1,570 results match your criteria Biomicrofluidics[Journal]


Design of acoustofluidic device for localized trapping.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 May 21;14(3):034107. Epub 2020 May 21.

State Key Laboratory of Fluid Power and Mechatronic Systems, School of Mechanical Engineering, Zhejiang University, No. 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027, People's Republic of China.

State of the art acoustofluidics typically treat micro-particles in a multi-wavelength range due to the scale limitations of the established ultrasound field. Here, we report a spatial selective acoustofluidic device that allows trapping micro-particles and cells in a wavelength scale. A pair of interdigital transducers with a concentric-arc shape is used to compress the beam width, while pulsed actuation is adopted to localize the acoustic radiation force in the wave propagating direction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/5.0006649DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7244329PMC

High-throughput and label-free isolation of senescent murine mesenchymal stem cells.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 May 21;14(3):034106. Epub 2020 May 21.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China.

Under internal or external insults such as aging and oxidative stresses, cells are induced into a senescent state and stop cellular division permanently. As senescent cells (SnCs) accumulate, the regeneration capacity of biological tissue would be compromised, which has been found to be associated with a plethora of age-related disorders. Therefore, isolating SnCs becomes necessary. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/5.0011925DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7244328PMC

Bamboo-joint-like platforms for fast, long-distance, directional, and spontaneous transport of fluids.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 May 19;14(3):034105. Epub 2020 May 19.

Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Intelligent Laser Manufacturing, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, China.

Spontaneous transport of fluids without external force offers an enabling tool for a wide spectrum of fields. However, the development of a universal spontaneous transport platform for liquids remains a challenge. In this work, a novel bamboo-joint-like platform with tapered micro-tubes as transport units is presented, which not only enables the spontaneous transport and extrusion of liquids but also enables customized and optional assembly of transport devices. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/5.0005358DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7239664PMC

Thermoplastic microfluidic bioreactors with integrated electrodes to study tumor treating fields on yeast cells.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 May 18;14(3):034104. Epub 2020 May 18.

BUMEMS Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bogazici University, 34342 Istanbul, Turkey.

Tumor-treating fields (TTFields) are alternating electrical fields of intermediate frequency and low intensity that can slow or inhibit tumor growth by disrupting mitosis division of cancerous cells through cell cycle proteins. In this work, for the first time, an in-house fabricated cyclo-olefin polymer made microfluidic bioreactors are integrated with Cr/Au interdigitated electrodes to test TTFields on yeast cells with fluorescent protein:Nop56 gene. A small gap between electrodes (50 m) allows small voltages (<150 mV) to be applied on the cells; hence, uninsulated gold electrodes are used in the non-faradaic region without causing any electrochemical reaction at the electrode-medium interface. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/5.0008462DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7237222PMC

Magnetic actuation and deformation of a soft shuttle.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 May 18;14(3):034103. Epub 2020 May 18.

School of Engineering, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000, Australia.

Here, we describe the magnetic actuation of soft shuttles for open-top microfluidic applications. The system is comprised of two immiscible liquids, including glycerol as the soft shuttle and a suspension of iron powder in sucrose solution as the magnetic drop. Permanent magnets assembled on 3D printed motorized actuators were used for the actuation of the magnetic drop, enabling the glycerol shuttle to be propelled along customized linear, circular, and sinusoidal paths. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/5.0008176DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7237223PMC

A droplet platform capable of handling dissimilar liquids and its application for separation of bacteria from blood.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 May 7;14(3):034102. Epub 2020 May 7.

School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798.

For passive droplet generation, multiple parameters such as the fluid viscosities and flow rates of the continuous and discrete phases correlate to each other, raising relevant control difficulties. In the current study, a droplet platform that is capable of handling dissimilar liquids is proposed. Through combining oscillatory flow and electric charge, synchronized generation and forced coalescence of different droplets can be achieved. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/5.0006111DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7211087PMC

Closed-loop feedback control of microbubble diameter from a flow-focusing microfluidic device.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 May 7;14(3):034101. Epub 2020 May 7.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville 22908, USA.

Real-time observation and control of particle size and production rate in microfluidic devices are important capabilities for a number of applications, including the production, sorting, and manipulation of microbubbles and droplets. The production of microbubbles from flow-focusing microfluidic devices had been investigated in multiple studies, but each lacked an approach for on-chip measurement and control of microbubble diameter in real time. In this work, we implement a closed-loop feedback control system in a flow-focusing microfluidic device with integrated on-chip electrodes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/5.0005205DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7211089PMC

The mechanical responses of advecting cells in confined flow.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 May 4;14(3):031501. Epub 2020 May 4.

School of Engineering, Bernal Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick V94 T9PX, Ireland.

Fluid dynamics have long influenced cells in suspension. Red blood cells and white blood cells are advected through biological microchannels in both the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems and, as a result, are subject to a wide variety of complex fluidic forces as they pass through. , microfluidic forces influence different biological processes such as the spreading of infection, cancer metastasis, and cell viability, highlighting the importance of fluid dynamics in the blood and lymphatic vessels. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/5.0005154DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7200165PMC

The effect of shear stress reduction on endothelial cells: A microfluidic study of the actin cytoskeleton.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Mar 21;14(2):024115. Epub 2020 Apr 21.

Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, LIPhy, 38000 Grenoble, France.

Reduced blood flow, as occurring in ischemia or resulting from exposure to microgravity such as encountered in space flights, induces a decrease in the level of shear stress sensed by endothelial cells forming the inner part of blood vessels. In the present study, we use a microvasculature-on-a-chip device in order to investigate the effect of such a reduction in shear stress on shear-adapted endothelial cells. We find that, within 1 h of exposition to reduced wall shear stress, human umbilical vein endothelial cells undergo reorganization of their actin skeleton with a decrease in the number of stress fibers and actin being recruited into the cells' peripheral band, indicating a fairly fast change in the cells' phenotype due to altered flow. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5143391DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7176460PMC

Ultrasound-induced molecular delivery to erythrocytes using a microfluidic system.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Mar 21;14(2):024114. Epub 2020 Apr 21.

Department of Bioengineering, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky 40292, USA.

Preservation of erythrocytes in a desiccated state for storage at ambient temperature could simplify blood transfusions in austere environments, such as rural clinics, far-forward military operations, and during space travel. Currently, storage of erythrocytes is limited by a short shelf-life of 42 days at 4 °C, and long-term preservation requires a complex process that involves the addition and removal of glycerol from erythrocytes before and after storage at -80 °C, respectively. Natural compounds, such as trehalose, can protect cells in a desiccated state if they are present at sufficient levels inside the cell, but mammalian cell membranes lack transporters for this compound. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5144617DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7176461PMC

Adhesive bonding strategies to fabricate high-strength and transparent 3D printed microfluidic device.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Mar 20;14(2):024113. Epub 2020 Apr 20.

Department of Bioengineering, Izmir Institute of Technology, Urla, Izmir 35430, Turkey.

Recently, the use of 3D printing technologies has become prevalent in microfluidic applications. Although these technologies enable low-cost, rapid, and easy fabrication of microfluidic devices, fabricated devices suffer from optical opaqueness that inhibits their use for microscopic imaging. This study investigates bonding strategies using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and printer resin as interlayer materials to fabricate high-strength optically transparent 3D-printed microfluidic devices. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/5.0003302DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7173975PMC

Heterogeneously flagellated microswimmer behavior in viscous fluids.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Mar 20;14(2):024112. Epub 2020 Apr 20.

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Southern Methodist University, 3101 Dyer Street, Suite 200, Dallas, Texas 75206, USA.

An analysis of heterogeneously flagellated microswimmers inside viscous fluids is presented. Flagella harvested from were isolated, repolymerized, and functionalized to have biotin at their ends, allowing for chemical attachment along the surfaces of avidin-coated microparticles. Assembled microswimmers were rotated under incremental magnetic field frequencies, in saline and methylcellulose solutions, to baseline their velocity responses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5137743DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7173976PMC

Hitting the wall: Human sperm velocity recovery under ultra-confined conditions.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Mar 30;14(2):024108. Epub 2020 Mar 30.

Infertility is a common medical condition encountered by health systems throughout the world. Despite the development of complex fertilization techniques, only one-third of these procedures are successful. New lab-on-a-chip systems that focus on spermatozoa selection require a better understanding of sperm behavior under ultra-confined conditions in order to improve outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5143194DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7105397PMC

Microfluidic methods for precision diagnostics in food allergy.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Mar 3;14(2):021503. Epub 2020 Apr 3.

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.

Food allergy has reached epidemic proportions and has become a significant source of healthcare burden. Oral food challenge, the gold standard for food allergy assessment, often is not performed because it places the patient at risk of developing anaphylaxis. However, conventional alternative food allergy tests lack a sufficient predictive value. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5144135DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7127910PMC

A localized surface acoustic wave applied spatiotemporally controllable chemical gradient generator.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Mar 25;14(2):024106. Epub 2020 Mar 25.

Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, People's Republic of China.

In many research studies and applications about microscale biochemical analysis, the generation of stable, spatiotemporally controllable concentration gradients is critical and challenging. However, precise adjustment of concentration gradients in microchannels is still a huge challenge. Because of its precise controllability, non-harmfulness, and immediacy, sound waves perfectly meet the needs of this type of problem. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/5.0002111DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7096240PMC

Inertial focusing in triangular microchannels with various apex angles.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Mar 24;14(2):024105. Epub 2020 Mar 24.

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University (ISU), Ames, Iowa 50011, USA.

We consider inertial focusing of particles in channels with triangular cross sections. The number and the location of inertial focusing positions in isosceles triangular channels can change with varying blockage ratios (/) and Reynolds numbers (). In triangular channels, asymmetric velocity gradient induced by the sloped sidewalls leads to changes in the direction and the strength of the inertial lift forces. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5133640DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7093208PMC

Blood group and size dependent stability of infected red blood cell aggregates in capillaries.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Mar 20;14(2):024104. Epub 2020 Mar 20.

Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Box 280, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.

For related malaria (B50), one of the outstanding host factors for the development of severe disease is the ABO blood group of malaria patients, where blood group O reduces the probability of severe disease as compared to individuals of groups A, B, or AB. In this report, we investigate the stability of rosette aggregates in malaria caused by in microflows. These flows are created in microfluidic channels with stenosis-like constrictions of different widths down to ones narrower as the rosette's diameter. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5125038DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7083652PMC

Flow induced particle separation and collection through linear array pillar microfluidics device.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Mar 19;14(2):024103. Epub 2020 Mar 19.

CSIR-Central Electronics and Engineering Research Institute (CSIR-CEERI) Campus, Pilani Rajasthan 333031, India.

Particle filtration and concentration have great significance in a multitude of applications. Physical filters are nearly indispensable in conventional separation processes. Similarly, microfabrication-based physical filters are gaining popularity as size-based particle sorters, separators, and prefiltration structures for microfluidics platforms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5143656DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7082176PMC
March 2020
3.357 Impact Factor

Cell patterning by surface tension pinning in microfluidic channels.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Mar 5;14(2):024102. Epub 2020 Mar 5.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2715, USA.

We present a simple method to pattern multiple cell populations inside a microfluidic channel. The microchannel is partially filled with a cell suspension, and the position of the liquid boundary remains pinned by surface tension. Cells then adhere only in the filled portion of the channel, producing a very sharp boundary. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5140990DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7058426PMC

Magnetic water-in-water droplet microfluidics: Systematic experiments and scaling mathematical analysis.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Mar 4;14(2):024101. Epub 2020 Mar 4.

A major barrier to the clinical utilization of microfluidically generated water-in-oil droplets is the cumbersome washing steps required to remove the non-biocompatible organic oil phase from the droplets. In this paper, we report an on-chip magnetic water-in-water droplet generation and manipulation platform using a biocompatible aqueous two-phase system of a polyethylene glycol-polypropylene glycol-polyethylene glycol triblock copolymer (PEG-PPG-PEG) and dextran (DEX), eliminating the need for subsequent washing steps. By careful selection of a ferrofluid that shows an affinity toward the DEX phase (the dispersed phase in our microfluidic device), we generate magnetic DEX droplets in a non-magnetic continuous phase of PEG-PPG-PEG. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5144137DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7056455PMC
March 2020
3.357 Impact Factor

Microfluidic single-cell analysis-Toward integration and total on-chip analysis.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Mar 6;14(2):021502. Epub 2020 Mar 6.

Division of Life Science, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, China.

Various types of single-cell analyses are now extensively used to answer many biological questions, and with this growth in popularity, potential drawbacks to these methods are also becoming apparent. Depending on the specific application, workflows can be laborious, low throughput, and run the risk of contamination. Microfluidic designs, with their advantages of being high throughput, low in reaction volume, and compatible with bio-inert materials, have been widely used to improve single-cell workflows in all major stages of single-cell applications, from cell sorting to lysis, to sample processing and readout. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5131795DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7060088PMC

Microfluidics-based fabrication of cell-laden microgels.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Mar 5;14(2):021501. Epub 2020 Mar 5.

Irving K. Barber School of Arts and Sciences, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, British Columbia V1V 1V7, Canada.

Microfluidic principles have been extensively utilized as powerful tools to fabricate controlled monodisperse cell-laden hydrogel microdroplets for various biological applications, especially tissue engineering. In this review, we report recent advances in microfluidic-based droplet fabrication and provide our rationale to justify the superiority of microfluidics-based techniques over other microtechnology methods in achieving the encapsulation of cells within hydrogels. The three main components of such a system-hydrogels, cells, and device configurations-are examined thoroughly. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5134060DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7058428PMC
March 2020
3.357 Impact Factor

Multi-layering of SU-8 exhibits distinct geometrical transitions from circular to planarized profiles.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Jan 21;14(1):014116. Epub 2020 Feb 21.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA.

The negative tone photoresist SU-8 permits the creation of micrometer-scale structures by optical lithography. It is also the most used photoresist in soft lithography for the fast-prototyping of microfluidic devices. Despite its importance, the effect of capillary forces on SU-8 multi-layering onto topographical features has not been thoroughly studied. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5139031DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7039731PMC
January 2020

Molecular ring toss of circular BAC DNA using micropillar array for single-molecule studies.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Jan 21;14(1):014115. Epub 2020 Feb 21.

Department of Intelligent Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kagawa University, Takamatsu 761-0396, Japan.

This paper reports a method for trapping circular DNA molecules and imaging the dynamics with high spatial resolution using a micropillar-array device. We successfully trapped circular bacterial artificial chromosome DNA molecules at a micropillar-based "ring toss" in the laminar flow of a microchannel under a fluorescence microscope and demonstrated the imaging of their extension by flow and condensation process induced by spermine solution. DNA molecules were visualized in an extended loop conformation, allowing high spatial resolution, and the results showed that the dynamics is induced by the microfluidic control of the surrounding chemical environment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5142666DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7039730PMC
January 2020

On-chip surface acoustic wave and micropipette aspiration techniques to assess cell elastic properties.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Jan 18;14(1):014114. Epub 2020 Feb 18.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3010, Australia.

The cytoskeletal mechanics and cell mechanical properties play an important role in cellular behaviors. In this study, in order to provide comprehensive insights into the relationship between different cytoskeletal components and cellular elastic moduli, we built a phase-modulated surface acoustic wave microfluidic device to measure cellular compressibility and a microfluidic micropipette-aspiration device to measure cellular Young's modulus. The microfluidic devices were validated based on experimental data and computational simulations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5138662DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7028434PMC
January 2020

Enhanced sample filling and discretization in thermoplastic 2D microwell arrays using asymmetric contact angles.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Jan 18;14(1):014113. Epub 2020 Feb 18.

Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, USA.

Sample filling and discretization within thermoplastic 2D microwell arrays is investigated toward the development of low cost disposable microfluidics for passive sample discretization. By using a high level of contact angle asymmetry between the filling channel and microwell surfaces, a significant increase in the range of well geometries that can be successfully filled is revealed. The performance of various array designs is characterized numerically and experimentally to assess the impact of contact angle asymmetry and device geometry on sample filling and discretization, resulting in guidelines to ensure robust microwell filling and sample isolation over a wide range of well dimensions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5126938DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7028432PMC
January 2020

A programmable microfluidic platform for multisample injection, discretization, and droplet manipulation.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Jan 5;14(1):014112. Epub 2020 Feb 5.

National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.

A programmable microfluidic platform enabling on-demand sampling, compartmentalization, and manipulation of multiple aqueous volumes is presented. The system provides random-access actuation of a microtrap array supporting selective discretization of picoliter volumes from multiple sample inputs. The platform comprises two interconnected chips, with parallel T-junctions and multiplexed microvalves within one chip enabling programmable injection of aqueous sample plugs, and nanoliter volumes transferred to a second microtrap array chip in which the plugs are actively discretized into picoliter droplets within a static array of membrane displacement actuators. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5143434DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7002170PMC
January 2020

Micro-nanoparticles magnetic trap: Toward high sensitivity and rapid microfluidic continuous flow enzyme immunoassay.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Jan 30;14(1):014111. Epub 2020 Jan 30.

Cinvestav-Monterrey, 66600 Apodaca, Nuevo León, Mexico.

In this work, we developed a microfluidic system for immunoassays where we combined the use of magnetic nanoparticles as immunosupport, a microfluidic magnetic trap, and a fluorogenic substrate in continuous flow for detection which, together with the optimization of the functionalization of surfaces to minimize nonspecific interactions, resulted in a detection limit in the order of femtomolar and a total assay time of 40 min for antibiotin antibody detection. A magnetic trap made of carbonyl-iron microparticles packaged inside a 200  m square microchannel was used to immobilize and concentrate nanoparticles. We functionalized the surface of the iron microparticles with a silica-polyethylene glycol (PEG) shell to avoid corrosion and unspecific protein binding. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5126027DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6992449PMC
January 2020

Nanocalorimeters for biomolecular analysis and cell metabolism monitoring.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Jan 31;14(1):011503. Epub 2020 Jan 31.

Department of Control Engineering, Northeastern University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066001, People's Republic of China.

Nanocalorimeters, or microfabricated calorimeters, provide a promising way to characterize the thermal process of biological processes, such as biomolecule interactions and cellular metabolic activities. They enabled miniaturized heat measurement onto a chip device with potential benefits including low sample consumption, low cost, portability, and high throughput. Over the past few decades, researchers have tried to improve nanocalorimeters' performance, in terms of sensitivity, accuracy, and detection resolution, by exploring different sensing methods, thermal insulation techniques, and liquid handling methods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5134870DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6994269PMC
January 2020

Chemosensory avoidance behaviors of marine amphipods revealed using a millifluidic perfusion technology.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Jan 22;14(1):014110. Epub 2020 Jan 22.

The Phenomics Laboratory, School of Science, RMIT University, Melbourne VIC 3083, Australia.

Chemosensory avoidance behaviors of aquatic invertebrates provide a functional link between early responses to pollutants at the infraorganismal and ecologically relevant supraorganismal levels. Despite significant importance, there is, however, a notable lack of user-friendly laboratory techniques. Here, we demonstrate a scalable millifluidic platform for higher throughput quantitative chemobehavioral studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5131187DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6976339PMC
January 2020

Chemotropism among populations of yeast cells with spatiotemporal resolution in a biofabricated microfluidic platform.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Jan 17;14(1):014108. Epub 2020 Jan 17.

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. 20064, USA.

Chemotropism is an essential response of organisms to external chemical gradients that direct the growth of cells toward the gradient source. Chemotropic responses between single cells have been studied using gradients of synthetically derived signaling molecules and helped to develop a better understanding of chemotropism in multiple organisms. However, dynamic changes including spatial changes to the gradient as well as fluctuations in levels of cell generated signaling molecules can result in the redirection of chemotropic responses, which can be difficult to model with synthetic peptides and single cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5128739DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6980865PMC
January 2020

Engineered fluidic systems to understand lymphatic cancer metastasis.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Jan 28;14(1):011502. Epub 2020 Jan 28.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, USA.

The majority of all cancers metastasize initially through the lymphatic system. Despite this, the mechanisms of lymphogenous metastasis remain poorly understood and understudied compared to hematogenous metastasis. Over the past few decades, microfluidic devices have been used to model pathophysiological processes and drug interactions in numerous contexts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5133970DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6986954PMC
January 2020

Applications of extracellular vesicles in tissue regeneration.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Jan 27;14(1):011501. Epub 2020 Jan 27.

Extracellular vesicles (EVs) can be classified into several types based on their different biosyntheses or release pathways, including exosomes, microvesicles, apoptotic bodies, and large oncosomes. As they contain DNAs, RNAs, proteins, and other bioactive signals, EVs have been utilized in the diagnosis field for a long time. Considering the fact that stem cells have been widely used for tissue regeneration and EVs possess similar biological properties to their source cells, tissue regeneration abilities of EVs have recently attracted much attention in the regenerative medicine field. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5127077DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6984977PMC
January 2020

Microfluidic opportunities in printed electrolyte-gated transistor biosensors.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Jan 27;14(1):011301. Epub 2020 Jan 27.

Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, 421 Washington Ave. SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA.

Printed electrolyte-gated transistors (EGTs) are an emerging biosensor platform that leverage the facile fabrication engendered by printed electronics with the low voltage operation enabled by ion gel dielectrics. The resulting label-free, nonoptical sensors have high gain and provide sensing operations that can be challenging for conventional chemical field effect transistor architectures. After providing an overview of EGT device fabrication and operation, we highlight opportunities for microfluidic enhancement of EGT sensor performance via multiplexing, sample preconcentration, and improved transport to the sensor surface. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5131365DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6984978PMC
January 2020

A droplet-based microfluidic viscometer for the measurement of blood coagulation.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Jan 17;14(1):014109. Epub 2020 Jan 17.

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA.

A continuous microfluidic viscometer is used to measure blood coagulation. The viscometer operates by flowing oil and blood into a cross section where droplets are generated. At a set pressure, the length of the droplets is inversely proportional to the viscosity of the blood sample being delivered. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5128255DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6968952PMC
January 2020

Counting-based microfluidic paper-based devices capable of analyzing submicroliter sample volumes.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Jan 10;14(1):014107. Epub 2020 Jan 10.

Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Ontario Tech University (UOIT), 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, Ontario L1G 0C5, Canada.

In this paper, we report the development of semiquantitative counting-based lateral flow assay (LFA)-type microfluidic paper-based analytical devices ( PADs) to analyze samples at submicroliter volumes. The ability to use submicroliter sample volumes is a significant advantage for PADs since it enables enhanced multiplexing, reduces cost, and increases user-friendliness since small sample volumes can be collected using methods that do not require trained personnel, such as finger pricking and microneedles. The challenge of accomplishing a semiquantitative test readout using submicroliter sample volumes was overcome with a counting-based approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5131751DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6954107PMC
January 2020

Elimination of pseudo-negative conductance by coercive steady state in perm-selective ion transportation.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Jan 10;14(1):014106. Epub 2020 Jan 10.

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Jeju National University, Jeju 63243, Republic of Korea.

Ion concentration polarization (ICP) has drawn unprecedented attention due to its new underlying physics and engineering applications such as biomolecular preconcentrator and electrofluidic desalination. Typically, the current-voltage characteristic of ICP has three distinctive regimes with a positive slope in all regimes, but an unintentional negative slope ("overshoot current") was often observed in the Ohmic/limiting regime. This phenomenon impeded an exact estimation of electrokinetic properties of the ICP platform. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5139251DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6954106PMC
January 2020

Influence of non-Newtonian power law rheology on inertial migration of particles in channel flow.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Jan 3;14(1):014105. Epub 2020 Jan 3.

Department of Mechanics, State Key Laboratory of Fluid Power and Mechatronic Systems, Zhejiang University, 310027 Hangzhou, China.

In this paper, the inertial migration of particles in the channel flow of power-law fluid is numerically investigated. The effects of the power-law index (), Reynolds number (), blockage ratio (), and channel aspect ratio (AR) on the inertial migration of particles and equilibrium position are explored. The results show that there exist two stages of particle migration and four stable equilibrium positions for particles in the cross section of a square channel. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5134504DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6941947PMC
January 2020

Surface engineering within a microchannel for hydrodynamic and self-assembled cell patterning.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Jan 2;14(1):014104. Epub 2020 Jan 2.

William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA.

The applications of cell patterning are widespread due to the high-throughput testing and different resolutions offered by these platforms. Cell patterning has aided in deconvoluting experiments to better characterize cellular mechanisms and increase therapeutic output. Here, we present a technique for engineering an artificial surface via surface chemistry to form large-scale arrays of cells within a microchannel by employing microstamping. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5126608DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6941948PMC
January 2020

Enhanced sample pre-concentration by ion concentration polarization on a paraffin coated converging microfluidic paper based analytical platform.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Jan 2;14(1):014103. Epub 2020 Jan 2.

School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798.

Microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) represent a modest and feasible alternative for conventional analytical methods. However, the inadequate sensitivity of these devices limits the possible applications of μPADs. In this scenario, inducing ion concentration polarization (ICP) on μPADs has shown promise to overcome this limitation by preconcentrating the analytes of interest. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5133946DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6941944PMC
January 2020

Development of microfluidic concentrator using ion concentration polarization mechanism to assist trapping magnetic nanoparticle-bound miRNA to detect with Raman tags.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Jan 2;14(1):014102. Epub 2020 Jan 2.

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the Center for Nano Bio-Detection, National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi 62102, Taiwan.

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding single-stranded ribonucleic acid molecules. This type of endogenous oligonucleotide could be secreted into the circulation and exist stably. The detection of specific miRNAs released by cancer cells potentially provides a noninvasive means to achieve early diagnosis and prognosis of cancers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5126293DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6941943PMC
January 2020

investigations of red blood cell phase separation in a complex microchannel network.

Biomicrofluidics 2020 Jan 2;14(1):014101. Epub 2020 Jan 2.

ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research, University of Bern, 3010 Bern, Switzerland.

Microvascular networks feature a complex topology with multiple bifurcating vessels. Nonuniform partitioning () of red blood cells (RBCs) occurs at diverging bifurcations, leading to a heterogeneous RBC distribution that ultimately affects the oxygen delivery to living tissues. Our understanding of the mechanisms governing RBC heterogeneity is still limited, especially in large networks where the RBC dynamics can be nonintuitive. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5127840DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6941945PMC
January 2020

Chips-on-a-plate device for monitoring cellular migration in a microchannel-based intestinal follicle-associated epithelium model.

Biomicrofluidics 2019 Nov 24;13(6):064127. Epub 2019 Dec 24.

Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141, Republic of Korea.

This paper describes a chips-on-a-plate (COP) device for monitoring the migration of Raji cells in the Caco-2/Raji coculture. To generate a model of the human intestinal follicle-associated epithelium (FAE), the coculture method using a conventional Transwell cell culture insert was established. Due to the structural limitations of the Transwell insert, live-cell tracking studies have not been performed previously using the existing FAE model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5128640DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6930141PMC
November 2019

Microfluidic device for on-chip isolation and detection of circulating exosomes in blood of breast cancer patients.

Biomicrofluidics 2019 Sep 31;13(5):054113. Epub 2019 Oct 31.

First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian 116011, China.

Tumor-derived circulating exosomes have been recognized as a promising biomarker source for cancer diagnosis via a less invasive procedure. The integration of isolation and detection of exosomes in routine clinical settings is still challenging. In this study, we developed a new microfluidic device for immunomagnetic separation and detection of blood exosomes . Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5110973DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6932858PMC
September 2019

Boyden chamber-based compartmentalized tumor spheroid culture system to implement localized anticancer drug treatment.

Biomicrofluidics 2019 Sep 24;13(5):054111. Epub 2019 Oct 24.

Center for International Research on Integrative Biomedical Systems, Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 156-0041, Japan.

In anticancer drug development, it is important to simultaneously evaluate both the effect of drugs on cell proliferation and their ability to penetrate tissues. To realize such an evaluation process, here, we present a compartmentalized tumor spheroid culture system utilizing a thin membrane with a through-hole to conduct localized anticancer treatment of tumor spheroids and monitor spheroid dimensions as an indicator of cell proliferation. The system is based on a commercialized Boyden chamber plate; a through-hole was bored through a porous membrane of the chamber, and the pre-existing 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5125650DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6932857PMC
September 2019

Highly integrated microfluidic device for cell pairing, fusion and culture.

Biomicrofluidics 2019 Sep 11;13(5):054109. Epub 2019 Oct 11.

State Key Laboratory of Precision Measurement Technology and Instrument, Department of Precision Instrument, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China.

In this study, we proposed a microfluidic device with compact structures integrating multiple modalities for cell capture, pairing, fusion, and culture. The microfluidic device is composed of upper and lower parts. The lower part configured with electrodes and capture wells is used for cell trapping/pairing/fusion, while the upper part configured with corresponding culture wells is used for cell culture. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5124705DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6932852PMC
September 2019

Multiparameter toxicity screening on a chip: Effects of UV radiation and titanium dioxide nanoparticles on HaCaT cells.

Biomicrofluidics 2019 Jul 27;13(4):044112. Epub 2019 Aug 27.

Future Industries Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, Mawson Lakes Boulevard, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095, Australia.

Microfluidic screening is gaining attention as an efficient method for evaluating nanomaterial toxicity. Here, we consider a multiparameter treatment where nanomaterials interact with cells in the presence of a secondary exposure (UV radiation). The microfluidic device contains channels that permit immobilization of HaCaT cells (human skin cell line), delivery of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TNPs), and exposure to a known dose of UV radiation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5113729DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6932853PMC

Transverse migration and microfluidic concentration of DNA using Newtonian buffers.

Biomicrofluidics 2019 Jul 23;13(4):044104. Epub 2019 Jul 23.

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA.

We present experimental evidence that DNA can be concentrated due to an electrohydrodynamic coupling between a pressure-driven flow and a parallel electric field. The effects of buffer properties on the process were measured in a microfluidic channel. The concentration rates and the efficiency of trapping DNA were quantified as functions of the ion and polymer concentrations of the buffer solution. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5110718DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6932854PMC

Enabling single cell electrical stimulation and response recording via a microfluidic platform.

Biomicrofluidics 2019 Nov 13;13(6):064126. Epub 2019 Dec 13.

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Akron, Akron, Ohio 44325, USA.

Electrical stimulation (ES) has been recognized to play important roles in regulating cell behaviors. A microfluidic device was developed for the electrical stimulation of single cells and simultaneous recording of extracellular field potential (EFP). Each single cell was trapped onto an electrode surface by a constriction channel for ES testing and was then driven to the outlet by the pressure afterward. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5128884DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6910869PMC
November 2019

Festschrift for Professor Hsueh-Chia Chang.

Authors:
Ronald Pethig

Biomicrofluidics 2019 Nov 12;13(6):060401. Epub 2019 Dec 12.

School of Engineering, The King's Buildings, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JF, United Kingdom.

This special collection of serves as a Festschrift to honor Professor Hsueh-Chia Chang, Bayer Professor at the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame. We acknowledge not only his role as Chief and Founding Editor of (from 2006 through 2018) but also his seminal contributions as a researcher in micro/nanofluidics, particularly in the area of nanoelectrokinetics. This research has also been recognized by the 2018 Lifetime Achievement Award of the AES Electrophoresis Society to him. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5141082DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6908456PMC
November 2019