6,014 results match your criteria Bites Insects


Tabanidae insect (horsefly and deerfly) allergy in humans: A review of the literature.

Clin Exp Allergy 2020 Jun 8. Epub 2020 Jun 8.

Section of Allergy and Immunology, School of Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA.

Allergy to insects of the family Tabanidae (order Diptera), commonly called horseflies or deerflies, is anecdotally common, although the published literature is limited to case reports and small case series. This review summarizes the available literature, in which there is enormous variability in clinical detail, identification of species or even genus, and means and thoroughness of assessment of sensitization. The clinical utility of in vivo and in vitro assays remains unclear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cea.13677DOI Listing

Bedbugs.

N Engl J Med 2020 06;382(23):2230-2237

From the VITROME (Vecteurs-Infections Tropicales et Méditerranéennes) Research Unit, Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire Méditerranée Infection, Marseille (P.P.), and the Parasitology-Mycology Department, Avicenne Hospital, Bobigny (A.I.) - both in France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMcp1905840DOI Listing

High frequency of knockdown resistance mutations in the para gene of cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis) samples collected from goats.

Parasitol Res 2020 Jul 28;119(7):2067-2073. Epub 2020 May 28.

Molecular Biology Section, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Ege University, 35040, İzmir, Turkey.

Fleas are ectoparasites of mammals and birds. In livestock such as sheep and goat, flea bites cause many clinical signs. Several types of insecticides including pyrethroids are used to struggle against fleas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-020-06714-3DOI Listing

Purification and characterization of a novel type of neurotoxic peptides from the venom of the Iranian scorpion .

Iran J Basic Med Sci 2020 Feb;23(2):195-201

Department of Human Vaccine and Serum, Razi Vaccine and Serum Research Institute, Agricultural Research, Education and Extension Organization, Karaj, Iran.

Objectives: Scorpion venom has toxic effects on mammals, insects and crustaceans. Toxicogenic peptides are major contributors to the scorpion venom, which make it toxic. The is one of the most common scorpion bites agent, and responsible for 95% of scorpion bite deaths cases in Iran. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.22038/IJBMS.2019.37910.9025DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7211352PMC
February 2020

National Estimates of Noncanine Bite and Sting Injuries Treated in US Hospital Emergency Departments, 2011-2015.

South Med J 2020 May;113(5):232-239

From the Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Raleigh, Marilyn Goss Haskell, Innovative One Health Solutions, Raleigh, North Carolina, and the Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

Objectives: Injuries resulting from contact with animals are a significant public health concern. This study quantifies and updates nonfatal bite and sting injuries by noncanine sources using the most recent data available (2011-2015) from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program with the purpose of using these updates to better understand public health consequences and prevention techniques. Increased rates of bites and stings can be expected in this study's time frame, possibly caused by the increasing human population expanding into animal territories, as well as changes in animal geographic distribution and pet ownership. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000001091DOI Listing

Investigating the epithelial barrier and immune signatures in the pathogenesis of equine insect bite hypersensitivity.

PLoS One 2020 28;15(4):e0232189. Epub 2020 Apr 28.

Division of Experimental Clinical Research, Department of Clinical Research and Veterinary Public Health, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is a Th-2, IgE-mediated dermatitis of horses caused by bites of insects of the genus Culicoides that has common features with human atopic dermatitis. Together with Th-2 cells, the epithelial barrier plays an important role in development of type I hypersensitivities. In order to elucidate the role of the epithelial barrier and of the skin immune response in IBH we studied the transcriptome of lesional whole skin of IBH-horses (IBH-LE; n = 9) in comparison to non-lesional skin (IBH-NL; n = 8) as well as to skin of healthy control horses (H; n = 9). Read More

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0232189PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7188278PMC

Tropism, pathology, and transmission of equine parvovirus-hepatitis.

Emerg Microbes Infect 2020 20;9(1):651-663. Epub 2020 Mar 20.

Baker Institute for Animal Health, Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, Ithaca, NY, USA.

Equine parvovirus-hepatitis (EqPV-H) has recently been associated with cases of Theiler's disease, a form of fulminant hepatic necrosis in horses. To assess whether EqPV-H is the cause of Theiler's disease, we first demonstrated hepatotropism by PCR on tissues from acutely infected horses. We then experimentally inoculated horses with EqPV-H and 8 of 10 horses developed hepatitis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/22221751.2020.1741326DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7144241PMC

Safety Considerations for Malaria Volunteer Infection Studies: A Mini-Review.

Am J Trop Med Hyg 2020 05;102(5):934-939

The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia.

Malaria clinical studies entailing the experimental infection of healthy volunteers with parasites by bites from infected mosquitos, injection of cryopreserved sporozoites, or injection of blood-stage parasites provide valuable information for vaccine and drug development. Success of these studies depends on maintaining safety. In this mini-review, we discuss the safety risks and associated mitigation strategies of these three types of experimental malaria infection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.19-0351DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7204585PMC

Infestations, Bites, and Insect Repellents.

Pediatr Ann 2020 Mar;49(3):e124-e131

Infestations and arthropod bite reactions in children are common reasons for presentation to pediatric health care providers. Infestations in children include head lice, scabies, and other mites. Fleas and bed bugs are common causes of bite reactions in children, and papular urticaria is a chronic, recurrent eruption resulting from delayed hypersensitivity to a variety of insect bites. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/19382359-20200214-01DOI Listing

Epidemiology of envenomation by Africanized honeybees in the state of Rio Grande do Norte, Northeastern Brazil.

Rev Bras Epidemiol 2020 21;23:e200005. Epub 2020 Feb 21.

Centro de Educação e Saúde, Unidade Acadêmica de Saúde, Graduate Program in Natural Sciences and Biotechnology, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande - Cuité (PB), Brazil.

Introduction: In the American continent, accidents caused by honeybees are a public health problem due to the high incidence and severity of the cases. Despite its medical importance, there are few epidemiological studies on this topic in Brazil, especially referring to the Northeastern states. The present study aims to describe the epidemiological features of honeybee envenomation cases in the state of the Rio Grande do Norte, Northeastern Brazil, from 2007 to 2014. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1980-549720200005DOI Listing

Prevalence of skin infections, infestations, and papular urticaria among adolescents in secondary schools in Calabar, Nigeria.

Ghana Med J 2019 Dec;53(4):287-293

Department of Dermatology, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria.

Background: Acne is an inflammatory disorder of the pilosebaceous gland, and the most common dermatosis in adolescents globally. Infectious dermatoses are common in the tropics, but due to the paucity of epidemiologic surveys, not much is known about the prevalence and common types found in different sub-populations including adolescents. It is however presumed that the prevalence will be high and the pattern diverse. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/gmj.v53i4.6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7036438PMC
December 2019

Waveforms From Stylet Probing of the Mosquito Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Measured by AC-DC Electropenetrography.

J Med Entomol 2020 Feb;57(2):353-368

University of Florida, Citrus Research and Education Center, Lake Alfred, FL.

Electropenetrography (EPG) has been used for many years to visualize unseen stylet probing behaviors of plant-feeding piercing-sucking insects, primarily hemipterans. Yet, EPG has not been extensively used with blood-feeding insects. In this study, an AC-DC electropenetrograph with variable input resistors (Ri), i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jme/tjz188DOI Listing
February 2020

Ethnomedicinal survey and in vitro confirmation of anti-inflammatory and antispasmodic properties of the termite strain Macrotermes bellicosus used in traditional medicine in the Republic of Benin.

J Ethnopharmacol 2020 May 22;254:112705. Epub 2020 Feb 22.

Leipzig University, Medical Faculty, Institute for Medical Physics and Biophysics, Leipzig, Germany. Electronic address:

Ethnopharmacological Relevance: Insects and insect-derived products play a vital role in traditional medicine in many parts of the world since ancient times. Among these insects, fungus-growing termites like Macrotermes bellicosus (M. bellicosus) are widely used in nutrition and traditional medicine in various societies of sub-Saharan Africa. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2020.112705DOI Listing

Toads prey upon scorpions and are resistant to their venom: A biological and ecological approach to scorpionism.

Toxicon 2020 Apr 18;178:4-7. Epub 2020 Feb 18.

Laboratório de Biologia Estrutural, Instituto Butantan, São Paulo, Brazil.

In recent years, SE Brazil, the most populous region in the country with an estimated population of 88 million, has been experiencing an alarming increase in scorpions accidents (scorpionism), mainly caused by the yellow scorpion (Tityus serrulatus), or "escorpião amarelo" in Portuguese. This species is considered particularly dangerous to humans and can reproduce by parthenogenesis favouring rapid dispersal and colonization of new environments. Since the 1940s, owing to the growing danger represented by scorpionism, public control policies have been developed, including active search for scorpions, together with the use of toxic substances applied in places most likely to serve as their refuges. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2020.02.013DOI Listing

Visceral leishmaniasis on the Indian Subcontinent: Efficacy of fipronil-based cattle treatment in controlling sand fly populations is dependent on specific aspects of sand fly ecology.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2020 02 18;14(2):e0008011. Epub 2020 Feb 18.

Ecological Systems Laboratory, Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, United States of America.

Background: Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a deadly disease transmitted by the sand fly Phlebotomus argentipes on the Indian subcontinent, with a promising means of vector control being orally treating cattle with fipronil-based drugs. While prior research investigating the dynamic relationship between timing of fipronil-based control schemes and the seasonality of sand flies provides insights into potential of treatment on a large scale, ecological uncertainties remain. We investigated how uncertainties associated with sand fly ecology might affect our ability to assess efficacy of fipronil-based control schemes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0008011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7048295PMC
February 2020

Massive Africanized honeybee stings in two hair sheep and a mare.

Toxicon 2020 Apr 28;177:35-40. Epub 2020 Jan 28.

Large Animal Veterinary Teaching Hospital, College of Agronomy and Veterinary Medicine, Universidade de Brasília, Galpão 4, Granja do Torto, Brasília, DF 70636-200, Brazil. Electronic address:

The findings of massive Africanized honeybee stings in two hair sheep and a mare are reported. One sheep died 15 h after attack, and the survivors developed skin necrosis on the sting sites. Pathological evaluation revealed necrosis in the dermis, degeneration of the tubular epithelial cells, and multifocal hemorrhages in heart and spleen. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2020.01.015DOI Listing

Impact of Education on Knowledge and Practice of Kala Azar Preventive Measures among Seasonal and Migrant Agricultural Workers in Northwest Ethiopia.

Am J Trop Med Hyg 2020 04;102(4):758-767

Department of Natural Sciences, University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, Maryland.

Kala azar occurs among seasonal and migrant agricultural workers in northwest Ethiopia and accounts for almost 60% of the disease burden in the country. We conducted a quantitative study on the level of knowledge and practice of this vulnerable group in relation to kala azar transmission and acceptability of its vector control tools. A total of 403 workers were randomly selected from eight farms using a purposive sampling technique. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.19-0079DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7124897PMC

Co-transmission of Related Malaria Parasite Lineages Shapes Within-Host Parasite Diversity.

Cell Host Microbe 2020 01 31;27(1):93-103.e4. Epub 2019 Dec 31.

Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, TX, USA. Electronic address:

In high-transmission regions, we expect parasite lineages within complex malaria infections to be unrelated due to parasite inoculations from different mosquitoes. This project was designed to test this prediction. We generated 485 single-cell genome sequences from fifteen P. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chom.2019.12.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7159252PMC
January 2020

A quantitative comparison of West Nile virus incidence from 2013 to 2018 in Emilia-Romagna, Italy.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2020 01 2;14(1):e0007953. Epub 2020 Jan 2.

Epidemiology Unit, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Lombardia e dell'Emilia Romagna "B. Ubertini", Bologna, Italy.

Background: West Nile virus (WNV) transmission was much greater in 2018 than in previous seasons in Europe. Focusing on Emilia-Romagna region (northern Italy), we analyzed detailed entomological and epidemiological data collected in 2013-2018 to quantitatively assess environmental drivers of transmission and explore hypotheses to better understand why the 2018 epidemiological season was substantially different than the previous seasons. In particular, in 2018 WNV was detected at least two weeks before the observed circulation in 2013-2017 and in a larger number of mosquito pools. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0007953DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6939904PMC
January 2020

Efficacy of Actellic 300 CS-based indoor residual spraying on key entomological indicators of malaria transmission in Alibori and Donga, two regions of northern Benin.

Parasit Vectors 2019 Dec 30;12(1):612. Epub 2019 Dec 30.

Centre de Recherche Entomologique de Cotonou (CREC), Cotonou, Benin.

Background: The current study shows the results of three years of IRS entomological monitoring (2016, before intervention; 2017 and 2018, after intervention) performed in Alibori and Donga, northern Benin.

Methods: Mosquito collections were performed on a monthly basis using human landing catches and pyrethrum spray catches in six districts including four treated with Actellic 300 CS (Kandi, Gogounou, Djougou and Copargo) and two untreated (Bembèrèkè and Kouandé) which served as control sites. Key transmission indicators of Anopheles gambiae (s. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13071-019-3865-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6937814PMC
December 2019

The Sting's the Thing.

Chimia (Aarau) 2019 Dec;73(12):1037-1038

Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, BPR 1096, Mattenstrasse 24a, CH-4058 Basel;, Email:

Bees defend themselves by stinging and injecting a venom into their victims; bee venom is a complex mixture of chemicals including the polypeptide melittin which is mainly responsible for triggering the pain of the sting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2533/chimia.2019.1037DOI Listing
December 2019

Impact of vector control interventions on malaria transmission intensity, outdoor vector biting rates and Anopheles mosquito species composition in Tororo, Uganda.

Malar J 2019 Dec 27;18(1):445. Epub 2019 Dec 27.

Department of Zoology, Entomology and Fisheries Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.

Background: Long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) and indoor residual spraying of insecticide (IRS) are widely recommended for the prevention of malaria in endemic regions. Data from human landing catches provide information on the impact of vector control on vector populations. Here, malaria transmission indoors and outdoors, before and after mass deployment of LLINs and IRS in Uganda was compared. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12936-019-3076-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6935116PMC
December 2019

Active dispersion, habitat requirements and human biting behaviour of the invasive mosquito Aedes japonicus japonicus (Theobald, 1901) in Hungary.

Parasitol Res 2020 Feb 24;119(2):403-410. Epub 2019 Dec 24.

Acrida Conservational Research L.P, Deák F. u. 7, Tapolca, 8300, Hungary.

Aedes japonicus japonicus is endemic in a number of countries in eastern Asia but has been accidently introduced into many regions of the world including Europe. It was first detected in Hungary in 2012. In 2017, robust populations of the species were found at Lake Balaton, one of the most important tourist destinations in Central Europe. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00436-019-06582-6DOI Listing
February 2020

Three New Species Isolated from Farmed White-Tailed Deer () in the United States.

Viruses 2019 12 20;12(1). Epub 2019 Dec 20.

Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA.

We report the detection and gene coding sequences of three novel species found in six dead farmed white-tailed deer in the United States. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the new orbiviruses are genetically closely related to the Guangxi, Mobuck, Peruvian horse sickness, and Yunnan orbiviruses, which are thought to be solely borne by mosquitos. However, four of the six viruses analyzed in this work were found as co-infecting agents along with a known cervid pathogen, epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus-2 (EHDV-2), raising questions as to whether the new viruses are primary pathogens or secondary pathogens that exacerbate EHDV-2 infections. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/v12010013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7019857PMC
December 2019
3.279 Impact Factor

Can the methanolic extract of Andrographis paniculata be used as a supplement to anti-snake venom to normalize hemostatic parameters: A thromboelastographic study.

J Ethnopharmacol 2020 Apr 17;252:112480. Epub 2019 Dec 17.

Department of Biochemistry, Melaka Manipal Medical College, Manipal, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, India. Electronic address:

Ethnopharmacological Relevance Of Andrographis Paniculata: The whole plant (including leaves and roots) is used in traditional Ayurveda and Siddha medicine to treat various clinical conditions such as fever, respiratory tract infections, colic pain, liver disorders, diabetes, hypertension, and inflammation. It is also used as an antidote for snake-bite, poisonous bites of insects and recommended as a dietary supplement to boost immunity.

Aim Of The Study: In-vitro thromboelastographic evaluation of the efficacy of methanolic extract of Andrographis paniculata (MAP) and polyvalent anti-snake venom (ASV) in neutralizing the Naja naja (N. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2019.112480DOI Listing

Thymoquinone ameliorates Pachycondyla sennaarensis venom-induced acute toxic shock in male rats.

BMC Pharmacol Toxicol 2019 12 17;20(1):84. Epub 2019 Dec 17.

Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh, 11451, Saudi Arabia.

Background: For many decades, the sting of Samsun ant (Pachycondyla sennaarensis) has been a serious clinical challenge for the people living in some of the major Middle East and Asian countries. In the present study, the therapeutic potential of Nigella sativa derived plant extract component, thymoquinone (TQ) has been tested against the Samsun ant venom (SAV) at the toxic dose in the rats.

Methods: The adult male rats were divided into four groups (n = 10): control, SAV treated, SAV + TQ treated and TQ alone treated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40360-019-0375-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6918657PMC
December 2019

Biological attributes of the kissing bug Triatoma rubrofasciata from Vietnam.

Parasit Vectors 2019 Dec 16;12(1):585. Epub 2019 Dec 16.

Sección Genética Evolutiva, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la República, 11400, Montevideo, Uruguay.

Background: Triatoma rubrofasciata is the only kissing bug species distributed globally. In the Americas, this species transmits the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, responsible for Chagas disease. The presence of T. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13071-019-3844-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6915989PMC
December 2019

Protecting migratory farmers in rural Tanzania using eave ribbons treated with the spatial mosquito repellent, transfluthrin.

Malar J 2019 Dec 10;18(1):414. Epub 2019 Dec 10.

Environmental Health and Ecological Science Department, Ifakara Health Institute, P.O. Box 53, Ifakara, Tanzania.

Background: Many subsistence farmers in rural southeastern Tanzania regularly relocate to distant farms in river valleys to tend to crops for several weeks or months each year. While there, they live in makeshift semi-open structures, usually far from organized health systems and where insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) do not provide adequate protection. This study evaluated the potential of a recently developed technology, eave ribbons treated with the spatial repellent transfluthrin, for protecting migratory rice farmers in rural southeastern Tanzania against indoor-biting and outdoor-biting mosquitoes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12936-019-3048-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6905030PMC
December 2019
3.109 Impact Factor

Stag Beetle Elytra: Localized Shape Retention and Puncture/Wear Resistance.

Insects 2019 Dec 5;10(12). Epub 2019 Dec 5.

Laboratory of Bio- Inspired & Graphene Nanomechanics, Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, University of Trento, via Mesiano, 77, 38123 Trento, Italy.

Beetles are by far one of the most successful groups of insects, with large diversity in terms of number of species. A part of this success is attributed to their elytra, which provide various functions such as protection to their bodies from mechanical forces. In this study, stag beetle () elytra were first examined for their overall flexural properties and were observed to have a localized shape-retaining snap-through mechanism, which may play a possible role in partly absorbing impact energy, e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/insects10120438DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6955947PMC
December 2019

Modelling exposure heterogeneity and density dependence in onchocerciasis using a novel individual-based transmission model, EPIONCHO-IBM: Implications for elimination and data needs.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2019 12 5;13(12):e0007557. Epub 2019 Dec 5.

London Centre for Neglected Tropical Disease Research (LCNTDR), Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine (St Mary's campus), Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.

Background: Density dependence in helminth establishment and heterogeneity in exposure to infection are known to drive resilience to interventions based on mass drug administration (MDA). However, the interaction between these processes is poorly understood. We developed a novel individual-based model for onchocerciasis transmission, EPIONCHO-IBM, which accounts for both processes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0007557DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7006940PMC
December 2019

Safety and Effectiveness of a 3-Day Rush Insect Venom Immunotherapy Protocol.

Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2020 3;181(2):111-118. Epub 2019 Dec 3.

Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, Germany,

Background: Venom immunotherapy (VIT) is an established and effective treatment for patients with Hymenoptera venom allergies. Especially during the build-up of VIT, systemic allergic reactions are a key issue.

Objective: To investigate the safety and effectiveness of a 3-day rush insect VIT protocol and a strategy for the management of individuals with VIT-induced anaphylaxis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000503965DOI Listing
February 2020

Evaluation of mosquito electrocuting traps as a safe alternative to the human landing catch for measuring human exposure to malaria vectors in Burkina Faso.

Malar J 2019 Dec 2;18(1):386. Epub 2019 Dec 2.

Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow, Graham Kerr Building, Glasgow, G12 8QQ, UK.

Background: Measuring human exposure to mosquito bites is a crucial component of vector-borne disease surveillance. For malaria vectors, the human landing catch (HLC) remains the gold standard for direct estimation of exposure. This method, however, is controversial since participants risk exposure to potentially infected mosquito bites. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12936-019-3030-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6889701PMC
December 2019

[Elimination of indigenous malaria in Argentina: history of a struggle and the risk of forgetting].

Rev Argent Microbiol 2019 Oct - Dec;51(4):289-291

Editora de la Revista Argentina de Microbiología. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ram.2019.11.001DOI Listing

Venom Immunotherapy: Questions and Controversies.

Authors:
David B K Golden

Immunol Allergy Clin North Am 2020 02 6;40(1):59-68. Epub 2019 Nov 6.

Department of Medicine, Division of Allergy-Immunology, Johns Hopkins University, 20 Crossroads Drive, Owings Mills, MD 21117, USA. Electronic address:

Questions and controversies regarding venom immunotherapy (VIT) remain. It is important to recognize risk factors for severe sting anaphylaxis that guide the recommendation for testing, epinephrine injectors, and VIT. Premedication, rush VIT, and omalizumab are successful in overcoming recurrent systemic reactions to VIT. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iac.2019.09.002DOI Listing
February 2020

Impressive bullous reaction to mosquito bites.

BMJ Case Rep 2019 Nov 19;12(11). Epub 2019 Nov 19.

Dermatology, Chu Ibn Sina, Rabat, Morocco.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2019-232791DOI Listing
November 2019

Honeybee Stings in the Era of Killer Bees: Anaphylaxis and Toxic Envenomation.

Am J Med 2020 05 9;133(5):621-626. Epub 2019 Nov 9.

Department of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona. Electronic address:

Background: Twenty-six years after the arrival of "killer bees" in Arizona, the entire state with the exception of high elevations in the north is populated with this bee variety and 11 people have died at the scene of massive bee attacks.

Methods: Because of the aggressive behavior of these bees we studied bee stings reported to the Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center. The center received 399 calls regarding 312 victims of bee stings from January 2017 to June 2019. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2019.10.028DOI Listing

Infectivity of Simulium damnosum s.l. and therapeutic coverage of ivermectin distribution 10 years post treatment around Owena Dam, Ondo state, Nigeria.

Braz J Infect Dis 2019 Nov - Dec;23(6):410-418. Epub 2019 Nov 4.

Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, Public Health and Epidemiology Department, Lagos, Nigeria.

Background: Studies related to infectivity status of insect vectors are seen as necessities in understanding the epidemiology of vector-borne diseases and planning effective control measures. This study assessed the infectivity ofSimulium damnosum s.l. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjid.2019.10.003DOI Listing

Risk factors affecting dairy cattle protective grouping behavior, commonly known as bunching, against Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) on California dairies.

PLoS One 2019 7;14(11):e0224987. Epub 2019 Nov 7.

Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California Davis, Tulare, California, United States of America.

Bunching is the term used to describe the protective aggregating behavior of cattle against the painful bites of stable flies (Stomoxys calcitrans), where cattle gather in a group with their heads to the center of the group and their tails to the outside to reduce stable fly attack. Both sexes of the stable fly feed on blood, and their painful bites negatively impact cattle health, productivity and welfare. A longitudinal study was conducted from April to July 2017 to estimate the stable fly activity on 20 California dairies (average herd size = 2466 ± 1050), to determine stable fly activity that induced bunching, and to evaluate the association between management and environmental factors, and cattle bunching. Read More

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0224987PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6837549PMC

A popular Indian clove-based mosquito repellent is less effective against Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti than DEET.

PLoS One 2019 5;14(11):e0224810. Epub 2019 Nov 5.

Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA, United States of America.

Insect repellents are widely used as the first line of defense against mosquito bites and transmission of disease-causing agents. However, the cost of daily applications of even the most affordable and the gold standard of insect repellents, DEET, is still high for low-income populations where repellents are needed the most. An Indian clove-based homemade recipe has been presented as a panacea. Read More

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0224810PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6830767PMC

An unusual cause of foot ulcer in a patient with diabetes mellitus.

J Family Med Prim Care 2019 Sep 30;8(9):3068-3070. Epub 2019 Sep 30.

Department of Endocrinology, Christian Medical College and Hospital, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India.

A diabetic foot ulcer is the leading cause of nontraumatic amputation worldwide. The most important predisposing factor for diabetic foot ulcer is peripheral neuropathy. Rat bites are an uncommon but important cause of ulcer in patients with diabetes, especially in lower socioeconomic strata. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jfmpc.jfmpc_569_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6820431PMC
September 2019
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What's eating you? cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis) revisited.

Cutis 2019 Sep;104(3):182-183;186

Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, USA.

Cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) often leave cats and dogs to bite humans, causing pruritic lesions of the lower extremities. Once flea bites are confirmed, various efforts can be made to eradicate these pests from the home or pets. Cat fleas also play a role in transmission of vector-borne diseases, especially endemic typhus. Read More

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September 2019

Insect Bite-Associated Invasive Fungal Infections.

Open Forum Infect Dis 2019 Oct 9;6(10):ofz385. Epub 2019 Oct 9.

Department of Infectious Diseases, Infection Control and Employee Health, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas.

Insect bites are rarely reported to result in myocutaneous mycoses. We reviewed the literature and report 22 cases. Molds were the most common pathogens (15), especially (9). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ofid/ofz385DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6785662PMC
October 2019

Host Associations Of Biting Midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae: ) Near Sentinel Chicken Surveillance Locations In Florida, USA.

J Am Mosq Control Assoc 2019 09;35(3):200-206

University of Florida IFAS, Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory, 200 9th Street SE, Vero Beach, FL 32962.

Quantifying host use is important for understanding transmission of vector-borne pathogens. Despite the importance of biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in pathogen transmission, the vector-host relationships of most species are poorly documented, even in locations where active arbovirus surveillance is conducted. Polymerase chain reaction-based blood-meal analysis was performed on 663 blood-engorged females collected by 7 Florida mosquito control districts at 24 sentinel chicken arbovirus surveillance sites in 2017. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2987/19-6834.1DOI Listing
September 2019

Local human movement patterns and land use impact exposure to zoonotic malaria in Malaysian Borneo.

Elife 2019 10 22;8. Epub 2019 Oct 22.

Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom.

Human movement into insect vector and wildlife reservoir habitats determines zoonotic disease risks; however, few data are available to quantify the impact of land use on pathogen transmission. Here, we utilise GPS tracking devices and novel applications of ecological methods to develop fine-scale models of human space use relative to land cover to assess exposure to the zoonotic malaria in Malaysian Borneo. Combining data with spatially explicit models of mosquito biting rates, we demonstrate the role of individual heterogeneities in local space use in disease exposure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.47602DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6814363PMC
October 2019

Analysis in a murine model points to IgG responses against the 34k2 salivary proteins from Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti as novel promising candidate markers of host exposure to Aedes mosquitoes.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2019 10 16;13(10):e0007806. Epub 2019 Oct 16.

Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy.

Background: Aedes mosquitoes are vectors of arboviral diseases of great relevance for public health. The recent outbreaks of dengue, Zika, chikungunya and the rapid worldwide spreading of Aedes albopictus emphasize the need for improvement of vector surveillance and control. Host antibody response to mosquito salivary antigens is emerging as a relevant additional tool to directly assess vector-host contact, monitor efficacy of control interventions and evaluate risk of arboviral transmission. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0007806DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6816578PMC
October 2019
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A Preliminary Report of the Relationship Between Gene Polymorphism of and Its Receptors and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome Caused by Wasp Stings.

DNA Cell Biol 2019 Dec 14;38(12):1512-1518. Epub 2019 Oct 14.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Taihe Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan, China.

The plasma levels of interleukin-8 () and its receptors ( and ) play a significant role in the development of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), but it is not clear how these proteins are involved in wasp sting patients developing SIRS. To study potential genetic factors predisposing to the risk of SIRS caused by wasp sting injury, we determined the plasma levels of and its receptors among SIRS patients with wasp sting injury and investigated the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms of these genes with SIRS. A total of 225 patients were divided into the SIRS group ( = 62) and non-SIRS group (control,  = 163), and we associated polymorphisms in [ (-251T>A), (-845C>T), (+396G>T), (+781T>C), (+860C>G), [ (+811T>C), (+1235C>T), and (+1440A>G)] with SIRS with a linear additive model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/dna.2019.4855DOI Listing
December 2019
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A field-based modeling study on ecological characterization of hourly host-seeking behavior and its associated climatic variables in Aedes albopictus.

Parasit Vectors 2019 Oct 14;12(1):474. Epub 2019 Oct 14.

Department of Pathogen Biology, Key Laboratory of Prevention and Control for Emerging Infectious Diseases of Guangdong Higher Institutes, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Research, School of Public Health, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, 510515, Guangdong, China.

Background: The global spread of mosquito-borne diseases (MBD) has presented increasing challenges to public health. The transmission of MBD is mainly attributable to the biting behaviors of female mosquitoes. However, the ecological pattern of hourly host-seeking behavior in Aedes albopictus and its association with climatic variables are still not well understood, especially for a precise requirement for establishing an effective risk prediction system of MBD transmission. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13071-019-3715-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6791010PMC
October 2019
3.430 Impact Factor

Streptococcus pyogenes cutaneous infection following sandfly bites.

J Microbiol Immunol Infect 2019 Dec 30;52(6):1000-1001. Epub 2019 Sep 30.

Departments of Laboratory Medicine and Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmii.2019.09.001DOI Listing
December 2019
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Multiple Blood Feeding: A Force Multiplier for Transmission.

Trends Parasitol 2019 12 1;35(12):949-952. Epub 2019 Oct 1.

Department of Biology, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue LC: 4983, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA.

Anopheles mosquitoes employ complex behavioral and physiological strategies to adapt to their environment. Here we show how altering the number of bites a mosquito takes per gonotrophic cycle (gonotrophic discordance) could raise the transmission potential of a mosquito population far above model predictions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pt.2019.08.004DOI Listing
December 2019