565 results match your criteria Bmc Ecology[Journal]


Leopard seal diets in a rapidly warming polar region vary by year, season, sex, and body size.

BMC Ecol 2020 Jun 3;20(1):32. Epub 2020 Jun 3.

Divsion of Biological Sciences, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, CA, USA.

Background: Resolving the preferred prey items and dietary proportions of leopard seals is central to understanding food-web dynamics in the rapidly-warming Antarctic Peninsula region. Previous studies have identified a wide range of prey items; however, due to anecdotal or otherwise limited information, leopard seal diets remain unresolved by seal sex, individual, body size, region, and season. Over the 2013, 2014, and 2017 field seasons we collected scat, tissue samples (red blood cells and plasma; n = 23) for stable isotope analyses, and previously-reported animal-borne video from 19 adult leopard seals foraging near mesopredator breeding colonies at Cape Shirreff, Livingston Island. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00300-yDOI Listing

Year-round spatiotemporal distribution pattern of a threatened sea duck species breeding on Kolguev Island, south-eastern Barents Sea.

BMC Ecol 2020 May 25;20(1):31. Epub 2020 May 25.

Department of Animal Ecology and Systematics, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 26-32, 35392, Giessen, Germany.

Background: The long-tailed duck (Clangula hyemalis) was categorized as ´Vulnerable` by the IUCN after a study revealed a rapid wintering population decline of 65% between 1992-1993 and 2007-2009 in the Baltic Sea. As knowledge about the European long-tailed duck's life cycle and movement ecology is limited, we investigate its year-round spatiotemporal distribution patterns. Specifically, we aimed to identify the wintering grounds, timing of migration and staging of this population via light-level geolocation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00299-2DOI Listing

Seed dispersal of wild radishes and its association with within-population spatial distribution.

BMC Ecol 2020 May 11;20(1):30. Epub 2020 May 11.

Institute of Plant Sciences, Agricultural Research Organization, 7505101, Rishon LeZion, Israel.

Background: The wild radishes, Raphanus raphanistrum and R. pugioniformis (Brassicaceae) are native to the East Mediterranean region. However, whereas R. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00297-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7212605PMC

The trinity of ecological contrasts: a case study on rich insect assemblages by means of species, functional and phylogenetic diversity measures.

BMC Ecol 2020 May 10;20(1):29. Epub 2020 May 10.

Department of Botany & Biodiversity Research, University of Vienna, Rennweg 14, 1030, Vienna, Austria.

Background: The 'classical' concept of species diversity was extended in the last decades into other dimensions focusing on the functional and phylogenetic diversity of communities. These measures are often argued to allow a deeper understanding of the mechanisms shaping community assembly along environmental gradients. Because of practical impediments, thus far only very few studies evaluated the performance of these diversity measures on large empirical data sets. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00298-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7211340PMC

Predicting the potential distribution of the parasitic Cuscuta chinensis under global warming.

BMC Ecol 2020 May 9;20(1):28. Epub 2020 May 9.

Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Plant Evolutionary Ecology and Conservation, Taizhou University, Taizhou, 318000, China.

Background: The climate is the dominant factor that affects the distribution of plants. Cuscuta chinensis is a stem holoparasitic plant without leaves or roots, which develops a haustorium and sucks nutrients from host plants. The potential distribution of the parasitic plant C. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00295-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7210669PMC

Soil properties changes earthworm diversity indices in different agro-ecosystem.

BMC Ecol 2020 May 7;20(1):27. Epub 2020 May 7.

Department of Botanical & Environmental Sciences, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab, India.

Background: Earthworm communities are generally very sensitive to physico-chemical properties of the soil in different agro-ecosystem i.e. cultivated or non-cultivated which directly or indirectly influence the earthworm survival. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00296-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7203807PMC

Effects of reproductive resource allocation and pollen density on fertilization success in plants.

BMC Ecol 2020 May 2;20(1):26. Epub 2020 May 2.

Forstgenetik und Forstpflanzenzüchtung. Fakultät Forstwissenschaften und Waldökologie, Universität Göttingen, Büsgenweg 2, 37077, Göttingen, Germany.

Background: Declining resources due to climate change may endanger the persistence of populations by reducing fecundity and thus population fitness via effects on gamete production. The optimal mode of generative reproduction allocates the limited resources to ovule and pollen production in proportions that maximize the number of fertilized ovules in the population. In order to locate this optimum and derive reproduction modes that compensate for declined resources to maintain reproductive success, a model of gamete production, pollen dispersal, and ovule fertilization is developed. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00290-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7208091PMC

Photosynthetic performance and growth responses of Liriope muscari (Decne.) L.H. Bailey (Asparagaceae) planted within poplar forests having different canopy densities.

BMC Ecol 2020 Apr 30;20(1):25. Epub 2020 Apr 30.

College of Biology and the Environment, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, 210037, China.

Background: Liriope muscari (Decne.) L.H. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00294-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7191787PMC

How to recover from a bad start: size at metamorphosis affects growth and survival in a tropical amphibian.

BMC Ecol 2020 Apr 21;20(1):24. Epub 2020 Apr 21.

Laboratory of Ecology and Conservation of Amphibians (LECA), Freshwater and OCeanic Science Unit of ReSearch (FOCUS), University of Liège, Liège, Belgium.

Background: In species with complex life cycles, size at metamorphosis is a key life-history trait which reflects the complex interactions between costs and benefits of life in the aquatic and terrestrial environments. Whereas the effects of a deteriorating larval habitat (e.g. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00291-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7175581PMC

Alpine ecology, plant biodiversity and photosynthetic performance of marker plants in a nitrogen gradient induced by Alnus bushes.

BMC Ecol 2020 Apr 20;20(1):23. Epub 2020 Apr 20.

Dept. of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland.

Background: Alpine alder vegetation acts upon the nearby grass and dwarf shrub vegetation by the nitrogen supply from the symbiotic bacteria Frankia alni of Alnus viridis. This has been studied in two transects concerning plant distribution, plant diversity, nitrate concentration in soil and photosynthetic performance of specific marker plants.

Results: Away from the alder stand, a band of some meters was dominated by Calamagrostis varia which then was followed by alpine dwarf shrub vegetation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00292-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7171859PMC

Genetic diversity and differentiation of populations of Chlorops oryzae (Diptera, Chloropidae).

BMC Ecol 2020 Apr 15;20(1):22. Epub 2020 Apr 15.

Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory for Biology and Control of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, College of Plant Protection, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha, 410128, China.

Background: Chlorops oryzae is an important pest of rice crops. There have been frequent outbreaks of this pest in recent years and it has become the main rice pest in some regions. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of frequent C. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00293-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7160969PMC

Compound-specific stable isotope analyses in Falkland Islands seabirds reveal seasonal changes in trophic positions.

BMC Ecol 2020 Apr 15;20(1):21. Epub 2020 Apr 15.

Department of Animal Ecology & Systematics, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 26, 35392, Giessen, Germany.

Background: While nitrogen and carbon stable isotope values can reflect ecological segregation, prey choice and spatial distribution in seabirds, the interpretation of bulk stable isotope values is frequently hampered by a lack of isotopic baseline data. In this study, we used compound-specific isotope analyses of amino acids (CSIA-AA) to overcome this constraint and to study interspecific differences, seasonal and historical changes in trophic positions of five seabird species, three penguins and two petrels, from a sub-Antarctic seabird community.

Results: CSIA-AA allowed comparing trophic positions of seabirds with temperate and polar distributions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00288-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7160925PMC

Correction to: American foulbrood in a honeybee colony: spore-symptom relationship and feedbacks between disease and colony development.

BMC Ecol 2020 Mar 23;20(1):16. Epub 2020 Mar 23.

Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 750 07, Uppsala, Sweden.

Unfortunately, the original version of the article [1] contained an error. The author has brought to our attention that the article title is truncated in the published version. The correct title is American foulbrood in a honeybee colony: spore-symptom relationship and feedbacks between disease and colony development. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00285-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7087355PMC

Investigating carbon dioxide absorption by urban trees in a new park of Bangkok, Thailand.

BMC Ecol 2020 Apr 13;20(1):20. Epub 2020 Apr 13.

Department of Forest Biology, Faculty of Forestry, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, 10900, Thailand.

Background: Trees remove atmospheric carbon dioxide through photosynthesis, hereafter CO absorption (A). Despite growing urban green areas, only a few studies have quantified A of urban trees and assessed their dynamical changes with varying atmospheric conditions. Hence, we investigated A in nine dominant tree species in a new park of Bangkok. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00289-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7155315PMC

Potential suitable habitat of Eleusine coracana (L) gaertn (Finger millet) under the climate change scenarios in Nepal.

BMC Ecol 2020 Apr 6;20(1):19. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Central Department of Botany, Tribhuvan University, Kirtipur, Kathmandu, Nepal.

Background: Finger millet is the fourth major crop in Nepal and is cultivated in a traditional integrated subsistence system. Timely rain and appropriate temperature predominately affects crop distribution and yield. Climate change is evident in Nepal and it is imperative to understand how it affects habitat suitability of finger millet. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00287-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7137418PMC

Daily fluctuating temperatures decrease growth and reproduction rate of a lethal amphibian fungal pathogen in culture.

BMC Ecol 2020 Apr 3;20(1):18. Epub 2020 Apr 3.

Department of Biology, University of Nevada Reno, 1664 N. Virginia Street, Reno, NV, 89557, USA.

Background: Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) are contributing to species die-offs worldwide. We can better understand EIDs by using ecological approaches to study pathogen biology. For example, pathogens are exposed to variable temperatures across daily, seasonal, and annual scales. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00286-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7118903PMC

Increased soil moisture aggravated the competitive effects of the invasive tree Rhus typhina on the native tree Cotinus coggygria.

BMC Ecol 2020 Mar 30;20(1):17. Epub 2020 Mar 30.

Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity, College of Life Sciences, Shandong University, Qingdao, 266237, People's Republic of China.

Background: Invasive exotic species have caused significant problems, and the effects of extreme precipitation and drought, which might occur more frequently under the global climate change scenarios, on interspecific relationship between invasive and native species remain unclear.

Results: We conducted a greenhouse experiment with three soil water levels (30-40%, 50-60%, and 70-80% of field capacity) and two cultivation treatments (monoculture pots, one seedling of either species and mixture pots, one seedling of each species) to investigate soil water content effects on the relationship between invasive Rhus typhina and native Cotinus coggygria. Rhus typhina had lower height but bigger crown area than C. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00284-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7106899PMC

American foulbrood in a honeybee colony: spore-symptom relationship and feedbacks.

BMC Ecol 2020 03 6;20(1):15. Epub 2020 Mar 6.

Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 750 07, Uppsala, Sweden.

Background: The most severe bacterial disease of honeybees is American foulbrood (AFB). The epidemiology of AFB is driven by the extreme spore resilience, the difficulty of bees to remove these spores, and the considerable incidence of undetected spore-producing colonies. The honeybee collective defence mechanisms and their feedback on colony development, which involves a division of labour at multiple levels of colony organization, are difficult to model. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00283-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7060557PMC

Coexistence and cooperation in structured habitats.

BMC Ecol 2020 03 2;20(1):14. Epub 2020 Mar 2.

Network Biology Research Laboratories, and Department of Chemical Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

Background: Natural habitats are typically structured, imposing constraints on inhabiting populations and their interactions. Which conditions are important for coexistence of diverse communities, and how cooperative interaction stabilizes in such populations, have been important ecological and evolutionary questions.

Results: We investigate a minimal ecological framework of microbial population dynamics that exhibits crucial features to show coexistence: Populations repeatedly undergo cycles of separation into compartmentalized habitats and mixing with new resources. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00281-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7053132PMC

The impact of conventional and organic farming on soil biodiversity conservation: a case study on termites in the long-term farming systems comparison trials in Kenya.

BMC Ecol 2020 02 27;20(1):13. Epub 2020 Feb 27.

Department of International Cooperation, Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Ackerstrasse 113, P.O. Box 219, 5070, Frick, Switzerland.

Background: A long-term experiment at two trial sites in Kenya has been on-going since 2007 to assess the effect of organic and conventional farming systems on productivity, profitability and sustainability. During these trials the presence of significant numbers of termites (Isoptera) was observed. Termites are major soil macrofauna and within literature they are either depict as 'pests' or as important indicator for environmental sustainability. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00282-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7045444PMC
February 2020

Effect of food limitation and reproductive activity on fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels in banded mongooses.

BMC Ecol 2020 02 18;20(1):12. Epub 2020 Feb 18.

Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Virginia Tech, 100 Cheatham Hall, Blacksburg, VA, 24061-0321, USA.

Background: Glucocorticoids mediate responses to perceived stressors, thereby restoring homeostasis. However, prolonged glucocorticoid elevation may cause homeostatic overload. Using extensive field investigations of banded mongoose (Mungos mungo) groups in northern Botswana, we assessed the influence of reproduction, predation risk, and food limitation on apparent homeostatic overload (n=13 groups, 1542 samples from 268 animals). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00280-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7027037PMC
February 2020

Prey-switching does not protect a generalist turtle from bioenergetic consequences when its preferred food is scarce.

BMC Ecol 2020 02 18;20(1):11. Epub 2020 Feb 18.

School of Science, Hawkesbury Institute, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag, 1797, Penrith, NSW, 2751, Australia.

Background: Optimal foraging theory explains how animals make foraging decisions based on the availability, nutritional content, and handling times of different food types. Generalists solve this problem by consuming a variety of food types, and alter their diets with relative ease. Specialists eat few food types, and may starve if those food types are not available. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00279-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7027299PMC
February 2020

Impact of mining on the floristic association of gold mined sites in Southwest Nigeria.

BMC Ecol 2020 02 10;20(1). Epub 2020 Feb 10.

Department of Soil Protection and Recultivation, Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-Senftenberg, Konrad-Wachsmann-Allee 6, Cottbus Platz der Deutschen Einheit 1, 03046, Cottbus, Germany.

Background: Occurrences in land use, human activities and climate change have both direct and indirect influences on the environment. Of interest for this study is mining; a common activity in developing countries such as Nigeria which is endowed with over 34 solid minerals. The gold mining sites in the Southwest region of the country is predominantly by Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining (ASM). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00276-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7008547PMC
February 2020

Efficiency of using electric toothbrush as an alternative to a tuning fork for artificial buzz pollination is independent of instrument buzzing frequency.

BMC Ecol 2020 02 10;20(1). Epub 2020 Feb 10.

Department of Biology, The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, TX, 78541, USA.

Background: Breeding programs and research activities where artificial buzz-pollinations are required to have primarily relied upon using tuning forks, and bumble bees. However, these methods can be expensive, unreliable, and inefficient. To find an alternative, we tested the efficiency of pollen collection using electric toothbrushes and compared it with tuning forks at three vibration frequencies-low, medium, and high and two extraction times at 3 s and 16 s- from two buzz-pollinated species (Solanum lycopersicum and Solanum elaeagnifolium). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00278-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7008546PMC
February 2020

Monitoring of the invasion of Spartina alterniflora from 1985 to 2015 in Zhejiang Province, China.

BMC Ecol 2020 02 6;20(1). Epub 2020 Feb 6.

Institute of Subtropical Forestry Research, Hangzhou, 311400, China.

Background: Spartina alterniflora is an invasive plant on the coast of China that replaces native vegetation and has a serious negative impact on local ecosystems. Monitoring the spatial distribution of S. alterniflora and its changes over time can reveal its expansion mechanism, which is crucial for the management of coastal ecosystems. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-00277-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7006405PMC
February 2020

Seasonal movements and habitat use of African buffalo in Ruaha National Park, Tanzania.

BMC Ecol 2020 02 3;20(1). Epub 2020 Feb 3.

Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center, University of California, 1089 Veterinary Medicine Drive, Davis, CA, 95616, USA.

Background: Assessing wildlife movements and habitat use is important for species conservation and management and can be informative for understanding population dynamics. The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) population of Ruaha National Park, Tanzania has been declining, and little was known about the movement, habitat selection, and space use of the population, which is important for understanding possible reasons behind the decline. A total of 12 African buffalo cows from four different herds were collared with satellite transmitters. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-0274-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6998266PMC
February 2020

The effect of season and post-fire on habitat preferences of the endangered Swayne's hartebeest (Alcelaphus buselaphus swaynei) in Maze National Park, Ethiopia.

BMC Ecol 2020 01 28;20(1). Epub 2020 Jan 28.

Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES), Department of Biosciences, University of Oslo, Blindern, PO Box 1066, 0316, Oslo, Norway.

Background: The availability of preferred habitats determines the spatial and temporal distribution of herbivores in savanna ecosystems. Understanding habitat preference of a targeted wildlife species is crucial for developing effective conservation strategies. Habitat preference of large grazers in connection to grass height and post-fire effect has been debated for the last century. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-020-0275-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6986001PMC
January 2020

Shell resource partitioning as a mechanism of coexistence in two co-occurring terrestrial hermit crab species.

BMC Ecol 2020 01 16;20(1). Epub 2020 Jan 16.

Department Animal Ecology I, University of Bayreuth and BayCEER, Universitaetsstr. 30, 95440, Bayreuth, Germany.

Background: Coexistence is enabled by ecological differentiation of the co-occurring species. One possible mechanism thereby is resource partitioning, where each species utilizes a distinct subset of the most limited resource. This resource partitioning is difficult to investigate using empirical research in nature, as only few species are primarily limited by solely one resource, rather than a combination of multiple factors. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0268-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6964008PMC
January 2020

Adaptation of wild boar (Sus scrofa) activity in a human-dominated landscape.

BMC Ecol 2020 01 9;20(1). Epub 2020 Jan 9.

Wildlife Research Unit, Agricultural Centre Baden-Württemberg, Aulendorf, Germany.

Background: Wild boars (Sus scrofa L.) are globally widely distributed, and their populations have increased in Europe during recent decades. Encounters between humans and wild boars are rare because of the predominantly nocturnal lifestyle of the latter, and wild boar management by hunting is a challenging task. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0271-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6953143PMC
January 2020

Enhanced inference of ecological networks by parameterizing ensembles of population dynamics models constrained with prior knowledge.

BMC Ecol 2020 01 8;20(1). Epub 2020 Jan 8.

Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, 14260, USA.

Background: Accurate network models of species interaction could be used to predict population dynamics and be applied to manage real world ecosystems. Most relevant models are nonlinear, however, and data available from real world ecosystems are too noisy and sparsely sampled for common inference approaches. Here we improved the inference of generalized Lotka-Volterra (gLV) ecological networks by using a new optimization algorithm to constrain parameter signs with prior knowledge and a perturbation-based ensemble method. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0272-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6950893PMC
January 2020

Species traits, patch turnover and successional dynamics: when does intermediate disturbance favour metapopulation occupancy?

BMC Ecol 2020 01 3;20(1). Epub 2020 Jan 3.

EDP Biodiversity Chair, CIBIO/InBio, Centro de Investigação em Biodiversidade e Recursos Genéticos, Universidade do Porto, Campus de Vairão, Vila do Conde, Portugal.

Background: In fragmented landscapes, natural and anthropogenic disturbances coupled with successional processes result in the destruction and creation of habitat patches. Disturbances are expected to reduce metapopulation occupancy for species associated with stable habitats, but they may benefit species adapted to transitory habitats by maintaining a dynamic mosaic of successional stages. However, while early-successional species may be favoured by very frequent disturbances resetting successional dynamics, metapopulation occupancy may be highest at intermediate disturbance levels for species with mid-successional habitat preferences, though this may be conditional on species traits and patch network characteristics. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0273-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6942360PMC
January 2020

Phylogeography of higher Diptera in glacial and postglacial grasslands in western North America.

BMC Ecol 2019 12 20;19(1):53. Epub 2019 Dec 20.

Natural Resource Sciences, McGill University, Macdonald Campus, Ste-Anne-De-Bellevue, QC, H9X 3V9, Canada.

Background: Pleistocene glaciations have had an important impact on the species distribution and community composition of the North American biota. Species survived these glacial cycles south of the ice sheets and/or in other refugia, such as Beringia. In this study, we assessed, using mitochondrial DNA from three Diptera species, whether flies currently found in Beringian grasslands (1) survived glaciation as disjunct populations in Beringia and in the southern refugium; (2) dispersed northward postglacially from the southern refugium; or (3) arose by a combination of the two. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0266-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6923875PMC
December 2019

Increased songbird nest depredation due to Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis) encroachment in Mediterranean shrubland.

BMC Ecol 2019 12 17;19(1):52. Epub 2019 Dec 17.

School of Zoology, The George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

Background: In recent decades, a decrease of passerine densities was documented in Mediterranean shrublands. At the same time, a widespread encroachment of Aleppo pines (Pinus halepensis) to Mediterranean shrubland occurred. Such changes in vegetation structure may affect passerine predator assemblage and densities, and in turn impact passerine densities. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0270-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6918703PMC
December 2019

FACEPAI: a script for fast and consistent environmental DNA processing and identification.

Authors:
Emma Wahlberg

BMC Ecol 2019 12 6;19(1):51. Epub 2019 Dec 6.

Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, Svante Arrhenius väg 18b, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: The use of environmental DNA (eDNA) has become an increasing important tool in environmental surveys and taxonomic research. High throughput sequencing of samples from soil, water, sediment, trap alcohol or bulk samples generate large amount of barcode sequences that can be assigned to a known taxon with a reference sequence. This process can however be bioinformatic cumbersome and time consuming, especially for researchers without specialised bioinformatic training. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0269-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6896590PMC
December 2019

High nutrient uptake efficiency and high water use efficiency facilitate the spread of Stellera chamaejasme L. in degraded grasslands.

BMC Ecol 2019 12 4;19(1):50. Epub 2019 Dec 4.

Department of Grassland Science, College of Animal Science and Technology, China Agricultural University, Beijing, 100193, China.

Background: Stellera chamaejasme L. is a poisonous plant widely distributes in degraded grasslands in China. The mechanism underlying its spread remains unknown. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0267-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6894284PMC
December 2019

Impact of global warming scenarios on life-history traits of Tetranychus evansi (Acari: Tetranychidae).

BMC Ecol 2019 11 27;19(1):48. Epub 2019 Nov 27.

Graduate School of Bio-Applications and Systems Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo, 184-8588, Japan.

Background: The tomato red spider mite, Tetranychus evansi Baker & Pritchard (Acari: Tetranychidae), is an agricultural pest of solanaceous crops. Although T. evansi is of South American subtropical origin, it has recently expanded its distribution range to many tropical and temperate areas around the world. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0264-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6880604PMC
November 2019

Assemblages of certain benthic molluscs along the southwestern Atlantic: from subtidal to deep sea.

BMC Ecol 2019 11 27;19(1):49. Epub 2019 Nov 27.

Laboratorio de Ecosistemas Costeros, Plataforma y Mar Profundo, Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia", Av. Angel Gallardo 470, C1405DJR, Ciudad de Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Background: We analyse the distribution of Gastropods and Chitons from shallow to deep waters along the southwestern Atlantic Ocean off Argentina and discuss possible factors determining the observed biogeographic patterns.

Results: Three major biogeographic groups are defined on the basis of Gastropod and Chiton species associations, i.e. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0263-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6880383PMC
November 2019

Experimental Listeria-Tetrahymena-Amoeba food chain functioning depends on bacterial virulence traits.

BMC Ecol 2019 11 22;19(1):47. Epub 2019 Nov 22.

Gamaleya Research Centre of Epidemiology and Microbiology, Gamaleya st. 18, Moscow, 123098, Russia.

Background: Some pathogenic bacteria have been developing as a part of terrestrial and aquatic microbial ecosystems. Bacteria are consumed by bacteriovorous protists which are readily consumed by larger organisms. Being natural predators, protozoa are also an instrument for selection of virulence traits in bacteria. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0265-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6874821PMC
November 2019

The luxury effect beyond cities: bats respond to socioeconomic variation across landscapes.

BMC Ecol 2019 11 1;19(1):46. Epub 2019 Nov 1.

Department of Biology, University of North Carolina Greensboro, Greensboro, NC, USA.

Background: The luxury effect describes the positive relationship between affluence and organism diversity or activity in urban ecosystems. Driven by human activities, the luxury effect can potentially be found at a broader scale across different landscapes. Previously, the luxury effect relationship has been established within a city for two bat species, the red bat (Lasiurus borealis) and the evening bat (Nycticeius humeralis). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0262-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6825354PMC
November 2019

Ecological niche modelling to estimate the distribution of Culicoides, potential vectors of bluetongue virus in Senegal.

BMC Ecol 2019 11 1;19(1):45. Epub 2019 Nov 1.

Institut Sénégalais de Recherches Agricoles/Laboratoire National de l'Elevage et de Recherches Vétérinaires, BP 2057, Dakar-Hann, Senegal.

Background: Vector-borne diseases are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in humans and animals. In the Afrotropical region, some are transmitted by Culicoides, such as Akabane, bluetongue, epizootic haemorrhagic fever and African horse sickness viruses. Bluetongue virus infection has an enormous impact on ruminant production, due to its high morbidity and mortality rates. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0261-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6825335PMC
November 2019

Environmental variation mediates the prevalence and co-occurrence of parasites in the common lizard, Zootoca vivipara.

BMC Ecol 2019 10 22;19(1):44. Epub 2019 Oct 22.

CNRS, Station d'Ecologie Théorique et Expérimentale, UMR 5321 and Université Toulouse III-Paul Sabatier, 09200, Moulis, France.

Background: Hosts and their parasites are under reciprocal selection, leading to coevolution. However, parasites depend not only on a host, but also on the host's environment. In addition, a single host species is rarely infested by a single species of parasite and often supports multiple species (i. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0259-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6806499PMC
October 2019
1 Read

A systematic survey of regional multi-taxon biodiversity: evaluating strategies and coverage.

BMC Ecol 2019 10 15;19(1):43. Epub 2019 Oct 15.

Section for Biodiversity & Conservation, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, 8410, Rønde, Denmark.

Background: In light of the biodiversity crisis and our limited ability to explain variation in biodiversity, tools to quantify spatial and temporal variation in biodiversity and its underlying drivers are critically needed. Inspired by the recently published ecospace framework, we developed and tested a sampling design for environmental and biotic mapping. We selected 130 study sites (40 × 40 m) across Denmark using stratified random sampling along the major environmental gradients underlying biotic variation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0260-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6792264PMC
October 2019
1 Read

Are river protected areas sufficient for fish conservation? Implications from large-scale hydroacoustic surveys in the middle reach of the Yangtze River.

BMC Ecol 2019 09 25;19(1):42. Epub 2019 Sep 25.

Key Laboratory of Freshwater Biodiversity Conservation, Ministry of Agriculture of China, Yangtze River Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, Wuhan, 430223, Hubei, China.

Background: The Yangtze River is the third largest river in the world and suffers from extensive anthropogenic impacts. The fishes in the Yangtze River are essential for the sustainable development of freshwater fisheries and the conservation of aquatic biodiversity in China. However, the fishery resources in the Yangtze River Basin have shown rapid decline due to various human activities. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0258-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6760103PMC
September 2019

Habitat-related differences in song structure and complexity in a songbird with a large repertoire.

BMC Ecol 2019 09 18;19(1):40. Epub 2019 Sep 18.

Department of Behavioural Ecology, Institute of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89, 61-614, Poznań, Poland.

Background: Urbanisation has been shown to influence many aspects of animal vocal communication. Much attention has been paid to anthropogenic noise, which is often described as one of the most challenging disturbances for urban dwellers. While a large body of literature describes associations between vocal behavior of avian populations and background noise level, most of these studies were conducted on species with relatively simple songs and small repertoire sizes. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0255-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6749692PMC
September 2019

The maintenance of stable yield and high genetic diversity in the agricultural heritage torreya tree system.

BMC Ecol 2019 09 18;19(1):41. Epub 2019 Sep 18.

College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Zijingang Campus, No. 866 Yuhangtang Road, Hangzhou, 310058, China.

Background: Understanding how traditional agriculture systems have been maintained would help design sustainable agriculture. In this study, we examined how farmers have used two types of local trees (Torreya grandis) for stable yield and maintaining genetic diversity in the "globally important agricultural heritage torreya tree system". The two type of torreya trees are grafted torreya (GT) tree and non-grafted-torreya (NGT) tree. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0256-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6751825PMC
September 2019
1 Read

Mapping out bare-nosed wombat (Vombatus ursinus) burrows with the use of a drone.

BMC Ecol 2019 09 18;19(1):39. Epub 2019 Sep 18.

School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University, Hawkesbury Campus, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW, 2751, Australia.

Background: Wombats are large, nocturnal herbivores that build burrows in a variety of habitats, including grassland communities, and can come into conflict with people. Counting the number of active burrows provides information on the local distribution and abundance of wombats and could prove to be an important management tool to monitor population numbers over time. We compared traditional ground surveys and a new method employing drones, to determine if drones could be used to effectively identify and monitor bare-nosed wombat burrows. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0257-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6749681PMC
September 2019

Enhancing healthy ecosystems in northern Ghana through eco-friendly farm-based practices: insights from irrigation scheme-types.

BMC Ecol 2019 09 12;19(1):38. Epub 2019 Sep 12.

Regional Institute for Population Studies (RIPS), University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana.

Background: Farming practices vary from farmer to farmer and from place to place depending on a number of factors including the agroclimatic condition, infrastructure (e.g. irrigation facilities) and management mechanisms (private versus state management). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://bmcecol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12898-01
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0254-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6740034PMC
September 2019
12 Reads

The abundance of epiphytic liverworts on the bark of Cryptomeria japonica in relation to different physical and biochemical attributes, found in Senchal Wildlife Sanctuary, Darjeeling, Eastern Himalaya.

BMC Ecol 2019 09 11;19(1):37. Epub 2019 Sep 11.

Botanical Survey of India, CGO Complex, 3rd MSO Building, Salt Lake Sector I, Kolkata, West Bengal, 700 064, India.

Background: Maintenance of biodiversity is an integral part of sustainable forest management. Epiphytic bryophytes are an important element of biodiversity. Thus, this work aims to study the role of different physical and biochemical factors in affecting the growth and proliferation of epiphytic liverworts. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0253-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6739907PMC
September 2019
3 Reads

Preferred, small-scale foraging areas of two Southern Ocean fur seal species are not determined by habitat characteristics.

BMC Ecol 2019 09 11;19(1):36. Epub 2019 Sep 11.

Mammal Research Institute, Department of Zoology & Entomology, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield, Pretoria, 0028, South Africa.

Background: To understand and predict the distribution of foragers, it is crucial to identify the factors that affect individual movement decisions at different scales. Individuals are expected to adjust their foraging movements to the hierarchical spatial distribution of resources. At a small local scale, spatial segregation in foraging habitat happens among individuals of closely situated colonies. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0252-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6739983PMC
September 2019

Comparison of feeding habits and habitat use between invasive raccoons and native raccoon dogs in Hokkaido, Japan.

BMC Ecol 2019 09 11;19(1):35. Epub 2019 Sep 11.

Department of Environmental Veterinary Science, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita 18 Nishi 9, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-0818, Japan.

Background: In Japan, invasive raccoons cause severe ecological and social problems by transmitting pathogens to humans, livestock, and native species, causing substantial crop damage, and competing with native species. Possible competition between invasive raccoons and native raccoon dogs is of concern in Japan because Japanese raccoon dogs have a limited distribution and are native only to Japan and the two species have similar characteristics. We assessed potential competition between raccoons and raccoon dogs by comparing feeding habits and habitat use. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://bmcecol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12898-01
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0249-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6737712PMC
September 2019
2 Reads