3,152 results match your criteria Biological Psychology [Journal]


Identification and transformation difficulty in problem solving: Electrophysiological evidence from chunk decomposition.

Biol Psychol 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Research Centre for Brain Function and Psychological Science, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China; Shenzhen Institute of Neuroscience, Shenzhen, China; Institute of Affective and Social Neuroscience, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China.

A wealth of studies have investigated how to overcome experience-based constraints in creative problem solving. One such experience-based constraint is the tendency for people to view tightly organized visual stimuli as single, unified percepts, even when decomposition of those stimuli into component parts (termed chunk decomposition) would facilitate problem solving. The current study investigates the neural underpinnings of chunk decomposition in creative problem solving by analyzing event-related potentials. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2019.02.004DOI Listing
February 2019
3.403 Impact Factor

Self-Report and Neurophysiological Indicators of Emotion Processing and Regulation in Social Anxiety Disorder.

Biol Psychol 2019 Feb 8. Epub 2019 Feb 8.

Department of Psychiatry, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States; Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States.

Individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD) report less habitual reappraisal and more frequent suppression compared to healthy controls (HC). However, it is unclear whether a neurophysiological index of emotional reactivity, the late positive potential (LPP), is aberrant in SAD or whether self-reported reappraisal or suppression relates to the LPP during on-line emotion reactivity and reappraisal. Participants with SAD (n = 51) and HC (n = 31) completed an Emotion Regulation Task. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03010511183053
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2019.01.019DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Is your own face more than a highly familiar face?

Biol Psychol 2019 Feb 6;142:100-107. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Departamento de Psicología Biológica y de la Salud, Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address:

This study aimed to elucidate whether distinct early processes underlie the perception of our own face. Alternatively, self-face perception might rely on the same processes that realize the perception of highly familiar faces. To this end, we recorded EEG activity while participants performed a facial recognition task in which they had to discriminate between their own face, a friend's face, and an unknown face. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2019.01.018DOI Listing
February 2019

Eye-gaze contingent attention training (ECAT): Examining the causal role of attention regulation in reappraisal and rumination.

Biol Psychol 2019 Feb 5;142:116-125. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Ghent University, Belgium.

This study used a novel eye-gaze contingent attention training (ECAT) to test the prediction that attention regulation is involved in reappraisal and rumination. Sixty-six undergraduates were randomly assigned to either the control or the active training condition of the ECAT. Active ECAT comprised training in allocating attention toward positive words to efficiently create positive interpretations while receiving gaze-contingent feedback. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2019.01.017DOI Listing
February 2019

The importance of age in the search for ERP biomarkers of aMCI.

Biol Psychol 2019 Feb 2;142:108-115. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Laboratorio de Neurociencia Cognitiva, Departamento de Psicoloxía Clínica e Psicobioloxía, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain.

Alzheimer's Disease (AD) has become a major health issue in recent decades, and there is now growing interest in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), an intermediate stage between healthy aging and dementia, usually AD. Event-related brain potential (ERP) studies have sometimes failed to detect differences between aMCI and control participants in the Go-P3 (or P3b, related to target classification processes in a variety of tasks) and NoGo-P3 (related to response inhibition processes, mainly in Go/NoGo tasks) ERP components. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the age factor, which is not usually taken into account in ERP studies, modulates group differences in these components. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2019.01.015DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation reduces spontaneous but not induced negative thought intrusions in high worriers.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 30;142:80-89. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Institute of Psychology, Leiden University, Wassenaarseweg 52, 2333 AK, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Worrying is a central component of anxiety disorders. We tested whether non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation reduces negative thought intrusions in high worriers. Worry was assessed with a Breathing Focus Task, which consists of a pre-worry period, a worry induction, and a post-worry period. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2019.01.014DOI Listing
January 2019
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Cortisol Reactivity and Depressive Symptoms in Pregnancy: The Moderating Role of Perceived Social Support and Neuroticism.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Department of Psychology and Social Behavior, University of California, Irvine, 4562 Social and Behavioral Sciences Gateway, Irvine, CA 92697-7085, USA. Electronic address:

Perinatal depression negatively impacts mother-infant health and well-being. Previous work has linked cortisol reactivity to perinatal depressive symptoms, but moderating effects including social support and neuroticism, have not been studied. Forty-nine pregnant women (9 - 30 weeks' gestational age; GA) provided saliva samples in response to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) and to awakening (cortisol awakening response, CAR), and completed questionnaires on perceived social support, personality, and depressive symptoms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2019.01.016DOI Listing
January 2019
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Prime warning moderates implicit affect primes' effect on effort-related cardiac response in men.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 28;142:62-69. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

University of Geneva, Switzerland. Electronic address:

Based on the Implicit-Affect-Primes-Effort model (Gendolla, 2012, 2015), we tested whether warning individuals about the occurrence of affect primes during a cognitive task moderates the primes' effect on effort-related cardiac response. Participants worked on a challenging mental arithmetic task with integrated masked affect primes-very briefly flashed pictures of facial sadness vs. happiness expressions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2019.01.013DOI Listing
January 2019

Selective attention, not cognitive load, elicited fewer eyeblinks in a concealed information test.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 28;142:70-79. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Department of Psychology, Kansai University of Welfare Sciences, Kashihara, 582-0026, Japan.

The concealed information test (CIT), a memory detection test, compares physiological responses to crime-related and crime-unrelated items. This study elucidated processes involving spontaneous eyeblinks during the CIT by manipulating participants' intention to conceal. Thirty-four participants committed mock theft. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2019.01.009DOI Listing
January 2019

The aroma of arousal: Effects of menstrual cycle phase and women's sexual arousal state on men's responsiveness to women's body odor.

Authors:
Heather Hoffmann

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 25;142:54-61. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Department of Psychology, 2 East South St., Box 59, Knox College, Galesburg, IL 61401, United States. Electronic address:

Humans can detect aspects of identity, reproductive status, and emotional state from body odor. Women have shown a distinctive neural response to male sexually-aroused (vs. resting) sweat. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2019.01.012DOI Listing
January 2019

Electro-cortical correlates of multisensory integration using ecologically valid emotional stimuli: Differential effects for fear and disgust.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 24. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Germany; Department of Psychiatry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, Athens, Greece; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical Faculty, University of Cologne, Germany. Electronic address:

Multisensory integration (MSI) is crucial for human communication and social interaction and has been investigated in healthy populations and neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the use of stimuli with high ecological validity is sparse, especially in event-related potential (ERP) studies. The present study examined the ERP correlates of MSI in healthy adults using short (500 ms) ecologically valid professional actor-produced emotions of fear or disgust as vocal exclamation or facial expression (unimodal conditions) or both (bimodal condition). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2019.01.011DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

One plus one is more than two: The interactive influence of group membership and emotional facial expressions on the modulation of the affective startle reflex.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 21. Epub 2019 Jan 21.

Faculty of Behavioral Sciences, Department of Psychology, Saarland University, Building A2 4, D-66123 Saarbrücken, Germany. Electronic address:

It has been demonstrated repeatedly that the evaluation of a face is not only influenced by the social message that is signaled by the face's emotional expression, but also by other social factors such as ethnicity or group membership. Studies in the field of startle research, however, have hitherto investigated only the effects of one of the two factors-that is, either emotional expression or group membership-on the startle response. Yet, we propose that the startle reflex is a sensitive marker for the interactive effect of both factors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.12.009DOI Listing
January 2019

Unpredictability impairs goal-directed target processing and performance.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 19;142:29-36. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

Department of Psychology, McGill University, 2001 McGill College Ave, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 1G1 Canada. Electronic address:

Unpredictability influences emotion and attention, but its effects on goal-directed behavior are unclear. We examined whether unpredictable events interfere with performance, using event-related potentials to specify underlying attentional dynamics. The paradigm involved task-irrelevant distracters of either predictable or unpredictable content (neutral/negative) preceding targets of a stimulus discrimination task. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2019.01.007DOI Listing
January 2019

Children's sustained attention to emotional facial expressions and their autonomic nervous system reactivity during parent-child interactions.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 18;142:37-44. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Center for Affective Science, Binghamton University (SUNY), United States.

The way individuals process socio-affective information is thought to impact their responses to social interactions, but research testing the relation between these processes is scarce, particularly among children. This study examined if children's attention to socio-affective stimuli was associated with their autonomic nervous system (ANS) reactivity during parent-child interactions. Children's sustained attention to facial expressions of emotion (afraid, happy, sad) was indexed using the late positive potential (LPP) event-related potential (ERP) component during a computer-based task. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2019.01.005DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

An analysis of stereotypical motor movements and cardiovascular coupling in individuals on the autism spectrum.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 12;142:90-99. Epub 2019 Jan 12.

Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA.

One of the core diagnostic features of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is engagement in stereotypical motor movements, although the etiology of this repetitive behavior is unknown. Since the 1960s, it has been hypothesized that stereotypical motor movements serve a homeostatic regulation function, and thereby a putative coupling mechanism to cardiovascular arousal. However, to date, surprisingly few reports explicitly assess cardio-somatic coupling and stereotypical motor movements. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2019.01.004DOI Listing
January 2019
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Developmental trajectories of autonomic functioning in autism from birth to early childhood.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 11;142:13-18. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Brown Center for the Study of Children at Risk, Women and Infants Hospital and the Rhode Island Consortium for Autism Research and Treatment, Providence, RI, United States; Department of Psychiatry & Human Behavior and Department of Pediatrics, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, United States.

Deficits in social engagement emerge in autism during the infant and toddler period and may be related to emotion regulation and stress response systems. This study examined patterns of growth in autonomic functioning related to autism diagnosis and addresses the hypothesis that there are differences in autonomic functioning related to autism in infancy. Heart rate (HR) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) were measured at 8 time points from 1 to 72 months of age in infants later diagnosed with autism (n = 12) and a non-autistic comparison group (n = 106). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2019.01.003DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Is auditory distraction by changing-state and deviant sounds underpinned by the same mechanism? Evidence from pupillometry.

Biol Psychol 2019 Feb 8;141:64-74. Epub 2019 Jan 8.

Université Laval, Québec, Canada; University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.

The mere presence of task-irrelevant auditory stimuli is known to interfere with cognitive functioning. Disruption can be caused by changing auditory distractors (the changing-state effect) or by a sound that deviates from the auditory background (the deviation effect). The unitary account of auditory distraction explains both phenomena in terms of attentional capture whereas the duplex-mechanism account posits that they reflect two fundamentally different forms of distraction in which only the deviation effect is caused by attentional capture. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2019.01.002DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Challenge, motivation, and effort: Neural and behavioral correlates of self-control of difficulty during practice.

Biol Psychol 2019 Feb 7;141:52-63. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Department of Health, Kinesiology, and Recreation, University of Utah, United States; Department of Physical Therapy and Athletic Training, University of Utah, United States. Electronic address:

Self-control of task-relevant parameters during practice results in superior learning. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. To investigate these effects, we collected frontal alpha asymmetry (ΔFAS) and midline frontal theta (ΔMFT). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2019.01.001DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Intertrial variability in emotive reactions to approach-motivated positive pictures predicts attentional narrowing: The role of individual differences.

Biol Psychol 2018 Dec 31;142:19-28. Epub 2018 Dec 31.

The University of Alabama, 505 Hackberry Lane, P. O. Box 870348, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0348, United States. Electronic address:

Previous research has found that high approach-motivated positive affect narrows cognitive scope. Additionally, this narrowing of cognitive scope in high approach-motivated states is related to neural correlates of motor-action preparation, including beta suppression over the motor cortex. However, past studies have only examined these effects averaging across trials, without accounting for individual variability from trial-to-trial. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.12.015DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Hemodynamic profile and compensation deficit in African and European Americans during physical and mental stress.

Biol Psychol 2019 Feb 30;141:17-24. Epub 2018 Dec 30.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; Center for Biobehavioral Health Disparities Research, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.

Increased vascular reactivity to stress has been suggested to contribute to the greater risk for developing hypertension in African Americans. Here, we examined the way (hemodynamic profile) and the extent to which (compensation deficit) cardiac output and total peripheral resistance compensate for each other in determining blood pressure responses to a physical (orthostasis) and a mental (anger recall) stress task, in normotensive African American (AA, n = 30) and European American (EA, n = 48) college students. Blood pressure stress reactivity did not differ as a function of race. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.12.003DOI Listing
February 2019
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Frontal alpha asymmetry moderates the relations between behavioral inhibition and social-effect ERN.

Biol Psychol 2019 Feb 29;141:10-16. Epub 2018 Dec 29.

Department of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology, University of Maryland, 3304 Benjamin Building, College Park, MD, 20742-1131, USA.

Behavioral inhibition (BI) is an early temperamental precursor of anxiety disorders, characterized by withdrawal from novel situations. Some but not all young children with BI go on to display anxiety disorders. Neural correlates, such as frontal alpha asymmetry or event-related negativity (ERN), could moderate the relations between early BI and later anxiety. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.12.014DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Error-related pupil dilation is sensitive to the evaluation of different error types.

Biol Psychol 2019 Feb 29;141:25-34. Epub 2018 Dec 29.

Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Ostenstraße 25, D-85072, Eichstätt, Germany.

Adjusting behavior following errors is essential for successful goal-directed performance. Error-related pupil dilation indicates increased autonomic arousal and has been shown to predict adaptive adjustments of post-error behavior. Because different types of errors may require different behavioral adjustments, we investigated whether this process is also sensitive to the evaluation of different types of errors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.12.013DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Abnormal emotional reactivity in depression: Contrasting theoretical models using neurophysiological data.

Biol Psychol 2019 Feb 29;141:35-43. Epub 2018 Dec 29.

Purdue University, United States.

Several theoretical models of aberrant emotional experiences in depression have been suggested. These models include potentiated reactivity to negatively-valenced stimuli, attenuated reactivity to positively-valenced stimuli, and attenuated emotional reactivity across contexts (termed emotion-context insensitivity). It is unclear if these models apply uniquely to depression or if they can explain other closely related symptoms, such as anxiety or general negative affect. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.12.011DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Skin conductance, heart rate and aggressive behavior type.

Biol Psychol 2019 Feb 22;141:44-51. Epub 2018 Dec 22.

Department of Psychology, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville TX, 77341, United States.

The current study tested the association between physiology and aggressive behavior type in a large sample of University students (N = 509). Measures of aggression were gathered with the Reactive and Proactive Aggression Questionnaire. Analyses used raw aggressive behavior type scores and residualized measures of aggressive behavior type, which account for the overlap between reactive and proactive aggression. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.12.012DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Ethnic differences in stress-induced cortisol responses:Increased risk for depression during pregnancy.

Biol Psychol 2018 Dec 19. Epub 2018 Dec 19.

Department of Psychology, California State University, 1250 Bellflower Blvd, Long Beach, CA 90840-0901, USA. Electronic address:

Few studies have examined individual differences in stress reactivity during pregnancy. The current study examined whether cortisol responses to a laboratory stressor (Trier Social Stress Test; TSST) significantly differed within an ethnically diverse sample of 34 pregnant women (38% Latina, 29% African American) identified to be at low (n = 17; i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.12.005DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Comparing stress and arousal systems in response to different social contexts in children with ASD.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 14;140:119-130. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, United States.

Response to psychological stress can vary based on the extent to which the context is perceived as stressful, especially under different social conditions. The purpose of this preliminary study was to compare physiological stress (cortisol) and regulation (respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA) of 10-12 year old children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD, n = 31) or typical development (TD, n = 25) when exposed to two social stress protocols. The extent to which perceived emotion (affect recognition) and anxiety (state and trait) mediate the stress response was also explored. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.12.010DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Interpersonal-level discrimination indices, sociodemographic factors, and telomere length in African-Americans and Whites.

Biol Psychol 2019 Feb 13;141:1-9. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, National Institute on Aging, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Objective: Studies have linked self-reported discrimination to telomere attrition, a biological marker of accelerated cellular aging. However, it is unknown whether intersections between social categories-race, socioeconomic status (SES), sex, and age-influence the association of varying forms of discrimination with telomere length. We examined these associations in a socioeconomically and racially/ethnically diverse urban sample. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.12.004DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Effects of sex and menstrual cycle phase on cardiac response and alpha- amylase levels in psychosocial stress.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 12;140:141-148. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Laboratory of Social Cognitive Neuroscience, IDOCAL, Department of Psychobiology, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain.

The impact of sex and the menstrual cycle phase on the autonomic response to psychosocial stress remains controversial. This study explored autonomic nervous system activity through salivary alpha-amylase, heart rate, and heart rate variability responses to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) in healthy young people. The sample was composed of 25 men, 26 women in the luteal phase, and 25 women in the follicular phase, from 18 to 25 years of age. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.12.002DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

A potential mechanistic role for neuroinflammation in reward processing impairments in autism spectrum disorder.

Biol Psychol 2018 Dec 12;142:1-12. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, USA; Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, USA; Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, USA. Electronic address:

Accumulating evidence suggests that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may be conceptualized within a framework of reward processing impairments. The Social Motivation Theory of Autism posits that reduced motivation to interact with people and decreased pleasure derived from social interactions may derail typical social development and contribute to the emergence of core social communication deficits in ASD. Neuroinflammation may disrupt the development of mesolimbic dopaminergic systems that are critical for optimal functioning of social reward processing systems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.12.008DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Religious fundamentalism is associated with hyperactive performance monitoring: ERP evidence from correct and erroneous responses.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 12;140:96-107. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Institute of Psychology, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 6, 30-060 Kraków, Poland.

The aim of the current study was to examine whether action monitoring is associated with religious fundamentalism. Participants performed a stop-signal task that required response inhibition to a simple auditory tone. The level of their religious fundamentalism was measured on a scale. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.12.007DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

The capacity and resolution of spatial working memory and its role in the storage of non-spatial features.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 11;140:108-118. Epub 2018 Dec 11.

Department of Psychological Sciences, Birkbeck, University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX, UK. Electronic address:

The question whether the storage of spatial locations and other non-spatial features in visual working memory (WM) is based on shared or separate processes remains unresolved. We recorded contralateral delay activity (CDA) components as on-line electrophysiological markers of WM maintenance in two tasks where observers had to retain either the colors or locations of sample stimuli. CDA components were elicited both in the Color and in the Location task, and increasing WM load had identical effects on CDA amplitudes, suggesting shared underlying mechanisms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.12.006DOI Listing
January 2019
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Quantification of fetal steroids in nails of neonates to quantify prenatal stress and growth restriction.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 10;140:81-85. Epub 2018 Dec 10.

General Pediatrics, Neonatology and Pediatric Cardiology, Heinrich-Heine-University, Moorenstraße 5, 40225, Düsseldorf, Germany. Electronic address:

This study assesses the impact of prenatal stress and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) on the dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosteronesulfate (DHEAS) concentrations in nails of newborns. Nail samples were gained from 56 newborn infants. The concentration of DHEA and DHEAS was measured by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.12.001DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

The P200 predominantly reflects distance-to-norm in face space whereas the N250 reflects activation of identity-specific representations of known faces.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 6;140:86-95. Epub 2018 Dec 6.

Department of General Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, Germany; ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders, School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Australia; Michael Stifel Center Jena for Data-Driven & Simulation Science, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, Germany.

The norm-based face space model (nMDFS) predicts that perceived typicality decreases with distance to the norm. Accordingly, an original face and its corresponding anti-face (deviating in exactly opposite direction from the norm) should inherit equivalent levels of typicality. Similarly, varying distance-to-norm (DTN, in absolute values) should have equivalent effects on typicality for both unfamiliar faces and their anti-faces. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.11.011DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Valence, arousal or both? Shared emotional deficits associated with Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder and Oppositional/Defiant-Conduct Disorder symptoms in school-aged youth.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 6;140:131-140. Epub 2018 Dec 6.

University of Cyprus, Cyprus. Electronic address:

We examined emotional responses in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity and Oppositional Defiant/Conduct Disorder to affective pictures. Eighty seven children (42 female, M = 11.2), with clinical or subclinical symptoms and controls viewed joy, fear, sadness or neutral pictures while heart rate, skin conductance, corrugator and zygomaticus responses were recorded. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.11.007DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read
3.403 Impact Factor

Olfactory change detection.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 27;140:75-80. Epub 2018 Nov 27.

Department of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatic Medicine, Medizinische Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany. Electronic address:

The human olfactory system is characterized by poor temporal and spatial resolution. When determining changes in the environment, humans rather rely on visual than on olfactory information. Against this background, we developed a test in order to investigate the human capacity to detect changes in the olfactory environment and to determine potential modulators of olfactory change detection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.11.010DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Sympathetic responding to unconditioned stimuli predicts subsequent threat expectancy, orienting, and visuocortical bias in human aversive Pavlovian conditioning.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 23;140:64-74. Epub 2018 Nov 23.

Center for the Study of Emotion and Attention, Department of Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA.

Threat expectancy is the ability to predict an aversive outcome. What is not known is the influence of initial threat responding on the acquisition of verbal, attentional and perceptual biases towards conditioned threat cues. This study evaluated the extent to which initial unconditioned stimulus (UCS) responding was related to trial-by-trial self-reported expectancy, sensory processing (visuocortical EEG) and orienting (heart rate deceleration) to threat cues during extinction learning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.11.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6343857PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

The presence of others reduces dyspnea and cortical neural processing of respiratory sensations.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 20;140:48-54. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

Research Group Health Psychology, University of Leuven, Tiensestraat 102, box 3726, 3000 Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address:

Dyspnea is a threatening symptom frequently experienced by patients within social contexts such as in the presence of family members, health professionals, or other patients. However, the effects of social presence on perceived dyspnea remain unknown. Therefore, this study examined the effects of social presence on dyspnea perception and cortical neural processing of respiratory sensations using respiratory-related evoked potentials (RREPs) in the electroencephalogram while additionally investigating the impact of dyspnea-specific fear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.11.004DOI Listing
January 2019
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Neural response to reward and psychosocial risk factors independently predict antenatal depressive symptoms.

Biol Psychol 2018 Nov 20. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

Florida State University, Department of Psychology, 1107 West Call Street, Tallahassee, FL, 32306, United States; Florida State University, Department of Biomedical Sciences, 1115 West Call Street, Tallahassee, FL, 32306, United States.

While psychosocial risk factors for peripartum depression are well-researched, studies on neural risk factors are scarce. Previous studies suggest a blunted neural response to reward may be a biomarker of depression and risk. In a sample of 86 pregnant women, the present study examined whether a reduced Reward Positivity (RewP), an event-related potential (ERP) elicited to feedback indicating monetary reward, relates to greater antenatal depressive symptoms. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03010511183016
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.11.008DOI Listing
November 2018
9 Reads

Touch targeting C-tactile afferent fibers has a unique physiological pattern: A combined electrodermal and facial electromyography study.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 20;140:55-63. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

Department of Behavioral Sciences in Medicine, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

Caress-like touch is thought to rely on C-tactile (CT) fiber signaling. Here, the arousing and emotional effects of CT-optimal touch were assessed via participants' skin conductance level (SCL), facial electromyography (EMG) responses and subjective ratings of pleasantness and intensity. Temporal facial EMG analysis was based on the conduction velocity of CT-fibers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.11.006DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

Reappraisal and suppression emotion-regulation tendencies differentially predict reward-responsivity and psychological well-being.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 20;140:35-47. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

Northwestern University, USA.

Individuals who suppress their emotions experience less positive emotions, worse relationships, and a reduced quality of life whereas those who tend to reappraise show an opposite pattern. Despite this divergent pattern, few have asked how the use of these emotion-regulation strategies relates to reward responsivity. We predicted that elevated suppression would be associated with blunted reward responsivity, whereas reappraisal would be associated with elevated reward responsivity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.11.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6321785PMC
January 2019
9 Reads

Modulation of sustained fear by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the right inferior frontal cortex (rIFC).

Biol Psychol 2018 Nov 26;139:173-177. Epub 2018 Oct 26.

Center of Mental Health, Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, University Hospital of Würzburg, Germany.

Downregulation of emotional responses to threat is strongly associated with frontal cortex functions. Additionally pathological anxiety has been proposed to be associated with the altered frontal control. Understanding the frontal regulation of both initial and sustained fear responses seems to be crucial for further research on the treatment of anxiety disorders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.10.013DOI Listing
November 2018
15 Reads

Frontal EEG theta/beta ratio during mind wandering episodes.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 17;140:19-27. Epub 2018 Nov 17.

Institute of Psychology, Leiden University, Leiden, the Netherlands; Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden, the Netherlands.

Background: In resting-state EEG, the ratio between frontal power in the slow theta frequency band and the fast beta frequency band (the theta/beta ratio, TBR) has previously been negatively related to attentional control. Also, increased theta and reduced beta power were observed during mind wandering (MW) compared to episodes of focused attention. Thus, increased resting-state frontal TBR could be related to MW, suggesting that previously observed relationships between TBR and attentional control could reflect MW episodes increasing the average resting state TBR in people with low attentional control. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.11.003DOI Listing
January 2019
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Shifts in frontal asymmetry underlying impulsive and controlled decision-making.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 16;140:28-34. Epub 2018 Nov 16.

Department of Psychology, The University of Alabama, 505 Hackberry Lane, P.O. Box 870348, Tuscaloosa, AL, 35487-0348, United States. Electronic address:

The frontal cortices are asymmetrically activated in impulsive and inhibitory action. However, no past work has examined shifts in frontal asymmetric activation during active impulse control or risk-taking behavior. The current study examined impulsive and controlled behavior in a behavioral risk-taking task (Balloon Analogue Risk Task) under alcohol or neutral cue exposure while EEG was recorded. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.11.002DOI Listing
January 2019
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Associations between premenstrual syndrome and postpartum depression: A systematic literature review.

Biol Psychol 2018 Nov 16. Epub 2018 Nov 16.

University of Zurich, Institute of Psychology, Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Binzumühlestrasse 14/ 26, 8050, Zürich, Switzerland. Electronic address:

Overlapping symptoms between premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and postpartum depression (PPD) suggest that these disorders may share a common etiology and pathology. Moreover, PMS is a risk factor for the development of PPD. This review aims to synthesize the evidence regarding associations between PMS and PPD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.10.014DOI Listing
November 2018
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Effects of conflict and strategic processing on neural responses to errors in schizophrenia.

Biol Psychol 2019 Jan 11;140:9-18. Epub 2018 Nov 11.

Psychiatry Service, Veterans Affairs San Francisco Healthcare System, 4150 Clement Street, San Francisco, CA, 94121, United States; Department of Psychiatry, Weill Institute for Neurosciences, University of California, San Francisco, 401 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA, 94143, United States. Electronic address:

The error-related negativity (ERN) and error-positivity (Pe) are commonly linked to error-detection and strategic processing. Studies have documented the influence of conflict probability on ERN amplitude. However, the influence of conflict probability on ERN/Pe in schizophrenia, where such components are reduced, is unknown. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03010511183028
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.11.001DOI Listing
January 2019
19 Reads

Visual mismatch negativity and representational momentum: Their possible involvement in the same automatic prediction.

Authors:
Motohiro Kimura

Biol Psychol 2018 Nov 8;139:178-185. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 6, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8566, Japan. Electronic address:

To maintain real-time interaction with a dynamically changing visual object, the brain is thought to automatically predict the next state of the object based on the pattern of its preceding changes. A behavioral phenomenon known as representational momentum (RM: forward displacement of the remembered final state of an object along its preceding change pattern) and an electrophysiological phenomenon known as visual mismatch negativity (VMMN: an event-related brain potential component that is elicited when an object suddenly deviates from its preceding change pattern) have each indicated the existence of such automatic predictive processes. However, there has been no direct investigation of whether or not these phenomena are involved in the same predictive processes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.10.015DOI Listing
November 2018
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Unity and diversity in working memory load: Evidence for the separability of the executive functions updating and inhibition using machine learning.

Biol Psychol 2018 Nov 4;139:163-172. Epub 2018 Nov 4.

Department of Computer Engineering, University of Tübingen, Sand 14, 72076 Tübingen, Germany.

Objective: According to current theoretical models of working memory (WM), executive functions (EFs) like updating, inhibition and shifting play an important role in WM functioning. The models state that EFs highly correlate with each other but also have some individual variance which makes them separable processes. Since this theory has mostly been substantiated with behavioral data like reaction time and the ability to execute a task correctly, the aim of this paper is to find evidence for diversity (unique properties) of the EFs updating and inhibition in neural correlates of EEG data by means of using brain-computer interface (BCI) methods as a research tool. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03010511183030
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.09.008DOI Listing
November 2018
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Individual differences in working memory and general intelligence indexed by P200 and P300: A latent variable model.

Biol Psychol 2018 Nov 28;139:96-105. Epub 2018 Oct 28.

Department of Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, UK. Electronic address:

A robust relationship between working memory (WM) and general intelligence (g) has been well established. Nevertheless, explanations for this relationship in terms of underlying neurocognitive processes are still inadequate. This study addresses this issue using an individual differences approach in which Central Executive System (CES) and Short-Term Storage (STS) components of WM are measured comprehensively and examined for their relationship with g via event-related potentials components (P200 and P300) as mediators. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03010511183026
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.10.009DOI Listing
November 2018
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A neuro-cognitive process model of emotional intelligence.

Biol Psychol 2018 Nov 28;139:131-151. Epub 2018 Oct 28.

Department of Psychiatry, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA.

The construct of emotional intelligence (EI) broadly reflects the idea that individuals differ in their disposition/ability to adaptively generate, recognize, understand, and regulate the emotions of self and others. However, while the neural processes underlying such differences have begun to receive investigation, no brain-based model of EI has yet been proposed to help guide the design and interpretation of neuroimaging research in this area. In this article, we propose a neural model of EI to fill this need. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S03010511183076
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.10.012DOI Listing
November 2018
9 Reads