2,172 results match your criteria Biology Of The Cell[Journal]


Motile ciliogenesis and the mitotic prism.

Biol Cell 2019 Mar 24. Epub 2019 Mar 24.

Institut de Biologie de l'École Normale Supérieure (IBENS), Paris Sciences et Lettres (PSL) Research University, Paris, F-75005, France.

Motile cilia of epithelial multiciliated cells transport vital fluids along organ lumens to promote essential respiratory, reproductive and brain functions. Progenitors of multiciliated cells undergo massive and coordinated organelle remodelling during their differentiation for subsequent motile ciliogenesis. Defects in multiciliated cell differentiation lead to severe cilia-related diseases by perturbing cilia-based flows. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800072DOI Listing

MicroRNAs as markers to monitor endothelin-1 signalling and potential treatment in renal disease: Carcinoma - proteinuric damage - toxicity.

Authors:
Jochen W U Fries

Biol Cell 2019 Mar 13. Epub 2019 Mar 13.

Department of Pathology, University Hospital of Koeln, 50931, Koeln, Germany.

This review highlights new developments in miRNA as diagnostic and surveillance tools in diseases damaging the renal proximal tubule mediated by endothelin in the field of renal carcinoma, proteinuric kidney disease and tubulotoxicity. A new mechanism in the miRNA regulation of proteins leads to the binding of the miRNA directly to the DNA with premature transcriptional termination and hence the formation of truncated protein isoforms (Mxi2, Vim3). These isoforms are mediated through miRNA15a or miRNA 498, respectively. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800059DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) regulates developmental morphogenesis and chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum.

Biol Cell 2019 Mar 13. Epub 2019 Mar 13.

Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara, 390 002, India.

Background Information: Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) has been attributed to varied roles in DNA repair, cell cycle, cell death, etc. Our previous reports demonstrate the role of PARP-1 during Dictyostelium discoideum development by its constitutive downregulation as well as by PARP-1 ortholog, ADP ribosyl transferase 1 A (ADPRT1A) overexpression. The current study analyses and strengthens the function of ADPRT1A in multicellular morphogenesis of D. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800056DOI Listing

Targeting of the unfolded protein response (UPR) as therapy for Parkinson's disease.

Biol Cell 2019 Mar 12. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Biomedical Neuroscience Institute (BNI), Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.

Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, leading to the progressive decline of motor control due to the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. At the molecular level, Parkinson's disease share common molecular signatures with most neurodegenerative diseases including the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the brain. Alteration in the buffering capacity of the proteostasis network during aging is proposed as one of the triggering steps leading to abnormal protein aggregation in this disease, highlighting disturbances in the function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800068DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

The atypical RhoU/Wrch1 Rho GTPase controls cell proliferation and apoptosis in the gut epithelium.

Biol Cell 2019 Mar 5. Epub 2019 Mar 5.

CRBM, CNRS, University of Montpellier, 34293, Montpellier CEDEX 5, France.

Background: The mammalian gut epithelium displays among the highest rates of self-renewal, with a turnover time of less than 5 days. Renewal involves concerted proliferation at the bottom of the crypt, migration and differentiation along the crypt-villus axis and anoïkis/shedding in the luminal epithelium. Renewal is controlled by interplay between signalling pathways, among which canonical and non-canonical Wnt signals play prominent roles. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800062DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

Mechanisms of kinesin-7 CENP-E in kinetochore-microtubule capture and chromosome alignment during cell division.

Biol Cell 2019 Feb 19. Epub 2019 Feb 19.

Department of Cell Biology and Genetics/Center for Cell and Developmental Biology, The School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian, 350108, China.

Chromosome congression is essential for faithful chromosome segregation and genomic stability in cell division. Centromere-associated protein E (CENP-E), a plus-end-directed kinesin motor, is required for congression of pole-proximal chromosomes in metaphase. CENP-E accumulates at the outer plate of kinetochores and mediates the kinetochore-microtubule capture. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800082DOI Listing
February 2019

Ciliary kinesins beyond IFT: Cilium length, disassembly, cargo transport and signalling.

Biol Cell 2019 Apr 15;111(4):79-94. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Laboratory of Hereditary Kidney Diseases, INSERM UMR 1163, Paris Descartes University, Imagine Institute, Paris, 75015, France.

Cilia and flagella are microtubule-based antenna which are highly conserved among eukaryotes. In vertebrates, primary and motile cilia have evolved to exert several key functions during development and tissue homoeostasis. Ciliary dysfunction in humans causes a highly heterogeneous group of diseases called ciliopathies, a class of genetic multisystemic disorders primarily affecting kidney, skeleton, retina, lung and the central nervous system. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800074DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read
3.506 Impact Factor

AMPK signalling: Implications for podocyte biology in diabetic nephropathy.

Biol Cell 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Mossakowski Medical Research Centre Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdańsk, Poland.

Diabetic nephropathy is a major long-term complication of diabetes mellitus and one of the most common causes of end-stage renal disease. Thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, glomerular cell hypertrophy and podocyte loss are among the main pathological changes that occur during diabetic nephropathy, resulting in proteinuria. Injury to podocytes, which are a crucial component of the glomerular filtration barrier, seems to play a key role in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800077DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Cell type-specific structural plasticity of the ciliary transition zone in C. elegans.

Biol Cell 2019 Apr 14;111(4):95-107. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Department of Genetics and Human Genetics Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ, 08854, USA.

Background Information: The current consensus on cilia development posits that the ciliary transition zone (TZ) is formed via extension of nine centrosomal microtubules. In this model, TZ structure remains unchanged in microtubule number throughout the cilium life cycle. This model does not however explain structural variations of TZ structure seen in nature and could also lend itself to the misinterpretation that deviations from nine-doublet microtubule ultrastructure represent an abnormal phenotype. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800042DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Blocking bacterial entry at the adhesion step reveals dynamic recruitment of membrane and cytosolic probes.

Biol Cell 2019 Mar 8;111(3):67-77. Epub 2019 Feb 8.

Cellular Microbiology and Physics of Infection Group, Center for Infection and Immunity of Lille, CNRS UMR8204, INSERM U1019, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Lille regional Univ. Hosp. Centr., Lille Univ., Lille, F-59019, France.

Background: Bacterial invasion covers two steps: adhesion and entry per se. The cell signalling response is triggered upon pathogen interaction at the cell surface. This response continues when the pathogen is internalised. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800070DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Dying under pressure: cellular characterisation and in vivo functions of cell death induced by compaction.

Biol Cell 2019 Mar 17;111(3):51-66. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Department of Developmental and Stem Cell Biology, Institut Pasteur, Paris, 75015, France.

Cells and tissues are exposed to multiple mechanical stresses during development, tissue homoeostasis and diseases. While we start to have an extensive understanding of the influence of mechanics on cell differentiation and proliferation, how excessive mechanical stresses can also lead to cell death and may be associated with pathologies has been much less explored so far. Recently, the development of new perturbative approaches allowing modulation of pressure and deformation of tissues has demonstrated that compaction (the reduction of tissue size or volume) can lead to cell elimination. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800075DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Long non-coding RNA Linc00518 promotes paclitaxel resistance of the human prostate cancer by sequestering miR-216b-5p.

Biol Cell 2019 Feb 7;111(2):39-50. Epub 2018 Dec 7.

Department of Urology Surgery, Heze Municipal Hospital, Heze, 274000, China.

Background Information: To characterise Linc00518 expression in prostate cancer and elucidate the potential mechanistic involvement in paclitaxel resistance, the relative expression of Linc00518 and miR-216b-5p was determined by real-time PCR. The regulatory effect of miR-216b-5p on either Linc00518 or GATA6 was interrogated with luciferase reporter assay. The endogenous GATA6 protein was analysed by Western blotting. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800054DOI Listing
February 2019
39 Reads

Rsph9 is critical for ciliary radial spoke assembly and central pair microtubule stability.

Biol Cell 2019 Feb 16;111(2):29-38. Epub 2018 Nov 16.

State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, CAS Center for Excellence in Molecular Cell Science, Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai, China.

Background Information: In the "9+2"-type motile cilia, radial spokes (RSs) protruded from the nine peripheral microtubule doublets surround and interact with the central pair (CP) apparatus to regulate ciliary beat. RSPH9 is the human homologue of the essential protozoan RS head protein Rsp9. Its mutations in human primary ciliary dyskinesia patients, however, cause CP loss in a small portion of airway cilia without affecting the ciliary localization of other head proteins. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800060DOI Listing
February 2019

Tamoxifen ameliorates obstructive nephropathy through Src and the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway.

Biol Cell 2019 Jan 21;111(1):18-27. Epub 2018 Oct 21.

Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Republic of Korea.

Background Information: Tubulointerstitial fibrosis is the end-point of chronic kidney diseases. Tamoxifen, a selective oestrogen receptor (ER) modulator, attenuates renal fibrosis, by regulating the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β/Smad signalling. Src and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways play critical roles in the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/boc.201800040
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800040DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

The role of the unfolded protein response in cancer progression: From oncogenesis to chemoresistance.

Biol Cell 2019 Jan 29;111(1):1-17. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Apoptosis Research Centre, NUI Galway, Ireland.

Tumour cells endure both oncogenic and environmental stresses during cancer progression. Transformed cells must meet increased demands for protein and lipid production needed for rapid proliferation and must adapt to exist in an oxygen- and nutrient-deprived environment. To overcome such challenges, cancer cells exploit intrinsic adaptive mechanisms such as the unfolded protein response (UPR). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/boc.201800050
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800050DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

The role of protein disulphide isomerase AGR2 in the tumour niche.

Biol Cell 2018 Dec 14;110(12):271-282. Epub 2018 Oct 14.

INSERM U1242, "Chemistry, Oncogenesis, Stress, Signaling", Université, de Rennes 1, Rennes, France.

In recent years, the discovery of 'tumour niche', a microenvironment that favours tumour development has changed our perspective of cancer. This microenvironment generated by the tumour cells itself and surrounding cells is capable of providing essential elements for its growth. Consequently, the homoeostasis of the secretory pathway (SP) has become an essential player in cancer development. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/boc.201800024
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800024DOI Listing
December 2018
13 Reads

NADPH-oxidase-derived ROS alters cell migration by modulating adhesions dynamics.

Biol Cell 2018 Oct 16;110(10):225-236. Epub 2018 Sep 16.

Basic Research Center in Dentistry, Dentistry School, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.

Background Information: Cell migration requires the coordinated activation of structural and signalling molecules, such as the RhoGTPase Rac1. It is known that the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase complex assembly, which generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the cell membrane, also relies on Rac1 activation, indicating a possible effect of ROS during cell migration. In this study, we evaluated the effect of NADPH-oxidase-derived ROS on the migration process. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/boc.201800011
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800011DOI Listing
October 2018
32 Reads

ARAP2 inhibits Akt independently of its effects on focal adhesions.

Biol Cell 2018 Dec 10;110(12):257-270. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Biology, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA.

Background Information: ARAP2, an Arf GTPase-activating protein (Arf GAP) that binds to adaptor protein with PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper motifs 1 (APPL1), regulates focal adhesions (FAs). APPL1 affects FA dynamics by regulating Akt. Here, we tested the hypothesis that ARAP2 affects FAs in part by regulating Akt through APPL1. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/boc.201800044
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800044DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6279576PMC
December 2018
10 Reads

Distinct nuclear and cytoplasmic machineries cooperatively promote the inheritance of RNAi in Caenorhabditis elegans.

Biol Cell 2018 Oct 9;110(10):217-224. Epub 2018 Sep 9.

Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027, P. R. China.

Epigenetic information can be inherited over multiple generations, which is termed as transgenerational epigenetic inheritance (TEI). Although the mechanism(s) of TEI remains poorly understood, noncoding RNAs have been demonstrated to play important roles in TEI. In many eukaryotes, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) triggers the silencing of cellular nucleic acids that exhibit sequence homology to the dsRNA via a process termed RNA interference (RNAi). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800031DOI Listing
October 2018
3.510 Impact Factor

Measuring the effects of α -antitrypsin polymerisation on the structure and biophysical properties of the endoplasmic reticulum.

Biol Cell 2018 Nov 10;110(11):249-255. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

Cambridge Institute for Medical Research (CIMR), University of Cambridge, Wellcome Trust/MRC Building, Cambridge, CB2 0XY, UK.

An important function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is to serve as a site of secretory protein folding. When the accumulation of misfolded proteins threatens to disturb luminal homoeostasis, the cell is said to experience ER stress. By contrast, the accumulation of well-folded proteins inside the ER leads to a distinct form of strain called ER overload. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800023DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Sec61 blockade by mycolactone: A central mechanism in Buruli ulcer disease.

Biol Cell 2018 Nov 14;110(11):237-248. Epub 2018 Aug 14.

Division of Molecular and Cellular Function, School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PT, UK.

Infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans results in a necrotising skin disease known as a Buruli ulcer, the pathology of which is directly linked to the bacterial production of the toxin mycolactone. Recent studies have identified the protein translocation machinery of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane as the primary cellular target of mycolactone, and shown that the toxin binds to the core subunit of the Sec61 complex. Mycolactone binding strongly inhibits the capacity of the Sec61 translocon to transport newly synthesised membrane and secretory proteins into and across the ER membrane. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800030DOI Listing
November 2018

Endoplasmic reticulum stress and kidney dysfunction.

Biol Cell 2018 Sep 1;110(9):205-216. Epub 2018 Aug 1.

INSERM U1151 - CNRS UMR 8253, Institut Necker Enfants Malades, Paris, France.

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects millions of persons worldwide and constitutes a major public health problem. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of CKD is a key challenge for the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies. A major contributor to chronic histological damage associated with CKD is acute kidney injury (AKI). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800019DOI Listing
September 2018
5 Reads

Three branches to rule them all? UPR signalling in response to chemically versus misfolded proteins-induced ER stress.

Biol Cell 2018 Sep 29;110(9):197-204. Epub 2018 Jul 29.

Università della Svizzera italiana (USI), Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Institute for Research in Biomedicine, Bellinzona, Switzerland.

Study of the unfolded protein responses (UPR) is mainly addressed by challenging eukaryotic cells with chemical compounds that impair calcium, redox or glycan homeostasis. These dramatically alter the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) environment and function, but also trigger pleiotropic effects that may result in multi-organellar failure and cell death. Recent works showed that UPR induced by the accumulation of unfolded polypeptides in the ER lumen drastically differs from chemically induced UPR. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800029DOI Listing
September 2018

Laminin α1 orchestrates VEGFA functions in the ecosystem of colorectal carcinoma.

Biol Cell 2018 Jun 15. Epub 2018 Jun 15.

Inserm U1109, MN3T, Strasbourg, F-67200, France.

Background Information: Tumor stroma remodeling is a key feature of malignant tumors and can promote cancer progression. Laminins are major constituents of basement membranes that physically separate the epithelium from the underlying stroma.

Results: By employing mouse models expressing high and low levels of the laminin α1 chain (LMα1), we highlighted its implication in a tumor-stroma crosstalk, thus leading to increased colon tumor incidence, angiogenesis and tumor growth. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800007DOI Listing
June 2018
10 Reads

STED microscopy: A simplified method for liver sinusoidal endothelial fenestrae analysis.

Biol Cell 2018 07 25;110(7):159-168. Epub 2018 Jun 25.

INSERM, UMR1053, Bordeaux, F-33076, France.

Background Information: Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) possess fenestrae, open transcellular pores with an average diameter of 100 nm. These fenestrae allow for the exchange between blood and hepatocytes. Alterations in their number or diameter in liver diseases have important implications for hepatic microcirculation and function. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800016DOI Listing
July 2018
1 Read

The role of Pdcd4 in tumour suppression and protein translation.

Biol Cell 2018 May 28. Epub 2018 May 28.

Department of Toxicology and Cancer Biology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA.

Programmed cell death 4 (Pdcd4), a tumour suppressor, is frequently down-regulated in various types of cancer. Pdcd4 has been demonstrated to efficiently suppress tumour promotion, progression and proliferation. The biochemical function of Pdcd4 is a protein translation inhibitor. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6261700PMC
May 2018
2 Reads

New insights on the functional role of URG7 in the cellular response to ER stress.

Biol Cell 2018 Jul 30;110(7):147-158. Epub 2018 May 30.

Dipartimento di Scienze, Università degli Studi della Basilicata, Potenza, 85100, Italy.

Background Information: Up-regulated Gene clone 7 (URG7) is an ER resident protein, whose expression is up-regulated in the presence of hepatitis B virus X antigen (HBxAg) during HBV infection. In virus-infected hepatocytes, URG7 shows an anti-apoptotic activity due to the PI3K/AKT signalling activation, does not seem to have tumorigenic properties, but it appears to promote the development and progression of fibrosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying URG7 activity remain largely unknown. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800004DOI Listing
July 2018
1 Read

Role of mechanical cues in shaping neuronal morphology and connectivity.

Biol Cell 2018 Jun 14;110(6):125-136. Epub 2018 May 14.

Sorbonne Université, CNRS UMR 7622, Laboratoire de Biologie du Développement-Institut de Biologie Paris Seine (LBD-IBPS), INSERM, Paris, 75005, France.

Neuronal circuits, the functional building blocks of the nervous system, assemble during development through a series of dynamic processes including the migration of neurons to their final position, the growth and navigation of axons and their synaptic connection with target cells. While the role of chemical cues in guiding neuronal migration and axonal development has been extensively analysed, the contribution of mechanical inputs, such as forces and stiffness, has received far less attention. In this article, we review the in vitro and more recent in vivo studies supporting the notion that mechanical signals are critical for multiple aspects of neuronal circuit assembly, from the emergence of axons to the formation of functional synapses. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800003DOI Listing

Nuclear localisation of 53BP1 is regulated by phosphorylation of the nuclear localisation signal.

Biol Cell 2018 Jun 23;110(6):137-146. Epub 2018 Apr 23.

Department of Cancer Cell Biology, Institute of Molecular Genetics of the ASCR, Prague, Czech Republic.

Background Information: Repair of damaged DNA is essential for maintaining genomic stability. TP53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) plays an important role in repair of the DNA double-strand breaks. Nuclear localisation of 53BP1 depends on importin β and nucleoporin 153, but the type and location of 53BP1 nuclear localisation signal (NLS) have yet to be determined. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201700067DOI Listing

Extramitochondrial energy production in platelets.

Biol Cell 2018 May 16;110(5):97-108. Epub 2018 Apr 16.

Department of Pharmacy, Biochemistry Lab, University of Genova, Genova, 16132, Italy.

Background Information: Energy demand in human platelets is very high, to carry out their functions. As for most human cells, the aerobic metabolism represents the primary energy source in platelets, even though mitochondria are negligibly represented. Following the hypothesis that other structures could be involved in chemical energy production, in this work, we have investigated the functional expression of an extramitochondrial aerobic metabolism in platelets. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201700025DOI Listing
May 2018
5 Reads
3.510 Impact Factor

Trogocytosis of ligand-receptor complex and its intracellular transport in CD30 signalling.

Biol Cell 2018 May 12;110(5):109-124. Epub 2018 Mar 12.

Department of Molecular Hematology, Faculty of Molecular Medical Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kitasato University, Minami-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, 252-0374, Japan.

Background Information: CD30, which is characteristically expressed in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), is thought to transduce signals by ligation of trimerised CD30 ligand (CD30L) on the surface of surrounding cells and recruitment of downstream molecules. In this report, we propose a new mechanism for CD30 signalling by its ligand. We prepared two stable transformants, CHO cells expressing CD30L fused to mCherry and HeLa cells expressing CD30 fused to GFP. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800002DOI Listing

Variation in traction forces during cell cycle progression.

Biol Cell 2018 Apr 12;110(4):91-96. Epub 2018 Mar 12.

University of Paris Diderot, INSERM, CEA, Hôpital Saint Louis, Institut Universitaire d'Hematologie, UMRS1160, CytoMorpho Lab, 75010, Paris, France.

Background Information: Tissue morphogenesis results from the interplay between cell growth and mechanical forces. While the impact of geometrical confinement and mechanical forces on cell proliferation has been fairly well characterised, the inverse relationship is much less understood. Here, we investigated how traction forces vary during cell cycle progression. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800006DOI Listing
April 2018
5 Reads

The desmin network is a determinant of the cytoplasmic stiffness of myoblasts.

Biol Cell 2018 Apr 22;110(4):77-90. Epub 2018 Feb 22.

Université Paris Diderot, CNRS, Matière et Systèmes Complexes UMR 7057, Paris, F-75013, France.

Background Information: The mechanical properties of cells are essential to maintain their proper functions, and mainly rely on their cytoskeleton. A lot of attention has been paid to actin filaments, demonstrating their central role in the cells mechanical properties, but much less is known about the participation of intermediate filament (IF) networks. Indeed the contribution of IFs, such as vimentin, keratins and lamins, to cell mechanics has only been assessed recently. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201700040DOI Listing
April 2018
1 Read

Integrin diversity brings specificity in mechanotransduction.

Biol Cell 2018 Mar 15;110(3):49-64. Epub 2018 Feb 15.

Institut Pasteur Paris CNRS UMR3691, Cell Polarity, Migration and Cancer Unit, Equipe Labellisée Ligue Contre le Cancer, Paris Cedex 15, France.

Cells sense and respond to the biochemical and physical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) through adhesive structures that bridge the cell cytoskeleton and the surrounding environment. Integrin-mediated adhesions interact with specific ECM proteins and sense the rigidity of the substrate to trigger signalling pathways that, in turn, regulate cellular processes such as adhesion, motility, proliferation and differentiation. This process, called mechanotransduction, influenced by the involvement of different integrin subtypes and their high ECM-ligand binding specificity, contributes to the cell-type-specific mechanical responses. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201700060DOI Listing

Mechanical responses of the mechanosensitive unstructured domains in cardiac titin.

Biol Cell 2018 Mar 28;110(3):65-76. Epub 2017 Dec 28.

Mechanobiology Institute, National University of Singapore, 117411, Singapore.

Background Information: Titin is one of the three main filaments in cardiac sarcomere. Besides a chain of Ig domains, cardiac titin also contains a proline (P), glutamate (E), valine (V), lysine (K) (PEVK) domain and a cardiac-specific N2B domain, both are largely unstructured. While they are believed to be involved in the elastic (PEVK and N2B) and the trophic (N2B) functions of the heart, their mechanical responses in physiological level of forces remains poorly understood. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201700061DOI Listing
March 2018
4 Reads

PERK leads a hub dictating pancreatic β cell homoeostasis.

Biol Cell 2018 Feb 15;110(2):27-32. Epub 2017 Dec 15.

Division of Experimental Medicine, Department of Medicine, McGill University and the Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

In humans, the pathogenesis of diabetes is characterised by two major pancreatic β cell defects: a reduction in β cell mass and the failure of β cells to produce enough insulin. Over the past two decades, multiple studies involving cell cultures, animal models and human subjects have established the importance of the protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) in the adaptive functional capacity of pancreatic β cells during embryonic development and into adulthood. In this review, we will highlight major findings identifying PERK as a crucial player in β cell physiology and in diabetes. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/boc.201700059
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201700059DOI Listing
February 2018
7 Reads

Flagellar incorporation of proteins follows at least two different routes in trypanosomes.

Biol Cell 2018 Feb 11;110(2):33-47. Epub 2017 Dec 11.

Trypanosome Cell Biology Unit, Institut Pasteur & INSERM U1201, Paris, 75015, France.

Background Information: Eukaryotic cilia and flagella are sophisticated organelles composed of several hundreds of proteins that need to be incorporated at the right time and the right place during assembly.

Results: Two methods were used to investigate this process in the model protist Trypanosoma brucei: inducible expression of epitope-tagged labelled proteins and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching of fluorescent fusion proteins. This revealed that skeletal components of the radial spokes (RSP3), the central pair (PF16) and the outer dynein arms (DNAI1) are incorporated at the distal end of the growing flagellum. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201700052DOI Listing
February 2018
12 Reads

Control of GABARAP-mediated autophagy by the Golgi complex, centrosome and centriolar satellites.

Biol Cell 2018 Jan 27;110(1):1-5. Epub 2017 Oct 27.

Molecular Cell Biology of Autophagy Laboratory, The Francis Crick Institute, London, NW1 1AT, UK.

Within minutes of induction of autophagy by amino-acid starvation in mammalian cells, multiple autophagosomes form throughout the cell cytoplasm. During their formation, the autophagosomes sequester cytoplasmic material and deliver it to lysosomes for degradation. How these organelles can be so rapidly formed and how their formation is acutely regulated are major questions in the autophagy field. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201700046DOI Listing
January 2018
22 Reads

GBF1 and Arf1 function in vesicular trafficking, lipid homoeostasis and organelle dynamics.

Biol Cell 2017 Dec 6;109(12):391-399. Epub 2017 Nov 6.

Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS, UMR 7592, Université Paris Diderot, Paris, F-75013, France.

The ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) small G proteins act as molecular switches to coordinate multiple downstream pathways that regulate membrane dynamics. Their activation is spatially and temporally controlled by the guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Members of the evolutionarily conserved GBF/Gea family of Arf GEFs are well known for their roles in formation of coat protein complex I (COPI) vesicles, essential for maintaining the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201700042DOI Listing
December 2017
9 Reads

Neural stem cells and adult brain fatty acid metabolism: Lessons from the 3xTg model of Alzheimer's disease.

Biol Cell 2018 Jan 15;110(1):6-25. Epub 2017 Nov 15.

Department of Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada.

Neural stem cell (NSC) activity and adult neurogenesis are physiologically relevant regulators of adult brain structure, function and repair. Given these roles, the NSC impairments observed in a wide range of neurodegenerative and psychiatric conditions likely factor into the overall cognitive dysfunction in these conditions. We investigated NSC regulation in the context of Alzheimer's disease (AD) using the well-characterised triple transgenic (3xTg) model of AD. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201700037DOI Listing
January 2018
7 Reads

Lipid remodelling in neuroendocrine secretion.

Biol Cell 2017 Nov 18;109(11):381-390. Epub 2017 Oct 18.

Institut des Neurosciences Cellulaires et Intégratives, CNRS UPR3212, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France.

Neuroendocrine cells secrete hormones and polypeptides through a complex membrane trafficking process that involves the transport of specific organelles, called large dense core secretory granules, from the Golgi apparatus to specialised sites at the plasma membrane where these vesicles are successively exocytosed and recaptured by endocytosis through tightly coupled reactions. The minimal machinery required for exocytosis has been defined as SNARE proteins associated with few accessory proteins. On the other side, clathrin and dynamin constitute major components of some of the most important endocytotic pathways. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201700030DOI Listing
November 2017

Perspective on architecture and assembly of membrane contact sites.

Biol Cell 2017 Dec 25;109(12):400-408. Epub 2017 Oct 25.

Cell Biology Division, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Francis Crick Avenue, Cambridge, CB2 0QH, UK.

Membrane contact sites (MCS) are platforms of physical contact between different organelles. They are formed through interactions involving lipids and proteins, and function in processes such as calcium and lipid exchange, metabolism and organelle biogenesis. In this article, we discuss emerging questions regarding the architecture, organisation and assembly of MCS, such as: What is the contribution of different components to the interaction between organelles? How is the specific composition of different types of membrane contacts sites established and maintained? How are proteins and lipids spatially organised at MCS and how does that influence their function? How dynamic are MCS on the molecular and ultrastructural level? We highlight current state of research and point out experimental approaches that promise to contribute to a spatiomechanistic understanding of MCS functions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/boc.201700031
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201700031DOI Listing
December 2017
2 Reads

Mitotic inheritance of the Golgi complex and its role in cell division.

Biol Cell 2017 Oct 1;109(10):364-374. Epub 2017 Sep 1.

Institute of Protein Biochemistry, National Research Council, Naples, 80131, Italy.

The Golgi apparatus plays essential roles in the processing and sorting of proteins and lipids, but it can also act as a signalling hub and a microtubule-nucleation centre. The Golgi complex (GC) of mammalian cells is composed of stacks connected by tubular bridges to form a continuous membranous system. In spite of this structural complexity, the GC is highly dynamic, and this feature becomes particularly evident during mitosis, when the GC undergoes a multi-step disassembly process that allows its correct partitioning and inheritance by daughter cells. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201700032DOI Listing
October 2017
1 Read

The molecular mechanism underlying unconventional secretion of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 from tumour cells.

Biol Cell 2017 Nov 6;109(11):375-380. Epub 2017 Sep 6.

Heidelberg University Biochemistry Center, Heidelberg, Germany.

Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2) is a potent cell survival factor involved in tumour-induced angiogenesis. FGF2 is secreted from cells through an unconventional secretory mechanism based upon direct translocation across the plasma membrane. The molecular mechanism underlying this process depends on a surprisingly small set of trans-acting factors that are physically associated with the plasma membrane. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/boc.201700036
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201700036DOI Listing
November 2017
38 Reads

Meeting after meeting: 20 years of discoveries by the members of the Exocytosis-Endocytosis Club.

Biol Cell 2017 Sep 22;109(9):339-353. Epub 2017 Aug 22.

Institut Curie - Centre de Recherche, PSL Research University, Membrane Dynamics and Mechanics of Intracellular Signaling Laboratory, Paris, France.

Twenty years ago, a group of French cell biologists merged two scientific clubs with the aim of bringing together researchers in the fields of Endocytosis and Exocytosis. Founded in 1997, the first annual meeting of the Exocytosis Club was held in 1998. The Endocytosis Club held quarterly meetings from its founding in 1999. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201700026DOI Listing
September 2017
4 Reads

Safely removing cell debris with LC3-associated phagocytosis.

Biol Cell 2017 Oct 25;109(10):355-363. Epub 2017 Aug 25.

Rudolf Virchow Center for Experimental Biomedicine, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, 97080, Germany.

Phagocytosis and autophagy are two distinct pathways that degrade external and internal unwanted particles. Both pathways lead to lysosomal degradation inside the cell, and over the last decade, the line between them has blurred; autophagy proteins were discovered on phagosomes engulfing foreign bacteria, leading to the proposal of LC3-associated phagocytosis (LAP). Many proteins involved in macroautophagy are used for phagosome degradation, although Atg8/LC3 family proteins only decorate the outer membrane of LC3-associated phagosomes, in contrast to both autophagosome membranes. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201700028DOI Listing
October 2017

Mechanics of blastocyst morphogenesis.

Biol Cell 2017 Sep 4;109(9):323-338. Epub 2017 Aug 4.

Institut Curie, PSL Research University, CNRS UMR3215, INSERM U934, Paris, France.

During pre-implantation development, the mammalian zygote transforms into the blastocyst, the structure that will implant the embryo in the maternal uterus. Consisting of a squamous epithelium enveloping a fluid-filled cavity and the inner cell mass, the blastocyst is sculpted by a succession of morphogenetic events. These deformations result from the changes in the forces and mechanical properties of the tissue composing the embryo. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201700029DOI Listing
September 2017

Mechanotransduction properties of the cytoplasmic tail of PECAM-1.

Biol Cell 2017 Aug 13;109(8):312-321. Epub 2017 Jul 13.

Department of Cardiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.

Background Information: Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) are a well-known cell system used in the study of mechanobiology. Using cultured ECs, we found that platelet EC adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1, CD31), a cell adhesion protein localised to regions of EC-EC contact, was rapidly tyrosine phosphorylated in ECs exposed to shear or cyclic stretch. Src-homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP2) binds phosphorylated PECAM-1 and activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) signalling cascade, a known flow-activated signalling pathway. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201600079DOI Listing
August 2017
28 Reads

Trafficking and localisation to the plasma membrane of Na 1.5 promoted by the β2 subunit is defective due to a β2 mutation associated with Brugada syndrome.

Biol Cell 2017 Jul;109(7):273-291

Cardiovascular Genetics Group, Girona Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBGI), Salt, Girona, 17190, Spain.

Background Information: Cardiac channelopathies arise by mutations in genes encoding ion channel subunits. One example is Brugada Syndrome (BrS), which causes arrhythmias and sudden death. BrS is often associated with mutations in SCN5A, encoding Na 1. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201600085DOI Listing
July 2017
24 Reads

Exposure to Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin affects integrin-mediated adhesion and mechanics in alveolar epithelial cells.

Biol Cell 2017 Aug 26;109(8):293-311. Epub 2017 Jul 26.

Inserm, U955, Equipe 13, Biomécanique & Appareil Respiratoire: une approche multi-échelle, Créteil Cedex, 94010, France.

Background Information: The adenylate cyclase (CyaA) toxin is a major virulent factor of Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough. CyaA toxin is able to invade eukaryotic cells where it produces high levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) affecting cellular physiology. Whether CyaA toxin can modulate cell matrix adhesion and mechanics of infected cells remains largely unknown. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201600082DOI Listing
August 2017
54 Reads