2,203 results match your criteria Biology Of The Cell[Journal]


Pancreatic stellate cells exhibit adaptation to oxidative stress evoked by hypoxia.

Biol Cell 2020 Jul 6. Epub 2020 Jul 6.

Institute of Molecular Pathology Biomarkers, University of Extremadura, Caceres, Spain.

Background Information: Pancreatic stellate cells play a key role in the fibrosis that develops in diseases such as pancreatic cancer. In the growing tumor, a hypoxia condition develops under which cancer cells are able to proliferate. The growth of fibrotic tissue contributes to hypoxia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.202000020DOI Listing

Mutations in the Drosophila rough deal gene affecting RZZ kinetochore function.

Biol Cell 2020 Jun 30. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Université de Paris, CNRS, Institut Jacques Monod, 15 rue Hélène Brion, Paris, 75013, France.

Background: The RZZ complex, composed of the proteins Rough-Deal (Rod), Zw10, and Zwilch, plays a central role in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which assures proper sister chromatid segregation during mitosis. RZZ contributes to the regulation of the SAC by helping to recruit Mad1-Mad2 and the microtubule motor dynein to unattached kinetochores. It is an important component of the outer kinetochore and specifically the fibrous corona whose expansion is believed to facilitate microtubule capture. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900105DOI Listing

Hepatic C9 cells switch their behaviour in short or long exposure to soft substrates.

Biol Cell 2020 May 25. Epub 2020 May 25.

LaNSBioDyT, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Circuito Exterior S/N, Ciudad de México, CP 04510, México.

Background Information: There have been several studies to understand the influence of stiffness of the culture substrates for different types of adherent cells. It is generally accepted that cell proliferation, spreading and focal adhesions increase with higher matrix stiffness. However, what remains unclear is whether this kind of cell behaviour may be reverted by culturing on soft substrates those cell lines that were originally selected or primed on stiff surfaces. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900115DOI Listing

AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates autophagy, inflammation and immunity and contributes to osteoclast differentiation and functionabs.

Biol Cell 2020 May 23. Epub 2020 May 23.

College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, Jiangsu, 225009, People's Republic of China.

Osteoclasts are multinucleated giant cells, responsible for bone resorption. Osteoclast differentiation and function requires a series of cytokines to remove the old bone, which coordinates with the induction of bone remodelling by osteoblast-mediated bone formation. Studies have demonstrated that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) play a negative regulatory role in osteoclast differentiation and function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.202000008DOI Listing

The unicellular eukaryotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii hijacks the migration machinery of mononuclear phagocytes to promote its dissemination.

Biol Cell 2020 May 2. Epub 2020 May 2.

Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, 10691, Sweden.

Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan with the ability to infect virtually any type of nucleated cell in warm-blooded vertebrates including humans. Toxoplasma gondii invades immune cells, which the parasite employs as shuttles for dissemination by a Trojan horse mechanism. Recent findings are starting to unveil how this parasite orchestrates the subversion of the migratory functions of parasitised mononuclear phagocytes, especially dendritic cells (DCs) and monocytes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.202000005DOI Listing

Insights into the functional aspects of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) in mitochondrial homeostasis in Dictyostelium discoideum.

Biol Cell 2020 Apr 23. Epub 2020 Apr 23.

Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara, Gujarat, 390002, India.

Background Information: Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is predominantly a nuclear protein and involved in various cellular processes like DNA repair, cell death, development, chromatin modulation etc. PARP-1 utilizes NAD and adds negatively charged PAR moieties on the target proteins. Over-activation of PARP-1 has been shown to cause energy crisis mediated cell death in which mitochondrial homeostasis is also affected. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900104DOI Listing

REV-ERBα activates the mTOR signalling pathway and promotes myotubes differentiation.

Biol Cell 2020 Apr 19. Epub 2020 Apr 19.

Institute of Biochemistry, Food Science and Nutrition, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, 76100, Israel.

Background Information: Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of cell and whole-body energy homoeostasis. REV-ERBα is a nuclear receptor that plays an important role in metabolism. While mTORC1 activation is necessary for muscle differentiation, the role of REV-ERBα is less clear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900091DOI Listing

Mechanobiology of antigen-induced T cell arrest.

Biol Cell 2020 Jul 27;112(7):196-212. Epub 2020 Apr 27.

Institut Curie-PSL Research University, INSERM U932, Paris, France.

To mount an immune response, T cells must first find rare antigens present at the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). They achieve this by migrating rapidly through the crowded space of tissues and constantly sampling the surface of APCs. Upon antigen recognition, T cells decelerate and polarise towards the APC, ultimately forming a specialised interface known as the immunological synapse. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900093DOI Listing

Sitting in the driver's seat: Manipulation of mammalian cell Rab GTPase functions by apicomplexan parasites.

Biol Cell 2020 Jul 6;112(7):187-195. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA.

Many intracellular microbial pathogens subvert, disrupt or otherwise modulate host membrane trafficking pathways to establish a successful infection. Among them, bacteria that are trapped in a phagosome during mammalian cell invasion, disengage the programmed degradation process by altering the identity of their replicative niche through the exclusion or recruitment of specific Rab GTPases to their vacuole. Many viruses co-opt essential cellular trafficking pathways to perform key steps in their lifecycles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900107DOI Listing

Why the -omic future of Apicomplexa should include gregarines.

Biol Cell 2020 Jun 7;112(6):173-185. Epub 2020 Apr 7.

Molécules de Communication et Adaptation des Microorganismes (MCAM, UMR 7245), Département Adaptations du Vivant (AVIV), Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, CNRS, Paris, Cedex 05, France.

Gregarines, a polyphyletic group of apicomplexan parasites infecting mostly non-vertebrates hosts, remains poorly known at taxonomic, phylogenetic and genomic levels. However, it represents an essential group for understanding evolutionary history and adaptive capacities of apicomplexan parasites to the remarkable diversity of their hosts. Because they have a mostly extracellular lifestyle, gregarines have developed other cellular developmental forms and host-parasite interactions, compared with their much better studied apicomplexan cousins, intracellular parasites of vertebrates (Hemosporidia, Coccidia, Cryptosporidia). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.202000006DOI Listing

Centrosomes: The good and the bad for brain development.

Biol Cell 2020 Jun 26;112(6):153-172. Epub 2020 Mar 26.

Biology of Centrosomes and Genetic Instability Laboratory, Institut Curie, PSL Research University, CNRS, UMR144, Paris, 75005, France.

Centrosomes nucleate and organise the microtubule cytoskeleton in animal cells. These membraneless organelles are key structures for tissue organisation, polarity and growth. Centrosome dysfunction, defined as deviation in centrosome numbers and/or structural integrity, has major impact on brain size and functionality, as compared with other tissues of the organism. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900090DOI Listing

Characterisation of endogenous Claudin-1 expression, motility and susceptibility to hepatitis C virus in CRISPR knock-in cells.

Biol Cell 2020 May 20;112(5):140-151. Epub 2020 Feb 20.

CNRS, IRIM Institut de Recherche en infectiologie de Montpellier, Montpellier, 34293, France.

Background Information: Claudin-1 (CLDN1) is a four-span transmembrane protein localised at cell-cell tight junctions (TJs), playing an important role in epithelial impermeability and tissue homoeostasis under physiological conditions. Moreover, CLDN1 expression is up-regulated in several cancers, and the level of CLDN1 expression has been proposed as a prognostic marker of patient survival.

Results: Here, we generated and characterised a novel reporter cell line expressing endogenous fluorescent levels of CLDN-1, allowing dynamic monitoring of CLDN-1 expression levels. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900085DOI Listing

A comparative analysis of fibroblast growth factor receptor signalling during Xenopus development.

Biol Cell 2020 May 17;112(5):127-139. Epub 2020 Feb 17.

Department of Biology, University of York, York, YO10 5DD, UK.

Background Information: The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling system of vertebrates is complex. In common with other vertebrates, secreted FGF ligands of the amphibian Xenopus signal through a family of four FGF receptor tyrosine kinases (fgfr1, 2, 3 and 4). A wealth of previous studies has demonstrated important roles for FGF signalling in regulating gene expression during cell lineage specification in amphibian development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900089DOI Listing

TSPO2 translocates 5-aminolevulinic acid into human erythroleukemia cells.

Biol Cell 2020 Apr 5;112(4):113-126. Epub 2020 Feb 5.

Sorbonne Université, Ecole Normale Supérieure, PSL University, CNRS, Laboratoire des Biomolécules (LBM), F-75005, Paris, France.

Background: 5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is the first precursor of heme biosynthesis pathway. The exogenous addition of ALA to cells leads to protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) accumulation that has been exploited in photodynamic diagnostic and photodynamic therapy. Several types of ALA transporters have been described depending on the cell type, but there was no clear entry pathway for erythroid cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900098DOI Listing

Increased intracellular survival of Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 in HIV-1-infected primary human macrophages is not associated with Salmonella hijacking the HIV compartment.

Biol Cell 2020 Mar 27;112(3):92-101. Epub 2020 Jan 27.

Institut Cochin, Université de Paris, INSERM, U1016, CNRS, UMR 8104, Paris, F-75014, France.

Background: Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) causes a severe invasive syndrome (iNTS disease) described in HIV-positive adults. The impact of HIV-1 on Salmonella pathogenesis and the molecular basis for the differences between these bacteria and classical diarrhoeal S. Typhimurium remains unclear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900055DOI Listing

The mechanics of myeloid cells.

Biol Cell 2020 Apr 20;112(4):103-112. Epub 2020 Jan 20.

National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London.

The effects of cell size, shape and deformability on cellular function have long been a topic of interest. Recently, mechanical phenotyping technologies capable of analysing large numbers of cells in real time have become available. This has important implications for biology and medicine, especially haemato-oncology and immunology, as immune cell mechanical phenotyping, immunologic function, and malignant cell transformation are closely linked and potentially exploitable to develop new diagnostics and therapeutics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900084DOI Listing
April 2020
3.506 Impact Factor

piR-39980 promotes cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and inhibits apoptosis via repression of SERPINB1 in human osteosarcoma.

Biol Cell 2020 Mar 10;112(3):73-91. Epub 2020 Jan 10.

RNAi and Functional Genomics Laboratory, Department of Life Science, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, 769008, Odisha, India.

Background Information: Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are a novel class of ∼23-36 nts long endogenous small non-coding RNAs, earlier known to maintain germline genome integrity during development by regulating transposable elements. Recently, piRNAs are known to regulate cell proliferation, apoptosis and metastasis in different cancer cells. However, piRNAs have not yet been reported in human osteosarcoma (OS), a highly metastatic aggressive bone tumour among adolescents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900063DOI Listing

FAK regulates dynein localisation and cell polarity in migrating mouse fibroblasts.

Biol Cell 2020 Feb 9;112(2):53-72. Epub 2020 Jan 9.

Migration, invasion and microenvironnement, Faculté de Pharmacie, UMR7021 CNRS, LBP, Université de Strasbourg, Illkirch, France.

Background: Fibroblasts executing directional migration position their centrosome, and their Golgi apparatus, in front of the nucleus towards the cell leading edge. Centrosome positioning relative to the nucleus has been associated to mechanical forces exerted on the centrosome by the microtubule-dependent molecular motor cytoplasmic dynein 1, and to nuclear movements such as rearward displacement and rotation events. Dynein has been proposed to regulate the position of the centrosome by exerting pulling forces on microtubules from the cell leading edge, where the motor is enriched during migration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900041DOI Listing
February 2020

Tissue-dependent differences in Bardet-Biedl syndrome gene expression.

Biol Cell 2020 Feb 13;112(2):39-52. Epub 2020 Jan 13.

Cilia Cell Biology, Institute of Molecular Physiology, Johannes-Gutenberg University, Mainz, 55128, Germany.

Background Information: Primary cilia are highly conserved multifunctional cell organelles that extend from the cell membrane. A range of genetic disorders, collectively termed ciliopathies, is attributed to primary cilia dysfunction. The archetypical ciliopathy is the Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), patients of which display virtually all symptoms associated with dysfunctional cilia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900077DOI Listing
February 2020

Theme series: Cilia and ciliopathies.

Authors:
Wei Li Guangshuo Ou

Biol Cell 2019 12;111(12):293

China Tsinghua-Peking Center for Life Sciences, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084, China.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900079DOI Listing
December 2019
3.506 Impact Factor

hVFL3/CCDC61 is a component of mother centriole subdistal appendages required for centrosome cohesion and positioning.

Biol Cell 2020 Jan 11;112(1):22-37. Epub 2019 Dec 11.

Université de Paris, Institut Jacques Monod, 75013, Paris, France.

Background: The centrosome regulates cell spatial organisation by controlling the architecture of the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton. Conversely, the position of the centrosome within the cell depends on cytoskeletal networks it helps organizing. In mammalian cells, centrosome positioning involves a population of MT stably anchored at centrioles, the core components of the centrosome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900038DOI Listing
January 2020

Changes in cellular prion protein expression, processing and localisation during differentiation of the neuronal cell line CAD 5.

Biol Cell 2020 Jan 6;112(1):1-21. Epub 2019 Dec 6.

Institute of Immunology and Microbiology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic.

Background Information: Cellular prion protein (PrP ) is infamous for its role in prion diseases. The physiological function of PrP remains enigmatic, but several studies point to its involvement in cell differentiation processes. To test this possibility, we monitored PrP changes during the differentiation of prion-susceptible CAD 5 cells, and then we analysed the effect of PrP ablation on the differentiation process. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900045DOI Listing
January 2020

HIV-1 Vpr inhibits autophagy during the early steps of infection of CD4 T cells.

Biol Cell 2019 Dec 30;111(12):308-318. Epub 2019 Oct 30.

IRIM, University of Montpellier, CNRS, 34293, Montpellier, France.

Background Information: Autophagy is induced during HIV-1 entry into CD4 T cells by the fusion of the membranes triggered by the gp41 envelope glycoprotein. This anti-HIV-1 mechanism is inhibited by the viral infectivity factor (Vif) neosynthesized after HIV-1 integration to allow viral replication. However, autophagy is very rapidly controlled after HIV-1 entry by a still unknown mechanism. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/boc.20190007
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900071DOI Listing
December 2019
5 Reads
3.506 Impact Factor

A moment at the cell centre.

Authors:
Michel Bornens

Biol Cell 2019 Dec 28;111(12):294-307. Epub 2019 Oct 28.

Institut Curie, PSL Research University, CNRS, Paris, France.

I have been invited by the board of the French Society of Cell Biology (SBCF) to write a text around my presentation in the Symposium 'A day at the Cell Centre', held at the Curie Institute on May 17, 2019, and organized by four of my former students, namely Juliette Azimzadeh, Nathalie Delgehyr, Matthieu Piel and Manuel Théry. I have to thank them warmly for the quality of the science during this day. It was also a moving day for me indeed to listen to so many figures in the field. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900068DOI Listing
December 2019

The MYB-bHLH-WDR interferers (MBWi) epigenetically suppress the MBW's targets.

Biol Cell 2019 Nov 24;111(11):284-291. Epub 2019 Oct 24.

Faculty of Biotechnology, Ho Chi Minh City Open University, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

Active repressors have been evidenced to function in different plant growth and development programs including hormonal signalling pathways. In Arabidopsis, the MYB-bHLH-WDR (MBW) complex is known to regulate different phenotypic traits such as anthocyanin biosynthesis, seed coat colour, trichome and root hair patterning. A number of transcription factors have been identified to play a negative role in the regulation of these traits via the interruption of MBW formation and function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900069DOI Listing
November 2019

Dock5 is a new regulator of microtubule dynamic instability in osteoclasts.

Biol Cell 2019 Nov 6;111(11):271-283. Epub 2019 Sep 6.

Centre de Recherche de Biologie Cellulaire (CRBM), CNRS UMR 5237, Montpellier, Cedex 5, 34293, France.

Background Information: Osteoclast resorption is dependent on a podosome-rich structure called sealing zone. It tightly attaches the osteoclast to the bone creating a favourable acidic microenvironment for bone degradation. This adhesion structure needs to be stabilised by microtubules whose acetylation is maintained by down-regulation of deacetylase HDAC6 and/or of microtubule destabilising kinase GSK3β activities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900014DOI Listing
November 2019

Transition from mesenchymal to bleb-based motility is predominantly exhibited by CD133-positive subpopulation of fibrosarcoma cells.

Biol Cell 2019 Oct 22;111(10):245-261. Epub 2019 Aug 22.

N.N. Blokhin National Medical Research Center of Oncology, Moscow, 115478, Russia.

Background Information: Metastatic disease is caused by the ability of cancer cells to reach distant organs and form secondary lesions at new locations. Dissemination of cancer cells depends on their migration plasticity - an ability to switch between motility modes driven by distinct molecular machineries. One of such switches is mesenchymal-to-amoeboid transition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800078DOI Listing
October 2019
2 Reads

Development of ligand-coated beads to measure macrophage antimicrobial activities.

Biol Cell 2019 Oct 26;111(10):262-270. Epub 2019 Aug 26.

Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

Background Information: After macrophage recognises and phagocytoses the microorganism, their phagosome undergoes a maturation process, which creates a hostile environment for the bacterium. The lumen is acidified, and proteolysis occurs to kill and degrade pathogen for further antigen presentation. It is important to understand the association between the macrophage intracellular activities and the outcome of infection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900042DOI Listing
October 2019
2 Reads
3.506 Impact Factor

The response of five intestinal cell lines to anoxic conditions in vitro.

Biol Cell 2019 Sep 25;111(9):232-244. Epub 2019 Jun 25.

Center for Microbial Ecology and Technology (CMET), Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Ghent, 9000, Belgium.

Background Information: In vivo oxygen levels in tissues range from 1% to 15%, while mechanistic cell culture studies employ an atmospheric oxygen level of 21% to grow cells. These oxygen concentrations are therefore not representative for conditions where the cell response is dependent on oxygen partial pressure. In pathological situation, such as (colon) cancer or chronic inflammation, tissue oxygenation is severely affected, and even under physiological conditions a steep oxygen gradient is present in the large intestine, where epithelial cells co-exist with microbial species, resulting in almost anoxia at the midpoint of the lumen. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800076DOI Listing
September 2019
12 Reads

Cilia in hereditary cerebral anomalies.

Biol Cell 2019 Sep 17;111(9):217-231. Epub 2019 Jun 17.

Laboratory of Hereditary Kidney Diseases, INSERM UMR 1163, Paris Descartes University, Imagine Institute, 75015, Paris, France.

Ciliopathies are complex genetic multi-system disorders causally related to abnormal assembly or function of motile or non-motile cilia. While most human cells possess a non-motile sensory/primary cilium (PC) during development and/or in adult tissues, motile cilia are restricted to specialised cells. As a result, PC-associated ciliopathies are characterised by high phenotypic variability with extensive clinical and genetic overlaps. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900012DOI Listing
September 2019
1 Read
3.506 Impact Factor

Lost in mechanobiology, what's next?: Missing tools related to the physics of the system.

Biol Cell 2019 Aug 19;111(8):213-215. Epub 2019 Jun 19.

Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, LIPhy, F-38000, Grenoble, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201900001DOI Listing
August 2019
8 Reads

Motile ciliogenesis and the mitotic prism.

Biol Cell 2019 Aug 5;111(8):199-212. Epub 2019 Apr 5.

Institut de Biologie de l'École Normale Supérieure (IBENS), Paris Sciences et Lettres (PSL) Research University, Paris, F-75005, France.

Motile cilia of epithelial multiciliated cells transport vital fluids along organ lumens to promote essential respiratory, reproductive and brain functions. Progenitors of multiciliated cells undergo massive and coordinated organelle remodelling during their differentiation for subsequent motile ciliogenesis. Defects in multiciliated cell differentiation lead to severe cilia-related diseases by perturbing cilia-based flows. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800072DOI Listing
August 2019
1 Read

MicroRNAs as markers to monitor endothelin-1 signalling and potential treatment in renal disease: Carcinoma - proteinuric damage - toxicity.

Authors:
Jochen W U Fries

Biol Cell 2019 Jul 8;111(7):169-186. Epub 2019 Apr 8.

Department of Pathology, University Hospital of Koeln, 50931, Koeln, Germany.

This review highlights new developments in miRNA as diagnostic and surveillance tools in diseases damaging the renal proximal tubule mediated by endothelin in the field of renal carcinoma, proteinuric kidney disease and tubulotoxicity. A new mechanism in the miRNA regulation of proteins leads to the binding of the miRNA directly to the DNA with premature transcriptional termination and hence the formation of truncated protein isoforms (Mxi2, Vim3). These isoforms are mediated through miRNA15a or miRNA 498, respectively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800059DOI Listing
July 2019
2 Reads

Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) regulates developmental morphogenesis and chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum.

Biol Cell 2019 Jul 21;111(7):187-197. Epub 2019 Mar 21.

Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara, 390 002, India.

Background Information: Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) has been attributed to varied roles in DNA repair, cell cycle, cell death, etc. Our previous reports demonstrate the role of PARP-1 during Dictyostelium discoideum development by its constitutive downregulation as well as by PARP-1 ortholog, ADP ribosyl transferase 1 A (ADPRT1A) overexpression. The current study analyses and strengthens the function of ADPRT1A in multicellular morphogenesis of D. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800056DOI Listing
July 2019
2 Reads

Targeting of the unfolded protein response (UPR) as therapy for Parkinson's disease.

Biol Cell 2019 Jun 25;111(6):161-168. Epub 2019 Mar 25.

Biomedical Neuroscience Institute (BNI), Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile.

Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, leading to the progressive decline of motor control due to the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. At the molecular level, Parkinson's disease share common molecular signatures with most neurodegenerative diseases including the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the brain. Alteration in the buffering capacity of the proteostasis network during aging is proposed as one of the triggering steps leading to abnormal protein aggregation in this disease, highlighting disturbances in the function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800068DOI Listing
June 2019
24 Reads

The atypical RhoU/Wrch1 Rho GTPase controls cell proliferation and apoptosis in the gut epithelium.

Biol Cell 2019 May 12;111(5):121-141. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

CRBM, CNRS, University of Montpellier, 34293, Montpellier CEDEX 5, France.

Background: The mammalian gut epithelium displays among the highest rates of self-renewal, with a turnover time of less than 5 days. Renewal involves concerted proliferation at the bottom of the crypt, migration and differentiation along the crypt-villus axis and anoïkis/shedding in the luminal epithelium. Renewal is controlled by interplay between signalling pathways, among which canonical and non-canonical Wnt signals play prominent roles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800062DOI Listing
May 2019
7 Reads

Mechanisms of kinesin-7 CENP-E in kinetochore-microtubule capture and chromosome alignment during cell division.

Biol Cell 2019 Jun 26;111(6):143-160. Epub 2019 Feb 26.

Department of Cell Biology and Genetics/Center for Cell and Developmental Biology, The School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian, 350108, China.

Chromosome congression is essential for faithful chromosome segregation and genomic stability in cell division. Centromere-associated protein E (CENP-E), a plus-end-directed kinesin motor, is required for congression of pole-proximal chromosomes in metaphase. CENP-E accumulates at the outer plate of kinetochores and mediates the kinetochore-microtubule capture. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800082DOI Listing
June 2019
1 Read

Ciliary kinesins beyond IFT: Cilium length, disassembly, cargo transport and signalling.

Biol Cell 2019 Apr 15;111(4):79-94. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Laboratory of Hereditary Kidney Diseases, INSERM UMR 1163, Paris Descartes University, Imagine Institute, Paris, 75015, France.

Cilia and flagella are microtubule-based antenna which are highly conserved among eukaryotes. In vertebrates, primary and motile cilia have evolved to exert several key functions during development and tissue homoeostasis. Ciliary dysfunction in humans causes a highly heterogeneous group of diseases called ciliopathies, a class of genetic multisystemic disorders primarily affecting kidney, skeleton, retina, lung and the central nervous system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800074DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads
3.506 Impact Factor

AMPK signalling: Implications for podocyte biology in diabetic nephropathy.

Biol Cell 2019 May 21;111(5):109-120. Epub 2019 Feb 21.

Mossakowski Medical Research Centre Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdańsk, Poland.

Diabetic nephropathy is a major long-term complication of diabetes mellitus and one of the most common causes of end-stage renal disease. Thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, glomerular cell hypertrophy and podocyte loss are among the main pathological changes that occur during diabetic nephropathy, resulting in proteinuria. Injury to podocytes, which are a crucial component of the glomerular filtration barrier, seems to play a key role in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800077DOI Listing
May 2019
1 Read

Cell type-specific structural plasticity of the ciliary transition zone in C. elegans.

Biol Cell 2019 Apr 14;111(4):95-107. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Department of Genetics and Human Genetics Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ, 08854, USA.

Background Information: The current consensus on cilia development posits that the ciliary transition zone (TZ) is formed via extension of nine centrosomal microtubules. In this model, TZ structure remains unchanged in microtubule number throughout the cilium life cycle. This model does not however explain structural variations of TZ structure seen in nature and could also lend itself to the misinterpretation that deviations from nine-doublet microtubule ultrastructure represent an abnormal phenotype. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800042DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6922583PMC
April 2019
9 Reads

Blocking bacterial entry at the adhesion step reveals dynamic recruitment of membrane and cytosolic probes.

Biol Cell 2019 Mar 8;111(3):67-77. Epub 2019 Feb 8.

Cellular Microbiology and Physics of Infection Group, Center for Infection and Immunity of Lille, CNRS UMR8204, INSERM U1019, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Lille regional Univ. Hosp. Centr., Lille Univ., Lille, F-59019, France.

Background: Bacterial invasion covers two steps: adhesion and entry per se. The cell signalling response is triggered upon pathogen interaction at the cell surface. This response continues when the pathogen is internalised. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800070DOI Listing
March 2019
9 Reads

Dying under pressure: cellular characterisation and in vivo functions of cell death induced by compaction.

Biol Cell 2019 Mar 17;111(3):51-66. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Department of Developmental and Stem Cell Biology, Institut Pasteur, Paris, 75015, France.

Cells and tissues are exposed to multiple mechanical stresses during development, tissue homoeostasis and diseases. While we start to have an extensive understanding of the influence of mechanics on cell differentiation and proliferation, how excessive mechanical stresses can also lead to cell death and may be associated with pathologies has been much less explored so far. Recently, the development of new perturbative approaches allowing modulation of pressure and deformation of tissues has demonstrated that compaction (the reduction of tissue size or volume) can lead to cell elimination. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800075DOI Listing
March 2019
9 Reads

Long non-coding RNA Linc00518 promotes paclitaxel resistance of the human prostate cancer by sequestering miR-216b-5p.

Biol Cell 2019 Feb 7;111(2):39-50. Epub 2018 Dec 7.

Department of Urology Surgery, Heze Municipal Hospital, Heze, 274000, China.

Background Information: To characterise Linc00518 expression in prostate cancer and elucidate the potential mechanistic involvement in paclitaxel resistance, the relative expression of Linc00518 and miR-216b-5p was determined by real-time PCR. The regulatory effect of miR-216b-5p on either Linc00518 or GATA6 was interrogated with luciferase reporter assay. The endogenous GATA6 protein was analysed by Western blotting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800054DOI Listing
February 2019
98 Reads

Rsph9 is critical for ciliary radial spoke assembly and central pair microtubule stability.

Biol Cell 2019 Feb 16;111(2):29-38. Epub 2018 Nov 16.

State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, CAS Center for Excellence in Molecular Cell Science, Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai, China.

Background Information: In the "9+2"-type motile cilia, radial spokes (RSs) protruded from the nine peripheral microtubule doublets surround and interact with the central pair (CP) apparatus to regulate ciliary beat. RSPH9 is the human homologue of the essential protozoan RS head protein Rsp9. Its mutations in human primary ciliary dyskinesia patients, however, cause CP loss in a small portion of airway cilia without affecting the ciliary localization of other head proteins. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800060DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Tamoxifen ameliorates obstructive nephropathy through Src and the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway.

Biol Cell 2019 Jan 21;111(1):18-27. Epub 2018 Oct 21.

Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Republic of Korea.

Background Information: Tubulointerstitial fibrosis is the end-point of chronic kidney diseases. Tamoxifen, a selective oestrogen receptor (ER) modulator, attenuates renal fibrosis, by regulating the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β/Smad signalling. Src and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways play critical roles in the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/boc.201800040
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800040DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

The role of the unfolded protein response in cancer progression: From oncogenesis to chemoresistance.

Biol Cell 2019 Jan 29;111(1):1-17. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Apoptosis Research Centre, NUI Galway, Ireland.

Tumour cells endure both oncogenic and environmental stresses during cancer progression. Transformed cells must meet increased demands for protein and lipid production needed for rapid proliferation and must adapt to exist in an oxygen- and nutrient-deprived environment. To overcome such challenges, cancer cells exploit intrinsic adaptive mechanisms such as the unfolded protein response (UPR). Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/boc.201800050
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800050DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

The role of protein disulphide isomerase AGR2 in the tumour niche.

Biol Cell 2018 Dec 14;110(12):271-282. Epub 2018 Oct 14.

INSERM U1242, "Chemistry, Oncogenesis, Stress, Signaling", Université, de Rennes 1, Rennes, France.

In recent years, the discovery of 'tumour niche', a microenvironment that favours tumour development has changed our perspective of cancer. This microenvironment generated by the tumour cells itself and surrounding cells is capable of providing essential elements for its growth. Consequently, the homoeostasis of the secretory pathway (SP) has become an essential player in cancer development. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/boc.201800024
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800024DOI Listing
December 2018
31 Reads

NADPH-oxidase-derived ROS alters cell migration by modulating adhesions dynamics.

Biol Cell 2018 Oct 16;110(10):225-236. Epub 2018 Sep 16.

Basic Research Center in Dentistry, Dentistry School, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.

Background Information: Cell migration requires the coordinated activation of structural and signalling molecules, such as the RhoGTPase Rac1. It is known that the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase complex assembly, which generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the cell membrane, also relies on Rac1 activation, indicating a possible effect of ROS during cell migration. In this study, we evaluated the effect of NADPH-oxidase-derived ROS on the migration process. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/boc.201800011
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800011DOI Listing
October 2018
51 Reads

ARAP2 inhibits Akt independently of its effects on focal adhesions.

Biol Cell 2018 Dec 10;110(12):257-270. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Biology, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA.

Background Information: ARAP2, an Arf GTPase-activating protein (Arf GAP) that binds to adaptor protein with PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper motifs 1 (APPL1), regulates focal adhesions (FAs). APPL1 affects FA dynamics by regulating Akt. Here, we tested the hypothesis that ARAP2 affects FAs in part by regulating Akt through APPL1. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/boc.201800044
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800044DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6279576PMC
December 2018
12 Reads

Distinct nuclear and cytoplasmic machineries cooperatively promote the inheritance of RNAi in Caenorhabditis elegans.

Biol Cell 2018 Oct 9;110(10):217-224. Epub 2018 Sep 9.

Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027, P. R. China.

Epigenetic information can be inherited over multiple generations, which is termed as transgenerational epigenetic inheritance (TEI). Although the mechanism(s) of TEI remains poorly understood, noncoding RNAs have been demonstrated to play important roles in TEI. In many eukaryotes, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) triggers the silencing of cellular nucleic acids that exhibit sequence homology to the dsRNA via a process termed RNA interference (RNAi). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/boc.201800031DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads
3.510 Impact Factor