848 results match your criteria Bmc Palliative Care[Journal]


Factors affecting quality of end-of-life hospital care - a qualitative analysis of free text comments from the i-CODE survey in Norway.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jul 7;19(1):98. Epub 2020 Jul 7.

Regional Centre of Excellence for Palliative Care, Western Norway, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.

Background: The ERANet-LAC CODE (Care Of the Dying Evaluation) international survey assessed quality of care for dying cancer patients in seven countries, by use of the i-CODE questionnaire completed by bereaved relatives. The aim of this sub study was to explore which factors improve or reduce quality of end-of-life (EOL) care from Norwegian relatives' point of view, as expressed in free text comments.

Methods: 194 relatives of cancer patients dying in seven Norwegian hospitals completed the i-CODE questionnaire 6-8 weeks after bereavement; recruitment period 14 months; response rate 58%. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00609-xDOI Listing

An evaluation of continuous subcutaneous infusions across seven NHS acute hospitals: is there potential for 48-hour infusions?

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jul 7;19(1):99. Epub 2020 Jul 7.

Pharmacy Department, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Prescot Street, Liverpool, L7 8XP, UK.

Background: Continuous subcutaneous infusions (CSCIs) are commonly used in the United Kingdom as a way of administering medication to patients requiring symptom control when the oral route is compromised. These infusions are typically administered over 24 h due to currently available safety data. The ability to deliver prescribed medication by CSCI over 48 h may have numerous benefits in both patient care and health service resource utilisation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00611-3DOI Listing

General practitioners' perceptions of compassionate communities: a qualitative study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jul 6;19(1):97. Epub 2020 Jul 6.

Department of Oncology and Metabolism, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.

Background: General Practitioners (GPs) face challenges when providing palliative care, including an ageing, multimorbid population, and falling GP numbers. A 'public health palliative care' approach, defined as "working with communities to improve people's experience of death, dying and bereavement", is gaining momentum. 'Compassionate communities' is one example, with a focus on linking professional health carers with supportive community networks. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00597-yDOI Listing

Hypernatremia at admission predicts poor survival in patients with terminal cancer: a retrospective cohort study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jul 1;19(1):94. Epub 2020 Jul 1.

Department of Family Medicine, Yonsei University Graduate School of Medicine, 211 Eonju-ro, Dogok-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Background: Although palliative care providers, patients, and their families rely heavily on accurate prognostication, the prognostic value of electrolyte imbalance has received little attention.

Methods: As a retrospective review, we screened inpatients with terminal cancer admitted between January 2017 and May 2019 to a single hospice-palliative care unit. Clinical characteristics and laboratory results were obtained from medical records for multivariable Cox regression analysis of independent prognostic factors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00607-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7331249PMC

"The way I am treated is as if I am under my mother's care": qualitative study of patients' experiences of receiving hospice care services in South Africa.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jul 1;19(1):95. Epub 2020 Jul 1.

Department of Psychology, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland, Stellenbosch, 7602, South Africa.

Background: Research on the patient experience of receiving palliative care across a number of settings is increasing, but the majority of these investigations are situated within the context of developed countries. There is limited research from resource-limited countries, especially with regard to patients with cancer who receive hospice care. The present study explored the lived experience of attending hospice care facilities in South Africa to develop a bottom-up understanding from the perspectives of patients themselves. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00605-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7330936PMC

Perceptions and practices of spiritual care among hospice physicians and nurses in a Taiwanese tertiary hospital: a qualitative study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jul 1;19(1):96. Epub 2020 Jul 1.

Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine and Hospital, National Taiwan University, No.1 Chang-de Street, Zhongzheng District, Taipei, Taiwan, 10048.

Background: Spiritual care is frequently cited as a key component of hospice care in Taiwanese healthcare and beyond. The aim of this research is to gauge physicians and nurses' self-reported perspectives and clinical practices on the roles of their professions in addressing spiritual care in an inpatient palliative care unit in a tertiary hospital with Buddhist origins.

Methods: We performed semi-structured interviews with physicians and nurses working in hospice care over a year on their self-reported experiences in inpatient spiritual care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00608-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7331138PMC

Expanding the 3 Wishes Project for compassionate end-of-life care: a qualitative evaluation of local adaptations.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jun 30;19(1):93. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Departments of Medicine and Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Background: The 3 Wishes Project (3WP) is an end-of-life program that honors the dignity of dying patients by fostering meaningful connections among patients, families, and clinicians. Since 2013, it has become embedded in the culture of end-of-life care in over 20 ICUs across North America. The purpose of the current study is to describe the variation in implementation of 3WP across sites, in order to ascertain which factors facilitated multicenter implementation, which factors remain consistent across sites, and which may be adapted to suit local needs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00601-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7325646PMC
June 2020
1.787 Impact Factor

Strengthening the spiritual domain in palliative care through a listening consultation service by spiritual caregivers in Dutch PaTz-groups: an evaluation study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jun 29;19(1):92. Epub 2020 Jun 29.

Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam Public Health research institute (APH), Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Background: Palliative care should be holistic, but spiritual issues are often overlooked. General practitioners and nurses working together in PaTz-groups (palliative home care groups) consider spiritual issues in palliative care to be relevant, but experience barriers in addressing spiritual issues and finding spiritual caregivers. This study evaluates the feasibility and perceived added value of a listening consultation service by spiritual caregivers in primary palliative care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00595-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7325007PMC

Negotiating the turning point in the transition from curative to palliative treatment: a linguistic analysis of medical records of dying patients.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jun 26;19(1):91. Epub 2020 Jun 26.

Larvik Municipality, Sentrum Legekontor, Sigurds gate 4, 3256, Larvik, Norway.

Background: Many deaths in Norway occur in medical wards organized to provide curative treatment. Still, medical departments are obliged to meet the needs of patients at the end of life. Here, we analyse the electronic patient record regarding documentation of the transition from curative to palliative care (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00602-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7320586PMC

Health- and social care in the last year of life among older adults in Sweden.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jun 23;19(1):90. Epub 2020 Jun 23.

School of Health Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden.

Background: In the last years of life, burden of disease and disability and need of health- and social care often increase. Social, functional and psychological factors may be important in regard to social- and health care utilization. This study aims to describe use of health- and social care during the last year of life among persons living in ordinary housing or in assisted living facilities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00598-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7313197PMC

Should analyses of large, national palliative care data sets with patient reported outcomes (PROs) be restricted to services with high patient participation? A register-based study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jun 23;19(1):89. Epub 2020 Jun 23.

Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, DK-1014, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Background: There is an increased interest in the analysis of large, national palliative care data sets including patient reported outcomes (PROs). No study has investigated if it was best to include or exclude data from services with low response rates in order to obtain the patient reported outcomes most representative of the national palliative care population. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether services with low response rates should be excluded from analyses to prevent effects of possible selection bias. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00596-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7313093PMC

Palliative care in its own discourse: a focused ethnography of professional messaging in palliative care.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jun 22;19(1):88. Epub 2020 Jun 22.

ATLANTES Research Group; Institute for Culture and Society, University of Navarra, Campus Universitario, 31009, Pamplona, Spain.

Background: Despite 50 years of modern palliative care (PC), a misunderstanding of its purpose persists. The original message that PC is focused on total care, helping to live until the person dies, is being replaced and linked to feelings of fear, anxiety and death, instead of compassion, support or appropriate care. Society is still afraid to speak its name, and specialized units are identified as "places of death" as opposed to "places of life" meant to treat suffering. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00582-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7310281PMC

Choosing and Doing wisely: triage level I resuscitation a possible new field for starting palliative care and avoiding low-value care - a nationwide matched-pair retrospective cohort study in Taiwan.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jun 20;19(1):87. Epub 2020 Jun 20.

Institute of Health and Welfare Policy, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Background: The association between palliative care and life-sustaining treatment following emergency department (ED) resuscitation is unclear. This study aims to analyze the usage of palliative care and life-sustaining treatments among ED triage level I resuscitation patients based on a nationally representative sample of patients in Taiwan.

Methods: A matched-pair retrospective cohort study was conducted to examine the association between palliative care and outcome variables using multivariate logistic regression and Kaplan-Meier survival analyses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00590-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7305586PMC

Relatives of deceased patients with metastatic lung cancer's views on the achievement of treatment goals and the choice to start treatment: a structured telephone interview study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jun 19;19(1):86. Epub 2020 Jun 19.

Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam Public Health research Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: Lung cancer has a high impact on both patients and relatives due to the high disease burden and short life expectancy. Previous studies looked into treatment goals patients have before starting a systemic treatment. However, studies on relatives' perceptions of treatment at the end of life are scarce. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00591-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7305592PMC

Midazolam sedation in palliative medicine: retrospective study in a French center for cancer control.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jun 19;19(1):85. Epub 2020 Jun 19.

Lille University Hospital and Medical School, Palliative care unit, 59000, Lille, France.

Background: French legislation about sedation in palliative medicine evolved in 2016 with the introduction of a right to deep and continuous sedation, maintained until death. The objective was to describe midazolam sedation at the COL (Centre Oscar Lambret [Oscar Lambret Center], French regional center for cancer control), in order to establish a current overview before the final legislative changes.

Methods: Descriptive, retrospective and single-center study, concerning major patients in palliative care hospitalized from 01/01/2014 to 12/31/2015, who had been sedated by midazolam. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00592-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7305615PMC

Characteristics and health related quality of life in a population with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a cross-sectional study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jun 18;19(1):84. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

Department of Pulmonary & Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Nordsjælland, Dyrehavevej 29, 3400, Hillerød, Denmark.

Background: It is important to understand the total burden of COPD and thereby be able to identify patients who need more intensive palliative care to avoid deteriorated quality of life. The aim of this study was to describe the psychosocial and demographic characteristics of a population with advanced COPD in a stable phase of the disease.

Methods: This study was cross-sectional based on a prospective observational cohort. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00593-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7301437PMC

Health and intention to leave the profession of nursing - which individual, social and organisational resources buffer the impact of quantitative demands? A cross-sectional study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jun 17;19(1):83. Epub 2020 Jun 17.

Institute of Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Obere Zahlbacher Str, 67 55131, Mainz, Germany.

Background: The aim of this study was to analyse the buffering effect of individual, social and organisational resources on health and intention to leave the profession in the context of burden due to quantitative job demands.

Methods: In 2017, a cross-sectional survey was carried out anonymously among nurses in palliative care in Germany. One thousand three hundred sixteen nurses responded to the questionnaire (response rate 38. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00589-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7298824PMC

Characterizing patients issued DNR orders who are ultimately discharged alive: a retrospective observational study in Japan.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jun 9;19(1):82. Epub 2020 Jun 9.

Department of Biomedical Ethics, School of Public Health, The University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033, Japan.

Background: The present study aimed to characterize factors associated with patients issued DNR orders during hospitalization who are discharged alive without any instruction orders by physicians regarding end-of-life treatment, with a focus on the timing of DNR order issuance.

Methods: In total, 2997 DNR cases from all 61,037 patients aged ≥20 years admitted to a representative general hospital in Tokyo were extracted and divided into two groups by patient hospital release status (discharged alive/deceased). Study items included age, sex, disease type (non-cancer/cancer), hospital department (internal medicine/others), timing of DNR order issuance, implementation (or not) of life-sustaining treatment (LST) or the presence of any restrictions on LST and hospital length of stay. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00588-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7285488PMC

Content validation of the EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL with advanced cancer patients and health care professionals from palliative care services in Chile.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jun 9;19(1):81. Epub 2020 Jun 9.

The Palliative Care Research Unit, Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine GP, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, DK-2400, Copenhagen, NV, Denmark.

Background: The assessment of patients' quality of life (QOL) is essential when evaluating the outcome of palliative care; however, no instruments have been validated for measuring symptoms and QOL in patients receiving palliative care in Chile. We aimed to investigate the content validity of the EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 15 Palliative Care (QLQ-C15-PAL), replicating the methods used previously to shorten the EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 (QLQ-C30) for use among patients in palliative care.

Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from October to November 2017 in four palliative care services. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00586-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7282045PMC

Barriers to advance care planning: a qualitative study of seriously ill Chinese patients and their families.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jun 8;19(1):80. Epub 2020 Jun 8.

Institute of Ageing, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China.

Background: Advance care planning (ACP) facilitates identification and documentation of patients' treatment preferences. Its goal aligns with that of palliative care - optimizing quality of life of seriously ill patients. However, concepts of ACP and palliative care remain poorly recognized in Chinese population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00587-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7282137PMC

Supportive and palliative care indicators tool (SPICT™): content validity, feasibility and pre-test of the Italian version.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jun 6;19(1):79. Epub 2020 Jun 6.

Antea Associazione, Piazza Santa Maria della Pietà, 5, Pad XXII, 00135, Rome, Italy.

Background: Difficulties in identifying patients at risk of clinical deterioration or death represent one of the main barriers to Palliative Care (PC) development in the community. Currently, no specific Italian tools aimed at identifying patients with PC needs are available. Of the different European tools available, the SPICT™ can be used easily in any kind of setting and does not include the Surprise Question. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00584-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7276086PMC

Constructing stability - a classic grounded theory of next-of-kin in palliative cancer care.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jun 5;19(1):78. Epub 2020 Jun 5.

Center for Collaborative Palliative Care, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.

Background: Being next-of-kin to someone with cancer requiring palliative care involves a complex life situation. Changes in roles and relationships might occur and the next-of-kin thereby try to adapt by being involved in the ill person's experiences and care even though they can feel unprepared for the care they are expected to provide. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a classic grounded theory of next-of-kin in palliative cancer care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00580-7DOI Listing

Spirituality alleviates the burden on family members caring for patients receiving palliative care exclusively.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jun 3;19(1):77. Epub 2020 Jun 3.

Intensive Care Unit, Hospital Sírio-Libanês - São Paulo, Rua Dona Adma Jafet, 115 - Bela Vista, São Paulo, SP, 01308-050, Brazil.

Background: Spirituality can give meaning to life, providing support and guidance in complex situations. Despite its importance in palliative care, the role of spirituality for family caregivers of patients under exclusive palliative care has not received enough attention in the literature. We aimed to address the correlation between spirituality and the emotional burden of family members of patients under exclusive palliative care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00585-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7271458PMC

Adverse events in deceased hospitalised cancer patients as a measure of quality and safety in end-of-life cancer care.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Jun 1;19(1):76. Epub 2020 Jun 1.

Institute of Community Medicine, The Arctic University of Norway, PO Box 6, 9038, Tromsø, Norway.

Background: Anticancer treatment exposes patients to negative consequences such as increased toxicity and decreased quality of life, and there are clear guidelines recommending limiting use of aggressive anticancer treatments for patients near end of life. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between anticancer treatment given during the last 30 days of life and adverse events contributing to death and elucidate how adverse events can be used as a measure of quality and safety in end-of-life cancer care.

Methods: Retrospective cohort study of 247 deceased hospitalised cancer patients at three hospitals in Norway in 2012 and 2013. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00579-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7265218PMC

End-of-life care in a pediatric intensive care unit: the impact of the development of a palliative care unit.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 28;19(1):74. Epub 2020 May 28.

Disorders of Immunity and Respiration of the Pediatric Critical Patient Research Group, Institut Recerca Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Universitat de Barcelona, Passeig Sant Joan de Déu, 2, Esplugues de Llobregat, 08950, Barcelona, Spain.

Background: The purpose of this paper is to describe how end-of-life care is managed when life-support limitation is decided in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit and to analyze the influence of the further development of the Palliative Care Unit.

Methods: A 15-year retrospective study of children who died after life-support limitation was initiated in a pediatric intensive care unit. Patients were divided into two groups, pre- and post-palliative care unit development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00575-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7254653PMC

Systematic symptom and problem assessment at admission to the palliative care ward - perspectives and prognostic impacts.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 28;19(1):75. Epub 2020 May 28.

Department of Oncology, Hematology and BMT, Palliative Care Unit, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany.

Background: Symptom assessment is essential in palliative care, but holds challenges concerning implementation and relevance. This study aims to evaluate patients' main symptoms and problems at admission to a specialist inpatient palliative care (SIPC) ward using physician proxy- and patient self-assessment, and aims to identify their prognostic impact as well as the agreement between both assessments.

Methods: Within 12 h after admission, palliative care specialists completed the Symptom and Problem Checklist of the German Hospice and Palliative Care Evaluation (HOPE-SP-CL). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00576-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7257199PMC

Understanding family caregivers' needs to support relatives with advanced progressive disease at home: an ethnographic study in rural Portugal.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 25;19(1):73. Epub 2020 May 25.

Cicely Saunders Institute of Palliative Care, Policy & Rehabilitation, Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery & Palliative Care, King's College of London, London, UK.

Background: Family caregivers play an important role supporting their relatives with advanced progressive disease to live at home. There is limited research to understand family caregiver needs over time, particularly outside of high-income settings. The aim of this study was to explore family caregivers' experiences of caring for a relative living with advanced progressive disease at home, and their perceptions of met and unmet care needs over time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00583-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7249372PMC

Implementing volunteer-navigation for older persons with advanced chronic illness (Nav-CARE): a knowledge to action study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 22;19(1):72. Epub 2020 May 22.

University of British Columbia Okanagan, 1147 Research Road. Arts 3rd Floor, Kelowna, BC, V1V 1V7, Canada.

Background: Nav-CARE is a volunteer-led intervention designed to build upon strategic directions in palliative care: a palliative approach to care, a public health/compassionate community approach to care, and enhancing the capacity of volunteerism. Nav-CARE uses specially trained volunteers to provide lay navigation for older persons and family living at home with advanced chronic illness. The goal of this study was to better understand the implementation factors that influenced the utilization of Nav-CARE in eight diverse Canadian contexts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00578-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7245025PMC

Equity and the financial costs of informal caregiving in palliative care: a critical debate.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 19;19(1):71. Epub 2020 May 19.

School of Nursing, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Background: Informal caregivers represent the foundation of the palliative care workforce and are the main providers of end of life care. Financial pressures are among the most serious concerns for many carers and the financial burden of end of life caregiving can be substantial.

Methods: The aim of this critical debate paper was to review and critique some of the key evidence on the financial costs of informal caregiving and describe how these costs represent an equity issue in palliative care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00577-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7236957PMC
May 2020
1.787 Impact Factor

Ethical challenges in family caregivers of patients with advanced cancer - a qualitative study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 18;19(1):70. Epub 2020 May 18.

Palliative Care Unit, Department of Oncology, Hematology and BMT, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Background: Caring for patients with advanced or terminal diseases can confront family caregivers (FC) with ethical challenges. The present study aims at tracing paths connected to ethical challenges among FC of advanced cancer patients by exploring morally troubling situations and related burden, as well as strategies to handle the situation and experience of moral distress from the grieving FC's perspective.

Methods: Within a qualitative design, interviews with 12 grieving FC were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00573-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7236546PMC

Determining the prevalence of palliative needs and exploring screening accuracy of depression and anxiety items of the integrated palliative care outcome scale - a multi-centre study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 14;19(1):69. Epub 2020 May 14.

Centre for Health Studies and Research, Av. Dias da Silva, 165, 3000-512, Coimbra, Portugal.

Background: patients with palliative needs often experience high symptom burden which causes suffering to themselves and their families. Depression and psychological distress should not be considered a "normal event" in advanced disease patients and should be screened, diagnosed, acted on and followed-up. Psychological distress has been associated with greater physical symptom severity, suffering, and mortality in cancer patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00571-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7226940PMC

Role of nurses in medication management at the end of life: a qualitative interview study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 13;19(1):68. Epub 2020 May 13.

Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.

Background: Patients in the last phase of their lives often use many medications. Physicians tend to lack awareness that reviewing the usefulness of medication at the end of patients' lives is important. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the perspectives of patients, informal caregivers, nurses and physicians on the role of nurses in medication management at the end of life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00574-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7222510PMC

Evaluation of a communication skills training to facilitate addressing palliative care related topics in advanced cancer patients: study protocol of a multicenter randomized controlled trial (PALLI-KOM).

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 12;19(1):67. Epub 2020 May 12.

Department of Medical Psychology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Background: Early integration of palliative care concurrently to standard cancer care is associated with several benefits for patients and their caregivers. However, communication barriers on part of the caring physicians often impede a timely referral to palliative care. This study describes the protocol of the evaluation of a communication skills training aiming to strengthen the ability of physicians to address palliative care related topics adequately and early during disease trajectory. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00568-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7218622PMC

An exploration of the experiences of professionals supporting patients approaching the end of life in medicines management at home. A qualitative study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 11;19(1):66. Epub 2020 May 11.

School of Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.

Background: The management of medicines towards the end of life can place increasing burdens and responsibilities on patients and families. This has received little attention yet it can be a source of great difficulty and distress patients and families. Dose administration aids can be useful for some patients but there is no evidence for their wide spread use or the implications for their use as patients become increasing unwell. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-0537-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7216477PMC

The required competencies of physicians within palliative care from the perspectives of multi-professional expert groups: a qualitative study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 9;19(1):65. Epub 2020 May 9.

Faculty of Medicine and Health Technology, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.

Background: Although statements on the competencies required from physicians working within palliative care exist, these requirements have not been described within different levels of palliative care provision by multi-professional workshops, comprising representatives from working life. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe the competencies required from physicians working within palliative care from the perspectives of multi-professional groups of representatives from working life.

Methods: A qualitative approach, using a workshop method, was conducted, wherein the participating professionals and representatives of patient organizations discussed the competencies that are required in palliative care, before reaching and documenting a consensus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00566-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7211329PMC

Two faces of the same coin: a qualitative study of patients' and carers' coexistence with chronic breathlessness associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 6;19(1):64. Epub 2020 May 6.

Discipline, Palliative and Supportive Services, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA, 5001, Australia.

Background: Chronic breathlessness is a recognized clinical syndrome that severely impacts patients and carers, who become increasingly restricted in their daily activities. Often, patients become reliant on their carers, who are required to provide constant support. Although individual experiences of breathlessness have been previously investigated, there are few studies exploring contemporaneous experiences of breathlessness of the patient and their carer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00572-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7203967PMC
May 2020
1.787 Impact Factor

Effect of palliative care training on perceived self-efficacy of the nurses.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 4;19(1):63. Epub 2020 May 4.

Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Faculty of Health, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences and Health Services, Yazd, Iran.

Background: Nurses are involved in providing end-of-life care for end stage individuals and their self-efficacy is one of the key factors bearing on such care. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of palliative care on perceived self-efficacy of the nurses.

Methods: This is a quasi-experimental study with pretest-posttest design. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00567-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7199299PMC

Complementary music therapy for cancer patients in at-home palliative care and their caregivers: protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 2;19(1):61. Epub 2020 May 2.

Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Malaga, Malaga, Spain.

Background: Patients with advanced cancer, receiving at-home palliative care, are subject to numerous symptoms that are changeable and often require attention, a stressful situation that also impacts on the family caregiver. It has been suggested that music therapy may benefit both the patient and the caregiver. We propose a study to analyse the efficacy and cost utility of a music intervention programme, applied as complementary therapy, for cancer patients in palliative care and for their at-home caregivers, compared to usual treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00570-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7196216PMC

Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for Palliative Care in German Comprehensive Cancer Centers - an evaluation of the implementation status.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 May 2;19(1):62. Epub 2020 May 2.

Department of Palliative Medicine, CCC Erlangen - EMN, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Krankenhausstraße 12, 91054, Erlangen, Germany.

Background: The working group for palliative medicine within the Comprehensive Cancer Center (CCC) network funded by the German Cancer Aid in Germany has developed and published 14 Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for palliative care in CCCs. This study analyzed to what extent these SOPs have been implemented in the clinical routine in the CCC network one year after their publication.

Methods: An online-based survey on the implementation status, limitations in daily practice and further themes was conducted between April and July 2018. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00565-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7196237PMC

Severe pain at the end of life: a population-level observational study.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 30;19(1):60. Epub 2020 Apr 30.

Department of Medicine, Division of Palliative Care, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Background: Pain is a prevalent symptom at the end of life and negatively impacts quality of life. Despite this, little population level data exist that describe pain frequency and associated factors at the end of life. The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence of clinically significant pain at the end of life and identify predictors of increased pain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00569-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7193354PMC
April 2020
1.787 Impact Factor

Battle, Journey, Imprisonment and Burden: patterns of metaphor use in blogs about living with advanced cancer.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 25;19(1):59. Epub 2020 Apr 25.

Center for Collaborative Palliative Care, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, SE-35195, Växjö, Sweden.

Background: The significance of metaphors for the experience of cancer has been the topic of extensive previous research, with "Battle" and "Journey" metaphors standing out as key. Adaptation to the patient's use of metaphor is generally believed to be an important aspect of person-centered care, especially in palliative care. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of metaphors in blogs written in Swedish by people living with advanced cancer and explore possible patterns associated with individuals, age and gender. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00557-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7183615PMC

Differences in well-being and fear of death among female hospice employees and volunteers in Hungary.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 24;19(1):58. Epub 2020 Apr 24.

Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Behavioural Sciences, Semmelweis University, 1089 Budapest, Nagyvárad tér 4, Budapest, Hungary.

Background: Voluntary work plays a significant role in hospice care, but international research has mainly been conducted on the mental health and fear of death of paid hospice staff. The aim of the present study was to compare the Hungarian hospice volunteers with paid employees with regard to attitudes and fear of death, as well as mental health in order to see their role in hospice work and their psychological well-being more clearly.

Methods: The target population of the cross-sectional questionnaire study was hospice care providers in Hungary (N = 1255). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00550-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7183127PMC

Social regulation activities in end-of-life: a qualitative study on completion of advance directives in Swiss nursing homes.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 23;19(1):57. Epub 2020 Apr 23.

Institut et Haute Ecole de la Santé La Source, Avenue Vinet 30, CH - 1004, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Background: In Switzerland as in many countries, steady trend is observed in nursing homes to promote writing of advanced directives (ADs). Implementation of ADs reflects the rise in public concern for the persons' right to self-determination and informed decision. The issue of end-of-life conditions is particularly acute in situations with dementia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00562-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7181527PMC

Palliative Performance Scale: cross cultural adaptation and psychometric validation for Polish hospice setting.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 22;19(1):52. Epub 2020 Apr 22.

Clinic of Pain Treatment and Palliative Care, Chair of Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland.

Background: Measuring functional status in palliative care may help clinicians to assess a patient's prognosis, recommend adequate therapy, avoid futile or aggressive medical care, consider hospice referral, and evaluate provided rehabilitation outcomes. An optimized, widely used, and validated tool is preferable. The Palliative Performance Scale Version 2 (PPSv2) is currently one of the most commonly used performance scales in palliative settings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00563-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7178730PMC

Disseminating research findings using a massive online open course for maximising impact and developing recommendations for practice.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 22;19(1):54. Epub 2020 Apr 22.

International Observatory on end of Life Care, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK.

Background: Developing recommendations for how we deliver healthcare is often left to leading experts in a field. Findings from the Integrated Palliative Care in cancer and chronic conditions (InSup-C) study, which aimed to identify best practice in integrated palliative care in cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and heart failure, led to recommendations developed through an expert consultation process. We also wanted to develop these recommendations further with participants who were largely clinicians and members of the public. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00564-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7178937PMC
April 2020
1.787 Impact Factor

The use of olanzapine as an antiemetic in palliative medicine: a systematic review of the literature.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 22;19(1):56. Epub 2020 Apr 22.

Palliative care unit, Oscar Lambret center, 3 rue Frédéric Combemale, F-59020, Lille, France.

Background: Olanzapine is an atypical antipsychotic that has affinity for many central nervous system receptors. Its efficacy is supported by several studies in the prevention and treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. No recommendations exist on the antiemetic use of olanzapine in the palliative care setting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00559-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7178955PMC

Challenges on the provision of palliative care for patients with cancer in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review of reviews.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 22;19(1):55. Epub 2020 Apr 22.

School of Nursing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong.

Background: Despite the significant benefits of palliative care (PC) services for cancer patients, multiple challenges hinder the provision of PC services for these patients. Low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are witnessing a sharp growth in the burden of non-communicable diseases. There is a significant gap between demand and supply of PC in LMICs in current health services. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00558-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7178566PMC

Early palliative care versus standard care in haematologic cancer patients at their last active treatment: study protocol of a feasibility trial.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 22;19(1):53. Epub 2020 Apr 22.

Scientific Directorate, Azienda USL-IRCCS di Reggio Emilia, Reggio Emilia, Italy.

Background: Patients with advanced haematological malignancies suffer from a very high symptom burden and psychological, spiritual, social and physical symptoms comparable with patients with metastatic non-haematological malignancy. Referral to palliative care services for these patients remains limited or often confined to the last days of life. We developed a palliative care intervention (PCI) integrated with standard haematological care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00561-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7178743PMC

Profiles of family caregivers of patients at the end of life at home: a Q-methodological study into family caregiver' support needs.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 21;19(1):51. Epub 2020 Apr 21.

Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam Public Health research institute, Expertise Center for Palliative Care, P.O. Box 7057, 1007 MB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: Family caregivers of patients at the end of life often experience care-related burden. To prevent caregiver burden and to enhance the capacity to provide care it is important to have insight in their support needs. The purpose of this study was to identify profiles of family caregivers who provide care to patients at the end of life at home. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00560-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7175554PMC

The family talk intervention for families when a parent is cared for in palliative care - potential effects from minor children's perspectives.

BMC Palliat Care 2020 Apr 16;19(1):50. Epub 2020 Apr 16.

Department of Health Care Sciences, Palliative Research Centre, Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College, Box 11189, 100 61, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Children show long-term psychological distress if family communication and illness-related information are poor during and after a parent's illness and death. Few psychosocial interventions for families with minor children living with a parent who has a life-threatening illness have been evaluated rigorously. Even fewer interventions have been family-centered. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12904-020-00551-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7164202PMC