frequently request product recommendations from dermatologists.

Objective: To determine the product performance characteristics and ingredients of best-selling moisturizers.

Design And Setting: This cohort study involved publicly available data of the top 100 best-selling whole-body moisturizing products at 3 major online retailers (Amazon, Target, and Walmart). Read More

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http://archderm.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?doi=10.1001/jam
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamadermatol.2017.3046DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5710429PMC
November 2017
168 Reads

The Role of Polyphenols in Rosacea Treatment: A Systematic Review.

J Altern Complement Med 2017 Dec 26;23(12):920-929. Epub 2017 Jun 26.

4 Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami , Miami, FL.

Objectives: Various treatment options are available for the management of rosacea symptoms such as facial erythema, telangiectasia, papules and pustules, burning, stinging, and itching. Botanical therapies are commonly used to treat the symptoms. The objective of this review is to evaluate the use of polyphenols in rosacea treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/acm.2016.0398DOI Listing
December 2017
81 Reads

Resveratrol, 4' Acetoxy Resveratrol, R-equol, Racemic Equol or S-equol as Cosmeceuticals to Improve Dermal Health.

Authors:
Edwin D Lephart

Int J Mol Sci 2017 Jun 3;18(6). Epub 2017 Jun 3.

Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology and The Neuroscience Center, LS 4005, College of Life Sciences, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, USA.

Phytochemicals are botanical compounds used in dermatology applications as cosmeceuticals to improve skin health. Resveratrol and equol are two of the best-known polyphenolic or phytoestrogens having similar chemical structures and some overlapping biological functions to 17β-estradiol. Human skin gene expression was reviewed for 28 different biomarkers when resveratrol, 4' acetoxy resveratrol (4AR), -equol, racemic equol or -equol were tested. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms18061193DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5486016PMC
June 2017
25 Reads

Contact dermatitis as an adverse reaction to some topically used European herbal medicinal products - part 4: Solidago virgaurea-Vitis vinifera.

Contact Dermatitis 2017 Aug 23;77(2):67-87. Epub 2017 May 23.

BoDD - Botanical Dermatology Database, Penarth, UK.

This review focuses on contact dermatitis as an adverse effect of a selection of topically used herbal medicinal products for which the European Medicines Agency has completed an evaluation up to the end of November 2013 and for which a Community herbal monograph - now (since 2014) called a 'European Union herbal monograph' - has been produced. The present part 4 addresses species from Solidago virgaurea L. to Vitis vinifera L. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cod.12807DOI Listing
August 2017
34 Reads

Artocarpin, an isoprenyl flavonoid, induces p53-dependent or independent apoptosis via ROS-mediated MAPKs and Akt activation in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

Oncotarget 2017 Apr;8(17):28342-28358

Department of Nursing, Division of Basic Medical Sciences, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Chia-Yi, Taiwan.

Artocarpin has been shown to exhibit cytotoxic effects on different cancer cells, including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC, A549). However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we explore both p53-dependent and independent apoptosis pathways in artocarpin-treated NSCLC cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.16058DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5438654PMC
April 2017
36 Reads

Identification of Ellagic Acid Rhamnoside as a Bioactive Component of a Complex Botanical Extract with Anti-biofilm Activity.

Front Microbiol 2017 23;8:496. Epub 2017 Mar 23.

Department of Chemistry, Emory University Atlanta, GA, USA.

is a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. It is listed among the top "serious threats" to human health in the USA, due in large part to rising rates of resistance. Many infections are recalcitrant to antibiotic therapy due to their ability to form a biofilm, which acts not only as a physical barrier to antibiotics and the immune system, but results in differences in metabolism that further restricts antibiotic efficacy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2017.00496DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5362615PMC
March 2017
16 Reads

An Open-Label Evaluator Blinded Study of the Efficacy and Safety of a New Nutritional Supplement in Androgenetic Alopecia: A Pilot Study.

J Clin Aesthet Dermatol 2017 Feb 1;10(2):52-56. Epub 2017 Feb 1.

Department of Dermatology, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University, Miami, Florida;; Greater Miami Skin and Laser Center, Miami Beach, Florida.

To evaluate the effectiveness of a novel oral supplement, Forti5, containing green tea extract, omega 3 and 6 fatty acids, cholecalciferol, melatonin, beta-sitosterol, and soy isoflavones, and in the management of subjects with androgenetic alopecia. A prospective case series of 10 subjects. Open-label, evaluator-blinded, proof-of-concept study. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5367873PMC
February 2017
10 Reads

: A remedy from Traditional Persian Medicine for treatment of cutaneous lesions of pemphigus vulgaris.

Avicenna J Phytomed 2017 Mar-Apr;7(2):107-115

Department of Traditional Persian Medicine, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Objective: Pemphigus is a rare autoimmune disease that may be fatal without proper medical intervention. It is a blistering disease that involves both the skin and mucus membranes, in which the most important causes of death comprise superimposed opportunistic infections and complications of long-term high-dose corticosteroid therapy or prolonged consumption of immune suppressant drugs. Skin lesions are the most important sources of infection, and any local treatment decreasing the healing time of lesions and reducing the total dosage of drugs is favorable. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5355816PMC
March 2017
12 Reads

Allergenic Ingredients in Facial Wet Wipes.

Dermatitis 2017 Nov/Dec;28(6):353-359

From the *University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Minneapolis; †Department of Dermatology, Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, MN; ‡HCMC Parkside Occupational and Contact Dermatitis Clinic; and §Department of Dermatology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.

Background: Allergic contact dermatitis commonly occurs on the face. Facial cleansing wipes may be an underrecognized source of allergens.

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of potentially allergenic ingredients in facial wet wipes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DER.0000000000000268DOI Listing
July 2018
13 Reads

High prevalence of sensitization to gibberellin-regulated protein (peamaclein) in fruit allergies with negative immunoglobulin E reactivity to Bet v 1 homologs and profilin: Clinical pattern, causative fruits and cofactor effect of gibberellin-regulated protein allergy.

J Dermatol 2017 Jul 22;44(7):735-741. Epub 2017 Mar 22.

Department of Environmental Immuno-Dermatology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan.

Gibberellin-regulated protein (GRP) is a new allergen in peach allergy, with an amino acid sequence very well conserved through several botanical species. We investigated the allergenicity of GRP in fruit allergies other than peaches and identified the clinical characteristics of fruit allergy patients with GRP sensitization. One hundred consecutive Japanese patients with fruit allergies were enrolled in the present study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.13795DOI Listing
July 2017
6 Reads

Botanicals With Dermatologic Properties Derived From First Nations Healing: Part 1-Trees.

J Cutan Med Surg 2017 Jul/Aug;21(4):288-298. Epub 2017 Feb 2.

2 Department of Dermatology & Skin Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Introduction: First Nations people have a long history of working with medicinal plants used to treat skin diseases. The purpose was to assess the dermatologic therapeutic potential of western red cedar, white spruce, birch, balsam poplar, and black spruce.

Methods: Based on expert recommendations, 5 trees were selected that were used in First Nations medicine for cutaneous healing and have potential and/or current application to dermatology today. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1203475417690306DOI Listing
May 2018
14 Reads

Topical Botanical Agents for the Treatment of Psoriasis: A Systematic Review.

Am J Clin Dermatol 2017 Aug;18(4):451-468

Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, 3301 C Street, Suite #1400, Sacramento, CA, 95816, USA.

Background: Patients with psoriasis often enquire about the use of numerous botanical therapeutics. It is important for dermatologists to be aware of the current evidence regarding these agents.

Methods: We conducted a systematic literature search using the PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases for controlled and uncontrolled clinical trials that assessed the use of topical botanical therapeutics for psoriasis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40257-017-0266-0DOI Listing
August 2017
31 Reads
2.519 Impact Factor

Virulence Inhibitors from Brazilian Peppertree Block Quorum Sensing and Abate Dermonecrosis in Skin Infection Models.

Sci Rep 2017 02 10;7:42275. Epub 2017 Feb 10.

Center for the Study of Human Health, Emory University, 550 Asbury Circle, Candler Library 107E, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Widespread antibiotic resistance is on the rise and current therapies are becoming increasingly limited in both scope and efficacy. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) represents a major contributor to this trend. Quorum sensing controlled virulence factors include secreted toxins responsible for extensive damage to host tissues and evasion of the immune system response; they are major contributors to morbidity and mortality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep42275DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5301492PMC
February 2017
18 Reads

Oral (Systemic) Botanical Agents for the Treatment of Psoriasis: A Review.

J Altern Complement Med 2017 Jun 3;23(6):418-425. Epub 2017 Feb 3.

5 Department of Dermatology, University of California-Davis , Sacramento, CA.

Introduction: Patients with psoriasis often use botanical therapies as part of their treatment. It is important for clinicians to be aware of the current evidence regarding these agents as they treat patients.

Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted using the PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE database for randomized clinical trials assessing the use of botanical therapeutics for psoriasis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/acm.2016.0324DOI Listing
June 2017
65 Reads
1.518 Impact Factor

The Combination of Resveratrol and High-Fluence Light Emitting Diode-Red Light Produces Synergistic Photobotanical Inhibition of Fibroblast Proliferation and Collagen Synthesis: A Novel Treatment for Skin Fibrosis.

Dermatol Surg 2017 Jan;43(1):81-86

*Department of Internal Medicine, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California;†Department of Dermatology, University of California at Davis, Sacramento, California;‡Dermatology Service, Sacramento VA Medical Center, Mather, California;§Department of Dermatology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York.

Background: Skin fibrosis is a debilitating condition that significantly impacts patient quality of life. Ultraviolet phototherapy is currently used to treat several diseases featuring skin fibrosis. High-fluence light-emitting diode-generated red light (HF-LED-RL) does not cause DNA damage associated with skin cancer, and it is generally regarded as safe, portable, and cost-effective. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DSS.0000000000000921DOI Listing
January 2017
30 Reads

Scutellaria baicalensis extract: a novel botanical allergen in cosmetic products?

Contact Dermatitis 2016 Dec;75(6):387-388

Department of Health Sciences, Section of Dermatology, University of Genoa, 16132, Genoa, Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cod.12659DOI Listing
December 2016
31 Reads

Botanicals in Dermatology: Essential Oils, Botanical Allergens, and Current Regulatory Practices.

Dermatitis 2016 Nov/Dec;27(6):317-324

From the *University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health; and †Department of Dermatology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison.

Largely because of their perceived safety, the use of essential oils and other botanically derived products has become increasingly popular. Recent evidence raises concern about the safety of these products, frequently found in cosmetics and sought as an alternative to standard medical treatments. Essential oils are challenging to standardize because of the variable growing conditions, genetics, and harvesting of botanicals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DER.0000000000000244DOI Listing
February 2018
7 Reads

Traditional food uses of wild plants among the Gorani of South Kosovo.

Appetite 2017 01 22;108:83-92. Epub 2016 Sep 22.

Institute for Biological and Environmental Research, University of Prishtina "Hasan Prishtina", Mother Teresa Str., 10000 Prishtinë, Republic of Kosovo.

A food ethnobotanical field study was conducted among the Gorani of South Kosovo, a small ethnic minority group that speaks a South-Slavic language and lives in the south of the country. We conducted forty-one semi-structured interviews in ten villages of the Kosovar Gora mountainous area and found that seventy-nine wild botanical and mycological taxa represent the complex mosaic of the food cultural heritage in this population. A large portion of the wild food plant reports refer to fermented wild fruit-based beverages and herbal teas, while the role of wild vegetables is restricted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2016.09.024DOI Listing
January 2017
42 Reads

Skin aging and oxidative stress: Equol's anti-aging effects via biochemical and molecular mechanisms.

Authors:
Edwin D Lephart

Ageing Res Rev 2016 11 9;31:36-54. Epub 2016 Aug 9.

Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology and The Neuroscience Center, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, USA. Electronic address:

Oxygen in biology is essential for life. It comes at a cost during normal cellular function, where reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated by oxidative metabolism. Human skin exposed to solar ultra-violet radiation (UVR) dramatically increases ROS production/oxidative stress. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arr.2016.08.001DOI Listing
November 2016
22 Reads