19 results match your criteria Biosocieties[Journal]

  • Page 1 of 1

Calibrating cancer risk, uncertainty and environments: Genetics and their contexts in southern Brazil.

Authors:
Sahra Gibbon

Biosocieties 2018 Dec 28;13(4):761-779. Epub 2018 Sep 28.

Drawing on empirical ethnographic research in Brazil this paper examines how in the spaces between identifying genetic markers and conditional cancer risk, environments and diverse epigenetic logics are emerging and being negotiated among research and clinical communities, patients and their families. Focusing on an arena of research and medical intervention related to a gene variant known as R337h, thought to occur with high frequency in the south of Brazil and linked to the cancer syndrome Li-Fraumeni, it emphasises the relevance of examining epigenetics as an emic category but also its utility as an analytic category. It shows how in a context of not yet fully knowing how and in what ways R337h contributes to increased cancer, a range of different 'environments' are invoked that unevenly articulate an emerging and still inchoate and unfolding terrain of understanding. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/s41292-017-0095-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6453108PMC
December 2018

Failing, hacking, passing: Autism, entanglement, and the ethics of transformation.

Authors:
Gregory Hollin

Biosocieties 2017 Dec;12(4):611-633

School of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK.

One of the most notable recent changes in autism science is the belief that autism is a heterogeneous condition with no singular essence. I argue that this notion of 'autistic heterogeneity' can be conceived as an 'agential cut' and traced to uncertainty work conducted by cognitive psychologists during the early 1990s. Researchers at this time overcame uncertainty in scientific theory by locating it within autism itself: epistemological uncertainty was interwoven with ontological indeterminacy and autism became heterogeneous and chance like, a condition determined by indeterminacy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/s41292-017-0054-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6112412PMC
December 2017

"I don't have to know why it snows, I just have to shovel it!": Addiction Recovery, Genetic Frameworks, and Biological Citizenship.

Biosocieties 2017 Dec 11;12(4):568-587. Epub 2017 Jul 11.

Pennsylvania State University, 1743C Humanities, Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA 17033

The gene has infiltrated the way citizens perceive themselves and their health. However, there is scant research that explores the ways genetic conceptions infiltrate individuals' understanding of their own health as it relates to a behavioral trait, like addiction. Do people seeking treatment for addiction ground their self-perception in biology in a way that shapes their experiences? We interviewed 63 participants in addiction treatment programs, asking how they make meaning of a genetic understanding of addiction in the context of their recovery, and in dealing with the stigma of addiction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/s41292-017-0045-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5851475PMC
December 2017
5 Reads

White opioids: Pharmaceutical race and the war on drugs that wasn't.

Biosocieties 2017 Jun 28;12(2):217-238. Epub 2017 Jun 28.

Departments of Anthropology and Psychiatry, New York University, New York, NY 10003, USA.

The US 'War on Drugs' has had a profound role in reinforcing racial hierarchies. Although Black Americans are no more likely than Whites to use illicit drugs, they are 6-10 times more likely to be incarcerated for drug offenses. Meanwhile, a very different system for responding to the drug use of Whites has emerged. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/biosoc.2015.46DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5501419PMC
June 2017
89 Reads

The decision: Relations to oneself, authority and vulnerability in the field of selective abortion.

Biosocieties 2015 Sep;10(3):317-340

Centre for the Studies of Sciences and the Humanities (SVT), University of Bergen , Allegt.34, PB 7805, 5020 Bergen, Norway.

This article is about selective abortion. It concentrates on the existential, moral and social conditions that arise when pregnant women, using prenatal diagnosis (PND), are told that there is something seriously wrong with the foetuses that they are carrying. This is characterised as a micro state of emergency, where both normal cognitive categories and normative orders are dissolved. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/biosoc.2014.39DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4547055PMC
September 2015

Pharmacogenomics, human genetic diversity and the incorporation and rejection of color/race in Brazil.

Biosocieties 2015 Mar;10(1):48-69

University College, London, UK.

Public funding for research on the action of drugs in countries like the United States requires that racial classification of research subjects should be considered when defining the composition of the samples as well as in data analysis, sometimes resulting in interpretations that Whites and Blacks differ in their pharmacogenetic profiles. In Brazil, pharmacogenomic results have led to very different interpretations when compared with those obtained in the United States. This is explained as deriving from the genomic heterogeneity of the Brazilian population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/biosoc.2014.21DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4538779PMC

Materiality matters: Blurred boundaries and the domestication of functional foods.

Biosocieties 2015 Jun;10(2):194-212

Department of Sociology, Freeman Building, University of Sussex , Brighton, BN1 9QE, UK . E-mail:

Previous scholarship on novel foods, including functional foods, has suggested that they are difficult to categorise for both regulators and users. It is argued that they blur the boundary between 'food' and 'drug' and that uncertainties about the products create 'experimental' or 'restless' approaches to consumption. We investigate these uncertainties drawing on data about the use of functional foods containing phytosterols, which are licensed for sale in the EU for people wishing to reduce their cholesterol. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/biosoc.2015.7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4469700PMC

Sensorial pedagogies, hungry fat cells and the limits of nutritional health education.

Authors:
Emilia Sanabria

Biosocieties 2015 Jun;10(2):125-142

Ecole normale supérieure de Lyon, INSERM & Triangle UMR5206 , Lyon 69007, France . E-mail:

This article examines the way the category of 'the sensorial' is mobilised across obesity research and care practices for overweight persons in France. The 'natural' body is understood to have developed mechanisms that motivate eaters to seek out energy-dense foods, a hardwiring that is maladaptive in today's plethoric food environment. The article analyses the feedback models mobilised in scientific literature on the neuroendocrine processes regulating appetite. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/biosoc.2015.5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4469699PMC

Scrutinizing the epigenetics revolution.

Biosocieties 2014 Nov;9(4):431-456

European Institute of Oncology , Via Adamello 16, Milan 20139, Italy .

Epigenetics is one of the most rapidly expanding fields in the life sciences. Its rise is frequently framed as a revolutionary turn that heralds a new epoch both for gene-based epistemology and for the wider discourse on life that pervades knowledge-intensive societies of the molecular age. The fundamentals of this revolution remain however to be scrutinized, and indeed the very contours of what counts as 'epigenetic' are often blurred. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/biosoc.2014.22DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4255066PMC
November 2014
4 Reads

Negotiating the dynamics of uncomfortable knowledge: The case of dual use and synthetic biology.

Biosocieties 2014 Nov;9(4):393-420

Department of Social Science, Health and Medicine, Faculty of Social Science & Public Policy, King's College London , Strand Campus, London, WC2R 2LS, UK .; ;

Institutions need to ignore some knowledge in order to function. This is "uncomfortable knowledge" because it undermines the ability of those institutions to pursue their goals (Rayner, 2012). We identify three bodies of knowledge that are relevant to understandings of the dual use threat posed by synthetic biology but are excluded from related policy discussions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/biosoc.2014.32DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4255065PMC
November 2014
2 Reads

Left to their own devices: Post-ELSI, ethical equipment and the International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) Competition.

Biosocieties 2013 Sep;8(3):311-335

Department of Sociology, University of Manchester , Arthur Lewis Building, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK .

In this article, we evaluate a novel method for post-ELSI (ethical, legal and social implications) collaboration, drawing on 'human practices' (HP) to develop a form of reflexive ethical equipment that we termed 'sociotechnical circuits'. We draw on a case study of working collaboratively in the International Genetically Engineered Machine Competition (iGEM) and relate this to the parts-based agenda of synthetic biology. We use qualitative methods to explore the experience of undergraduate students in the Competition, focussing on the 2010 University of Sheffield team. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1057/biosoc.2013.13
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/biosoc.2013.13DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3772706PMC
September 2013
2 Reads

Health economists, tobacco control and international development: On the economisation of global health beyond neoliberal structural adjustment policies.

Authors:
David Reubi

Biosocieties 2013 Jun;8(2):205-228

School of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London , Mile End Road, London E1 4NS, UK . E-mail:

This article addresses the increasing influence of economic rationalities in global health over the past 30 years by examining the genealogy of one economic strategy - taxation - that has become central to international anti-smoking initiatives in the global South. It argues that this genealogy sits uncomfortably with the usual story about economics and global health, which reduces the economisation of international health to neoliberal structural adjustment policies aimed at stabilisation, liberalisation and privatisation and laments their detrimental effect on health. While not disputing these policies' importance and damaging impact, the genealogy of tobacco taxes outlined in this article shows that the economisation of global health is not only about neoliberal structural adjustment policies but also about sin taxes, market failures and health economics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/biosoc.2013.3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3671369PMC

Biomarkers, the molecular gaze and the transformation of cancer survivorship.

Authors:
Kirsten Bell

Biosocieties 2013 Jun;8(2):124-143

Department of Anthropology, University of British Columbia , 6303 NW Marine Dr, Vancouver, BC V6 T 1Z3, Canada . E-mail:

Over the past two decades, molecular technologies have transformed the landscape of cancer diagnosis, treatment and disease surveillance. However, although the effects of these technologies in the areas of primary and secondary cancer prevention have been the focus of growing study, their role in tertiary prevention remains largely unexamined. Treating this topic as a problematic to be conceptually explored rather than empirically demonstrated, this article focuses on the molecularisation of tertiary prevention, especially the growing use of molecular biomarkers to monitor disease recurrence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/biosoc.2013.6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3671370PMC

Holding blame at bay? 'Gene talk' in family members' accounts of schizophrenia aetiology.

Biosocieties 2012 Sep 3;7(3):273-293. Epub 2012 Sep 3.

Centre for Medical Humanities, Durham University , House 4, Trevelyan College, Elvet Hill Road, Durham, DH1 3LN, UK.

We provide the first detailed analysis of how, for what purposes and with what consequences people related to someone with a diagnosis of schizophrenia use 'gene talk'. The article analyses findings from a qualitative interview study conducted in London and involving 19 participants (mostly women). We transcribed the interviews verbatim and analysed them using grounded theory methods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/biosoc.2012.12DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3514449PMC
September 2012
30 Reads

Creating the 'ethics industry': Mary Warnock, in vitro fertilization and the history of bioethics in Britain.

Authors:
Duncan Wilson

Biosocieties 2011 Jun 29;6(2):121-141. Epub 2010 Nov 29.

Centre for History of Science, Technology and Medicine, University of Manchester , UK . E-mail:

Recent decades have seen a shift in the management and discussion of biomedicine. Issues once considered by doctors and scientists are now handled by a diverse array of participants, including philosophers, lawyers, theologians and lay representatives. This new approach, known as 'bioethics', has become the norm in regulatory committees and public debate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/biosoc.2010.26DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3342788PMC
June 2011
4 Reads

Food as exposure: Nutritional epigenetics and the new metabolism.

Authors:
Hannah Landecker

Biosocieties 2011 Jun 7;6(2):167-194. Epub 2011 Mar 7.

Center for Society and Genetics, University of California Los Angeles , Box 957221, 1323 Rolfe Hall, Los Angeles, CA 90095-7221 USA . E-mail:

Nutritional epigenetics seeks to explain the effects of nutrition on gene expression. For social science, it is an area of life science whose analysis reveals a concentrated form of a wider shift in the understanding of food and metabolism. Rather than the chemical conversion of food to energy and body matter of classic metabolism, food is now also a conditioning environment that shapes the activity of the genome and the physiology of the body. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/biosoc.2011.1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3500842PMC

Claude Lévi-Strauss on Race, History, and Genetics.

Biosocieties 2010 Sep;5(3):330-347

ESRC Centre for Genomics and Society, University of Exeter.

In 1952, the French anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss published a small booklet titled . It formed part of a series of pamphlets on the so-called "race-question" by leading anthropologists and geneticists, which UNESCO published as part of its campaign against racism. Roughly twenty years later, in 1971, UNESCO invited Lévi-Strauss to give a lecture to open the International Year of Action to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/biosoc.2010.17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4326674PMC
September 2010
2 Reads

The organization of scientists and its relation to scientific productivity: Perceptions of Chinese stem cell researchers.

Authors:
Joy Yueyue Zhang

Biosocieties 2010 Jun;5(2):219-235

BIOS Centre, London School of Economics and Political Science, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE, UK.

Chinese government funding of R&D ranks third in the world. Yet China ranks only 17th in terms of scientific productivity per unit of investment. The author recently conducted fieldwork on the team structure of 22 Chinese stem cell research groups. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/biosoc.2010.3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3797515PMC

A Multilevel Developmental Contextual Approach To Substance Use and Addiction.

Authors:
Michael Windle

Biosocieties 2010 6;5:124-136. Epub 2009 Oct 6.

Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Emory University, 1518 Clifton Road NE, Room 520, Atlanta, Georgia 30322

Emerging technological advances in genetics and neuroscience have spawned innovative or elaborated conceptual models in the field of addiction science, as well as contributed to the mushrooming of new knowledge. By addictions, reference is made to chronic, often relapsing disorders typified by obsession, compulsion, or physical or psychological dependence. In this article it is proposed that a multilevel developmental contextual approach to substance use and addictions provides a useful framework for integrating existing studies across disciplines and serving as a generative guide to intriguing novel research questions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1057/biosoc.2009.9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3384512PMC
October 2009
7 Reads
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