19 results match your criteria Biological Conservation[Journal]

  • Page 1 of 1

Assessing threats of non-native species to native freshwater biodiversity: Conservation priorities for the United States.

Biol Conserv 2018 Aug;224:199-208

National Exposure Research Laboratory, US Environmental Research Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, United States.

Non-native species pose one of the greatest threats to native biodiversity, and can have severe negative impacts in freshwater ecosystems. Identifying regions of spatial overlap between high freshwater biodiversity and high invasion pressure may thus better inform the prioritization of freshwater conservation efforts. We employ geospatial analysis of species distribution data to investigate the potential threat of non-native species to aquatic animal taxa across the continental United States. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2018.05.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6145479PMC

Protected area connectivity: Shortfalls in global targets and country-level priorities.

Biol Conserv 2018 Mar;219:53-67

European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Directorate D - Sustainable Resources, Via E. Fermi 2749, I-21027 Ispra, VA, Italy.

Connectivity of protected areas (PAs) is crucial for meeting their conservation goals. We provide the first global evaluation of countries' progress towards Aichi Target 11 of the Convention on Biological Diversity that is to have at least 17% of the land covered by well-connected PA systems by 2020. We quantify how well the terrestrial PA systems of countries are designed to promote connectivity, using the Protected Connected (ProtConn) indicator. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2017.12.020DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5825384PMC
March 2018
1 Read

Quantifying the expected value of uncertain management choices for over-abundant Greylag Geese.

Biol Conserv 2017 Oct;214:147-155

Biological and Environmental Science, School of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4LA, UK.

In many parts of the world, conservation successes or global anthropogenic changes have led to increasing native species populations that then compete with human resource use. In the Orkney Islands, Scotland, a 60-fold increase in Greylag Goose numbers over 24 years has led to agricultural damages and culling attempts that have failed to prevent population increase. To address uncertainty about why populations have increased, we combined empirical modelling of possible drivers of Greylag Goose population change with expert-elicited benefits of alternative management actions to identify whether to learn versus act immediately to reduce damages by geese. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2017.08.013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5687450PMC
October 2017
1 Read

Wartime scars or reservoirs of biodiversity? The value of bomb crater ponds in aquatic conservation.

Biol Conserv 2017 May;209:253-262

WasserCluster Lunz, Dr. Carl Kupelwieser Promenade 5, AT-3293 Lunz am See, Austria.

Considering the ongoing loss of aquatic habitats, anthropogenic ponds are gaining importance as substitute habitats. It is therefore important to assess their functioning in comparison to their natural precursors. Here we assess the biodiversity value of sodic bomb crater ponds by comparing their gamma diversity to that of natural reference habitats, astatic soda pans, and assess their importance on the landscape level by studying alpha and beta diversity. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2017.02.025DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5438044PMC
May 2017
6 Reads

The impact of logging roads on dung beetle assemblages in a tropical rainforest reserve.

Biol Conserv 2017 Jan;205:85-92

School of Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK.

The demand for timber products is facilitating the degradation and opening up of large areas of intact habitats rich in biodiversity. Logging creates an extensive network of access roads within the forest, yet these are commonly ignored or excluded when assessing impacts of logging on forest biodiversity. Here we determine the impact of these roads on the overall condition of selectively logged forests in Borneo, Southeast Asia. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2016.11.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5239768PMC
January 2017
5 Reads

Can survival analyses detect hunting pressure in a highly connected species? Lessons from straw-coloured fruit bats.

Biol Conserv 2016 Aug;200:131-139

Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0ES, UK; Institute of Zoology, Zoological Society of London, Regent's Park, London NW1 4RY, UK; Environmental Futures Research Institute, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland 4111, Australia.

Animal behaviour, social structure and population dynamics affect community structure, interspecific interactions, and a species' resilience to harvesting. Building on new life history information for the straw-coloured fruit bat () from multiple localities across Africa, we used survival analyses based on tooth-cementum annuli data to test alternative hypotheses relating to hunting pressure, demography and population connectivity. The estimated annual survival probability across Africa was high (≥ 0. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2016.06.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4965785PMC
August 2016
4 Reads

Similar biodiversity of ectomycorrhizal fungi in set-aside plantations and ancient old-growth broadleaved forests.

Biol Conserv 2016 Feb;194:71-79

Centre for Biological Sciences, Institute for Life Sciences Building 85, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK.

Setting aside overmature planted forests is currently seen as an option for preserving species associated with old-growth forests, such as those with dispersal limitation. Few data exist, however, on the utility of set-aside plantations for this purpose, or the value of this habitat type for biodiversity relative to old-growth semi-natural ecosystems. Here, we evaluate the contribution of forest type relative to habitat characteristics in determining species richness and composition in seven forest blocks, each containing an ancient old-growth stand (> 1000 yrs) paired with a set-aside even-aged planted stand (ca. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2015.12.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4730558PMC
February 2016
9 Reads

Shifts in indigenous culture relate to forest tree diversity: a case study from the Tsimane', Bolivian Amazon.

Biol Conserv 2015 Jun;186:251-259

ICREA and Institut de Ciència i Tecnologia Ambientals, Edifici Z, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Spain.

Understanding how indigenous peoples' management practices relate to biological diversity requires addressing contemporary changes in indigenous peoples' way of life. This study explores the association between cultural change among a Bolivian Amazonian indigenous group, the Tsimane', and tree diversity in forests surrounding their villages. We interviewed 86 informants in six villages about their level of attachment to traditional Tsimane' values, our proxy for cultural change. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2015.03.026DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4471141PMC
June 2015
1 Read

Age and residency duration of loggerhead turtles at a North Pacific bycatch hotspot using skeletochronology.

Biol Conserv 2015 Jun;186:134-142

Division of Biological Sciences, Ecology, Behavior, and Evolution Section, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0116, USA.

For migratory marine animals, like sea turtles, effective conservation can be challenging because key demographic information such as duration of life stages and exposure to spatially explicit threats in different habitats are often unknown. In the eastern Pacific near the Baja California Peninsula (BCP), Mexico, tens of thousands of endangered North Pacific loggerhead sea turtles () concentrate at a foraging area known to have high rates of fishery bycatch. Because stage survivorship of loggerheads in the BCP will vary significantly depending on the number of years spent in this region, we applied skeletochronology to empirically estimate residency duration in this loggerhead hotspot. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2015.03.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4384431PMC
June 2015
1 Read

Chytrid fungus infections in laboratory and introduced populations: assessing the risks for U.K. native amphibians.

Biol Conserv 2015 Apr;184:380-388

European Xenopus Resource Centre, School of Biological Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 2DT, UK.

The chytrid fungus () is notorious amongst current conservation biology challenges, responsible for mass mortality and extinction of amphibian species. World trade in amphibians is implicated in global dissemination. Exports of South African have led to establishment of this invasive species on four continents. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2015.01.034DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4380136PMC
April 2015
5 Reads

Declining Use of Wild Resources by Indigenous Peoples of the Ecuadorian Amazon.

Biol Conserv 2015 Feb;182:270-277

Carolina Population Center, Campus Box 8120, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27516, USA,

Wild product harvesting by forest-dwelling peoples, including hunting, fishing, forest product collection and timber harvesting, is believed to be a major threat to the biodiversity of tropical forests worldwide. Despite this threat, few studies have attempted to quantify these activities across time or across large spatial scales. We use a unique longitudinal household survey (n = 480) to describe changes in these activities over time in 32 indigenous communities from five ethnicities in the northern Ecuadorian Amazon. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2014.12.022DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4302340PMC
February 2015
1 Read

Out of sight but not out of harm's way: Human disturbance reduces reproductive success of a cavity-nesting seabird.

Biol Conserv 2014 Jun;174(100):127-133

Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK.

While negative effects of human disturbance on animals living above the ground have been widely reported, few studies have considered effects on animals occupying cavities or burrows underground. It is generally assumed that, in the absence of direct visual contact, such species are less vulnerable to disturbance. Seabird colonies can support large populations of burrow- and cavity-nesting species and attract increasing numbers of tourists. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2014.03.020DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4039997PMC
June 2014
1 Read

The identity of crop pollinators helps target conservation for improved ecosystem services.

Biol Conserv 2014 Jan;169(100):128-135

Centre for Agri-Environmental Research, School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, University of Reading, UK.

Insect pollinated mass flowering crops are becoming more widespread and there is a need to understand which insects are primarily responsible for the pollination of these crops so conservation measures can be appropriately targeted in the face of pollinator declines. This study used field surveys in conjunction with cage manipulations to identify the relative contributions of different pollinator taxa to the pollination of two widespread flowering crops, field beans and oilseed rape. Flower visiting pollinator communities observed in the field were distinct for each crop; while field beans were visited primarily by a few bumblebee species, multiple pollinator taxa visited oilseed, and the composition of this pollinator community was highly variable spatially and temporally. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2013.11.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3969722PMC
January 2014
3 Reads

Space and habitat use by wild Bactrian camels in the Transaltai Gobi of southern Mongolia.

Biol Conserv 2014 Jan;169(100):311-318

Denver Zoological Foundation, 2300 Steele St., Denver, CO 80205, USA.

Wild Bactrian camels () are listed as Critically Endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and only persist in some of the most remote locations in northern China and southern Mongolia. Although the species has been recognized as an umbrella species for the fragile central Asian desert ecosystem and has been high on the conservation agenda, little is known about the species' habitat requirements, with most information coming from anecdotal sightings and descriptive studies. We compiled the only available telemetry data from wild camels worldwide. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2013.11.033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3969720PMC
January 2014
1 Read

Predicted and observed mortality from vector-borne disease in small songbirds.

Biol Conserv 2013 Sep;165:79-85

University of California, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Santa Cruz, CA, 95060, USA.

Numerous diseases of wildlife have recently emerged due to trade and travel. However, the impact of disease on wild animal populations has been notoriously difficult to detect and demonstrate, due to problems of attribution and the rapid disappearance of bodies after death. Determining the magnitude of avian mortality from West Nile virus (WNV) is emblematic of these challenges. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2013.05.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3743256PMC
September 2013
8 Reads

Uncovering the fruit bat bushmeat commodity chain and the true extent of fruit bat hunting in Ghana, West Africa.

Biol Conserv 2011 Dec;144(12):3000-3008

Cambridge Infectious Disease Consortium, Dept. of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ES, UK.

Harvesting, consumption and trade of bushmeat are important causes of both biodiversity loss and potential zoonotic disease emergence. In order to identify possible ways to mitigate these threats, it is essential to improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which bushmeat gets from the site of capture to the consumer's table. In this paper we highlight the previously unrecognized scale of hunting of the African straw-colored fruit bat, Eidolon helvum, a species which is important in both ecological and public health contexts, and describe the commodity chain in southern Ghana for its trade. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2011.09.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3323830PMC
December 2011

Connectivity of the Asiatic wild ass population in the Mongolian Gobi.

Biol Conserv 2011 Feb;144(2):920-929

Research Institute of Wildlife Ecology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria.

Long-distance migrations of wildlife have been identified as important biological phenomena, but their conservation remains a major challenge. The Mongolian Gobi is one of the last refuges for the Asiatic wild ass (Equus hemionus) and other threatened migratory mammals. Using historic and current distribution ranges, population genetics, and telemetry data we assessed the connectivity of the wild ass population in the context of natural and anthropogenic landscape features and the existing network of protected areas. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2010.12.013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3040789PMC
February 2011
1 Read

Genetic Introgression and the Survival of Florida Panther Kittens.

Biol Conserv 2010 Nov;143(11):2789-2796

Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, 110 Newins-Ziegler Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0430.

Estimates of survival for the young of a species are critical for population models. These models can often be improved by determining the effects of management actions and population abundance on this demographic parameter. We used multiple sources of data collected during 1982-2008 and a live recapture-dead recovery modeling framework to estimate and model survival of Florida panther (Puma concolor coryi) kittens (age 0 - 1 year). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2010.07.028DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2989677PMC
November 2010
4 Reads

Removal of nonnative fish results in population expansion of a declining amphibian (mountain yellow-legged frog, Rana muscosa).

Biol Conserv 2007 Feb;135(1):11-20

Sierra Nevada Aquatic Research Laboratory, University of California, HCR 79, Box 198 Mammoth Lakes, CA 93546, USA.

The mountain yellow-legged frog (Rana muscosa) was once a common inhabitant of the Sierra Nevada (California, USA), but has declined precipitously during the past century due in part to the introduction of nonnative fish into naturally fishless habitats. The objectives of the current study were to describe (1) the effect of fish removal from three lakes (located in two watersheds) on the small, remnant R. muscosa populations inhabiting those lakes, and (2) the initial development of metapopulation structure in each watershed as R. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2006.09.013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1839007PMC
February 2007
  • Page 1 of 1