199 results match your criteria Bioscience[Journal]


A Metacommunity Approach to Improve Biological Assessments in Highly Dynamic Freshwater Ecosystems.

Bioscience 2020 May 22;70(5):427-438. Epub 2020 Apr 22.

DYNAM Lab, INRAE, Lyon, France.

Rapid shifts in biotic communities due to environmental variability challenge the detection of anthropogenic impacts by current biomonitoring programs. Metacommunity ecology has the potential to inform such programs, because it combines dispersal processes with niche-based approaches and recognizes variability in community composition. Using intermittent rivers-prevalent and highly dynamic ecosystems that sometimes dry-we develop a conceptual model to illustrate how dispersal limitation and flow intermittence influence the performance of biological indices. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biaa033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7231578PMC

The Influence of Forests on Freshwater Fish in the Tropics: A Systematic Review.

Bioscience 2020 May 1;70(5):404-414. Epub 2020 Apr 1.

Center for International Forestry Research, Bogor, Indonesia.

Tropical forests influence freshwater fish through multiple pathways, only some of which are well documented. We systematically reviewed the literature to assess the current state of knowledge on forests and freshwater fish in the tropics. The existing evidence is mostly concentrated in the neotropics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biaa021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7231604PMC

Bending the Curve of Global Freshwater Biodiversity Loss: An Emergency Recovery Plan.

Bioscience 2020 Apr 19;70(4):330-342. Epub 2020 Feb 19.

Science adviser for WWF-UK, in Woking, United Kingdom.

Despite their limited spatial extent, freshwater ecosystems host remarkable biodiversity, including one-third of all vertebrate species. This biodiversity is declining dramatically: Globally, wetlands are vanishing three times faster than forests, and freshwater vertebrate populations have fallen more than twice as steeply as terrestrial or marine populations. Threats to freshwater biodiversity are well documented but coordinated action to reverse the decline is lacking. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biaa002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7138689PMC
April 2020
5.377 Impact Factor

Theoretical Perspectives of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study: Conceptual Evolution in a Social-Ecological Research Project.

Bioscience 2020 Apr 26;70(4):297-314. Epub 2020 Feb 26.

Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.

The Earth's population will become more than 80% urban during this century. This threshold is often regarded as sufficient justification for pursuing urban ecology. However, pursuit has primarily focused on building empirical richness, and urban ecology theory is rarely discussed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biz166DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7138672PMC

Glacier Retreat and Pacific Salmon.

Bioscience 2020 Mar 11;70(3):220-236. Epub 2020 Mar 11.

Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana, Polson, Montana.

Glaciers have shaped past and present habitats for Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) in North America. During the last glacial maximum, approximately 45% of the current North American range of Pacific salmon was covered in ice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biaa015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7064434PMC

Coproducing Science to Inform Working Lands: The Next Frontier in Nature Conservation.

Bioscience 2020 Jan 18;70(1):90-96. Epub 2019 Dec 18.

Sagebrush ecosystem specialist with the Natural Resources Conservation Service, Portland, Oregon.

Conservationists are increasingly convinced that coproduction of science enhances its utility in policy, decision-making, and practice. Concomitant is a renewed reliance on privately owned working lands to sustain nature and people. We propose a coupling of these emerging trends as a better recipe for conservation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biz144DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6956880PMC
January 2020

Corrigendum: A Worm's World: Ecological Flexibility Pays Off for Free-Living Nematodes in Sediments and Soils.

Bioscience 2019 Nov 25;69(11):945. Epub 2019 Sep 25.

Laboratory of Nematology of Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands.

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1093/biosci/biz086.]. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biz120DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6829013PMC
November 2019

Breeding Centers, Private Ranches, and Genomics for Creating Sustainable Wildlife Populations.

Bioscience 2019 Nov 9;69(11):928-943. Epub 2019 Oct 9.

Fossil Rim Wildlife Center, 2155 County Road 2008, Glen Rose, TX 76043.

Human-induced changes to environments are causing species declines. Beyond preserving habitat (in situ), insurance (ex situ) populations are essential to prevent species extinctions. The Conservation Centers for Species Survival (C2S2) is leveraging space of breeding centers and private ranches to produce "source populations"-genetically diverse reservoirs that also support research and reintroductions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biz091DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6829018PMC
November 2019

Improving the Integration of Restoration and Conservation in Marine and Coastal Ecosystems: Lessons from the Disaster.

Bioscience 2019 Nov 18;69(11):920-927. Epub 2019 Sep 18.

Mote Marine Laboratory, Sarasota, Florida.

In the wake of the Deepwater Horizon disaster, much has been learned about the biological, ecological, physical, and chemical conditions of the Gulf of Mexico. In parallel, the research community has also gained insight about the social and organizational structures and processes necessary for oil spill response and subsequent marine and coastal restoration. However, even with these lessons from both the Deepwater Horizon and previous spills, including 1989's Exxon Valdez and the Ixtoc 1 in 1979, our understanding of how to avoid future crises has not advanced at the same pace as offshore oil and gas development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biz103DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6829012PMC
November 2019

Micro Methods for Megafauna: Novel Approaches to Late Quaternary Extinctions and Their Contributions to Faunal Conservation in the Anthropocene.

Bioscience 2019 Nov 2;69(11):877-887. Epub 2019 Oct 2.

Department of Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Jena, Germany.

Drivers of Late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions are relevant to modern conservation policy in a world of growing human population density, climate change, and faunal decline. Traditional debates tend toward global solutions, blaming either dramatic climate change or dispersals of Homo sapiens to new regions. Inherent limitations to archaeological and paleontological data sets often require reliance on scant, poorly resolved lines of evidence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biz105DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6829010PMC
November 2019

A Worm's World: Ecological Flexibility Pays Off for Free-Living Nematodes in Sediments and Soils.

Bioscience 2019 Nov 4;69(11):867-876. Epub 2019 Sep 4.

Laboratory of Nematology, Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands.

Free-living nematodes, an ancient animal phylum of unsegmented microscopic roundworms, have successfully adapted to nearly every ecosystem on Earth: from marine and freshwater to land, from the polar regions to the tropics, and from the mountains to the ocean depths. They are globally the most abundant animals in sediments and soils. In the present article, we identify the factors that collectively explain the successful ecological proliferation of free-living nematodes and demonstrate the impact they have on vital sediment and soil processes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biz086DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6829015PMC
November 2019

Comment on Havens and colleagues (2019).

Bioscience 2019 Nov 19;69(11):853. Epub 2019 Sep 19.

National Park Service, Woodstock, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biz110DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6829014PMC
November 2019

A Framework for Global Twenty-First Century Scenarios and Models of Biological Invasions.

Bioscience 2019 Sep 31;69(9):697-710. Epub 2019 Jul 31.

Division of Conservation Biology, Landscape, and Vegetation Ecology at the University of Vienna, in Vienna, Austria.

Biological invasions have emerged as an eminent feature of global change, with substantial impacts on the environment and human livelihoods. Current research demonstrates that the numbers and impacts of alien species are rising unabatedly. At the same time, we lack a thorough understanding of potential future trajectories for the decades to come. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biz070DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6739238PMC
September 2019

Enabling Green and Blue Infrastructure to Improve Contributions to Human Well-Being and Equity in Urban Systems.

Bioscience 2019 Jul 26;69(7):566-574. Epub 2019 Jun 26.

Institute of Environmental Science and Technology at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, in Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain.

The circumstances under which different ecosystem service benefits can be realized differ. The benefits tend to be coproduced and to be enabled by multiple interacting social, ecological, and technological factors, which is particularly evident in cities. As many cities are undergoing rapid change, these factors need to be better understood and accounted for, especially for those most in need of benefits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biz058DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6622445PMC
July 2019
1 Read

The Ecological Paw Print of Companion Dogs and Cats.

Bioscience 2019 Jun 22;69(6):467-474. Epub 2019 May 22.

Maastricht University, in Maastricht, the Netherlands.

As an indicator of sustainable development, the ecological footprint has been successful in providing a basis for discussing the environmental impacts of human consumption. Humans are at the origin of numerous pollutant activities on Earth and are the primary drivers of climate change. However, very little research has been conducted on the environmental impacts of animals, especially companion animals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biz044DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6551214PMC
June 2019
2 Reads

Direct Ties to a Faculty Mentor Related to Positive Outcomes for Undergraduate Researchers.

Bioscience 2019 May 8;69(5):389-397. Epub 2019 May 8.

Professor of biochemistry and molecular biology and is the Georgia Athletic Association Professor of Innovative Science Education at the University of Georgia, in Athens. She studies undergraduate research experiences, course-based research, and research mentoring.

Mentored research is critical for integrating undergraduates into the scientific community. Undergraduate researchers experience a variety of mentoring structures, including dyads (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biz039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6506343PMC
May 2019
2 Reads

Integrating Subjective and Objective Dimensions of Resilience in Fire-Prone Landscapes.

Bioscience 2019 May 8;69(5):379-388. Epub 2019 May 8.

Ronin Institute for Independent Scholarship, in Boulder, Colorado.

Resilience has become a common goal for science-based natural resource management, particularly in the context of changing climate and disturbance regimes. Integrating varying perspectives and definitions of resilience is a complex and often unrecognized challenge to applying resilience concepts to social-ecological systems (SESs) management. Using wildfire as an example, we develop a framework to expose and separate two important dimensions of resilience: the inherent properties that maintain structure, function, or states of an SES and the human perceptions of desirable or valued components of an SES. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biz030DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6506416PMC
May 2019
6 Reads

Battling a Common Enemy: Joining Forces in the Fight against Sewage Pollution.

Authors:
Stephanie L Wear

Bioscience 2019 May 22;69(5):360-367. Epub 2019 Apr 22.

Global Science, The Nature Conservancy, Arlington, US.

The health of both coral reefs and people are imperiled by a local threat that is widespread across the globe-sewage and the typical components it carries (e.g., nutrients, sediments, heavy metals, endocrine disruptors, pathogens, and pharmaceuticals). Read More

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https://academic.oup.com/bioscience/article/69/5/360/5429664
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biz025DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6506342PMC
May 2019
15 Reads

Progress toward Equitably Managed Protected Areas in Aichi Target 11: A Global Survey.

Bioscience 2019 Mar 2;69(3):191-197. Epub 2019 Jan 2.

Center for Macroecology, Evolution, and Climate, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

The Convention on Biological Diversity Aichi Target 11 requires its 193 signatory parties to incorporate social equity into protected area (PA) management by 2020. However, there is limited evidence of progress toward this commitment. We surveyed PA managers, staff, and community representatives involved in the management of 225 PAs worldwide to gather information against 10 equity criteria, including the distribution of benefits and burdens, recognition of rights, diversity of cultural and knowledge systems, and processes of participation in decision-making. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biy143DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6429033PMC
March 2019
18 Reads

Using Semistructured Surveys to Improve Citizen Science Data for Monitoring Biodiversity.

Bioscience 2019 Mar 18;69(3):170-179. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Department of Natural History at the Florida Museum of Natural History and with the University of Florida's Biodiversity and Genetic Institutes, at the University of Florida, in Gainsville.

Biodiversity is being lost at an unprecedented rate, and monitoring is crucial for understanding the causal drivers and assessing solutions. Most biodiversity monitoring data are collected by volunteers through citizen science projects, and often crucial information is lacking to account for the inevitable biases that observers introduce during data collection. We contend that citizen science projects intended to support biodiversity monitoring must gather information about the observation process as well as species occurrence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biz010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6422830PMC
March 2019
2 Reads

Independent Scientific Review under the Endangered Species Act.

Bioscience 2019 Mar 13;69(3):198-208. Epub 2019 Feb 13.

Nossaman LLP, Irvine, California.

The directive from Congress in the Endangered Species Act obliging the US Fish and Wildlife Service and National Marine Fisheries Service along with other federal agencies to use the best available scientific information in their determinations-and calls from stakeholder communities to show that they have done so-have led the federal wildlife agencies to seek external, expert review of their determinations with increasing frequency over time. In the present article, we survey the agency determinations that may be subject to independent science review and the technical tasks embedded in those determinations that can benefit from such review. We go on to identify common failures in scientific review that compromise the quality and reliability of agency determinations and then describe the attributes of independent scientific reviews that enable the agencies to discharge their statutory duties while seeking to conserve threatened and endangered species and the ecosystems on which they depend. Read More

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https://academic.oup.com/bioscience/article/69/3/198/5308141
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biz001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6422828PMC
March 2019
5 Reads

Food Inequality, Injustice, and Rights.

Bioscience 2019 Mar 27;69(3):180-190. Epub 2019 Feb 27.

Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.

As humanity continues to grow in size, questions related to human rights and the existing unequal distribution of food resources have taken on greater urgency. Is inequality in food access unjust or a regrettable consequence of the geographic distribution of biophysical resources? To what extent are there obligations to redress inequalities in access to food? We draw from a human rights perspective to identify obligations associated with access to food and develop a quantitative framework to evaluate the fulfillment of the human right to food. We discuss the capacity of socioeconomic development to reduce inequalities in per capita food availability with respect to the distribution of biophysical resources among countries. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biz002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6422829PMC
March 2019
3 Reads

The Ethics of Eliminating Harmful Species: The Case of the Tsetse Fly.

Bioscience 2019 Feb 19;69(2):125-135. Epub 2018 Dec 19.

Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society at Oregon State University, in Corvallis.

Wildlife species harmful to humans are often targets of control and elimination programs. A contemporary example is the tsetse fly, a vector of sleeping sickness and African animal trypanosomosis. Tsetse flies have recently been targeted by a pan-African eradication campaign. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biy155DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6377282PMC
February 2019
5 Reads

From CREATE Workshop to Course Implementation: Examining Downstream Impacts on Teaching Practices and Student Learning at 4-Year Institutions.

Bioscience 2019 Jan 10;69(1):47-58. Epub 2019 Jan 10.

Professor of biology at City College of the City University of New York.

The faculty workshop model has long been used for disseminating innovative methods in STEM education. Despite significant investments by researchers and funding agencies, there is a dearth of evidence regarding downstream impacts of faculty development. CREATE is an evidence-based strategy for teaching science using primary literature. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biy145DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6327835PMC
January 2019
3 Reads

Conceptualizing Ecological Responses to Dam Removal: If You Remove It, What's to Come?

Bioscience 2019 Jan 10;69(1):26-39. Epub 2019 Jan 10.

American Rivers, in Washington DC.

One of the desired outcomes of dam decommissioning and removal is the recovery of aquatic and riparian ecosystems. To investigate this common objective, we synthesized information from empirical studies and ecological theory into conceptual models that depict key physical and biological links driving ecological responses to removing dams. We define models for three distinct spatial domains: upstream of the former reservoir, within the reservoir, and downstream of the removed dam. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biy152DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6327834PMC
January 2019
7 Reads

Collaboration Matters: Honey Bee Health as a Transdisciplinary Model for Understanding Real-World Complexity.

Bioscience 2018 Dec 10;68(12):990-995. Epub 2018 Oct 10.

Beekeepers.

We develop a transdisciplinary deliberative model that moves beyond traditional scientific collaborations to include nonscientists in designing complexity-oriented research. We use the case of declining honey bee health as an exemplar of complex real-world problems requiring cross-disciplinary intervention. Honey bees are important pollinators of the fruits and vegetables we eat. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biy118DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6278639PMC
December 2018
5 Reads

Corrigendum: Rethinking Living Fossils.

Bioscience 2018 Nov 29;68(11):926. Epub 2018 Sep 29.

Department of Philosophy and the Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science at the University of Minnesota, in Minneapolis.

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1093/biosci/biy084.]. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biy129DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6238963PMC
November 2018
3 Reads

Poetry as a Creative Practice to Enhance Engagement and Learning in Conservation Science.

Bioscience 2018 Nov 4;68(11):905-911. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

Environmental Science and Policy Department at George Mason University, in Fairfax, Virginia.

Creativity is crucial to the capacity to do science well, to communicate it in compelling ways, and to enhance learning. Creativity can be both practiced and enhanced to strengthen conservation science professionals' efforts to address global environmental challenges. We explore how poetry is one creative approach that can further conservation scientists' engagement and learning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biy105DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6238961PMC
November 2018
31 Reads

Temperature-Driven Biodiversity Change: Disentangling Space and Time.

Bioscience 2018 Nov 19;68(11):873-884. Epub 2018 Sep 19.

Associate professor and Canada research chair in marine physiological ecology at Memorial University of Newfoundland.

Temperature regimes have multiple spatial and temporal dimensions that have different impacts on biodiversity. Signatures of warming across these dimensions may contribute uniquely to the large-scale species redistributions and abundance changes that underpin community dynamics. A comprehensive review of the literature reveals that 86% of studies were focused on community responses to temperature aggregated over spatial or temporal dimensions (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biy096DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6238962PMC
November 2018
28 Reads

Recent History of : Vector Genomics and Epidemiology Records.

Bioscience 2018 Nov 31;68(11):854-860. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

Yale University, in New Haven, Connecticut.

Aedes aegypti bears the common name "the yellow fever mosquito," although, today, it is of more concern as the major vector of dengue, chikungunya, and, most recently, Zika viruses. In the present article, we review recent work on the population genetics of this mosquito in efforts to reconstruct its recent (approximately 600 years) history and relate these findings to epidemiological records of occurrences of diseases transmitted by this species. The two sources of information are remarkably congruent. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biy119DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6238964PMC
November 2018
48 Reads

Rethinking Living Fossils.

Bioscience 2018 Oct 15;68(10):760-770. Epub 2018 Aug 15.

Department of Philosophy and the Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.

Biologists would be mistaken if they relegated living fossils to paleontological inquiry or assumed that the concept is dead. It is now used to describe entities ranging from viruses to higher taxa, despite recent warnings of misleading inferences. Current work on character evolution illustrates how analyzing living fossils and stasis in terms of parts (characters) and wholes (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biy084DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6203082PMC
October 2018
3 Reads

Theory Meets Empiry: A Citation Network Analysis.

Bioscience 2018 Oct 22;68(10):805-812. Epub 2018 Aug 22.

Institut de Mathématiques de Marseille, France, which is a mixed research unit of Aix-Marseille University, CNRS, and Centrale Marseille.

According to a recent survey, ecologists and evolutionary biologists feel that theoretical and empirical research should coexist in a tight feedback loop but believe that the two domains actually interact very little. We evaluate this perception using a citation network analysis for two data sets, representing the literature on sexual selection and speciation. Overall, 54%-60% of citations come from a paper's own category, whereas 17%-23% are citations across categories. Read More

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https://academic.oup.com/bioscience/article/68/10/805/507565
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biy083DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6195343PMC
October 2018
30 Reads

Making Stream Restoration More Sustainable: A Geomorphically, Ecologically, and Socioeconomically Principled Approach to Bridge the Practice with the Science.

Authors:
Robert J Hawley

Bioscience 2018 Jul 13;68(7):517-528. Epub 2018 Jun 13.

The principal at Sustainable Streams, LLC, in Louisville, Kentucky. He is an experienced stream restoration designer and licensed professional engineer in several states, including active projects funded through the Fee-In-Lieu-Of (FILO) Stream Mitigation Program in Kentucky, as well as 303(d) grant-funded projects and projects with Municipal and private clients.

Despite large advances in the state of the science of stream ecology and river mechanics, the practitioner-driven field of stream restoration remains plagued by narrowly focused projects that sometimes even fail to improve aquatic habitat or geomorphic stability-two nearly universal project goals. The intent of this article is to provide an accessible framework that bridges that gap between the current state of practice and a more geomorphically robust and ecologically holistic foundation that also provides better accounting of socioeconomic factors in support of more sustainable stream restoration outcomes. It points to several more comprehensive design references and presents some simple strategies that could be used to protect against common failure mechanisms of ubiquitous design approaches (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biy048DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6037085PMC
July 2018
5 Reads

Evidence-Based Causal Chains for Linking Health, Development, and Conservation Actions.

Bioscience 2018 Mar 21;68(3):182-193. Epub 2018 Feb 21.

The Nature Conservancy, in Arlington, Virginia.

Sustainability challenges for nature and people are complex and interconnected, such that effective solutions require approaches and a common theory of change that bridge disparate disciplines and sectors. Causal chains offer promising approaches to achieving an integrated understanding of how actions affect ecosystems, the goods and services they provide, and ultimately, human well-being. Although causal chains and their variants are common tools across disciplines, their use remains highly inconsistent, limiting their ability to support and create a shared evidence base for joint actions. Read More

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https://academic.oup.com/bioscience/article/68/3/182/4850537
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/bix167DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6019009PMC
March 2018
24 Reads

A Science Products Inventory for Citizen-Science Planning and Evaluation.

Bioscience 2018 Jun 5;68(6):436-444. Epub 2018 Apr 5.

US Geological Survey, in Tucson, Arizona.

Citizen science involves a range of practices involving public participation in scientific knowledge production, but outcomes evaluation is complicated by the diversity of the goals and forms of citizen science. Publications and citations are not adequate metrics to describe citizen-science productivity. We address this gap by contributing a science products inventory (SPI) tool, iteratively developed through an expert panel and case studies, intended to support general-purpose planning and evaluation of citizen-science projects with respect to science productivity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biy028DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5972590PMC
June 2018
5 Reads

A Science Products Inventory for Citizen-Science Planning and Evaluation.

Bioscience 2018 Jun 5;68(6):436-444. Epub 2018 Apr 5.

US Geological Survey, in Tucson, Arizona.

Citizen science involves a range of practices involving public participation in scientific knowledge production, but outcomes evaluation is complicated by the diversity of the goals and forms of citizen science. Publications and citations are not adequate metrics to describe citizen-science productivity. We address this gap by contributing a science products inventory (SPI) tool, iteratively developed through an expert panel and case studies, intended to support general-purpose planning and evaluation of citizen-science projects with respect to science productivity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bioscience/biy028DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5972569PMC
June 2018
5 Reads

From Bottleneck to Breakthrough: Urbanization and the Future of Biodiversity Conservation.

Bioscience 2018 Jun 22;68(6):412-426. Epub 2018 Apr 22.

Living Landscapes Program, Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, US.

For the first time in the Anthropocene, the global demographic and economic trends that have resulted in unprecedented destruction of the environment are now creating the necessary conditions for a possible renaissance of nature. Drawing reasonable inferences from current patterns, we can predict that 100 years from now, the Earth could be inhabited by between 6 and 8 billion people, with very few remaining in extreme poverty, most living in towns and cities, and nearly all participating in a technologically driven, interconnected market economy. Building on the scholarship of others in demography, economics, sociology, and conservation biology, here, we articulate a theory of social-environmental change that describes the simultaneous and interacting effects of urban lifestyles on fertility, poverty alleviation, and ideation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biy039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5972570PMC
June 2018
33 Reads
5.380 Impact Factor

Addressing Criticisms of Large-Scale Marine Protected Areas.

Bioscience 2018 May 5;68(5):359-370. Epub 2018 Apr 5.

Professor at the Environment Department at the University of York, in the United Kingdom.

Designated large-scale marine protected areas (LSMPAs, 100,000 or more square kilometers) constitute over two-thirds of the approximately 6.6% of the ocean and approximately 14.5% of the exclusive economic zones within marine protected areas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biy021DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5925769PMC
May 2018
14 Reads

A Global Mitigation Hierarchy for Nature Conservation.

Bioscience 2018 May 18;68(5):336-347. Epub 2018 Apr 18.

Professor at the University of Oxford's Department of Zoology, in Oxford, United Kingdom.

Efforts to conserve biodiversity comprise a patchwork of international goals, national-level plans, and local interventions that, overall, are failing. We discuss the potential utility of applying the mitigation hierarchy, widely used during economic development activities, to all negative human impacts on biodiversity. Evaluating all biodiversity losses and gains through the mitigation hierarchy could help prioritize consideration of conservation goals and drive the empirical evaluation of conservation investments through the explicit consideration of counterfactual trends and ecosystem dynamics across scales. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biy029DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5925785PMC
May 2018
24 Reads

Educating as if Survival Matters.

Bioscience 2018 May 22;68(5):324-326. Epub 2018 Mar 22.

Associate professor in the School of Integrative Studies, George Mason University.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biy026DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5925772PMC
May 2018
8 Reads

Population Abundance and Ecosystem Service Provision: The Case of Birds.

Bioscience 2018 Apr 7;68(4):264-272. Epub 2018 Mar 7.

Environmental and Sustainability Institute at the University of Exeter, in Penryn, Cornwall, United Kingdom.

Although there is a diversity of concerns about recent persistent declines in the abundances of many species, the implications for the associated delivery of ecosystem services to people are surprisingly poorly understood. In principle, there are a broad range of potential functional relationships between the abundance of a species or group of species and the magnitude of ecosystem-service provision. Here, we identify the forms these relationships are most likely to take. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biy005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5905662PMC
April 2018
8 Reads

Corrigendum: Internet Blogs, Polar Bears, and Climate-Change Denial by Proxy.

Bioscience 2018 Apr 28;68(4):237. Epub 2018 Mar 28.

Department of Meteorology and Atmospheric Science at Pennsylvania State University, in University Park.

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1093/biosci/bix133.]. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biy033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5894075PMC
April 2018
12 Reads

Managing for Multifunctionality in Perennial Grain Crops.

Bioscience 2018 Apr 21;68(4):294-304. Epub 2018 Mar 21.

US Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service Mycotoxin Prevention and Applied Microbiology Research Unit, Peoria, Illinois.

Plant breeders are increasing yields and improving agronomic traits in several perennial grain crops, the first of which is now being incorporated into commercial food products. Integration strategies and management guidelines are needed to optimize production of these new crops, which differ substantially from both annual grain crops and perennial forages. To offset relatively low grain yields, perennial grain cropping systems should be multifunctional. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biosci/biy014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5894082PMC
April 2018
12 Reads