7 results match your criteria Biogeochemistry[Journal]

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Spatial variability of organic matter properties determines methane fluxes in a tropical forested peatland.

Biogeochemistry 2019 26;142(2):231-245. Epub 2018 Nov 26.

1School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD UK.

Tropical peatland ecosystems are a significant component of the global carbon cycle and feature a range of distinct vegetation types, but the extent of links between contrasting plant species, peat biogeochemistry and greenhouse gas fluxes remains unclear. Here we assessed how vegetation affects small scale variation of tropical peatland carbon dynamics by quantifying in situ greenhouse gas emissions over 1 month using the closed chamber technique, and peat organic matter properties using Rock-Eval 6 pyrolysis within the rooting zones of canopy palms and broadleaved evergreen trees. Mean methane fluxes ranged from 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10533-018-0531-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6383829PMC
November 2018

Arsenic and high affinity phosphate uptake gene distribution in shallow submarine hydrothermal sediments.

Biogeochemistry 2018 20;141(1):41-62. Epub 2018 Sep 20.

5Department of Geology and Geoenvironment, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis Zographou, 157 84 Athens, Greece.

The toxicity of arsenic (As) towards life on Earth is apparent in the dense distribution of genes associated with As detoxification across the tree of life. The ability to defend against As is particularly vital for survival in As-rich shallow submarine hydrothermal ecosystems along the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA), where life is exposed to hydrothermal fluids containing up to 3000 times more As than present in seawater. We propose that the removal of dissolved As and phosphorus (P) by sulfide and Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxide minerals during sediment-seawater interaction, produces nutrient-deficient porewaters containing < 2. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10533-018-0500-8
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10533-018-0500-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6413627PMC
September 2018
2 Reads

The impact of flooding on aquatic ecosystem services.

Biogeochemistry 2018 11;141(3):439-461. Epub 2018 May 11.

11Department of Biology, Trent University, Peterborough, ON Canada.

Flooding is a major disturbance that impacts aquatic ecosystems and the ecosystem services that they provide. Predicted increases in global flood risk due to land use change and water cycle intensification will likely only increase the frequency and severity of these impacts. Extreme flooding events can cause loss of life and significant destruction to property and infrastructure, effects that are easily recognized and frequently reported in the media. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10533-018-0449-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404734PMC

Rapid warming and salinity changes in the Gulf of Maine alter surface ocean carbonate parameters and hide ocean acidification.

Biogeochemistry 2018 12;141(3):401-418. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

Ocean Process Analysis Laboratory, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 USA.

A profound warming event in the Gulf of Maine during the last decade has caused sea surface temperatures to rise to levels exceeding any earlier observations recorded in the region over the last 150 years. This event dramatically affected CO solubility and, in turn, the status of the sea surface carbonate system. When combined with the concomitant increase in sea surface salinity and assumed rapid equilibration of carbon dioxide across the air sea interface, thermodynamic forcing partially mitigated the effects of ocean acidification for pH, while raising the saturation index of aragonite ( ) by an average of 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10533-018-0505-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404729PMC
October 2018

Alternative futures of dissolved inorganic nitrogen export from the Mississippi River Basin: influence of crop management, atmospheric deposition, and population growth.

Biogeochemistry 2017 May;133(3):263-277

Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Western Ecology Division, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR, USA.

Nitrogen (N) export from the Mississippi River Basin contributes to seasonal hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). We explored monthly dissolved inorganic N (DIN) export to the GOM for a historical year (2002) and two future scenarios (year 2022) by linking macroeonomic energy, agriculture market, air quality, and agriculture land management models to a DIN export model. Future scenarios considered policies aimed at encouraging bioenergy crop production and reducing atmospheric N-emissions, as well as the effect of population growth and the states' infrastructure plans on sewage fluxes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10533-017-0331-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6260936PMC
May 2017
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Contribution of carbonate weathering to the CO efflux from temperate forest soils.

Biogeochemistry 2015;124(1-3):273-290. Epub 2015 Apr 14.

Department of Microbiology and Ecosystem Science, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Temperate forests provide favorable conditions for carbonate bedrock weathering as the soil CO partial pressure is high and soil water is regularly available. As a result of weathering, abiotic CO can be released and contribute to the soil CO efflux. We used the distinct isotopic signature of the abiotic CO to estimate its contribution to the total soil CO efflux. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10533-015-0097-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4512732PMC
April 2015
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Recovery of ecosystem carbon fluxes and storage from herbivory.

Biogeochemistry 2011;106(3):357-370. Epub 2011 Jan 7.

School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Building, St. Machar Drive, Aberdeen, AB24 3UU UK.

The carbon (C) sink strength of arctic tundra is under pressure from increasing populations of arctic breeding geese. In this study we examined how CO and CH fluxes, plant biomass and soil C responded to the removal of vertebrate herbivores in a high arctic wet moss meadow that has been intensively used by barnacle geese () for ca. 20 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10533-010-9516-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4459552PMC
January 2011
7 Reads
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