19 results match your criteria Biosemiotics[Journal]

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Time from Semiosis: E-series Time for Living Systems.

Biosemiotics 2018 9;11(1):65-83. Epub 2018 Apr 9.

4Nagaoka University of Technology, Nagaoka, Japan.

We develop a semiotic scheme of time, in which time precipitates from the repeated succession of punctuating the progressive tense by the perfect tense. The underlying principle is communication among local participants. Time can thus be seen as a meaning-making, semiotic system in which different time codes are delineated, each having its own grammar and timekeeping. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s12304-018-9316-0
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12304-018-9316-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6002431PMC
April 2018
16 Reads

Composite Agency: Semiotics of Modularity and Guiding Interactions.

Authors:
Alexei A Sharov

Biosemiotics 2017 Jul 27;10(2):157-178. Epub 2017 Jul 27.

National Institute on Aging, Laboratory of Genetics, 251 Bayview Blvd., Baltimore, MD 21224, USA.

Principles of constructivism are used here to explore how organisms develop tools, subagents, scaffolds, signs, and adaptations. Here I discuss reasons why organisms have composite nature and include diverse subagents that interact in partially cooperating and partially conflicting ways. Such modularity is necessary for efficient and robust functionality, including mutual construction and adaptability at various time scales. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12304-017-9301-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5714302PMC
July 2017
2 Reads

Is Empiricism Empirically False? Lessons from Early Nervous Systems.

Biosemiotics 2017 27;10(2):229-245. Epub 2017 Jun 27.

Institute of Philosophy and Sociology, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Nowy Świat 72, 00-330 Warszawa, Poland.

Recent work on skin-brain thesis (de Wiljes et al. 2015; Keijzer 2015; Keijzer et al. 2013) suggests the possibility of empirical evidence that empiricism is false. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12304-017-9294-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5585295PMC
June 2017
6 Reads

Mental Misrepresentation in Non-human Psychopathology.

Biosemiotics 2017 4;10(2):195-210. Epub 2017 Aug 4.

Institute of Philosophy and Sociology, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Nowy Świat 72, 00-330 Warszawa, Poland.

In this paper, we defend a representational approach to at least some kinds of non-human psychopathology. Mentally-ill non-human minds, in particular in delusions, obsessive-compulsive disorders and similar cognitive states, are traditionally understood in purely behavioral terms. In contrast, we argue that non-human mental psychopathology should be at least sometimes not only ascribed contentful mental representation but also understood as really having these states. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12304-017-9299-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5585286PMC

Genetic Engineering and Human Mental Ecology: Interlocking Effects and Educational Considerations.

Authors:
Ramsey Affifi

Biosemiotics 2017 28;10(1):75-98. Epub 2017 Mar 28.

Education, Teaching and Leadership (ETL), Moray House School of Education, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH8 8AQ UK.

This paper describes some likely semiotic consequences of genetic engineering on what Gregory Bateson has called "the mental ecology" (1979) of future humans, consequences that are less often raised in discussions surrounding the safety of GMOs (genetically modified organisms). The effects are as follows: an increased 1) habituation to the presence of GMOs in the environment, 2) normalization of empirically false assumptions grounding genetic reductionism, 3) acceptance that humans are capable and entitled to decide what constitutes an evolutionary improvement for a species, 4) perception that the main source of creativity and problem solving in the biosphere is anthropogenic. Though there are some tensions between them, these effects tend to produce self-validating webs of ideas, actions, and environments, which may reinforce destructive habits of thought. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12304-017-9286-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5437137PMC

Evolutionary biosemiotics and multilevel construction networks.

Authors:
Alexei A Sharov

Biosemiotics 2016 Dec 16;9(3):399-416. Epub 2016 Aug 16.

National Institute on Aging, Laboratory of Genetics, 251 Bayview Blvd., Baltimore, MD 21224, USA.

In contrast to the traditional relational semiotics, biosemiotics decisively deviates towards dynamical aspects of signs at the evolutionary and developmental time scales. The analysis of sign dynamics requires (in a broad sense) to explain how new components such as subagents, sensors, effectors, and interpretation networks are produced by developing and evolving organisms. Semiotic networks that include signs, tools, and subagents are multilevel, and this feature supports the plasticity, robustness, and evolvability of organisms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12304-016-9269-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5283393PMC
December 2016
1 Read

The Semiosis of "Side Effects" in Genetic Interventions.

Authors:
Ramsey Affifi

Biosemiotics 2016 15;9(3):345-364. Epub 2016 Oct 15.

University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.

Genetic interventions, which include transgenic engineering, gene editing, and other forms of genome modification aimed at altering the information "in" the genetic code, are rapidly increasing in power and scale. Biosemiotics offers unique tools for understanding the nature, risks, scope, and prospects of such technologies, though few in the community have turned their attention specifically in this direction. Bruni (2003, 2008) is an important exception. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12304-016-9274-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5179580PMC
October 2016

Vitalism as Pathos.

Authors:
Thomas Osborne

Biosemiotics 2016;9:185-205. Epub 2016 Feb 25.

SPAIS (School of Sociology, Politics and International Studies), University of Bristol, 11 Priory Road, Bristol, UK.

This paper addresses the remarkable longevity (in spite of numerous 'refutations') of the idea of vitalism in the biological sciences and beyond. If there is to be a renewed vitalism today, however, we need to ask - ? This paper argues that recent invocations of a generalized, processual variety of vitalism in the social sciences and humanities above all, however exciting in their scope, miss much of the basic originality - and interest - of the vitalist perspective itself. The paper argues that any renewed spirit of vitalism in the contemporary era would have to base itself on the normativity of the living organism rather than on any generalized conceptions of process or becoming. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12304-016-9254-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4982892PMC
February 2016

Comprehending the Semiosis of Evolution.

Biosemiotics 2016 Apr;9(1):1-6

Department of Social Studies and Department of Health Studies, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12304-016-9262-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4988684PMC
April 2016
1 Read

Evolution of natural agents: preservation, advance, and emergence of functional information.

Authors:
Alexei A Sharov

Biosemiotics 2016 Apr;9(1):103-129

National Institute on Aging, Laboratory of Genetics and Genomics, 251 Bayview Blvd. Baltimore, MD 21224, USA, .

Biological evolution is often viewed narrowly as a change of morphology or allele frequency in a sequence of generations. Here I pursue an alternative informational concept of evolution, as preservation, advance, and emergence of functional information in natural agents. Functional information is a network of signs (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12304-015-9250-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4978442PMC
April 2016
3 Reads

Virus is a Signal for the Host Cell.

Biosemiotics 2015 17;8(3):483-491. Epub 2015 Jul 17.

Laboratory of RNA Archeology, Instituto de Parasitología y Biomedicina 'López-Neyra', Consejo Superior de Ivestigaciones Científicas, Armilla 18100 Granada, Spain.

Currently, the concept of the cell as a society or an ecosystem of molecular elements is gaining increasing acceptance. The basic idea arose in the 19th century, from the surmise that there is not just a single unit underlying an individual's appearance, but a plurality of entities with both collaborative and conflicting relationships. The following hypothesis is based around this model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12304-015-9245-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4661187PMC
July 2015
2 Reads

DNA Dispose, but Subjects Decide. Learning and the Extended Synthesis.

Authors:
Markus Lindholm

Biosemiotics 2015;8(3):443-461. Epub 2015 May 27.

Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalléen 21, 0349 Oslo, Norway ; Rudolf Steiner University College, Dahls gate 30, 0260 Oslo, Norway.

Adaptation by means of natural selection depends on the ability of populations to maintain variation in heritable traits. According to the Modern Synthesis this variation is sustained by mutations and genetic drift. Epigenetics, evodevo, niche construction and cultural factors have more recently been shown to contribute to heritable variation, however, leading an increasing number of biologists to call for an extended view of speciation and evolution. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12304-015-9242-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4661179PMC
May 2015
2 Reads

The Natural Emergence of (Bio)Semiosic Phenomena.

Authors:
J H van Hateren

Biosemiotics 2015;8(3):403-419. Epub 2015 May 27.

Johann Bernouilli Institute for Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 407, 9700 AK Groningen, The Netherlands.

Biological organisms appear to have agency, goals, and meaningful behaviour. One possibility is that this is mere appearance, where such properties are not real, but only 'as if' consequences of the physiological structure of organisms. Another possibility is that these properties are real, as emerging from the organism's structure and from how the organism interacts with its environment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12304-015-9241-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4661186PMC

Language Evolution: Why Hockett's Design Features are a Non-Starter.

Biosemiotics 2015;8(1):29-46. Epub 2014 Jul 19.

Center for Language Evolution Studies (CLES); Department of English, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Bojarskiego 1, Toruń, 87-100 Poland.

The set of design features developed by Charles Hockett in the 1950s and 1960s remains probably the most influential means of juxtaposing animal communication with human language. However, the general theoretical perspective of Hockett is largely incompatible with that of modern language evolution research. Consequently, we argue that his classificatory system-while useful for some descriptive purposes-is of very limited use as a theoretical framework for evolutionary linguistics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12304-014-9203-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4544681PMC

Protosemiosis: agency with reduced representation capacity.

Biosemiotics 2015 Apr;8(1):103-123

School of Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Tampere, 33014 University of Tampere, Finland.

Life has semiotic nature; and as life forms differ in their complexity, functionality, and adaptability, we assume that forms of semiosis also vary accordingly. Here we propose a criterion to distinguish between the primitive kind of semiosis, which we call "protosemiosis" (following Prodi) from the advanced kind of semiosis, or "eusemiosis". In protosemiosis, agents associate signs directly with actions without considering objects, whereas in eusemiosis, agents associate signs with objects and only then possibly with actions. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s12304-014-9219-7
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12304-014-9219-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4414345PMC
April 2015
6 Reads

On the meaning of chance in biology.

Authors:
James A Coffman

Biosemiotics 2014 Dec;7(3):377-388

Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory, Salisbury Cove, Maine, USA 04672.

Chance has somewhat different meanings in different contexts, and can be taken to be either ontological (as in quantum indeterminacy) or epistemological (as in stochastic uncertainty). Here I argue that, whether or not it stems from physical indeterminacy, chance is a fundamental biological reality that is meaningless outside the context of knowledge. To say that something happened by chance means that it did not happen by design. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12304-014-9206-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4392722PMC
December 2014
2 Reads

Manipulating Representations.

Biosemiotics 2012 Apr 20;5(1):95-120. Epub 2011 May 20.

Università degli Studi della Basilicata, Polo di Matera, Via San Rocco, Matera, 75100 Italy.

The present paper proposes a definition for the complex polysemic concepts of consciousness and awareness (in humans as well as in other species), and puts forward the idea of a progressive ontological development of consciousness from a state of 'childhood' awareness, in order to explain that humans are not only able to manipulate objects, but also their mental representations. The paper builds on the idea of qualia intended as entities posing regular invariant requests to neural processes, trough the permanence of different properties. The concept of semantic differential introduces the properties of metaphorical qualia as an exclusively human ability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12304-011-9116-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3271209PMC

The Rules of Variation Expanded, Implications for the Research on Compatible Genomics.

Biosemiotics 2011 May;2011:1-25

Universidad de Guadalajara, Centro Universitario de la Costa, Puerto Vallarta, Mexico.

The main focus of this article is to present the practical aspect of the code rules of variation and the search for a second set of genomic rules, including comparison of sequences to understand how to preserve compatible organisms in danger of extinction and how to generate biodiversity. Three new rules of variation are introduced: 1) homologous recombination, 2) a healthy fertile offspring, and 3) comparison of compatible genomes. The novel search in the natural world for fully compatible genomes capable of homologous recombination is explored by using examples of human polymorphisms in the LDLRAP1 gene, and by the production of fertile offspring by crossbreeding. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12304-011-9118-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3130522PMC

Role of Utility and Inference in the Evolution of Functional Information.

Authors:
Alexei A Sharov

Biosemiotics 2009 Apr;2(1):101-115

Functional information means an encoded network of functions in living organisms from molecular signaling pathways to an organism's behavior. It is represented by two components: code and an interpretation system, which together form a self-sustaining semantic closure. Semantic closure allows some freedom between components because small variations of the code are still interpretable. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12304-008-9032-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2759718PMC
April 2009
1 Read
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