7 results match your criteria Biology And Fertility Of Soils[Journal]

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Effects of urease and nitrification inhibitors on soil N, nitrifier abundance and activity in a sandy loam soil.

Biol Fertil Soils 2020 25;56(2):185-194. Epub 2019 Nov 25.

1Sustainable Agriculture Sciences Department, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, AL5 2JQ Hertfordshire UK.

Inhibitors of urease and ammonia monooxygenase can limit the rate of conversion of urea to ammonia and ammonia to nitrate, respectively, potentially improving N fertilizer use efficiency and reducing gaseous losses. Winter wheat grown on a sandy soil in the UK was treated with urea fertilizer with the urease inhibitor N-(n-butyl) thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT), the nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide (DCD) or a combination of both. The effects on soil microbial community diversity, the abundance of genes involved in nitrification and crop yields and net N recovery were compared. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00374-019-01411-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6981326PMC
November 2019

Nature and mechanisms of aluminium toxicity, tolerance and amelioration in symbiotic legumes and rhizobia.

Biol Fertil Soils 2018 12;54(3):309-318. Epub 2018 Feb 12.

1Department of Chemistry, Tshwane University of Technology, Arcadia campus, 175 Nelson Mandela Drive, Private Bag X680, Pretoria, 0001 South Africa.

Recent findings on the effect of aluminium (Al) on the functioning of legumes and their associated microsymbionts are reviewed here. Al represents 7% of solid matter in the Earth's crust and is an important abiotic factor that alters microbial and plant functioning at very early stages. The trivalent Al (Al) dominates at pH < 5 in soils and becomes a constraint to legume productivity through its lethal effect on rhizobia, the host plant and their interaction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00374-018-1262-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6560468PMC
February 2018
2 Reads

Stoichiometric constraints on the microbial processing of carbon with soil depth along a riparian hillslope.

Biol Fertil Soils 2018 10;54(8):949-963. Epub 2018 Oct 10.

1Environment Centre Wales, Bangor University, Deiniol Road, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW UK.

Soil organic matter (SOM) content is a key indicator of riparian soil functioning and in the provision of ecosystem services such as water retention, flood alleviation, pollutant attenuation and carbon (C) sequestration for climate change mitigation. Here, we studied the importance of microbial biomass and nutrient availability in regulating SOM turnover rates. C stabilisation in soil is expected to vary both vertically, down the soil profile and laterally across the riparian zone. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00374-018-1317-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6413827PMC
October 2018
1 Read

An assessment of factors controlling NO and CO emissions from crop residues using different measurement approaches.

Biol Fertil Soils 2017 13;53(5):547-561. Epub 2017 Apr 13.

1Dipartimento di Scienze Agrarie e Forestali, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo, Italy.

Management of plant residues plays an important role in maintaining soil quality and nutrient availability for plants and microbes. However, there is considerable uncertainty regarding the factors controlling residue decomposition and their effects on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the soil. This uncertainty is created both by the complexity of the processes involved and limitations in the methodologies commonly used to quantify GHG emissions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00374-017-1195-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6979693PMC

Crop residues exacerbate the negative effects of extreme flooding on soil quality.

Biol Fertil Soils 2017 19;53(7):751-765. Epub 2017 Jun 19.

School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW UK.

Extreme flood events are predicted to have a negative impact on soil quality. Currently, there is a lack of information about the effect of agricultural practices on soil functioning and microbial processes under these events. We hypothesized that the impact of flooding on soil quality will be exacerbated when crop residues are present in the soil as they will induce more extreme anaerobicity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00374-017-1214-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6961515PMC

Herbivory of an invasive slug in a model grassland community can be affected by earthworms and mycorrhizal fungi.

Biol Fertil Soils 2014;50(1):13-23. Epub 2013 Jun 18.

Institute of Zoology, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Gregor Mendel Straße 33, 1180 Vienna, Austria.

Invasion of non-native species is among the top threats for the biodiversity and functioning of native and agricultural ecosystems worldwide. We investigated whether the herbivory of the slug (formerly ; Gastropoda), that is listed among the 100 worst alien species in Europe, is affected by soil organisms commonly present in terrestrial ecosystems (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00374-013-0827-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4459544PMC
June 2013
3 Reads

Subsurface earthworm casts can be important soil microsites specifically influencing the growth of grassland plants.

Biol Fertil Soils 2013;49(8):1097-1107. Epub 2013 Apr 26.

Institute of Zoology, Department of Integrative Biology and Biodiversity Research, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Gregor Mendel Straße 33, 1180 Vienna, Austria ; Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL), Seidengasse 33-35, 1070 Vienna, Austria.

Earthworms (Annelida: Oligochaeta) deposit several tons per hectare of casts enriched in nutrients and/or arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and create a spatial and temporal soil heterogeneity that can play a role in structuring plant communities. However, while we begin to understand the role of surface casts, it is still unclear to what extent plants utilize subsurface casts. We conducted a greenhouse experiment using large mesocosms (volume 45 l) to test whether (1) soil microsites consisting of earthworm casts with or without AMF (four taxa) affect the biomass production of 11 grassland plant species comprising the three functional groups grasses, forbs, and legumes, (2) different ecological groups of earthworms (soil dwellers- vs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00374-013-0808-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4459550PMC
April 2013
4 Reads
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