666 results match your criteria Bmc Palliative Care[Journal]


Towards appropriate information provision for and decision-making with patients with limited health literacy in hospital-based palliative care in Western countries: a scoping review into available communication strategies and tools for healthcare providers.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Apr 12;18(1):37. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

Nivel, Netherlands institute for health services research, P.O. Box 1568, 3500 BN, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background: Person-centred palliative care poses high demands on professionals and patients regarding appropriate and effective communication and informed decision-making. This is even more so for patients with limited health literacy, as they lack the necessary skills to find, understand and apply information about their health and healthcare. Recognizing patients with limited health literacy and adapting the communication, information provision and decision-making process to their skills and needs is essential to achieve desired person-centred palliative care. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0421-xDOI Listing
April 2019
5 Reads

An online international comparison of thresholds for triggering a negative response to the "Surprise Question": a study protocol.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Apr 9;18(1):36. Epub 2019 Apr 9.

University College London, London, UK.

Background: The Surprise Question (SQ) "would I be surprised if this patient were to die in the next 12 months?" has been suggested to help clinicians, and especially General Practitioners (GPs), identify people who might benefit from palliative care. The prognostic accuracy of this approach is unclear and little is known about how GPs use this tool in practice. Are GPs consistent, individually and as a group? Are there international differences in the use of the tool? Does including the alternative Surprise Question ("Would I be surprised if the patient were still alive after 12 months?") alter the response? What is the impact on the treatment plan in response to the SQ? This study aims to address these questions. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0413-xDOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Multicentre analysis of intensity of care at the end-of-life in patients with advanced cancer, combining health administrative data with hospital records: variations in practice call for routine quality evaluation.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Apr 5;18(1):35. Epub 2019 Apr 5.

Unité Fonctionnelle de Médecine Palliative, Hôpital Cochin, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, F-75014, Paris, France.

Background: Accessible indicators of aggressiveness of care at the end-of-life are useful to monitor implementation of early integrated palliative care practice. To determine the intensity of end-of-life care from exhaustive data combining administrative databases and hospital clinical records, to evaluate its variability across hospital facilities and associations with timely introduction of palliative care (PC).

Methods: For this study designed as a decedent series nested in multicentre cohort of advanced cancer patients, we selected 997 decedents from a cohort of patients hospitalised in 2009-2010, with a diagnosis of metastatic cancer in 3 academic medical centres and 2 comprehensive cancer centres in the Paris area. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0419-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6451228PMC

Self-efficacy for coping: utility of the Cancer behavior inventory (Italian) for use in palliative care.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Apr 5;18(1):34. Epub 2019 Apr 5.

Istituto Oncologico Veneto IOV - IRCCS, Via Gattamelata, 64, 35128, Padova, Italy.

Background: Newer models of palliative and supportive cancer care view the person as an active agent in managing physical and psychosocial challenges. Therefore, personal efficacy is an integral part of this model. Due to the lack of instruments in Italian to assess coping self-efficacy, the present study included the translation and validation of the Italian version of the Cancer Behavior Inventory-Brief (CBI-B/I) and an initial analysis of the utility of self-efficacy for coping in an Italian sample of palliative care patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0420-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6449975PMC

How to come to terms with facing death: a qualitative study examining the experiences of patients with terminal Cancer.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Apr 4;18(1):33. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

Department of Nursing, Gunma University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8514, Japan.

Background: Cancer patients who have reached the terminal stage despite attempts at treatment are likely to experience various problems, particularly as they encounter increasing difficulty in doing what they were able to do easily, and their physical symptoms increase as the disease advances. The purpose of this study is to explore how terminal cancer patients who have not clearly expressed a depressed mood or intense grief manage their feelings associated with anxiety and depression.

Methods: Eleven terminally ill patients with cancer who were receiving symptom-relieving treatment at home or in palliative care units were interviewed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0417-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6449951PMC

Recommendations on priorities for integrated palliative care: transparent expert consultation with international leaders for the InSuP-C project.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Apr 3;18(1):32. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

International Observatory on End of Life Care, Division of Health Research, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YG, UK.

Background: The World Health Organisation (WHO) endorses integrated palliative care which has a significant impact on quality of life and satisfaction with care. Effective integration between hospices, palliative care services, hospitals and primary care services are required to support patients with palliative care needs. Studies have indicated that little is known about which aspects are regarded as most important and should be priorities for international implementation. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0418-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448308PMC
April 2019
1 Read
1.787 Impact Factor

Optimal treatment of opioid induced constipation in daily clinical practice - an observational study.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Mar 29;18(1):31. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081, HV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: Opioids are prescribed in over 40% of patients with advanced cancer, but side effects occur frequently. In this study we evaluated the development and treatment of opioid induced constipation (OIC), and OIC resolving effect of methylnaltrexone for different opioid subtypes in daily clinical practice.

Methods: Patients with cancer using opioids were included in a retrospective chart analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0416-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6439982PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Multiple and multidimensional life transitions in the context of life-limiting health conditions: longitudinal study focussing on perspectives of young adults, families and professionals.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Mar 25;18(1):30. Epub 2019 Mar 25.

Independent Counselling Psychologist, Glasgow, UK.

Background: There is a dearth of literature that investigates life transitions of young adults (YAs) with life-limiting conditions, families and professionals. The scant literature that is available has methodological limitations, including not listening to the voice of YAs, collecting data retrospectively, at one time point, from one group's perspective and single case studies. The aim of this study was to address the gaps found in our literature review and provide a clearer understanding of the multiple and multi-dimensional life transitions experienced by YAs and significant others, over a period of time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0414-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6434813PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Palliative radiotherapy near the end of life.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Mar 23;18(1):29. Epub 2019 Mar 23.

Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, 505 Parnassus Ave, L-75, 1600 Divisadero St., H1031, San Francisco, CA, 94143, USA.

Background: A significant proportion of patients with advanced cancer undergo palliative radiotherapy (RT) within their last 30 days of life. This study characterizes palliative RT at our institution and aims to identify patients who may experience limited benefit from RT due to imminent mortality.

Methods: Five hundred and-eighteen patients treated with external beam RT to a site of metastatic disease between 2012 and 2016 were included. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0415-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6431041PMC

The significance of gratitude for palliative care professionals: a mixed method protocol.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Mar 21;18(1):28. Epub 2019 Mar 21.

Universidad de Navarra, ICS, ATLANTES, Campus Universitario, 31080, Pamplona, Spain.

Background: In palliative care (PC) patients and relatives (P/R) often show their gratitude to the healthcare professionals (HP) who care for them. HP appreciate these displays of gratitude, although the impact of the same has not been examined in detail. Publications analysed tell personal experiences in which HP say that displays of gratitude create sensations of well-being, pride and increased motivation to carry on caring. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0412-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6427884PMC
March 2019
7 Reads

Psychometric properties of the Chinese mainland version of the Palliative Care Spiritual Care Competency Scale (PCSCCS-M) in nursing: a cross-sectional study.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Mar 8;18(1):27. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Background: Spiritual care competencies are among the primary professional skills that enable best practices in nursing. Assessing these competencies and identifying those that are insufficient are important tasks. The traditional Chinese version of the Palliative Care Spiritual Care Competency Scale (PCSCCS) used in Taiwan is a well-validated tool to measure palliative caregivers' competencies in providing spiritual care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0409-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6408799PMC
March 2019
2 Reads

Discussing end of life wishes - the impact of community interventions?

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Mar 7;18(1):26. Epub 2019 Mar 7.

End of Life Partnership, Cheshire, Winterley Grange, Unit 8, Wheelock Heath Business Court, Alsager Road, Winterely, Sandbach, Cheshire, CW11 4RQ, UK.

Background: Many people do not discuss end of life preferences with those closest to them, although this can be beneficial to the individual and wider population. This study evaluated a community intervention to promote end of life preparation and discussion among people who are currently well.

Methods: A series of presentations and workshops (the intervention) were delivered to community groups and people working within health and social care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0407-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6407206PMC

Patient experiences of nurse-facilitated advance care planning in a general practice setting: a qualitative study.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Mar 6;18(1):25. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, 2052, Australia.

Background: Advance care planning (ACP) can offer benefits to patients and their families, especially when delivered in outpatient settings, but uptake remains low. Common barriers for health professionals include a perceived lack of time and adequate training, experience, and confidence in conducting ACP. Patient-reported barriers include a lack of awareness of ACP or discomfort initiating or engaging in discussions about end-of-life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0411-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404299PMC

Assigned nurses and a professional relationship: a qualitative study of COPD patients' perspective on a new palliative outpatient structure named CAPTAIN.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Mar 2;18(1):24. Epub 2019 Mar 2.

Neuroscience Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Section 2091, Inge Lehmanns Vej 7, 2100, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.

Background: Little is known of how to organize non-malign palliative care, and existing knowledge show that patients with COPD live with unmet palliative needs and low quality of life. With the intent to improve palliative care for patients with COPD, we changed the structure of our outpatient clinic from routine visits by a pulmonary specialist to a structure where each patient was assigned a nurse, offered annual advance care planning dialogues, and ad hoc pulmonary specialist visits. The aim of this study was to explore COPD patients' experiences with a new and altered palliative organization. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0410-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6397743PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Factor structure of the Quality of Children's Palliative Care Instrument (QCPCI) when complete by parents of children with cancer.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Mar 1;18(1):23. Epub 2019 Mar 1.

Paediatric Advanced Care Team, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, M5G 1X8, Canada.

Background: Currently available indicators of quality pediatric palliative care tend to focus on care provided during the end-of-life period rather than care provided throughout the disease trajectory. We adapted a previously developed instrument focused on mothers' perspectives on the quality of end-of-life care and assessed its psychometric properties with mothers and fathers of children with cancer at any stage of the illness.

Methods: Four subscales were included in the analysis: Connect with Families, Involve Parents, Share Information Among Health Professionals, Support Siblings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0406-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6397460PMC

Healthcare professionals' views of palliative care for American war veterans with non-malignant respiratory disease living in a rural area: a qualitative study.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Feb 27;18(1):22. Epub 2019 Feb 27.

Pulmonary and MICU, Boise VA Medical Centre, Boise, USA.

Background: Chronic lung diseases, such as COPD, are a growing health concern within the veteran population. Palliative care programs have mainly focused on the needs of people with malignant disease in the past, however the majority of those worldwide needing palliative care have a non-malignant diagnosis. Additionally, palliative care provision can often be fragmented and varied dependent upon a patient's geographical location. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0408-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6394001PMC
February 2019

Cultural safety strategies for rural Indigenous palliative care: a scoping review.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Feb 14;18(1):21. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Development, Okanagan Campus, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada.

Background: There is little scholarship on culturally safe approaches to palliative care, especially for rural Indigenous clients. Thus, it is important to articulate how cultural safety can be enacted to support rural Indigenous Peoples and communities at end of life. We sought to identify strategies described in existing literature that have potential to deepen our understanding of culturally safe approaches to palliative care within rural and small-town settings in Canada. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0404-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6376644PMC
February 2019
13 Reads

Hospice care education needs of nursing home staff in South Korea: a cross-sectional study.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Feb 12;18(1):20. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

The Catholic University of Korea College of Nursing, 222 Banpo-Daero, Seocho-Gu, Seoul, 06591, South Korea.

Background: While the importance of hospice care education in nursing homes is recognized, the volume of research on the specific educational needs of caregivers in hospice care in nursing homes is still lacking. This study aimed to assess educational needs in hospice care among the nursing home staff in South Korea, and to examine factors related to their education needs.

Methods: This is a cross-sectional descriptive study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0405-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6373091PMC
February 2019

Development and validation of a French questionnaire concerning patients' perspectives of the quality of palliative care: the QUALI-PALLI-Patient.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Feb 11;18(1):19. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Haute Autorité de Santé, Saint Denis, France.

Background: Indicators for the quality of palliative care are a priority of caregivers and managers to allow improvement of various care settings and their comparison. The involvement of patients and families is of paramount, although this is rarely achieved in practice. No validated assessment tools are available in French. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0403-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6369559PMC
February 2019
1 Read

What do patients and family-caregivers value from hospice care? A systematic mixed studies review.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Feb 8;18(1):18. Epub 2019 Feb 8.

St Davids Hospice, Llandudno, North Wales, UK.

Background: It is not known which attributes of care are valued the most by those who experience hospice services. Such knowledge is integral to service development as it facilitates opportunities for continuous improvement of hospice care provision. The objectives of this mixed-studies systematic review were to explore patients' and their family carer views and experiences, to determine what they valued about adult hospice care in the UK. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0401-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6368799PMC
February 2019
7 Reads

Enabling activity in palliative care: focus groups among occupational therapists.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Feb 7;18(1):17. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, S-70182, Örebro, Sweden.

Background: Activity participation may support clients in palliative care to maintain dignity and quality of life. Literature and policy documents state that occupational therapists should be part of the team in palliative care but provide limited guidance on how interventions should be employed. Thus, the aim was to describe occupational therapists' experiences of enabling activity for seriously ill and dying clients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0394-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6367774PMC
February 2019

"Small small interventions, big big roles"- a qualitative study of patient, care-giver and health-care worker experiences of a palliative care programme in Kerala, India.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Feb 4;18(1):16. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Community Medicine, Government T.D Medical College Alappuzha, Vandanam P.O, Alappuzha, Kerala, India.

Background: Home-based palliative care is an essential resource for many communities. We conducted a qualitative study to explore perceptions of a home-based palliative care programme in Kerala, India, from the perspective of patients, their care-givers and the doctors, nurses and volunteers running the intervention.

Methods: A descriptive qualitative study was carried out. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0400-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6362568PMC
February 2019
1 Read

A pattern language of compassion in intensive care and palliative care contexts.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Feb 2;18(1):15. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Department of Community Health Sciences, Office of Health and Medical Education Scholarship, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

Background: Compassion has been identified as important for therapeutic relationships in clinical medicine however there have been few empirical studies looking at how compassion is expressed different contexts. The purpose of this study was to explore how context impacts perceptions and expressions of compassion in the intensive care unit and in palliative care.

Methods: This was an inductive qualitative study that employed sensitizing concepts from activity theory, realist inquiry, phenomenology and autoethnography. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0402-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6359837PMC
February 2019
1 Read

"Song of Life (SOL)" study protocol: a multicenter, randomized trial on the emotional, spiritual, and psychobiological effects of music therapy in palliative care.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 30;18(1):14. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Center of Pain Therapy and Palliative Care Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 131, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany.

Background: Although patients in palliative care commonly report high emotional and spiritual needs, effective psychosocial treatments based on high quality studies are rare. First research provides evidence for benefits of psychosocial interventions in advanced cancer care. To specifically address end-of-life care requirements, life review techniques and creative-arts based therapies offer a promising potential. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0397-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6354383PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Timing of palliative care referral and aggressive cancer care toward the end-of-life in pancreatic cancer: a retrospective, single-center observational study.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 28;18(1):13. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Mercy Hospital for Women, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Background: Pancreatic cancer is noted for its late presentation at diagnosis, limited prognosis and physical and psychosocial symptom burden. This study examined associations between timing of palliative care referral (PCR) and aggressive cancer care received by pancreatic cancer patients in the last 30 days of life through a single health service.

Method: A retrospective cohort analysis of end-of-life (EOL) care outcomes of patients with pancreatic cancer who died between 2012 and 2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0399-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6350289PMC
January 2019
1 Read

"Just too busy living in the moment and surviving": barriers to accessing health care for structurally vulnerable populations at end-of-life.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 26;18(1):11. Epub 2019 Jan 26.

Institute on Aging and Lifelong Health, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC, V8P 5C2, Canada.

Background: Despite access to quality care at the end-of-life (EOL) being considered a human right, it is not equitable, with many facing significant barriers. Most research examines access to EOL care for homogenous 'normative' populations, and as a result, the experiences of those with differing social positioning remain unheard. For example, populations experiencing structural vulnerability, who are situated along the lower rungs of social hierarchies of power (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0396-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6348076PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Study protocol for a multi-methods study: SAVOIR - evaluation of specialized outpatient palliative care (SAPV) in Germany: outcomes, interactions, regional differences.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 26;18(1):12. Epub 2019 Jan 26.

Department of Palliative Care, Jena University Hospital, Am Klinikum 1, 07747, Jena, Germany.

Background: Since 2007, the German statutory health insurance covers Specialized Outpatient Palliative Care (SAPV). SAPV offers team-based home care for patients with advanced and progressive disease, complex symptoms and life expectancy limited to days, weeks or months. The introduction of SAPV is ruled by a directive (SAPV directive). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0398-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6348077PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

Caregiver exposure to critical events and distress in home-based palliative care in Germany a cross-sectional study using the Stressful Caregiving Adult Reactions to Experiences of Dying (SCARED) scale.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 24;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Institute of Occupational, Social, and Environmental Medicine, Centre for Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany.

Background: Lay family caregivers of patients receiving palliative care often confront stressful situations in the care of their loved ones. This is particularly true for families in the home-based palliative care settings, where the family caregivers are responsible for a substantial amount of the patient's care. Yet, to our knowledge, no study to date has examined the family caregivers' exposure to critical events and distress with home-based palliative care has been reported from Germany. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0395-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6346516PMC
January 2019

How to conserve dignity in palliative care: suggestions from older patients, significant others, and healthcare professionals in Swedish municipal care.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 24;18(1):10. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Centre for Collaborative Palliative Care, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Kalmar/Växjö, Sweden.

Background: An essential aspect of palliative care nursing is to conserve the dignity of the patient. A Dignity Care Intervention (DCI) has been developed in Scotland to facilitate this role for nurses. The DCI is now being adapted to a Swedish context (DCI-SWE) and a central step is to identify culturally relevant, dignity-conserving care actions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0393-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6346549PMC
January 2019

"An odyssey without receiving proper care" - experts' views on palliative care provision for patients with migration background in Germany.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 21;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Clinic for Palliative Medicine, University Medical Center Goettingen, Robert Koch-Str. 40, 37075, Goettingen, Germany.

Background: Migrants seem to be underrepresented in palliative care in Germany. Access barriers and challenges in care remain unclear. We aimed to provide a comprehensive insight into palliative care for migrants, using expert interviews. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0392-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6341678PMC
January 2019
7 Reads

Integrated respiratory and palliative care leads to high levels of satisfaction: a survey of patients and carers.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 19;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 19.

Chair of Palliative Medicine, University of Melbourne, St Vincent's Hospital and Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia.

Background: The Advanced Lung Disease Service is a unique, new model of integrated respiratory and palliative care, which aims to address the unmet needs of patients with advanced, non-malignant, respiratory diseases. This study aimed to explore patients' and carers' experiences of integrated palliative care and identify valued aspects of care.

Methods: All current patients of the integrated service and their carers were invited to complete a confidential questionnaire by post or with an independent researcher. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0390-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6339689PMC
January 2019
11 Reads

Caregivers' perspectives and experiences of withdrawing acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine in advanced dementia: a qualitative analysis of an online discussion forum.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 17;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 17.

School of Pharmacy, Queen's University Belfast, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast, BT9 7BL, UK.

Background: There is considerable uncertainty surrounding the medications used to delay the progression of dementia, especially their long-term efficacy and when to withdraw treatment with these agents. Current research regarding the optimal use of antidementia medication is limited, contributing to variability in practice guidelines and in clinicians' prescribing practices. Little is currently known about the experiences encountered by caregivers of people with dementia after antidementia medication is withdrawn. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0387-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6337775PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Trends in descriptions of palliative care in the cancer clinical practice guidelines before and after enactment of the Cancer Control Act (2007): content analysis.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 12;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 12.

Department of Health Informatics, Kyoto University School of Public Health, Yoshida honcho sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan.

Background: Palliative care was a priority issue in the Cancer Control Act enacted in 2007 in Japan, and this has resulted in efforts being made toward educational goals in clinical settings. An investigation of how descriptions of palliative care for the treatment of cancer have changed in clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) could be expected to provide a better understanding of palliative care-related decision-making. This study aimed to identify trends in descriptions of palliative care in cancer CPGs in Japan before and after enactment of the Cancer Control Act. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-019-0391-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6330565PMC
January 2019
2 Reads
1.787 Impact Factor

Assessing the exertion required to induce breathlessness in a population with advanced cancer: matching measures to the level of physical function.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 10;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 10.

IMPACCT, Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, PO Box 123, Ultimo, NSW, 2007, Australia.

Background: The aim of the study was to assess four evidence-based assessments utilising exercise challenges that induce breathlessness, each with progressively less demanding levels of exertion, which can be tailored to people with a range of functional capabilities in the setting of advanced cancer for research studies. Functional cut off points for these assessments have not previously been defined.

Methods: A cross sectional study of four exercise tests attempted by all participants: 6 min walk test (6MWT); (derived) 2 min walk test (2MWT); arm exercises; and reading numbers aloud. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0386-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6329151PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Potential quality indicators for seriously ill home care clients: a cross-sectional analysis using Resident Assessment Instrument for Home Care (RAI-HC) data for Ontario.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 9;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession Street, 4th Floor, Room 4-229, Hamilton, Ontario, L8V 5C2, Canada.

Background: Currently, there are no formalized measures for the quality of home based palliative care in Ontario. This study developed a set of potential quality indicators for seriously ill home care clients using a standardized assessment.

Methods: Secondary analysis of Resident Assessment Instrument for Home Care data for Ontario completed between 2006 and 2013 was used to develop quality indicators (QIs) thought to be relevant to the needs of older (65+) seriously ill clients. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0389-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6325754PMC
January 2019
18 Reads

Are care staff equipped for end-of-life communication? A cross-sectional study in long-term care facilities to identify determinants of self-efficacy.

BMC Palliat Care 2019 Jan 8;18(1). Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Amsterdam UMC, Department of Public and Occupational Health, VUmc Expertise Center for Palliative Care, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, 1007, Amsterdam, MB, Netherlands.

Background: End-of-life conversations are rarely initiated by care staff in long-term care facilities. A possible explanation is care staff's lack of self-efficacy in such conversations. Research into the determinants of self-efficacy for nurses and care assistants in end-of-life communication is scarce and self-efficacy might differ between care staff of mental health facilities, nursing homes, and care homes. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0388-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6323808PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

Non-pharmacological solutions to sleep and circadian rhythm disruption: voiced bedside experiences of hospice and end-of-life staff caregivers.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Dec 22;17(1):131. Epub 2018 Dec 22.

Center for Sleep Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.

Background: Sleep disturbance is a significant issue, particularly for patients with advanced terminal illness. Currently, there are no practice-based recommended approaches for managing sleep and circadian disruptions in this population. To address this gap, a cross-sectional focus group study was performed engaging 32 staff members at four hospices/end-of-life programs in three demographically diverse counties in New York State. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0385-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6303860PMC
December 2018
14 Reads

Delay in commencement of palliative care service episodes provided to Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients: cross-sectional analysis of an Australian multi-jurisdictional dataset.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Dec 22;17(1):130. Epub 2018 Dec 22.

Western Australian Centre for Rural Health, School of Population and Global Health, The University of Western Australia (M706), 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA, 6009, Australia.

Background: Rapid effective responsiveness to patient needs is pivotal to high quality palliative care. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) people are susceptible to life-limiting illnesses at younger ages than other Australians and experience inequity of health service provision. The Palliative Care Outcomes Collaboration collects Australia-wide health service data on patient care, and has established performance benchmarks for specialist palliative care services. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0380-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6303928PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Facilitating successful implementation of a person-centred intervention to support family carers within palliative care: a qualitative study of the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) intervention.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Dec 20;17(1):129. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

Division of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.

Background: An understanding of how to implement person-centred interventions in palliative and end of life care is lacking, particularly for supporting family carers. To address this gap, we investigated components related to successful implementation of the Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) intervention, a person-centred process of carer assessment and support, using Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) as a theoretical framework. This study identifies how the PARIHS component of 'facilitation' and its interplay with the components of 'context' and 'evidence' affect implementation success. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0382-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6302509PMC
December 2018
1 Read

End-of-life decisions guiding the palliative care of cancer patients visiting emergency department in South Western Finland: a retrospective cohort study.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Dec 17;17(1):128. Epub 2018 Dec 17.

Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Turku University Hospital, PO Box 52, FI-20521, Turku, Finland.

Background: Until recently, palliative care (PC) resources in Finland have been sparse. To meet the increasing need for PC an end-of-life (EOL) care project has been ongoing in South Western Finland since 2012, and in 2015, a weekday palliative outpatient clinic was established in Turku University Hospital (TUH). The aim of this study was to explore the effect of the project and the PC clinic on the management practices of EOL cancer patients attending the Emergency Department (ED) of TUH from 2013 to 2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0383-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6297980PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Advance care planning after hospital discharge: qualitative analysis of facilitators and barriers from patient interviews.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Dec 5;17(1):127. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

Department of Medicine, The Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada.

Background: Patients who engage in Advance Care Planning (ACP) are more likely to get care consistent with their values. We sought to determine the barriers and facilitators to ACP engagement after discharge from hospital.

Methods: Prior to discharge from hospital eligible patients received a standardized conversation about prognosis and ACP. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0379-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6282276PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Quality of life in men with metastatic prostate cancer in their final years before death - a retrospective analysis of prospective data.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Dec 3;17(1):126. Epub 2018 Dec 3.

Department of Nursing, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden.

Background: Quality of Life (QoL) is the most important outcome for patients in palliative care along with symptom alleviation. Metastatic prostate cancer (mPC) is a life-threatening illness, and hence, a palliative care approach may be beneficial to this group. Over time, new life-prolonging treatments have been developed for men with mPC, but the possibility to prolong life should also be balanced against the men's QoL, particularly because there are side effects involved with these treatments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0381-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6278096PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

A randomised controlled pilot and feasibility study of music therapy for improving the quality of life of hospice inpatients.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Nov 27;17(1):125. Epub 2018 Nov 27.

School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Background: Evidence about the effectiveness of music therapy for improving the quality of life of palliative care patients is positive but weak in terms of risk of bias.

Methods: This study aimed to determine the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of music therapy for improving the quality of life of hospice inpatients, as measured by the McGill Quality of Life questionnaire. Objectives included recruitment of 52 participants over 12 months and provision of data to support the calculation of the required sample size for a definitive randomised trial, taking into account the retention rates of recruited participants; and evaluation of the viability of the intervention and the acceptability of the assessment tool. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0378-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6260709PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

Anticipatory grief of spousal and adult children caregivers of people with dementia.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Nov 20;17(1):124. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

School of Nursing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Room FG425, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong.

Background: Anticipatory grief (AG) among caregivers of people with dementia is common and has been found to be related to negative health outcomes. Previous studies showed different patterns of AG between spousal and adult children caregivers of people with dementia (PWD) at different stages; however, the levels of such grief are not yet compared. The findings in Western studies are very limited, and inconsistencies have also been found in Asian studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0376-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6247750PMC
November 2018
11 Reads

Addressing the needs of terminally-ill patients in Bosnia-Herzegovina: patients' perceptions and expectations.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Nov 19;17(1):123. Epub 2018 Nov 19.

Division of Tropical and Humanitarian Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 6, 1205, Geneva, Switzerland.

Background: Many terminally ill patients in Bosnia-Herzegovina (BiH) fail to receive needed medical attention and social support. In 2016 a primary healthcare centreer (PHCC) in Doboj (BiH) requested the methodological and technical support of a local partner (Fondacija fami) and the Geneva University Hospitals to address the needs of terminally ill patients living at home. In order to design acceptable, affordable and sustainable solutions, we involved patients and their families in exploring needs, barriers and available resources. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0377-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6245800PMC
November 2018
14 Reads

Bereaved parents' experiences of research participation.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Nov 7;17(1):122. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

School of Nursing and Midwifery, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.

Background: As understandings of the impacts of end-of-life experiences on parents' grief and bereavement increase, so too does the inclusion of bereaved parents into research studies exploring these experiences. However, designing and obtaining approval for these studies can be difficult, as guidance derived from bereaved parents' experiences of the research process are limited within the current literature.

Methods: We aimed to explore bereaved parents' experiences of research participation in a larger grounded theory study exploring experiences of the death of a child in the paediatric intensive care unit. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0375-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6223065PMC
November 2018
14 Reads

Correction to: The prognosis in palliative care study II (PiPS2): study protocol for a multi-centre, prospective, observational, cohort study.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 11 3;17(1):121. Epub 2018 Nov 3.

Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Department, Division of Psychiatry, UCL, 6th Floor, Maple House, 149 Tottenham Court Road, London, W1T 7NF, UK.

After publication, the authors noticed some minor errors in "Nested qualitative sub-study" section, first paragraph of the section, page 7 of the published article. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0373-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6215351PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

A public health approach to palliative care in the response to drug resistant TB: an ethnographic study in Bengaluru, India.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Oct 31;17(1):120. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

Departments of Clinical Research and Global Health and Development, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, WC1E 7HT, UK.

Background: The treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis represents one of the most significant challenges to global health. Despite guidance on improving treatment outcomes, there is little focus on how to support individuals in their suffering. Palliative care is therefore proposed as a necessary component in the global strategy to fight Tuberculosis. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0374-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6211508PMC
October 2018
17 Reads

Access to palliative care for homeless people: complex lives, complex care.

BMC Palliat Care 2018 Oct 24;17(1):119. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (Nivel), P.O. Box 1568, 3500, BN, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background: People experiencing homelessness often encounter progressive incurable somatic diseases in combination with psychiatric and psychosocial problems, and many need palliative care at the end of their lives. Little is known about how palliative care for this group can be started in good time and provided optimally. The objective of this paper is to give insight into the extent people experiencing homelessness have access to good palliative care. Read More

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https://bmcpalliatcare.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-018-0368-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6201635PMC
October 2018
26 Reads