1,291 results match your criteria Biological Reviews [Journal]


Death domain of p75 neurotrophin receptor: a structural perspective on an intracellular signalling hub.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

School of Life Sciences, Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072, People's Republic of China.

The death domain (DD) is a globular protein motif with a signature feature of an all-helical Greek-key motif. It is a primary mediator of a variety of biological activities, including apoptosis, cell survival and cytoskeletal changes, which are related to many neurodegenerative diseases, neurotrauma, and cancers. DDs exist in a wide range of signalling proteins including p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75 ), a member of the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12502DOI Listing
February 2019

Mate choice in a changing world.

Authors:
Ulrika Candolin

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

Organismal and Evolutionary Biology, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 65, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland.

Human activities by altering environmental conditions are influencing the mate choice of animals. This is by impacts on: (i) the production and expression of traits evaluated by mate choosers; (ii) the transmission of information about potential mates to choosers; (iii) the reception and processing of the information by choosers; and (iv) the final mate choice. Here, I first discuss how these four stages of the mate-choice process can be altered by environmental change, and how these alterations, in turn, can influence individuals, populations, and communities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12501DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in naturally assembled communities.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2019 Feb 6. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Systematic Botany and Functional Biodiversity, Institute of Biology, Leipzig University, Johannisallee 21-23, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.

Approximately 25 years ago, ecologists became increasingly interested in the question of whether ongoing biodiversity loss matters for the functioning of ecosystems. As such, a new ecological subfield on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning (BEF) was born. This subfield was initially dominated by theoretical studies and by experiments in which biodiversity was manipulated, and responses of ecosystem functions such as biomass production, decomposition rates, carbon sequestration, trophic interactions and pollination were assessed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12499DOI Listing
February 2019

Leaf surface development and the plant fossil record: stomatal patterning in Bennettitales.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2019 Feb 4. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 3AB, U.K.

Stomata play a critical ecological role as an interface between the plant and its environment. Although the guard-cell pair is highly conserved in land plants, the development and patterning of surrounding epidermal cells follow predictable pathways in different taxa that are increasingly well understood following recent advances in the developmental genetics of the plant epidermis in model taxa. Similarly, other aspects of leaf development and evolution are benefiting from a molecular-genetic approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12497DOI Listing
February 2019

Nuclear envelope dynamics during mammalian spermatogenesis: new insights on male fertility.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2019 Jan 31. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Medical Sciences, Neuroscience and Signalling Laboratory, Institute for Biomedicine (iBiMED), University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal.

The production of highly specialized spermatozoa from undifferentiated spermatogonia is a strictly organized and programmed process requiring extensive restructuring of the entire cell. One of the most remarkable cellular transformations accompanying the various phases of spermatogenesis is the profound remodelling of the nuclear architecture, in which the nuclear envelope (NE) seems to be crucially involved. In recent years, several proteins from the distinct layers forming the NE (i. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/brv.12498
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12498DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

The growth ring concept: seeking a broader and unambiguous approach covering tropical species.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2019 Jan 25. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Laboratório de Anatomia Vegetal e Identificação de Madeiras (LAVIM), Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Rua Barão de Jeremoabo, Campus de Ondina, 147, Salvador, BA 40.170-290, Brazil.

The concept of growth rings is little discussed in the literature and their treatment remains somewhat confusing in terms of the diversity of structures described. This situation has a major impact on the study of growth rings in tropical species, in which variations and complexity are greater and accuracy of identification less good. The rigid conceptual delimitations used by dendrochronologists and wood anatomists of temperate regions cannot be applied to the study of growth rings in most tropical species, which has led to neglect of this subject. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12495DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Effects of developmental stress on animal phenotype and performance: a quantitative review.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2019 Jan 4. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Centre for Integrative Ecology, Deakin University, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, 75 Pigdons rd, Geelong, VIC 3216, Australia.

Developmental stressors are increasingly recognised for their pervasive influence on the ecology and evolution of animals. In particular, many studies have focused on how developmental stress can give rise to variation in adult behaviour, physiology, and performance. However, there remains a poor understanding of whether general patterns exist in the effects and magnitude of phenotypic responses across taxonomic groups. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12496DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Towards a 'Sea-Level Sensitive' dynamic model: impact of island ontogeny and glacio-eustasy on global patterns of marine island biogeography.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2019 Jan 4. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Department of Geosciences, Williams College, Williamstown, MA 01267, U.S.A.

A synthetic model is presented to enlarge the evolutionary framework of the General Dynamic Model (GDM) and the Glacial Sensitive Model (GSM) of oceanic island biogeography from the terrestrial to the marine realm. The proposed 'Sea-Level Sensitive' dynamic model (SLS) of marine island biogeography integrates historical and ecological biogeography with patterns of glacio-eustasy, merging concepts from areas as diverse as taxonomy, biogeography, marine biology, volcanology, sedimentology, stratigraphy, palaeontology, geochronology and geomorphology. Fundamental to the SLS model is the dynamic variation of the littoral area of volcanic oceanic islands (defined as the area between the intertidal and the 50-m isobath) in response to sea-level oscillations driven by glacial-interglacial cycles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12492DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Neuronal sub-compartmentalization: a strategy to optimize neuronal function.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2019 Jan 4. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Clem Jones Centre for Dementia Research, Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Neurons are highly polarized cells that consist of three main structural and functional domains: a cell body or soma, an axon, and dendrites. These domains contain smaller compartments with essential roles for proper neuronal function, such as the axonal presynaptic boutons and the dendritic postsynaptic spines. The structure and function of these compartments have now been characterized in great detail. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12487DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Paradoxes of tumour complexity: somatic selection, vulnerability by design, or infectious aetiology?

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Dec 27. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

Institute of Biology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest 1117, Hungary.

The aetiology of cancer involves intricate cellular and molecular mechanisms that apparently emerge on the short timescale of a single lifetime. Some of these traits are remarkable not only for their complexity, but also because it is hard to conceive selection pressures that would favour their evolution within the local competitive microenvironment of the tumour. Examples include 'niche construction' (re-programming of tumour-specific target sites) to create permissive conditions for distant metastases; long-range feedback loops of tumour growth; and remarkably 'plastic' phenotypes (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12490DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Cognitive costs of reproduction: life-history trade-offs explain cognitive decline during pregnancy in women.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Dec 26. Epub 2018 Dec 26.

Department of Environmental Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow 31-531, Poland.

Life-history theory predicts that access to limited resources leads to trade-offs between competing body functions. Women, who face higher costs of reproduction when compared to men, should be especially vulnerable to these trade-offs. We propose the 'cognitive costs of reproduction hypothesis', which states that energy trade-offs imposed by reproduction may lead to a decline in maternal cognitive function during gestation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12494DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

The covariance between metabolic rate and behaviour varies across behaviours and thermal types: meta-analytic insights.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Dec 26. Epub 2018 Dec 26.

Evolution and Ecology Research Centre and School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia.

Energy metabolism has received much attention as a potential driver of repeatable among-individual differences in behaviour (animal personality). Several factors have been hypothesized to mediate this relationship. We performed a systematic review with a meta-analysis of >70 studies comprised of >8000 individuals reporting relationships between measures of maintenance metabolic rates (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12491DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Assessing the fitness consequences of mitonuclear interactions in natural populations.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Dec 26. Epub 2018 Dec 26.

School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia.

Metazoans exist only with a continuous and rich supply of chemical energy from oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. The oxidative phosphorylation machinery that mediates energy conservation is encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genes, and hence the products of these two genomes must interact closely to achieve coordinated function of core respiratory processes. It follows that selection for efficient respiration will lead to selection for compatible combinations of mitochondrial and nuclear genotypes, and this should facilitate coadaptation between mitochondrial and nuclear genomes (mitonuclear coadaptation). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12493DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Muscle wasting in the presence of disease, why is it so variable?

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Dec 26. Epub 2018 Dec 26.

National Institute for Health Research Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust and Imperial College London, Sydney Street, London SW3 6NP, U.K.

Skeletal muscle wasting is a common clinical feature of many chronic diseases and also occurs in response to single acute events. The accompanying loss of strength can lead to significant disability, increased care needs and have profound negative effects on quality of life. As muscle is the most abundant source of amino acids in the body, it appears to function as a buffer for fuel and substrates that can be used to repair damage elsewhere and to feed the immune system. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/brv.12489
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12489DOI Listing
December 2018
11 Reads

Animal movements in fire-prone landscapes.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Dec 18. Epub 2018 Dec 18.

Department of Ecology, Environment and Evolution, School of Life Sciences, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria 3086, Australia.

Movement is a trait of fundamental importance in ecosystems subject to frequent disturbances, such as fire-prone ecosystems. Despite this, the role of movement in facilitating responses to fire has received little attention. Herein, we consider how animal movement interacts with fire history to shape species distributions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12486DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Trait-based ecology of terrestrial arthropods.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Dec 13. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3PS, U.K.

In focusing on how organisms' generalizable functional properties (traits) interact mechanistically with environments across spatial scales and levels of biological organization, trait-based approaches provide a powerful framework for attaining synthesis, generality and prediction. Trait-based research has considerably improved understanding of the assembly, structure and functioning of plant communities. Further advances in ecology may be achieved by exploring the trait-environment relationships of non-sessile, heterotrophic organisms such as terrestrial arthropods, which are geographically ubiquitous, ecologically diverse, and often important functional components of ecosystems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12488DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Recent advances in New Caledonian biogeography.

Authors:
Michael Heads

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Dec 6. Epub 2018 Dec 6.

Buffalo Museum of Science, Buffalo, NY 14211-1293, U.S.A.

The biota of New Caledonia is one of the most unusual in the world. It displays high diversity and endemism, many peculiar absences, and far-flung biogeographic affinities. For example, New Caledonia is the only place on Earth with both main clades of flowering plants - the endemic Amborella and 'all the rest', and it also has the highest concentration of diversity in conifers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12485DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Evolutionary history of fire-stimulated resprouting, flowering, seed release and germination.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Nov 28. Epub 2018 Nov 28.

College of Horticulture and Forestry Sciences, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China.

Fire has shaped the evolution of many plant traits in fire-prone environments: fire-resistant tissues with heat-insulated meristems, post-fire resprouting or fire-killed but regenerating from stored seeds, fire-stimulated flowering, release of on-plant-stored seeds, and germination of soil-stored seeds. Flowering, seed release and germination fit into three categories of response to intensifying fire: fire not required, weakly fire-adapted or strongly fire-adapted. Resprouting also has three categories but survival is always reduced by increasing fire intensity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12483DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Sexual selection and its evolutionary consequences in female animals.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Nov 28. Epub 2018 Nov 28.

Centre for Evolutionary Biology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Perth, 6009, Australia.

For sexual selection to act on a given sex, there must exist variation in the reproductive success of that sex as a result of differential access to mates or fertilisations. The mechanisms and consequences of sexual selection acting on male animals are well documented, but research on sexual selection acting on females has only recently received attention. Controversy still exists over whether sexual selection acts on females in the traditional sense, and over whether to modify the existing definition of sexual selection (to include resource competition) or to invoke alternative mechanisms (usually social selection) to explain selection acting on females in connection with reproduction. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/brv.12484
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12484DOI Listing
November 2018
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Persistence and stochasticity are key determinants of genetic diversity in plants associated with banded iron formation inselbergs.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Nov 26. Epub 2018 Nov 26.

Biodiversity and Conservation Science, Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions, Locked Bag 104, Bentley Delivery Centre, Perth, WA, 6983, Australia.

The high species endemism characteristic of many of the world's terrestrial island systems provides a model for studying evolutionary patterns and processes, yet there has been no synthesis of studies to provide a systematic evaluation of terrestrial island systems in this context. The banded iron formations (BIFs) of south-western Australia are ancient terrestrial island formations occurring within a mosaic of alluvial clay soils, sandplains and occasional granite outcropping, across an old, gently undulating, highly weathered, plateau. Notably, these BIFs display exceptionally high beta plant diversity. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/brv.12477
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12477DOI Listing
November 2018
3 Reads

Synzoochory: the ecological and evolutionary relevance of a dual interaction.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Nov 22. Epub 2018 Nov 22.

Departamento de Ecología Integrativa, Integrative Ecology Group, Estación Biológica de Doñana (EBD-CSIC), Avda. Americo Vespucio S/N, E-41092 Sevilla, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12481DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Biophysical factors in the regulation of asymmetric division of stem cells.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Nov 22. Epub 2018 Nov 22.

Centre for Healthcare Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah, West Bengal 711103, India.

Stem cells are a promising cell source for regenerative medicine due to their characteristics of self-renewal and differentiation. The intricate balance between these two cell fates is maintained by precisely controlled symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions. Asymmetric division has a fundamental importance in maintaining tissue homeostasis and in the development of multi-cellular organisms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12479DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Emerging threats and persistent conservation challenges for freshwater biodiversity.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Nov 22. Epub 2018 Nov 22.

Fish Ecology and Conservation Physiology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Carleton University, Ottawa, K1S 5B6, Canada.

In the 12 years since Dudgeon et al. (2006) reviewed major pressures on freshwater ecosystems, the biodiversity crisis in the world's lakes, reservoirs, rivers, streams and wetlands has deepened. While lakes, reservoirs and rivers cover only 2. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12480DOI Listing
November 2018
47 Reads

Evolutionary significance of the microbial assemblages of large benthic Foraminifera.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Nov 18. Epub 2018 Nov 18.

Marine Biodiversity Group, Naturalis Biodiversity Center, 2300 RA, Leiden, 9517, the Netherlands.

Large benthic Foraminifera (LBF) are major carbonate producers on coral reefs, and are hosts to a diverse symbiotic microbial community. During warm episodes in the geological past, these reef-building organisms expanded their geographical ranges as subtropical and tropical belts moved into higher latitudes. During these range-expansion periods, LBF were the most prolific carbonate producers on reefs, dominating shallow carbonate platforms over reef-building corals. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/brv.12482
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12482DOI Listing
November 2018
11 Reads

Modularity is the mother of invention: a review of polymorphism in bryozoans.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Nov 18. Epub 2018 Nov 18.

School of Biological Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 600, Wellington, 6140, New Zealand.

Modularity is a fundamental concept in biology. Most taxa within the colonial invertebrate phylum Bryozoa have achieved division of labour through the development of specialized modules (polymorphs), and this group is perhaps the most outstanding exemplar of the phenomenon. We provide a comprehensive description of the diversity, morphology and function of these polymorphs and the significance of modularity to the evolutionary success of the phylum, which has >21000 described fossil and living species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12478DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

A long winter for the Red Queen: rethinking the evolution of seasonal migration.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Nov 4. Epub 2018 Nov 4.

Museum of Zoology and Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, U.S.A.

This paper advances an hypothesis that the primary adaptive driver of seasonal migration is maintenance of site fidelity to familiar breeding locations. We argue that seasonal migration is therefore principally an adaptation for geographic persistence when confronted with seasonality - analogous to hibernation, freeze tolerance, or other organismal adaptations to cyclically fluctuating environments. These ideas stand in contrast to traditional views that bird migration evolved as an adaptive dispersal strategy for exploiting new breeding areas and avoiding competitors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12476DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Sex-biased dispersal: a review of the theory.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Oct 24. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057, Zurich, Switzerland.

Dispersal is ubiquitous throughout the tree of life: factors selecting for dispersal include kin competition, inbreeding avoidance and spatiotemporal variation in resources or habitat suitability. These factors differ in whether they promote male and female dispersal equally strongly, and often selection on dispersal of one sex depends on how much the other disperses. For example, for inbreeding avoidance it can be sufficient that one sex disperses away from the natal site. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/brv.12475
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12475DOI Listing
October 2018
5 Reads

The enigmatic ATP supply of the endoplasmic reticulum.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Oct 19. Epub 2018 Oct 19.

Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Gottfried Schatz Research Center, Medical University of Graz, Neue Stiftingtalstraße 6/6, 8010 Graz, Austria.

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a functionally and morphologically complex cellular organelle largely responsible for a variety of crucial functions, including protein folding, maturation and degradation. Furthermore, the ER plays an essential role in lipid biosynthesis, dynamic Ca storage, and detoxification. Malfunctions in ER-related processes are responsible for the genesis and progression of many diseases, such as heart failure, cancer, neurodegeneration and metabolic disorders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12469DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Vicariance and dispersal in southern hemisphere freshwater fish clades: a palaeontological perspective.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Oct 19. Epub 2018 Oct 19.

Museum of Paleontology and Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Michigan, 1105 N. University Ave, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1079, U.S.A.

Widespread fish clades that occur mainly or exclusively in fresh water represent a key target of biogeographical investigation due to limited potential for crossing marine barriers. Timescales for the origin and diversification of these groups are crucial tests of vicariant scenarios in which continental break-ups shaped modern geographic distributions. Evolutionary chronologies are commonly estimated through node-based palaeontological calibration of molecular phylogenies, but this approach ignores most of the temporal information encoded in the known fossil record of a given taxon. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12473DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

The effects of long-distance migration on the evolution of moult strategies in Western-Palearctic passerines.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Oct 18. Epub 2018 Oct 18.

Department of Evolutionary and Environmental Biology and Institute of Evolution, University of Haifa 199 Aba Khoushy Avenue, Mount Carmel 3498838, Haifa, Israel.

Although feathers are the unifying characteristic of all birds, our understanding of the causes, mechanisms, patterns and consequences of the feather moult process lags behind that of other major avian life-history phenomena such as reproduction and long-distance migration. Migration, which evolved in many species of the temperate and arctic zones, requires high energy expenditure to endure long-distance journeys. About a third of Western-Palearctic passerines perform long-distance migrations of thousands of kilometres each year using various morphological, physiological, biomechanical, behavioural and life-history adaptations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12474DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Dropping to escape: a review of an under-appreciated antipredator defence.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Oct 9. Epub 2018 Oct 9.

School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Dyer's Brae House, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9TH, U.K.

Dropping is a common antipredator defence that enables rapid escape from a perceived threat. However, despite its immediate effectiveness in predator-prey encounters (and against other dangers such as a parasitoid or an aggressive conspecific), it remains an under-appreciated defence strategy in the scientific literature. Dropping has been recorded in a wide range of taxa, from primates to lizards, but has been studied most commonly in insects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12466DOI Listing
October 2018
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The community and ecosystem consequences of intraspecific diversity: a meta-analysis.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Oct 7. Epub 2018 Oct 7.

CNRS, Station d'Écologie Théorique et Expérimentale du CNRS à Moulis UMR-5321, Université Toulouse III Paul Sabatier, 2 route du CNRS, F-09200, Moulis, France.

Understanding the relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning has major implications. Biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships are generally investigated at the interspecific level, although intraspecific diversity (i.e. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/brv.12472
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12472DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Using the Value of Information to improve conservation decision making.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Oct 2. Epub 2018 Oct 2.

School of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, U.K.

Conservation decisions are challenging, not only because they often involve difficult conflicts among outcomes that people value, but because our understanding of the natural world and our effects on it is fraught with uncertainty. Value of Information (VoI) methods provide an approach for understanding and managing uncertainty from the standpoint of the decision maker. These methods are commonly used in other fields (e. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/brv.12471
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12471DOI Listing
October 2018
13 Reads

Functional principles of steerable multi-element probes in insects.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Sep 26. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

Experimental Zoology Group, Department of Animal Sciences, Wageningen University, De Elst 1, 6708 WD, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Hemipterans, mosquitoes, and parasitic wasps probe in a variety of substrates to find hosts for their larvae or food sources. Probes capable of sensing and precise steering enable insects to navigate through solid substrates without visual information and to reach targets that are hidden deep inside the substrate. The probes belong to non-related taxa and originate from abdominal structures (wasps) or mouthparts (hemipterans and mosquitoes), but nevertheless share several morphological characteristics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12467DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Causes and consequences of ontogenetic dietary shifts: a global synthesis using fish models.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Sep 24. Epub 2018 Sep 24.

Department of Arctic and Marine Biology, Faculty of Biosciences, Fisheries and Economics, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037, Tromsø, Norway.

Ontogenetic dietary shifts (ODSs), the changes in diet utilisation occurring over the life span of an individual consumer, are widespread in the animal kingdom. Understanding ODSs provides fundamental insights into the biological and ecological processes that function at the individual, population and community levels, and is critical for the development and testing of hypotheses around key concepts in trophic theory on model organisms. Here, we synthesise historic and contemporary research on ODSs in fishes, and identify where further research is required. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12468DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Resilience and restoration of tropical and subtropical grasslands, savannas, and grassy woodlands.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Sep 24. Epub 2018 Sep 24.

Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 77843-2138, U.S.A.

Despite growing recognition of the conservation values of grassy biomes, our understanding of how to maintain and restore biodiverse tropical grasslands (including savannas and open-canopy grassy woodlands) remains limited. To incorporate grasslands into large-scale restoration efforts, we synthesised existing ecological knowledge of tropical grassland resilience and approaches to plant community restoration. Tropical grassland plant communities are resilient to, and often dependent on, the endogenous disturbances with which they evolved - frequent fires and native megafaunal herbivory. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/brv.12470
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12470DOI Listing
September 2018
12 Reads

Context dependency of animal resource subsidies.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Sep 24. Epub 2018 Sep 24.

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, U.S.A.

The transport of resource subsidies by animals has been documented across a range of species and ecosystems. Although many of these studies have shown that animal resource subsidies can have significant effects on nutrient cycling, ecosystem productivity, and food-web structure, there is a great deal of variability in the occurrence and strength of these effects. Here we propose a conceptual framework for understanding the context dependency of animal resource subsidies, and for developing and testing predictions about the effects of animal subsidies over space and time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12465DOI Listing
September 2018
5 Reads

Enigmatic ear stones: what we know about the functional role and evolution of fish otoliths.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Sep 21. Epub 2018 Sep 21.

Department Biology II, Zoology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Großhaderner Strasse 2, 82152, Planegg-Martinsried, Germany.

Otoliths in bony fishes play an important role in the senses of balance and hearing. Otolith mass and shape are, among others, likely to be decisive factors influencing otolith motion and thus ear functioning. Yet our knowledge of how exactly these factors influence otolith motion is incomplete. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/brv.12463
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12463DOI Listing
September 2018
17 Reads

The physiological roles of autophagy in the mammalian life cycle.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Sep 21. Epub 2018 Sep 21.

State Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100101 Beijing, China.

Autophagy is primarily an efficient intracellular catabolic pathway used for degradation of abnormal cellular protein aggregates and damaged organelles. Although autophagy was initially proposed to be a cellular stress responder, increasing evidence suggests that it carries out normal physiological roles in multiple biological processes. To date, autophagy has been identified in most organs and at many different developmental stages, indicating that it is not only essential for cellular homeostasis and renovation, but is also important for organ development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12464DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

What, where and when: spatial foraging decisions in primates.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Sep 13. Epub 2018 Sep 13.

Département Hommes et Environnements Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Musée de l'Homme, UMR 7206-CNRS/MNHN, Paris, 75116, France.

When exploiting the environment, animals have to discriminate, track, and integrate salient spatial cues to navigate and identify goal sites. Actually, they have to know what can be found (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12462DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Seeds of future past: climate change and the thermal memory of plant reproductive traits.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Sep 6. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Comparative Plant and Fungal Biology, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew; Wellcome Trust Millennium Building, Wakehurst Place, Ardingly, West Sussex, RH17 6TN, U.K.

Plant persistence and migration in face of climate change depends on successful reproduction by seed, a central aspect of plant life that drives population dynamics, community assembly and species distributions. Plant reproduction by seed is a chain of physiological processes, the rates of which are a function of temperature, and can be modelled using thermal time models. Importantly, while seed reproduction responds to its instantaneous thermal environment, there is also evidence of phenotypic plasticity in response to the thermal history experienced by the plant's recent ancestors, by the reproducing plant since seedling establishment, and by its seeds both before and after their release. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/brv.12461
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12461DOI Listing
September 2018
9 Reads

Diversity in warning coloration: selective paradox or the norm?

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Aug 27. Epub 2018 Aug 27.

Department of Biology, East Carolina University, 1000 E Fifth St, Greenville, NC 27858, U.S.A.

Aposematic theory has historically predicted that predators should select for warning signals to converge on a single form, as a result of frequency-dependent learning. However, widespread variation in warning signals is observed across closely related species, populations and, most problematically for evolutionary biologists, among individuals in the same population. Recent research has yielded an increased awareness of this diversity, challenging the paradigm of signal monomorphy in aposematic animals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12460DOI Listing
August 2018
6 Reads

Roles of microRNAs in mammalian reproduction: from the commitment of germ cells to peri-implantation embryos.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Aug 27. Epub 2018 Aug 27.

Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biotechnology, Humanized Pig Research Centre (SRC), Konkuk University, Seoul, 143-701, Republic of Korea.

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are active regulators of numerous biological and physiological processes including most of the events of mammalian reproduction. Understanding the biological functions of miRNAs in the context of mammalian reproduction will allow a better and comparative understanding of fertility and sterility in male and female mammals. Herein, we summarize recent progress in miRNA-mediated regulation of mammalian reproduction and highlight the significance of miRNAs in different aspects of mammalian reproduction including the biogenesis of germ cells, the functionality of reproductive organs, and the development of early embryos. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12459DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads

Climate-driven ecological stability as a globally shared cause of Late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions: the Plaids and Stripes Hypothesis.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Aug 22. Epub 2018 Aug 22.

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA.

Controversy persists about why so many large-bodied mammal species went extinct around the end of the last ice age. Resolving this is important for understanding extinction processes in general, for assessing the ecological roles of humans, and for conserving remaining megafaunal species, many of which are endangered today. Here we explore an integrative hypothesis that asserts that an underlying cause of Late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions was a fundamental shift in the spatio-temporal fabric of ecosystems worldwide. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/brv.12456
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12456DOI Listing
August 2018
11 Reads

Reintroduction of freshwater macroinvertebrates: challenges and opportunities.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Aug 22. Epub 2018 Aug 22.

Department of River Ecology and Conservation, Senckenberg Research Institute and Natural History Museum Frankfurt, Clamecystr. 12, 63571, Gelnhausen, Germany.

Species reintroductions - the translocation of individuals to areas in which a species has been extirpated with the aim of re-establishing a self-sustaining population - have become a widespread practice in conservation biology. Reintroduction projects have tended to focus on terrestrial vertebrates and, to a lesser extent, fishes. Much less effort has been devoted to the reintroduction of invertebrates into restored freshwater habitats. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/brv.12458
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12458DOI Listing
August 2018
32 Reads

Comprehensive review of Hepatitis B Virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma research through text mining and big data analytics.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Aug 13. Epub 2018 Aug 13.

Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 119077, Singapore.

PubMed was text mined to glean insights into the role of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from the massive number of publications (9249) available to date. Reports from ∼70 countries identified >1300 human genes associated with either the Core, Surface or X gene in HBV-associated HCC. One hundred and forty-three of these host genes, which can potentially yield 1180 biomolecular interactions, each were reported in at least three different publications to be associated with the same HBV. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/brv.12457
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12457DOI Listing
August 2018
15 Reads

Brood parasitism, relatedness and sociality: a kinship role in female reproductive tactics.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Aug 2. Epub 2018 Aug 2.

Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Medicinaregatan 18, 40530 Göteborg, Sweden.

Conspecific brood parasitism (CBP) is a reproductive tactic in which parasitic females lay eggs in nests of other females of the same species that then raise the joint brood. Parasites benefit by increased reproduction, without costs of parental care for the parasitic eggs. CBP occurs in many egg-laying animals, among birds most often in species with large clutches and self-feeding young: two major factors facilitating successful parasitism. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/brv.12455
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12455DOI Listing
August 2018
21 Reads

Laminins and their receptors in the CNS.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Aug 2. Epub 2018 Aug 2.

Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, University of Georgia, 240 W Green Street, Athens, GA 30602, U.S.A.

Laminin, an extracellular matrix protein, is widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). By interacting with integrin and non-integrin receptors, laminin exerts a large variety of important functions in the CNS in both physiological and pathological conditions. Due to the existence of many laminin isoforms and their differential expression in various cell types in the CNS, the exact functions of each individual laminin molecule in CNS development and homeostasis remain largely unclear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12454DOI Listing
August 2018
3 Reads

Gene transcription in bursting: a unified mode for realizing accuracy and stochasticity.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Jul 19. Epub 2018 Jul 19.

National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Department of Physics, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093, China.

There is accumulating evidence that, from bacteria to mammalian cells, messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are produced in intermittent bursts - a much 'noisier' process than traditionally thought. Based on quantitative measurements at individual promoters, diverse phenomenological models have been proposed for transcriptional bursting. Nevertheless, the underlying molecular mechanisms and significance for cellular signalling remain elusive. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12452DOI Listing
July 2018
3 Reads

Life-history evolution under fluctuating density-dependent selection and the adaptive alignment of pace-of-life syndromes.

Biol Rev Camb Philos Soc 2018 Jul 17. Epub 2018 Jul 17.

Behavioural Ecology, Department of Biology, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (LMU), 82152 Planegg-Martinsried, Germany.

We present a novel perspective on life-history evolution that combines recent theoretical advances in fluctuating density-dependent selection with the notion of pace-of-life syndromes (POLSs) in behavioural ecology. These ideas posit phenotypic co-variation in life-history, physiological, morphological and behavioural traits as a continuum from the highly fecund, short-lived, bold, aggressive and highly dispersive 'fast' types at one end of the POLS to the less fecund, long-lived, cautious, shy, plastic and socially responsive 'slow' types at the other. We propose that such variation in life histories and the associated individual differences in behaviour can be explained through their eco-evolutionary dynamics with population density - a single and ubiquitous selective factor that is present in all biological systems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/brv.12451DOI Listing
July 2018
5 Reads