2,685 results match your criteria Birth defects research[Journal]


A case-control analysis of maternal diet and risk of neural tube defects in Bangladesh.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Apr 15. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Department of Neurology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.

Objectives: Mothers need a nutrient-rich diet for healthy neural tube development. Neural tube defect risk can be reduced through fortifying grain products with folic acid and taking folic acid supplements. Fortification is not required in Bangladesh. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/bdr2.1505
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1505DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Association of IFT88 gene variants with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Apr 5. Epub 2019 Apr 5.

Center for Craniofacial Research, School of Dentistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas.

Background: Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCLP) is a common birth defect with multifactorial etiology. Genetic studies have identified numerous gene variants in association with NSCLP. IFT88 (intraflagellar transport 88) has been suggested to play a major role in craniofacial development, as Ift88 mutant mice exhibit cleft palate and mutations in IFT88 were identified in individuals with NSCLP. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1504DOI Listing

Evaluation of prenatal diabetes mellitus and other risk factors for craniofacial microsomia.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 30. Epub 2019 Mar 30.

Center for Developmental Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, Washington.

Objectives: Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) is a congenital condition that typically involves hypoplasia of the ear and jaw. It is often associated with adverse effects such as hearing loss and sleep-disordered breathing. There is little research on its etiology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1502DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Gastroschisis as a thrombotic disruption.

Authors:
Mark Lubinsky

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 29. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Wauwatosa, Wisconsin.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1503DOI Listing

Prevalence of selected birth defects by maternal nativity status, United States, 1999-2007.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 28. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

Birth Defects Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Texas Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas.

Objectives: We investigated differences in prevalence of major birth defects by maternal nativity within racial/ethnic groups for 27 major birth defects.

Methods: Data from 11 population-based birth defects surveillance systems in the United States including almost 13 million live births (approximately a third of U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1489DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Risk factors associated with the development of double-inlet ventricle congenital heart disease.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 28. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California.

Background: Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common birth defect group and a significant contributor to neonatal and infant death. CHD with single ventricle anatomy, including hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), tricuspid atresia (TA), and various double-inlet ventricle (DIV) malformations, is the most complex with the highest mortality. Prenatal risk factors associated with HLHS have been studied, but such data for DIV are lacking. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1501DOI Listing
March 2019
7 Reads

Fetal cardiac intervention for right sided heart disease: Pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum.

Authors:
James Strainic

Birth Defects Res 2019 May 28;111(8):395-399. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, The Congenital Heart Collaborative, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, University Hospitals of Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio.

Congenital heart disease (CHD), the most common of birth defects, can be serious enough to require a lifetime of medical care including multiple surgeries or other interventions. Advances in ultrasound technology and a better understanding of the progression of CHDs have made it possible to intervene in utero. This early stage intervention allows the still plastic cardiovascular system to return to a more normal trajectory thus sparing the newborn from negative consequences to morbidity and mortality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1499DOI Listing

Genesis of placental sequestration in malaria and possible targets for drugs for placental malaria.

Authors:
Robert L Clark

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 28. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

Artemis Pharmaceutical Research, Jacksonville, Florida.

Malaria during pregnancy results in intrauterine growth restriction, fetal anemia, and infant mortality. Women are more susceptible to malaria during pregnancy due to malaria-induced inflammation and the sequestration of infected red blood cells in the placenta, which bind to the chondroitin sulfate portion of syndecan-1 on the syncytiotrophoblast and in the intervillous space. Syndecan-1 is a dimeric proteoglycan with an extracellular ectodomain that is cleaved from the transmembrane domain (referred to as "shedding") by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), likely the secreted MMP-9. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1496DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

The association between prenatal alcohol exposure and protein expression in human placenta.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 19. Epub 2019 Mar 19.

Department of Neurosciences, School of Medicine, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Background: The need for earlier recognition of children at risk for neurobehavioral problems associated with prenatal ethanol exposure (PAE) has prompted investigations of biomarkers prognostic for altered fetal development. Here, we examined whether PAE alters the expression of angiogenesis-related proteins and cytokines in human placenta in subjects from an Ethanol, Neurodevelopment, Infant and Child Health prospective cohort.

Methods: PAE was ascertained by screening questionnaires, Time-line Follow-back interviews and a panel of ethanol biomarkers at two study visits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1488DOI Listing

Use of benzodiazepine medications during pregnancy and potential risk for birth defects, National Birth Defects Prevention Study, 1997-2011.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 19. Epub 2019 Mar 19.

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

Background: Benzodiazepine medications can be used to treat anxiety, a condition affecting 15% of women of childbearing age in the United States. Studies have shown conflicting results for the association between benzodiazepine use during pregnancy and birth defects.

Methods: We analyzed 1997-2011 data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a multisite, population-based case-control study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1497DOI Listing
March 2019
7 Reads

HSPA6: A new autosomal recessive candidate gene for the VATER/VACTERL malformation spectrum.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 18. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Institute of Human Genetics, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.

Background: The VATER/VACTERL association refers to the nonrandom co-occurrence of at least three of the following component features (CFs): vertebral defects (V), anorectal malformations (ARM) (A), cardiac defects (C), tracheoesophageal fistula with or without esophageal atresia (TE), renal malformations (R), and limb defects (L). Patients presenting with two CFs have been termed VATER/VACTERL-like phenotypes.

Methods: We surveyed the exome for recessive disease variants in three affected sib-pairs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1493DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Fetal aortic valvuloplasty to prevent progression to hypoplastic left heart syndrome in utero.

Birth Defects Res 2019 May 14;111(8):389-394. Epub 2019 Mar 14.

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Columbia University Medical Center, Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of NewYork-Presbyterian, New York, New York.

Advances in fetal echocardiography have allowed for the prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease and an understanding of its natural history in utero. This insight has led to the development of fetal cardiac intervention (FCI) for select defects to prevent significant morbidity or mortality postnatally. Fetal aortic valvuloplasty (FAV) may be performed to prevent progression to hypoplastic left heart syndrome, a severe form of congenital heart disease, in utero. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1478DOI Listing

Temporal trends in diagnoses of congenital microcephaly, Texas Hospital Discharge Diagnoses, 2000-2015.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 12. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Birth Defects Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, Texas Department of State Health Services, Austin, Texas.

Objective: Assess temporal trends in congenital microcephaly.

Methods: We used Texas inpatient discharge diagnoses between 2000 and 2015, restricting to newborns. Between 2000 and 2003, the maximum number of fields for recording diagnostic codes was eight, and between 2004 and 2015 it was 24. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1491DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Introduction to "fetal interventions to alleviate heart defects".

Birth Defects Res 2019 May 12;111(8):367-369. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, The Congenital Heart Collaborative, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1483DOI Listing

The effects of alcohol and cannabinoid exposure during the brain growth spurt on behavioral development in rats.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 10. Epub 2019 Mar 10.

Department of Psychology, Center for Behavioral Teratology, San Diego State University, San Diego, California.

Cannabis is the most commonly used illicit drug among pregnant women. Moreover, over half of pregnant women who are consuming cannabis are also consuming alcohol; however, the consequences of combined prenatal alcohol and cannabis exposure on fetal development are not well understood. The current study examined behavioral development following exposure to ethanol (EtOH) and/or CP-55,940 (CP), a cannabinoid receptor agonist. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/bdr2.1487
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1487DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

Prenatal diagnosis and management of congenital complete heart block.

Birth Defects Res 2019 May 1;111(8):380-388. Epub 2019 Mar 1.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology/Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, California.

Congenital complete heart block (CCHB) is a life-threatening medical condition in the unborn fetus with insufficiently validated prenatal interventions. Maternal administration of medications aimed at decreasing the immune response in the fetus and beta-agonists intended to increase fetal cardiac output have shown only marginal benefits. Anti-inflammatory therapies cannot reverse CCHB, but may decrease myocarditis and improve heart function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1459DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6474813PMC
May 2019
1 Read

An evolutionary and developmental biology approach to gastroschisis.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Apr 28;111(6):294-311. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah.

Recent advances have now made it possible to speak of gastroschisis narrowly in morphogenetic terms invoking the Rittler-Beaudoin (R-B) model. This proceeds from the appreciation of gastroschisis as a congenital intestinal herniation (without cover or liver) within the primordial umbilical ring, mostly to the right side of a normally formed umbilical cord. Presently, it is unresolved whether this visceral prolapse represents failure of ring closure before return of the physiological hernia into the abdomen or rupture of the delicate amniotic/peritoneal membrane at the ring's edge to the right of the cord. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1481DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Birth prevalence of orofacial clefts among perinatal infants: A register-based study in Bao'an district, Shenzhen, China.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Apr 23;111(7):353-359. Epub 2019 Feb 23.

Department of Health Care, Bao'an Maternal and Child Health Hospital, Shenzhen, China.

Background: The birth prevalence of orofacial clefts (OFCs) has been widely studied, but results are considerable varied, and epidemiological studies in southern China are few in numbers. To address this gap, we carried out a register-based study to estimate the birth prevalence of OFCs in Bao'an district, Shenzhen, China.

Methods: Data of perinatal infants born between 2003 and 2017 were extracted from Shenzhen Maternal and Child Health Management System. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1467DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Differentially sensitive neuronal subpopulations in the central nervous system and the formation of hindbrain heterotopias in ethanol-exposed zebrafish.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Feb 21. Epub 2019 Feb 21.

Department of Molecular Biosciences, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas.

Background: A cardinal feature of prenatal ethanol exposure is CNS damage, resulting in a continuum of neurological and behavioral impairments that are described by the term fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). FASDs are variable and depend on several factors, including the amount, timing, and duration of prenatal ethanol exposure. To enhance interventions for CNS dysfunction, it is necessary to identify ethanol-sensitive neuronal populations and expand the understanding of factors that modify ethanol teratogenesis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1477DOI Listing
February 2019

Exploring the contributions and suitability of relational and community-centered fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) prevention work in First Nation communities.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Feb 20. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Department of Educational Psychology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

Background: This study provides initial evidence of the contributions and suitability of relational, trauma-informed, and community-based approaches for programs aimed at the prevention of future alcohol-and drug-exposed births. Specifically, this study extends understanding of the experiences of mentors providing evidence-based 3-year home visitation services through the Parent-Child Assistance Program (PCAP) in rural and isolated First Nation communities in Alberta, Canada.

Methods: Using a participatory approach to this research project, we explored existing PCAP services to capture implementation across six rural and isolated Alberta fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) networks involving First Nation communities over an 8-month period. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1480DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Application of quality indicators to data from the National Network of Congenital Anomalies of Argentina.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Apr 13;111(6):333-340. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

National Network of Congenital Anomalies of Argentina (RENAC), National Center of Medical Genetics, National Administration of Health Laboratories and Institutes, National Ministry of Health, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Background: In Argentina, birth defects are a leading cause of infant deaths. In 2009, the National Network for Congenital Anomalies of Argentina (RENAC) was established as a hospital-based surveillance system of major structural birth defects. To assess and enhance the system's data quality, we previously developed data quality indicators (DQI). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1472DOI Listing
April 2019
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A proposal for the systematic assessment of data quality indicators in birth defects surveillance.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Apr 11;111(6):324-332. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

International Centre on Birth Defects (ICBD), Rome, Italy.

Background: Quality control and improvement are a key part of the implementation of an effective surveillance program. Data quality indicators (DQI) are key tools but have not been widely used, especially in a low-resource setting.

Methods: We developed a list of data quality indicators of birth defects surveillance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1474DOI Listing

Introduction to the focus on "the immune system from placenta to birth".

Authors:
Michiko Watanabe

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 11;111(4):175-177. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Section Editor of BDRm, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, The Congenital Heart Collaborative, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1468DOI Listing

Understanding chondrodysplasia (cho): A comprehensive review of cho as an animal model of birth defects, disorders, and molecular mechanisms.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 4;111(5):237-247. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Department of Physiology and Developmental Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah.

Background: The mutant chondrodysplasia (cho) is a cartilage-targeting disorder in C57BL mice that results in dwarfing and other malformations stemming from this collagenopathy. Clarke Fraser made the discovery of the mutation accidentally in the early 1960s during the thalidomide tragedy.

Methods: For this review we identified key research on cho as since its discovery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1473DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Relation between adaptive function and IQ among youth with histories of heavy prenatal alcohol exposure.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Center for Behavioral Teratology and Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, California.

Background: Adaptive function and general intellectual function are two important and often correlated domains. While youth with prenatal alcohol exposure frequently demonstrate impairments in both domains, it is not clear whether the relation between these domains is consistent across levels of ability or whether, for example, adaptive function is less affected by intellectual function at higher ability levels. The aim of the current study was to test this relation in youth with and without prenatal alcohol exposure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1463DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Environmental exposures during pregnancy: Mechanistic effects on immunity.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 1;111(4):178-196. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Department of Environmental Health and Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.

In human studies, it is well established that exposures during embryonic and fetal development periods can influence immune health. Coupled with genetic predisposition, these exposures can alter lifetime chronic and infectious disease trajectory, and, ultimately, life expectancy. Fortunately, as research advances, mechanisms governing long-term effects of prenatal exposures are coming to light and providing the opportunity for intervention and risk reduction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1469DOI Listing

Short-term results of patients with neural tube defects followed-up in the Konya region, Turkey.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 1;111(5):261-269. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Department of Pediatrics, Selçuk University, Selçuklu Medical Faculty, Konya, Turkey.

Background: Additional congenital anomalies have often been found in patients with neural tube defect (NTD). We aimed to find out the clinical features, short term prognosis, treatment approaches, and systemic anomalies of NTD patients in the Konya region.

Method: A total of 186 newborn babies with NTD were retrospectively included in the study and all were assessed in detail for congenital anomalies and clinical features. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1462DOI Listing
March 2019
18 Reads

Testicular function in cultured postnatal mouse testis fragments is similar to that of animals during the first wave of spermatogenesis.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 31;111(5):270-280. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Division of Systems Biology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, Arkansas.

Background: Previously, we evaluated optimal organ culture conditions to produce elongated spermatids in an in vitro mouse testis culture system. However, differences in testicular function between the cultured testis fragments and animal testis have not been determined.

Methods: To examine how closely cultured testis fragments in vitro approximates what typically occurs during the first wave of spermatogenesis in vivo, C57BL/6J mouse testis fragments obtained on postnatal day (PND) 5 were cultured in AlbuMAX™ I/ α-Minimal Essential Medium for 15, 23, 30, 35, 42, and 49 days, and compared to mouse testes obtained at PND 5, 14, 20, 24, 28, 30, 35, and 40. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/bdr2.1451
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1451DOI Listing
March 2019
10 Reads

An insight into the role of the death receptor CD95 throughout pregnancy: Guardian, facilitator, or foe.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 31;111(4):197-211. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Environmental toxicology and Chemical Pharmacology, INRS - Institut Armand-Frappier and Center for Interdisciplinary Research on Well-Being, Health, Society and Environment, Laval, Quebec, Canada.

The prototype death receptor CD95 (Fas) and its ligand, CD95L (FasL), have been thoroughly studied due to their role in immune homeostasis and elimination of infected and transformed cells. The fact that CD95 is present in female reproductive cells and modulated during embryogenesis and pregnancy has raised interest in its role in immune tolerance to the fetoplacental unit. CD95 has been shown to be critical for proper embryonic formation and survival. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1470DOI Listing

Differential neuroimaging indices in prefrontal white matter in prenatal alcohol-associated ADHD versus idiopathic ADHD.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Jan 29. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Jane & Terry Semel Institute for Neuroscience, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.

Background: Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is common in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) but also in patients without prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE). Many patients diagnosed with idiopathic ADHD may actually have ADHD and covert PAE, a treatment-relevant distinction.

Methods: We compared proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI; N = 44) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI; N = 46) of the anterior corona radiata (ACR)-a key fiber tract in models of ADHD-at 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1460DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Hypospadias risk is increased with maternal residential exposure to hormonally active hazardous air pollutants.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Apr 29;111(7):345-352. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Scott Department of Urology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.

Background: With the increasing birth prevalence of hypospadias, there is growing concern for pollutant exposure interfering with normal penile development. We assess the association between hypospadias and hormonally active hazardous air pollutants (HAHAPs) through a nationwide database of hazardous air pollutants and the Texas Birth Defects Registry (TBDR).

Methods: Using the TBDR, we identified 8,981 nonsyndromic isolated hypospadias cases from 1999 to 2008. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/bdr2.1461
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1461DOI Listing
April 2019
11 Reads

Characterizing adverse prenatal and postnatal experiences in children.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

Background: Prenatal and postnatal adversities, including prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE), prenatal exposure to other substances, toxic stress, lack of adequate resources, and postnatal abuse or neglect, often co-occur. These exposures can have cumulative effects, or interact with each other, leading to worse outcomes than single exposures. However, given their complexity and heterogeneity, exposures can be difficult to characterize. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1464DOI Listing
January 2019

Women's periconceptional lowered carbohydrate intake and NTD-affected pregnancy risk in the era of prefortification with folic acid.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 25;111(5):248-253. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.

Background: A recent study observed women's restricted carbohydrate diet in the year before conception was associated with increased risk of neural tube defect (NTD)-affected pregnancies. That study corresponded to the era of postfortification of folic acid. Because folic acid and carbohydrate measures would derive from similar foods, investigators of that study could not determine whether the increased risk with restricted carbohydrate intake was a consequence of lower folate intake. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1466DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

The effects of nifedipine and ivabradine on the functionality of the early rat embryonic heart. Are these drugs a risk in early human pregnancy?

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 17;111(5):281-288. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Discipline of Anatomy and Histology, Sydney School of Medical Science, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Background: When the human heart begins its earliest contractions from day 21, it lacks a functional autonomic nerve supply. Instead, contractions are generated by regular calcium transients later augmented by the funny current (I ) produced by sinoatrial-like cells. This study examined effects of blocking these currents in the early rat embryonic heart. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1457DOI Listing

Ethanol and cannabinoids interact to alter behavior in a zebrafish fetal alcohol spectrum disorder model.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Jan 16. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

Julius L. Chambers Biomedical/Biotechnology Research Institute, North Carolina Central University, Durham, North Carolina.

Background: Recent work suggests that endocannabinoids (eCBs) may signal through the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway. We therefore hypothesized that combined ethanol and eCB exposure during defined stages of zebrafish embryogenesis will produce deficits comparable to human fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD).

Methods: Zebrafish embryos were exposed to ethanol or cannabinoid agonists alone or in combination at defined developmental stages and assessed for changes in brain morphology or expression of marker genes such as pax6a. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/bdr2.1458
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1458DOI Listing
January 2019
16 Reads

Response to comments on "Reproductive toxicology studies supporting the safety of molindone, a dopamine receptor antagonist".

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 11;111(4):230-231. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Preclinical DMPK and Pharmacology, Supernus Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Rockville, Maryland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1447DOI Listing
March 2019
6 Reads

Outcomes of infants born to women with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Jan 9;111(2):88-95. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

Background: Pregnant women with influenza are more likely to have complications, but information on infant outcomes is limited.

Methods: Five state/local health departments collected data on outcomes of infants born to pregnant women with 2009 H1N1 influenza reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from April to December 2009. Collaborating sites linked information on pregnant women with confirmed 2009 H1N1 influenza, many who were severely ill, to their infants' birth certificates. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/bdr2.1445
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1445DOI Listing
January 2019
57 Reads

Prepregnancy asthma and the subsequent risk of central nervous system defects in offspring.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 8;111(5):254-260. Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Sherbrooke University Hospital Research Centre, Sherbrooke, Canada.

Background: The relationship between childhood asthma and central nervous system defects in offspring is poorly understood. We assessed if childhood asthma was associated with the risk of having an infant with neural tube or other nervous system defects compared with asthma during pregnancy.

Methods: We analyzed a longitudinal cohort of 128,060 women who were 5 years or less at study entry and later delivered an infant in Quebec, Canada (1989-2014). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1452DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Maternal residential exposure to specific agricultural pesticide active ingredients and birth defects in a 2003-2005 North Carolina birth cohort.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Apr 28;111(6):312-323. Epub 2018 Dec 28.

Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Research Triangle Park, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.

Background: Previously we observed elevated odds ratios (ORs) for total pesticide exposure and 10 birth defects: three congenital heart defects and structural defects affecting the gastrointestinal, genitourinary and musculoskeletal systems. This analysis examines association of those defects with exposure to seven commonly applied pesticide active ingredients.

Methods: Cases were live-born singleton infants from the North Carolina Birth Defects Monitoring Program linked to birth records for 2003-2005; noncases served as controls (total n = 304,906). Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/bdr2.1448
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1448DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6445756PMC
April 2019
17 Reads

Limb body wall complex: Its delineation and relationship with amniotic bands using clustering methods.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 27;111(4):222-228. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

ECLAMC at CEMIC (Centro de Educación Médica e Investigaciones Clínicas), Conicet, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Background: Despite the numerous reports on the limb body wall complex (LBWC), this association has never been adequately defined. Amniotic bands (AB) are frequently present but their role remains unclear. Since most reports were based on clinical and often subjective diagnoses, the aim of this work was to define LBWC and the role of AB, minimizing subjectivity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1442DOI Listing

A machine learning approach to investigate potential risk factors for gastroschisis in California.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Mar 26;111(4):212-221. Epub 2018 Dec 26.

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.

Background: To generate new leads about risk factors for gastroschisis, a birth defect that has been increasing in prevalence over time, we performed an untargeted data mining statistical approach.

Methods: Using data exclusively from the California Center of the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, we compared 286 cases of gastroschisis and 1,263 non-malformed, live-born controls. All infants had delivery dates between October 1997 and December 2011 and were stratified by maternal age at birth (<20 and ≥ 20 years). Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/bdr2.1441
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1441DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6397054PMC
March 2019
10 Reads

Risk factors for congenital microcephaly in the pre-Zika era.

Birth Defects Res 2019 Jan 24;111(2):96-118. Epub 2018 Dec 24.

Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts.

Background: The Zika epidemic has brought increased attention to congenital microcephaly as a birth outcome. However, little is known about risks for microcephaly unrelated to Zika.

Methods: Using data from the Slone Epidemiology Center Birth Defects Study from 1993 to 2015, we identified 57 cases of microcephaly alone ("isolated") and 109 cases of microcephaly that included other major birth defects ("non-isolated"), and considered a large number of potential risk factors including demographic characteristics, illnesses, and medications used during pregnancy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1443DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Maternal hyperglycemia and fetal cardiac development: Clinical impact and underlying mechanisms.

Birth Defects Res 2018 12;110(20):1504-1516

Center for Cardiovascular Research and Heart Center, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio.

Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of birth defect and is both a significant pediatric and adult health problem, in light of a growing population of survivors. The etiology of CHD has been considered to be multifactorial with genetic and environmental factors playing important roles. The combination of advances in cardiac developmental biology, which have resulted in the elucidation of molecular pathways regulating normal cardiac morphogenesis, and genome sequencing technology have allowed the discovery of numerous genetic contributors of CHD ranging from chromosomal abnormalities to single gene variants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1435DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6310016PMC
December 2018

Inherited nongenetic influences on the gut microbiome and immune system.

Birth Defects Res 2018 12;110(20):1494-1503

Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri.

The gut microbiome and the immune system codevelop around the time of birth, well after genetic information has been passed from the parents to the offspring. Each of these "organ systems" displays plasticity. The immune system can mount highly specific adaptive responses to newly encountered antigens, and the gut microbiota is affected by changes in the environment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1436DOI Listing
December 2018

Molecules and microbes and cells, Oh My! What mothers give to us besides genes.

Birth Defects Res 2018 12;110(20):1491-1493

Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, The Congenital Heart Collaborative, School of Medicine, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1440DOI Listing
December 2018

Oxygen and lack of oxygen in fetal and placental development, feto-placental coupling, and congenital heart defects.

Birth Defects Res 2018 12;110(20):1517-1530

Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Low oxygen concentration (hypoxia) is part of normal embryonic development, yet the situation is complex. Oxygen (O ) is a janus gas with low levels signaling through hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF) that are required for development of fetal and placental vasculature and fetal red blood cells. This results in coupling of fetus and mother around midgestation as a functional feto-placental unit (FPU) for O transport, which is required for continued growth and development of the fetus. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/bdr2.1430
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1430DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Adverse maternal environment leads to cardiac fibrosis in adult male mice.

Birth Defects Res 2018 12;110(20):1551-1555

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Background: Cardiac fibrosis is a cardinal feature of multiple types of cardiovascular disease, which lead to heart failure. Multiple studies connect adverse maternal environment (AME) with cardiac fibrosis. AME does not always result in fibrosis, though. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1428DOI Listing
December 2018