3 results match your criteria Biology And Fertility Of Soils[Journal]

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Stoichiometric constraints on the microbial processing of carbon with soil depth along a riparian hillslope.

Biol Fertil Soils 2018 10;54(8):949-963. Epub 2018 Oct 10.

1Environment Centre Wales, Bangor University, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW UK.

Soil organic matter (SOM) content is a key indicator of riparian soil functioning and in the provision of ecosystem services such as water retention, flood alleviation, pollutant attenuation and carbon (C) sequestration for climate change mitigation. Here, we studied the importance of microbial biomass and nutrient availability in regulating SOM turnover rates. C stabilisation in soil is expected to vary both vertically, down the soil profile and laterally across the riparian zone. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00374-018-1317-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6413827PMC
October 2018

Herbivory of an invasive slug in a model grassland community can be affected by earthworms and mycorrhizal fungi.

Biol Fertil Soils 2014;50(1):13-23. Epub 2013 Jun 18.

Institute of Zoology, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Gregor Mendel Straße 33, 1180 Vienna, Austria.

Invasion of non-native species is among the top threats for the biodiversity and functioning of native and agricultural ecosystems worldwide. We investigated whether the herbivory of the slug (formerly ; Gastropoda), that is listed among the 100 worst alien species in Europe, is affected by soil organisms commonly present in terrestrial ecosystems (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00374-013-0827-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4459544PMC

Subsurface earthworm casts can be important soil microsites specifically influencing the growth of grassland plants.

Biol Fertil Soils 2013;49(8):1097-1107. Epub 2013 Apr 26.

Institute of Zoology, Department of Integrative Biology and Biodiversity Research, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Gregor Mendel Straße 33, 1180 Vienna, Austria ; Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Seidengasse 33-35, 1070 Vienna, Austria.

Earthworms (Annelida: Oligochaeta) deposit several tons per hectare of casts enriched in nutrients and/or arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and create a spatial and temporal soil heterogeneity that can play a role in structuring plant communities. However, while we begin to understand the role of surface casts, it is still unclear to what extent plants utilize subsurface casts. We conducted a greenhouse experiment using large mesocosms (volume 45 l) to test whether (1) soil microsites consisting of earthworm casts with or without AMF (four taxa) affect the biomass production of 11 grassland plant species comprising the three functional groups grasses, forbs, and legumes, (2) different ecological groups of earthworms (soil dwellers- vs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00374-013-0808-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4459550PMC
April 2013
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