4 results match your criteria Biology and medicine Aligarh[Journal]

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Cancer Stem Cells: Dynamic Entities in an Ever-Evolving Paradigm.

Biol Med (Aligarh) 2015 Nov 11;7(Suppl 2). Epub 2014 Nov 11.

Hugo W. Moser Research Institute at Kennedy Krieger, USA; Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis postulates that there is a hierarchy of cellular differentiation within cancers and that the bulk population of tumor cells is derived from a relatively small population of multi-potent neoplastic stem-like cells (CSCs). This tumor-initiating cell population plays an important role in maintaining tumor growth through their unlimited self-renewal, therapeutic resistance, and capacity to propagate tumors through asymmetric cell division. Recent findings from multiple laboratories show that cancer progenitor cells have the capacity to de-differentiate and acquire a stem-like phenotype in response to either genetic manipulation or environmental cues. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4172/0974-8369.1000S2-001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4857888PMC
November 2015
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Two Faces of Cathepsin D: Physiological Guardian Angel and Pathological Demon.

Biol Med (Aligarh) 2014 Jul;6(2)

Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 2300 Children's Plaza, Box 222, Chicago, Illinois, 60614-3394, USA.

Since its discovery as a lysosomal hydrolase, Cathepsin D (CatD) has been the subject of intensive scrutiny by numerous scientists. Those accumulated efforts have defined its biosynthetic pathway, structure, and companion proteins in the context of its perceived "house keeping" function. However, in the past two decades CatD has emerged as a multifunctional enzyme, involved in myriad biological processes beyond its original "housekeeping" role. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4172/0974-8369.1000206DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4318633PMC
July 2014
17 Reads

GABA Receptor Expression in the Forebrain of Ataxic Mice.

Biol Med (Aligarh) 2014 ;6(1)

NeuroSearch A/S, Pederstrupvej 93, 2750 Ballerup, Denmark ; School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University, South Road, Science Laboratories, Durham DH1 3LE, United Kingdom ; Vision Research Center, Department of Ophthalmology University of Missouri, Kansas City, School of Medicine, 2411 Holmes St., Kansas City, MO 64108, USA ; K&P Scientific LLC, 8570 N Hickory St. Ste. 412, Kansas City, MO 64155, USA.

The human CACNA1A gene encodes the pore-forming α subunit of Ca2.1 (P/Q-type) calcium channels and is the locus for several neurological disorders, including episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2), spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) and Familial Hemiplegic Migraine type 1 (FHM1). Several spontaneous mouse Cacna1a mutant strains exist, among them (), carrying the R1262G point mutation in the mouse Cacna1a gene. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4172/1234-3425.1000198DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4191822PMC
January 2014

Muscarinic receptor antagonist and an alpha-adrenergic agonist are required in combination to provide stable mydriasis following intravitreal injection in mice.

Biol Med (Aligarh) 2010 Jan;2(1):17-23

Verna and Marrs McLean Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, One Baylor Plaza, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Tropicamide (muscarinic receptor antagonist) and phenylephrine (α-adrenergic receptor agonist) are commonly used to dilate the pupils by topical application. These two eye drops are often used, singly or in combination, to dilate the pupil and perform acute light-evoked physiological experiments (electroretinography, for example), before and after intravitreal injections of pharmacological agents, as an assay for their affect on retinal activity. This study wanted to determine whether treatment with one of these drugs, or with both, is most effective in maintaining mydriasis after intravitreal injections. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2941443PMC
January 2010
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