31 results match your criteria Biological Invasions[Journal]

  • Page 1 of 1

Potential establishment and ecological effects of bighead and silver carp in a productive embayment of the Laurentian Great Lakes.

Biol Invasions 2020 21;22(8):2473-2495. Epub 2020 Apr 21.

Horn Point Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, P.O. Box 775, Cambridge, MD 21613 USA.

Bighead carp . and silver carp (collectively bigheaded carps, BHC) are invasive planktivorous fishes that threaten to enter the Laurentian Great Lakes and disrupt food webs. To assess the likelihood of BHC establishment and their likely effects on the food web of Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron, we developed a multi-species individual-based bioenergetics model that tracks individual bighead and silver carp, four key fish species, and seven prey biomass groups over 50 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-020-02263-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7319282PMC

North American Douglas-fir (. in Europe: establishment and reproduction within new geographic space without consequences for its genetic diversity.

Biol Invasions 2019 8;21(11):3249-3267. Epub 2019 Jul 8.

2Department of Forest Growth and Silviculture, Austrian Research Centre for Forests BFW, Seckendorff-Gudent-Weg 8, 1131 Vienna, Austria.

Genetic admixture and plasticity along with propagule pressure, large seed dispersal distances and fast adaptation support successful establishment and spread of introduced species outside their native range. Consequently, introductions may display climatic niche shifts in the introduced range. Douglas-fir, a controversial forest and ornamental conifer represented by two ecologically different and hybridising varieties, was transferred multiple times outside the native range in North America. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-019-02045-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6936651PMC

The potential of large rafting objects to spread Lessepsian invaders: the case of a detached buoy.

Biol Invasions 2019 29;21(6):1887-1893. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

1Department of Palaeontology, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14, 1090 Vienna, Austria.

A diverse and abundant fouling community dominated by Lessepsian non-indigenous species was identified on a 13.5-m-long steel buoy stranded on the Israeli coast but originating from Port Said, at the Mediterranean entrance of the Suez Canal, Egypt. The molluscan community was sampled quantitatively by scraping. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-019-01972-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6510832PMC
March 2019
3 Reads

Where Vectors Collide: The Importance of Mechanisms Shaping the Realized Niche for Modeling Ranges of Invasive Mosquitoes.

Biol Invasions 2018 Aug 25;20(8):1913-1929. Epub 2018 Jan 25.

School of Biological Sciences, Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois 61790-4120, USA.

The vector mosquitoes (L.), native to Africa, and (Skuse), native to Asia, are widespread invasives whose spatial distributions frequently overlap. Predictive models of their distributions are typically correlative rather than mechanistic, and based on only abiotic variables describing putative environmental requirements despite extensive evidence of competitive interactions leading to displacements. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10530-018-1674-7
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-018-1674-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6133263PMC
August 2018
11 Reads

Historical ecology of a biological invasion: the interplay of eutrophication and pollution determines time lags in establishment and detection.

Biol Invasions 2018 24;20(6):1417-1430. Epub 2017 Nov 24.

1Department of Palaeontology, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14, 1090 Vienna, Austria.

Human disturbance modifies selection regimes, depressing native species fitness and enabling the establishment of non-indigenous species with suitable traits. A major impediment to test the effect of disturbance on invasion success is the lack of long-term data on the history of invasions. Here, we overcome this problem and reconstruct the effect of disturbance on the invasion of the bivalve from sediment cores in the Adriatic Sea. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10530-017-1634-7
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-017-1634-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5959955PMC
November 2017
4 Reads

Changes in habitat associations during range expansion: disentangling the effects of climate and residence time.

Biol Invasions 2018 22;20(5):1147-1159. Epub 2017 Nov 22.

1School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7TJ UK.

The distributions of many species are not at equilibrium with their environment. This includes spreading non-native species and species undergoing range shifts in response to climate change. The habitat associations of these species may change during range expansion as less favourable climatic conditions at expanding range margins constrain species to use only the most favourable habitats, violating the species distribution model assumption of stationarity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-017-1616-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6560651PMC
November 2017
1 Read

Environmental and ecological factors influencing the spillover of the non-native kelp, , from marinas into natural rocky reef communities.

Biol Invasions 2018 10;20(4):1049-1072. Epub 2017 Nov 10.

1Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, The Laboratory, Citadel Hill, Plymouth, PL1 2PB UK.

The non-native kelp, , is considered one of the world's worst invasive species. The northeast Atlantic is a hotspot of invasion, yet there is limited knowledge on its invasion dynamics. In the UK its distribution is strongly associated with artificial structures, primarily marina and harbour pontoons, with relatively few records of on natural substrates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-017-1610-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6560939PMC
November 2017
1 Read

Transformation of detritus by a European native and two invasive alien freshwater decapods.

Biol Invasions 2018 31;20(7):1799-1808. Epub 2018 Jan 31.

2School of Geography, University of Leeds, Leeds, West Yorkshire UK.

Invasive alien species have the potential to alter biodiversity and ecosystem processes. In freshwaters, detritus decomposition is a major ecosystem service but it remains uncertain whether invasive alien decapods process detritus differently to natives. This study examined leaf litter processing, and cascading effects on biofilms, by the European native white clawed crayfish () compared to two invasive alien decapod species: the American signal crayfish () and the Chinese mitten crab (). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-018-1661-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6445490PMC
January 2018
2 Reads

Biological invasions increase the richness of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from a Hawaiian subtropical ecosystem.

Biol Invasions 2018 21;20(9):2421-2437. Epub 2018 Mar 21.

2Department of Botany, University of Hawaii Manoa, 3190 Maile Way Room 101, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA.

Biological invasions can have various impacts on the diversity of important microbial mutualists such as mycorrhizal fungi, but few studies have tested whether the effects of invasions on mycorrhizal diversity are consistent across spatial gradients. Furthermore, few of these studies have taken place in tropical ecosystems that experience an inordinate rate of invasions into native habitats. Here, we examined the effects of plant invasions dominated by non-native tree species on the diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in Hawaii. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-018-1710-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6417436PMC
March 2018
1 Read

Effects of admixture in native and invasive populations of .

Biol Invasions 2018 21;20(9):2381-2393. Epub 2018 Mar 21.

4Department of Terrestrial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Droevendaalsesteeg 10, 6708 PB Wageningen, Netherlands.

Intraspecific hybridization between diverged populations can enhance fitness via various genetic mechanisms. The benefits of such admixture have been proposed to be particularly relevant in biological invasions, when invasive populations originating from different source populations are found sympatrically. However, it remains poorly understood if admixture is an important contributor to plant invasive success and how admixture effects compare between invasive and native ranges. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-018-1707-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6417435PMC
March 2018
2 Reads

Increase in density of genetically diverse invasive Asian shore crab () populations in the Gulf of Maine.

Biol Invasions 2017 Apr;19(4):1153-1168

Bates College, Lewiston, ME 04240, USA.

, the Asian shore crab, has rapidly replaced , the green crab, as the most abundant crab on rocky shores in the northwest Atlantic since its introduction to the United States (USA) in 1988. The northern edge of this progressing invasion is the Gulf of Maine, where Asian shore crabs are only abundant in the south. We compared population densities to those from published 2005 surveys and quantified genetic variation using the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10530-016-1304-1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-016-1304-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5597051PMC
April 2017
8 Reads

Distribution of the invasive bryozoan in Great Britain and Ireland and a review of its European distribution.

Biol Invasions 2017 28;19(8):2225-2235. Epub 2017 Apr 28.

The Environmental Research Institute, North Highland College, The University of the Highlands and Islands, Ormlie Rd, Thurso, KW14 7EE Scotland, UK.

The bryozoan Ortmann (1890) was first recorded in European waters in 2010 and has since been reported from further locations in Great Britain (GB) and Norway. This paper provides a new earliest European record for the species from 2009, a first record from Ireland and presence and absence records from a total of 231 marinas and harbours across GB, Ireland, the Isle of Man, France and Portugal. This species is typically associated with human activity, including commercial and recreational vessels, aquaculture equipment, and both wave and tidal energy devices. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10530-017-1440-2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-017-1440-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5529492PMC
April 2017
25 Reads

Towards the genetic control of invasive species.

Biol Invasions 2017 21;19(6):1683-1703. Epub 2017 Feb 21.

The Pirbright Institute, Pirbright, UK.

Invasive species remain one of the greatest threats to global biodiversity. Their control would be enhanced through the development of more effective and sustainable pest management strategies. Recently, a novel form of genetic pest management (GPM) has been developed in which the mating behaviour of insect pests is exploited to introduce genetically engineered DNA sequences into wild conspecific populations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-017-1384-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5446844PMC
February 2017
4 Reads

Size matters: predation of fish eggs and larvae by native and invasive amphipods.

Authors:
N G Taylor A M Dunn

Biol Invasions 2017 8;19(1):89-107. Epub 2016 Sep 8.

School of Biology and water@leeds, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT UK.

Invasive predators can have dramatic impacts on invaded communities. Extreme declines in macroinvertebrate populations often follow killer shrimp () invasions. There are concerns over similar impacts on fish through predation of eggs and larvae, but these remain poorly quantified. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-016-1265-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7175601PMC
September 2016

Awareness, concern and willingness to adopt biosecure behaviours: public perceptions of invasive tree pests and pathogens in the UK.

Biol Invasions 2017 19;19(9):2567-2582. Epub 2017 Jun 19.

London, UK.

The growing incidence of invasive tree pest and disease outbreaks is recognised as an increasing threat to ecosystem services and human wellbeing. Linked to global trade, human movement and climate change, a number of outbreaks have attracted high public and media attention. However, there is surprisingly little evidence characterising the nature of public attentiveness to these events, nor how publics might respond to evolving outbreaks and the management actions taken. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-017-1467-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7082003PMC

Modelling the spread and control of in the early stages of invasion in Apulia, Italy.

Biol Invasions 2017 21;19(6):1825-1837. Epub 2017 Feb 21.

4Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0QB UK.

is an important plant pathogen that attacks several plants of economic importance. Once restricted to the Americas, the bacterium, which causes olive quick decline syndrome, was discovered near Lecce, Italy in 2013. Since the initial outbreak, it has invaded 23,000 ha of olives in the Apulian Region, southern Italy, and is of great concern throughout Mediterranean basin. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-017-1393-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6979717PMC
February 2017

Are genetic databases sufficiently populated to detect non-indigenous species?

Biol Invasions 2016 5;18(7):1911-1922. Epub 2016 Apr 5.

2Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON N9B 3P4 Canada.

Correct species identifications are of tremendous importance for invasion ecology, as mistakes could lead to misdirecting limited resources against harmless species or inaction against problematic ones. DNA barcoding is becoming a promising and reliable tool for species identifications, however the efficacy of such molecular taxonomy depends on gene region(s) that provide a unique sequence to differentiate among species and on availability of reference sequences in existing genetic databases. Here, we assembled a list of aquatic and terrestrial non-indigenous species (NIS) and checked two leading genetic databases for corresponding sequences of six genome regions used for DNA barcoding. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-016-1134-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7175672PMC

The compensatory potential of increased immigration following intensive American mink population control is diluted by male-biased dispersal.

Biol Invasions 2016 1;18(10):3047-3061. Epub 2016 Jul 1.

1School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, AB24 2TZ UK.

Attempts to mitigate the impact of invasive species on native ecosystems increasingly target large land masses where control, rather than eradication, is the management objective. Depressing numbers of invasive species to a level where their impact on native biodiversity is tolerable requires overcoming the impact of compensatory immigration from non-controlled portions of the landscape. Because of the expected scale-dependency of dispersal, the overall size of invasive species management areas relative to the dispersal ability of the controlled species will determine the size of any effectively conserved core area unaffected by immigration from surrounding areas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-016-1199-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7175656PMC

Extinction of an introduced warm-climate alien species, , by extreme weather events.

Biol Invasions 2015;17(11):3183-3195. Epub 2015 Jul 16.

School of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA UK.

Invasive, non-native species represent a major threat to biodiversity worldwide. The African amphibian is widely regarded as an invasive species and a threat to local faunas. Populations originating at the Western Cape, South Africa, have been introduced on four continents, mostly in areas with a similar Mediterranean climate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-015-0944-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4581400PMC
July 2015
2 Reads

Invaders in hot water: a simple decontamination method to prevent the accidental spread of aquatic invasive non-native species.

Biol Invasions 2015;17(8):2287-2297. Epub 2015 Mar 26.

Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), Barrack Road, The Nothe, Weymouth, Dorset, DT4 8UB UK.

Watersports equipment can act as a vector for the introduction and spread of invasive non native species (INNS) in freshwater environments. To support advice given to recreational water users under the UK Government's biosecurity campaign and ensure its effectiveness at killing a range of aquatic INNS, we conducted a survival experiment on seven INNS which pose a high risk to UK freshwaters. The efficacy of exposure to hot water (45 °C, 15 min) was tested as a method by which waters users could 'clean' their equipment and was compared to drying and a control group (no treatment). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-015-0875-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4544425PMC
March 2015
4 Reads

Contrasting the effects of environment, dispersal and biotic interactions to explain the distribution of invasive plants in alpine communities.

Biol Invasions 2015 May;17(5):1407-1423

Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Laboratoire d'Ecologie Alpine (LECA), F-38000 Grenoble, France ; CNRS, Laboratoire d'Ecologie Alpine (LECA), F-38000 Grenoble, France.

Despite considerable efforts devoted to investigate the community assembly processes driving plant invasions, few general conclusions have been drawn so far. Three main processes, generally acting as successive filters, are thought to be of prime importance. The invader has to disperse (1 filter) into a suitable environment (2 filter) and succeed in establishing in recipient communities through competitive interactions (3 filter) using two strategies: competition avoidance by the use of different resources (), or of native species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-014-0803-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4538782PMC
May 2015
6 Reads

Ongoing expansion of the worldwide invader (Ascidiacea) in the Mediterranean Sea: high plasticity of its biological cycle promotes establishment in warm waters.

Biol Invasions 2015;17(7):2075-2085. Epub 2015 Mar 4.

Center for Advanced Studies of Blanes (CEAB-CSIC), Acces Cala S Francesc 14, 17300 Blanes, Girona Spain.

Non-indigenous ascidians are of particular concern to aquaculture industry and, paradoxically, the activities associated with it represent an important way to translocate these species worldwide. In 2012 a non-indigenous ascidian was found covering the oyster crops in the Ebro Delta (Western Mediterranean). We have identified the ascidian genetically and morphologically as Kott, 2002. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-015-0861-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4513794PMC
March 2015
2 Reads

Harbor networks as introduction gateways: contrasting distribution patterns of native and introduced ascidians.

Biol Invasions 2015;17(6):1623-1638. Epub 2014 Dec 10.

Center for Advanced Studies of Blanes (CEAB-CSIC), Accés Cala S. Francesc 14, 17300 Blanes, Girona, Spain.

Harbors and marinas are well known gateways for species introductions in marine environments but little work has been done to ascertain relationships between species diversity, harbor type, and geographic distance to uncover patterns of secondary spread. Here, we sampled ascidians from 32 harbors along ca. 300 km of the NW Mediterranean coast and investigated patterns of distribution and spread related to harbor type (marina, fishing, commercial) and geographic location using multivariate techniques. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-014-0821-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4498637PMC
December 2014
4 Reads

Contributions of temporal segregation, oviposition choice, and non-additive effects of competitors to invasion success of (Diptera: Culicidae) in North America.

Biol Invasions 2015 Jun;17(6):1669-1681

School of Biological Sciences, Illinois State University, Normal, IL, USA.

The mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) has spread rapidly through North America since its introduction in the 1990s. The mechanisms underlying its establishment in container communities occupied by competitors and are unclear. Possibilities include (A) temporal separation of from other , (B) oviposition avoidance by of sites containing heterospecific larvae, and (C) non-additive competitive effects in assemblages of multiple . Read More

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http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s10530-014-0824
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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10530-014-0824-9
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-014-0824-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4474485PMC
June 2015
16 Reads

Domestic ships as a potential pathway of nonindigenous species from the Saint Lawrence River to the Great Lakes.

Biol Invasions 2014 13;16(4):793-801. Epub 2013 Sep 13.

1Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON N9B 3P4 Canada.

Ballast water moved by transoceanic vessels has been recognized globally as a predominant vector for the introduction of aquatic nonindigenous species (NIS). In contrast, domestic ships operating within confined geographic areas have been viewed as low risk for invasions, and are exempt from regulation in consequence. We examined if the St. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-013-0537-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6568021PMC
September 2013

Combining field epidemiological information and genetic data to comprehensively reconstruct the invasion history and the microevolution of the sudden oak death agent (Stramenopila: Oomycetes) in California.

Biol Invasions 2013 29;15:2281-2297. Epub 2013 May 29.

Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, 130 Mulford Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-3114 USA.

Understanding the migration patterns of invasive organisms is of paramount importance to predict and prevent their further spread. Previous attempts at reconstructing the entire history of the sudden oak death (SOD) epidemic in California were limited by: (1) incomplete sampling; (2) the inability to include infestations caused by a single genotype of the pathogen; (3) collapsing of non-spatially contiguous yet genetically similar samples into large meta-samples that confounded the coalescent analyses. Here, we employ an intensive sampling coverage of 832 isolates of (the causative agent of SOD) from 60 California forests, genotyped at nine microsatellite loci, to reconstruct its invasion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-013-0453-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3782357PMC
May 2013
13 Reads

Initial epidemic area is strongly associated with the yearly extent of soybean rust spread in North America.

Biol Invasions 2013 Jul;15(7):1431-1438

Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, 2082 Cordley Hall, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-2902, USA.

Hosts of soybean rust () are sensitive to low temperatures, limiting this obligate parasite in the United States to overwintering sites in a restricted area along the Gulf Coast. This temperature sensitivity of soybean rust hosts allowed us to study spatial spread of epidemic invasions over similar territory for seven sequential years, 2005-2011. The epidemic front expanded slowly from early April through July, with the majority of expansion occurring from August through November. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-012-0381-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3706196PMC
July 2013
19 Reads

Invasive leaf resources alleviate density dependence in the invasive mosquito, Aedes albopictus.

Biol Invasions 2010 Jul 19;12(7):2319-2328. Epub 2009 Nov 19.

Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Oklahoma State University, 127 Noble Research Center, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA.

Interactions between invasive species can have important consequences for the speed and impact of biological invasions. Containers occupied by the invasive mosquito, Aedes albopictus Skuse, may be sensitive to invasive plants whose leaves fall into this larval habitat. To examine the potential for interactions between invasive leaf species and larval A. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-009-9646-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3331710PMC
July 2010
2 Reads

Ecological impacts of non-native invertebrates and fungi on terrestrial ecosystems.

Biol Invasions 2009 15;11(1):1-3. Epub 2008 Jul 15.

2Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, P.O. Box 4000, 1350 Regent Street, Fredericton, NB Canada E3B 5P7.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-008-9326-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7088337PMC

Biological Invasions Across Spatial Scales: Intercontinental, Regional, and Local Dispersal of Cladoceran Zooplankton.

Biol Invasions 2006 ;8(3):459-473

Department of Biology, Southwest Missouri State University, 901 S. National Avenue, Springfield, MO 65804 USA.

The frequency of dispersal of invertebrates among lakes depends upon perspective and spatial scale. Effective passive dispersal requires both the transport of propagules and the establishment of populations large enough to be detected. At a global scale, biogeographic patterns of cladoceran zooplankton species suggest that effective dispersal among continents was originally rare, but greatly increased in the past century with expanded commerce. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10530-005-6410-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7088012PMC
January 2006

Escape from gregarine parasites affects the competitive interactions of an invasive mosquito.

Biol Invasions 2002 Sep;4(3):283-297

Behavior, Ecology, Evolution, & Systematics Section, Department of Biological Sciences, Illinois State University, Normal, IL 61790-4120, USA.

When a species is introduced into a new location, it may escape, at least temporarily, from its natural enemies. In field surveys, we found that when the exotic, invasive mosquito, Aedes albopictus, invades new sites, it initially experiences reduced infection by its gut parasite, Ascogregarina taiwanensis. To determine the effect of this escape from parasitism on the competitive ability of A. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1020933705556DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2748405PMC
September 2002
2 Reads
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