33 results match your criteria Biological Journal Of The Linnean Society[Journal]

  • Page 1 of 1

Strong, but incomplete, mate choice discrimination between two closely related species of paper wasp.

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2019 Feb 18;126(3):614-622. Epub 2018 Dec 18.

Cornell University Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, Ithaca, NY, USA.

Paper wasps (genus ) are one of the most species-rich genera of social insect. Prior studies have found that male coloration, male colour pattern, territory choice and female caste are potential drivers of intraspecific mate choice in paper wasps. However, there has been no formal assessment of interspecific mate choice in this group; therefore, the mechanism driving diversification in paper wasps remains an open question. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biolinnean/bly191DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6393845PMC
February 2019

Biparental care is predominant and beneficial to parents in the burying beetle (Coleoptera: Silphidae).

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2016 Dec 26;119(4):1082-1088. Epub 2016 May 26.

Department of Genetics, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 30602, USA.

Parenting strategies can be flexible within a species, and may have varying fitness effects. Understanding this flexibility and its fitness consequences is important for understanding why parenting strategies evolve. Here, we investigate the fitness consequences of flexible parenting in the burying beetle , a species known for its advanced provisioning behaviour of regurgitated vertebrate carrion to offspring by both sexes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bij.12830DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5181846PMC
December 2016
7 Reads

Strong between-site variation in New Caledonian crows' use of hook-tool-making materials.

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2016 06 13;118(2):226-232. Epub 2016 Jan 13.

Centre for Biological Diversity School of Biology University of St Andrews St Andrews KY16 9TH UK.

Functional tool use requires the selection of appropriate raw materials. New Caledonian crows are known for their extraordinary tool-making behaviour, including the crafting of hooked stick tools from branched vegetation. We describe a surprisingly strong between-site difference in the plant materials used by wild crows to manufacture these tools: crows at one study site use branches of the non-native shrub , whereas only approximately 7 km away, birds apparently ignore this material in favour of the terminal twigs of an as-yet-unidentified tree species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bij.12757DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5111415PMC
June 2016
1 Read

Temporal and spatial mosaics: deep host association and shallow geographic drivers shape genetic structure in a widespread pinworm, .

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2016 10 26;119(2):397-413. Epub 2016 May 26.

Department of Biology, Museum of Southwestern Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108, USA.

Climate and host demographic cycling often shape both parasite genetic diversity and host distributions, processes that transcend a history of strict host-parasite association. We explored host associations and histories based on an evaluation of mitochondrial and nuclear sequences to reveal the underlying history and genetic structure of a pinworm, , infecting 10 species of western North American chipmunks (Rodentia:, subgenus ). contains divergent lineages influenced by the diversity of hosts and variation across the complex topography of western North America. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5055073PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bij.12833DOI Listing
October 2016
7 Reads

A cautionary note on the use of Ornstein Uhlenbeck models in macroevolutionary studies.

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2016 May 1;118(1):64-77. Epub 2015 Dec 1.

Department of Animal and Plant Sciences University of Sheffield Sheffield S10 2TN UK.

Phylogenetic comparative methods are increasingly used to give new insights into the dynamics of trait evolution in deep time. For continuous traits the core of these methods is a suite of models that attempt to capture evolutionary patterns by extending the Brownian constant variance model. However, the properties of these models are often poorly understood, which can lead to the misinterpretation of results. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bij.12701DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4949538PMC
May 2016
10 Reads

Plasma carotenoid concentrations of incubating American kestrels () show annual, seasonal, and individual variation and explain reproductive outcome.

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2016 Mar 18;117(3):414-421. Epub 2015 Sep 18.

In wild birds, the proximate and ultimate factors that affect circulating carotenoid concentrations remain poorly understood. We studied variation in plasma carotenoid concentrations across several scales: annual, seasonal, pair, territory and individual, and evaluated whether carotenoid levels explained reproductive outcome of wild American kestrels (). We sampled plasma carotenoid concentrations of 99 female and 80 male incubating kestrels from April-June in 2008-2012. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bij.12653DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4811609PMC

Biogeography of "": intensive genetic sampling from the Pecos River 'melting pot' reveals a dynamic history and phylogenetic complexity.

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2016 Feb 26;117(2):264-284. Epub 2015 Sep 26.

Department of Biology and Museum of Southwestern Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131.

Thorough sampling is necessary to delineate lineage diversity for polytypic "species" such as . We conducted extensive mtDNA sampling (cytochrome b and ND4) from the Pecos River, Rio Grande, and South Canadian River, New Mexico. Our study emphasized the Pecos River due to its complex geological history and potential to harbor multiple lineages. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bij.12664DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4742353PMC
February 2016
3 Reads

Have superfetation and matrotrophy facilitated the evolution of larger offspring in poeciliid fishes?

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2015 Dec 6;116(4):787-804. Epub 2015 Sep 6.

Departamento de Ecología y Recursos Naturales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Distrito Federal 04510, México.

Superfetation is the ability of females to simultaneously carry multiple broods of embryos, with each brood at a different developmental stage. Matrotrophy is the post-fertilization maternal provisioning of nutrients to developing embryos throughout gestation. Several studies have demonstrated that, in viviparous fishes, superfetation and matrotrophy have evolved in a correlated way, such that species capable of bearing several simultaneous broods also exhibit advanced degrees of post-fertilization provisioning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bij.12662DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4659389PMC
December 2015
17 Reads

The static allometry of sexual and non-sexual traits in vervet monkeys.

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2015 Mar;114(3):527-537

Department of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201, USA ; Department of Genetics, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa.

Sexual traits vary tremendously in static allometry. This variation may be explained in part by body size-related differences in the strength of selection. We tested this hypothesis with in two populations of vervet monkeys, using estimates of the level of condition dependence for different morphological traits as a proxy for body size-related variation in the strength of selection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bij.12440DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4323093PMC

Canalization of body size matters for lifetime reproductive success of male predatory mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2014 Apr;111(4):889-899

Group of Arthropod Ecology and Behavior, Division of Plant Protection, Department of Crop Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Peter Jordanstrasse 82, 1190 Vienna, Austria.

The adaptive canalization hypothesis predicts that highly fitness-relevant traits are canalized via past selection, resulting in low phenotypic plasticity and high robustness to environmental stress. Accordingly, we hypothesized that the level of phenotypic plasticity of male body size of the predatory mites (low plasticity) and (high plasticity) reflects the effects of body size variation on fitness, especially male lifetime reproductive success (LRS). We first generated small and standard-sized males of and by rearing them to adulthood under limited and ample prey supply, respectively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bij.12235DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4133644PMC
April 2014
1 Read

Functional morphology of the feeding apparatus and evolution of proboscis length in metalmark butterflies (Lepidoptera: Riodinidae).

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2013 Oct;110(2):291-304

Integrative Zoology, University of Vienna, Althanstraße 14, Vienna, 1090, Austria.

An assessment of the anatomical costs of extremely long proboscid mouthparts can contribute to the understanding of the evolution of form and function in the context of insect feeding behaviour. An integrative analysis of expenses relating to an exceptionally long proboscis in butterflies includes all organs involved in fluid feeding, such as the proboscis plus its musculature, sensilla, and food canal, as well as organs for proboscis movements and the suction pump for fluid uptake. In the present study, we report a morphometric comparison of derived long-tongued (proboscis approximately twice as long as the body) and short-tongued Riodinidae (proboscis half as long as the body), which reveals the non-linear scaling relationships of an extremely long proboscis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bij.12134DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4021108PMC
October 2013
3 Reads

Spermatozoa Production by Triploid Males in the New Zealand Freshwater Snail

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2013 Sep;110(1)

Indiana University, Department of Biology, Bloomington, IN.

Asexual lineages derived from dioecious taxa are typically assumed to be all female. Even so, asexual females from a variety of animal taxa occasionally produce males. The existence of these males sets the stage for potential gene flow across asexual lineages as well as between sexual and asexual lineages. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bij.12085DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3844136PMC
September 2013

Take time to smell the frogs: vocal sac glands of reed frogs (Anura: Hyperoliidae) contain species-specific chemical cocktails.

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2013 Dec;110(4)

Department of Integrative Zoology, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14, Wien 1090, Austria.

Males of all reed frog species (Anura: Hyperoliidae) have a prominent, often colourful, gular patch on their vocal sac, which is particularly conspicuous once the vocal sac is inflated. Although the presence, shape, and form of the gular patch are well-known diagnostic characters for these frogs, its function remains unknown. By integrating biochemical and histological methods, we found strong evidence that the gular patch is a gland producing volatile compounds, which might be emitted while calling. Read More

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https://academic.oup.com/biolinnean/article-lookup/doi/10.11
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bij.12167DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3837199PMC
December 2013
5 Reads

Adaptations for nectar-feeding in the mouthparts of long-proboscid flies (Nemestrinidae: ).

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2012 Oct;107(2):414-424

Department of Evolutionary Biology, University of Vienna, Faculty of Life Science, Althanstrasse 14, 1090 Vienna, Austria.

The insects with the longest proboscis in relation to body length are the nectar-feeding Nemestrinidae. These flies represent important pollinators of the South African flora and feature adaptations to particularly long-tubed flowers. The present study examined the morphology of the extremely long and slender mouthparts of Nemestrinidae for the first time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8312.2012.01945.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4021155PMC
October 2012
3 Reads

Ancestral Plasticity and Allometry in Threespine Stickleback Fish Reveal Phenotypes Associated with Derived, Freshwater Ecotypes.

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2012 Mar 10;105(3):573-583. Epub 2012 Jan 10.

Department of Biology, The College of New Jersey, 2000 Pennington Road, Ewing, NJ 08628 USA.

For over a century, evolutionary biologists have debated whether and how phenotypic plasticity impacts the processes of adaptation and diversification. The empirical tests required to resolve these issues have proven elusive, mainly because it requires documentation of ancestral reaction norms, a difficult prospect where many ancestors are either extinct or have evolved. The threespine stickleback radiation is not limited in this regard, making it an ideal system in which to address general questions regarding the role of plasticity in adaptive evolution. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.hb824gd4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3351840PMC
March 2012
4 Reads

Sex-specific developmental plasticity of generalist and specialist predatory mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae) in response to food stress.

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2011 Mar;102(3):650-660

Institute of Plant Protection, Department of Applied Plant Sciences and Plant Biotechnology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, 1190 Vienna, Austria.

We studied developmental plasticity under food stress in three female-biased size dimorphic predatory mite species, Phytoseiulus persimilis, Neoseiulus californicus, and Amblyseius andersoni. All three species prey on two-spotted spider mites but differ in the degree of adaptation to this prey. Phytoseiulus persimilis is a specialized spider mite predator, N. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8312.2010.01593.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3191859PMC
March 2011
2 Reads

On the origin of a domesticated species: Identifying the parent population of Russian silver foxes (Vulpes vulpes).

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2011 May;103(1):168-175

Canid Diversity and Conservation Laboratory, Center for Veterinary Genetics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA.

The foxes at Novosibirsk, Russia, are the only population of domesticated foxes in the world. These domesticated foxes originated from farm-bred silver foxes (Vulpes vulpes), whose genetic source is unknown. In this study we examined the origin of the domesticated strain of foxes and two other farm-bred fox populations (aggressive and unselected) maintained in Novosibirsk. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8312.2011.01629.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3101803PMC
May 2011
6 Reads

On the evolutionary and ontogenetic origins of tool-oriented behaviour in New Caledonian crows ().

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2011 Apr;102(4):870-877

Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK.

New Caledonian crows () are prolific tool users in captivity and in the wild, and have an inherited predisposition to express tool-oriented behaviours. To further understand the evolution and development of tool use, we compared the development of object manipulation in New Caledonian crows and common ravens (), which do not routinely use tools. We found striking qualitative similarities in the ontogeny of tool-oriented behaviour in New Caledonian crows and food-caching behaviour in ravens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8312.2011.01613.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4398869PMC
April 2011
3 Reads

Ancestral populations perform better in a novel environment: domestication of medfly populations from five global regions.

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2011 Feb;102(2):334-345

Department of Agriculture, Crop Production and Rural Environment, University of Thessaly, Phytokou St. N, Ionia, 384 46, Magnisias, Greece.

Geographically isolated populations of a species may differ in several aspects of life-history, morphology, behavior, and genetic structure as a result of adaptation in ecologically diverse habitats. We used a global invasive species, the Mediterranean fruit fly to investigate, whether adaptation to a novel environment differs among geographically isolated populations that vary in major life history components such as life span and reproduction. We used wild populations from five global regions (Kenya, Hawaii, Guatemala, Portugal, and Greece). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8312.2010.01579.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3029021PMC
February 2011
3 Reads

Classification of threespine stickleback along the benthic-limnetic axis.

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2010 Nov;101(3):595-608

Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3211 Providence Dr., Anchorage AK 99508, USA.

Many species of fish display morphological divergence between individuals feeding on macroinvertebrates associated with littoral habitats (benthic morphotypes) and individuals feeding on zooplankton in the limnetic zone (limnetic morphotypes). Threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus L.) have diverged along the benthic-limnetic axis into allopatric morphotypes in thousands of populations and into sympatric species pairs in several lakes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8312.2010.01531.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3017379PMC
November 2010
2 Reads

Lifespan of a Ceratitis fruit fly increases with higher altitude.

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2010 Oct;101(2):345-350

CIRAD, UPR 26, PRAM - BP 214 - 97285 Lamentin Cedex 2 - Martinique, French West Indies, France.

Variation in lifespan may be linked to geographic factors. While latitudinal variation in lifespan has been studied for a number of species, altitude variation has received much less attention, particularly in insects. We measured the lifespan of different populations of the Natal fruit fly Ceratitis rosa along an altitudinal cline. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8312.2010.01497.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2971552PMC
October 2010
1 Read

How to become a yucca moth: Minimal trait evolution needed to establish the obligate pollination mutualism.

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2010 Aug;100(4):847-855

Dept. of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844, USA.

The origins of obligate pollination mutualisms, such as the classic yucca-yucca moth association, appear to require extensive trait evolution and specialization. To understand the extent to which traits truly evolved as part of establishing the mutualistic relationship, rather than being preadaptations, we used an expanded phylogenetic estimate with improved sampling of deeply-diverged groups to perform the first formal reconstruction of trait evolution in pollinating yucca moths and their non-pollinating relatives. Our analysis demonstrates that key life history traits of yucca moths, including larval feeding in the floral ovary and the associated specialized cutting ovipositor, as well as colonization of woody monocots in xeric habitats, may have been established before the obligate mutualism with yuccas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8312.2010.01478.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2922768PMC
August 2010
6 Reads

The development of an Arabidopsis model system for genome-wide analysis of polyploidy effects.

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 2004 Aug;82(4):689-700

Intercollegiate Program in Genetics and Department of Soil and Crop Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-2474, USA.

Arabidopsis is a model system not only for studying numerous aspects of plant biology, but also for understanding mechanisms of the rapid evolutionary process associated with genome duplication and polyploidization. Although in animals interspecific hybrids are often sterile and aneuploids are related to disease syndromes, both Arabidopsis autopolyploids and allopolyploids occur in nature and can be readily formed in the laboratory, providing an attractive system for comparing changes in gene expression and genome structure among relatively 'young' and 'established' or 'ancient' polyploids. Powerful reverse and forward genetics in Arabidopsis offer an exceptional means by which regulatory mechanisms of gene and genome duplication may be revealed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8312.2004.00351.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2136415PMC
August 2004
30 Reads

Variation in female life-history traits among Alaskan populations of the threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus L. (Pisces: Gasterosteidae)

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 1998 Jan;63(1):141-59

Department of Biology, Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts, 01610, U.S.A.

Life-history characteristics of female threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) were examined in 12 populations, 11 freshwater and one anadromous, within the Cook Inlet region of Alaska. Because this area has been deglaciated during the last 20 000 years, the freshwater populations are recently derived, probably independently, from the local marine or anadromous stickleback. Freshwater threespine stickleback have undergone considerable morphological evolution within this region, apparently in response to environmental factors including predatory regimes and environmental productivity. Read More

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January 1998

Body size and feeding specificity: macrolepidoptera in Britain

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 1998 Jan;63(1):121-39

Department of Entomology, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London, SW7 5BD

Within a geographic assemblage, large-bodied species of macrolepidopteran moths tend, on average, to be less host-specific than small-bodied. Five possible explanations for this pattern are identified, based respectively on (i) phylogenetic relationships between species, (ii) latitudinal gradients in body size and feeding specificity, (iii) the relationship between range size and body size, (iv) larger body size as a buffer from environmental variation, and (v) the relationship between endophagous host associations and small body size. These mechanisms are tested using data for British macrolepidoptera and also evaluated using evidence from the literature at large. Read More

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January 1998

Pacific Coast Iris species delimitation using three species definitions: biological, phylogenetic and genealogical

Authors:
Young

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 1998 Jan;63(1):99-120

Section of Ecology and Systematics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, U.S.A.

Morphological characters are used to discriminate the five Oregon species of the Pacific Coast irises (Iris series Californicae). In nearly every case, fixed differences were found between species, revealing that they are good phylogenetic species. However, when the biological species concept is applied, the whole series is found to be one biological species. Read More

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January 1998

The significance of relatedness and gene flow on population genetic structure in the®subsocial spider Eresus cinnaberinus (Araneae: Eresidae)

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 1998 Jan;63(1):81-98

Institut fur Zoologie, Universitat Mainz, Saarstrasse 21, Mainz, D-55099, Germany

Interdemic selection, inbreeding and highly structured populations have been invoked to explain the evolution of cooperative social behaviour in the otherwise solitary and cannibalistic spiders. The family Eresidae consists of species ranging from solitary and intermediate subsocial to species exhibiting fully cooperative social behaviour. In this study we, in a hierarchical analysis, investigated relatedness of putative family clusters, inbreeding and population genetic structure of the subsocial spider Eresus cinnaberinus. Read More

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January 1998

Mitochondrial DNA phylogeny of Brimstone butterflies (genus Gonepteryx) from the Canary Islands and Madeira

Authors:
Brunton Hurst

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 1998 Jan;63(1):69-79

Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge, CB2 3EH

Part of the mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase I gene was sequenced for seven species of Gonepteryx (Pieridae) butterflies. Four of the species are island endemics inhabiting the Canary Island archipelago and Madeira. The remaining three are European and African conspecifics. Read More

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January 1998

Intraspecific variation in laryngeal and ear morphology in male cricket frogs (Acris crepitans)

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 1998 Jan;63(1):51-67

Department of Psychology, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas, 78712, U.S.A.

In a previous report, the authors found significant population variation in the calls of cricket frogs (Acris crepitans) that could not be explained by geographic variation in body size alone. Here we extend that work by investigating intraspecific population variation in the morphological characteristics underlying acoustic communication in male cricket frogs from several sites in Texas. We measured the volumes of laryngeal and auditory components responsible for the generation or reception of species-specific vocalizations in male frogs from eight populations. Read More

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January 1998

The use of hierarchies as organizational models in systematics

Authors:
Knox

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 1998 Jan;63(1):1-49

Herbarium and Department of Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1048, U.S.A.

A hierarchy is an abstract organizational model of inter-level relationships among entities. When isomorphic with nature, hierarchies are useful for organizing and manipulating our knowledge. Hierarchies have been used in biological systematics to represent several distinct, but interrelated, facets of the evolution of life with different organizational properties, and these distinctions have been confused by the rubric «the hierarchy of life». Read More

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January 1998

Xerophytes, xeromorphs and sclerophylls: the history of some concepts in ecology.

Authors:
G Seddon

Biol J Linn Soc Lond 1974 ;6:65-87

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September 1977
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