51 results match your criteria Bioelectronic medicine[Journal]


Parameters matter: modulating cytokines using nerve stimulation.

Authors:
Bruno Bonaz

Bioelectron Med 2020 26;6:12. Epub 2020 Jun 26.

University Grenoble Alpes, Inserm, U1216, Grenoble Institute Neurosciences and Division of Hepato-Gastroenterology, CHU Grenoble Alpes, 38000 Grenoble, France.

The vagus nerve-based inflammatory reflex regulates inflammation and cytokine release. Recent successful clinical trials using implantable bioelectronic devices to modulate the inflammatory reflex in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease have demonstrated the efficacy of targeting neural circuits as an efficient alternative to drug treatments. However, the optimal vagus nerve stimulation parameters to achieve efficacious symptomatic relief for inflammation are still unknown. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-020-00049-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7318398PMC

Ultrasound-driven piezoelectric current activates spinal cord neurocircuits and restores locomotion in rats with spinal cord injury.

Bioelectron Med 2020 1;6:13. Epub 2020 Jun 1.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China.

Background: Neuromodulation via electrical stimulation (ES) is a common technique to treat numerous brain and spinal cord related neurological conditions. In the present study, we examined the efficacy of piezoelectric stimulation (pES) by a custom miniature piezostimulator to activate the spinal cord neurocircuit in comparison with conventional epidural ES in rats.

Methods: Stimulation electrodes were implanted on L2 and S1 spinal cord and were connected to a head-plug for ES, and a piezostimulator for pES. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-020-00048-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7268413PMC

A computational outlook on neurostimulation.

Bioelectron Med 2020 25;6:10. Epub 2020 May 25.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI USA.

Efficient identification of effective neurostimulation strategies is critical due to the growing number of clinical applications and the increasing complexity of the corresponding technology. In consequence, investigators are encouraged to accelerate translational research of neurostimulation technologies and move quickly to clinical applications. However, this process is hampered by rigorous, but necessary, regulations and lack of a mechanistic understanding of the interactions between electric fields and neural circuits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-020-00047-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7247210PMC

Closed-loop bioelectronic medicine for diabetes management.

Bioelectron Med 2020 15;6:11. Epub 2020 May 15.

1Centre for Bio-Inspired Technology, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, London, UK.

Modulation of the nervous system by delivering electrical or pharmaceutical agents has contributed to the development of novel treatments to serious health disorders. Recent advances in multidisciplinary research has enabled the emergence of a new powerful therapeutic approach called bioelectronic medicine. Bioelectronic medicine exploits the fact that every organ in our bodies is neurally innervated and thus electrical interfacing with peripheral nerves can be a potential pathway for diagnosing or treating diseases such as diabetes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-020-00046-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7227365PMC

A review of the bioelectronic implications of stimulation of the peripheral nervous system for chronic pain conditions.

Bioelectron Med 2020 24;6. Epub 2020 Apr 24.

Spine and Nerve Center for the Virginias, 400 Court Street, Suite 100, Charleston, West Virginia 25301 USA.

Background: Peripheral Nerve Stimulation has been used to treat human disease including pain for several decades. Innovation has made it a more viable option for treatment of common chronic pain processes, and interest in the therapy is increasing.

Main Body: While clinical data is forthcoming, understanding factors that influence successful outcomes in the use of PNS still needs to be delineated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-020-00045-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7181529PMC

Specific vagus nerve stimulation parameters alter serum cytokine levels in the absence of inflammation.

Bioelectron Med 2020 10;6. Epub 2020 Apr 10.

Laboratory of Biomedical Science, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Northwell Health, 350 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030 USA.

Background: Electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves is a widely used technique to treat a variety of conditions including chronic pain, motor impairment, headaches, and epilepsy. Nerve stimulation to achieve efficacious symptomatic relief depends on the proper selection of electrical stimulation parameters to recruit the appropriate fibers within a nerve. Recently, electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve has shown promise for controlling inflammation and clinical trials have demonstrated efficacy for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-020-00042-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7146955PMC

Auricular neural stimulation as a new non-invasive treatment for opioid detoxification.

Bioelectron Med 2020 30;6. Epub 2020 Mar 30.

1Department of Psychiatry, Zucker Hillside Hospital, Northwell Health, Glen Oaks, NY USA.

The recent opioid crisis is one of the rising challenges in the history of modern health care. New and effective treatment modalities with less adverse effects to alleviate and manage this modern epidemic are critically needed. The FDA has recently approved two non-invasive electrical nerve stimulators for the adjunct treatment of symptoms of acute opioid withdrawal. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-020-00044-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7110792PMC

Correction to: Biomarkers and neuromodulation techniques in substance use disorders.

Bioelectron Med 2020 19;6. Epub 2020 Mar 19.

2Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1186/s42234-020-0040-0.]. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-020-00043-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098233PMC

Correction to: Prospective trial examining safety and efficacy of microcurrent stimulation for the treatment of sinus pain and congestion.

Bioelectron Med 2020 30;6. Epub 2020 Jan 30.

3University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA USA.

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1186/s42234-019-0035-x.]. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-020-0039-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098218PMC
January 2020

Retraction Note: The quantum physiology of oxygen; from electrons to the evolution of redox signaling in the human brain.

Bioelectron Med 2019 20;5. Epub 2019 Jun 20.

University of South Wales, Pontypridd, UK.

[This retracts the article DOI: 10.1186/s42234-018-0014-7.]. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-019-0026-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098230PMC

Spinal cord stimulation in Parkinson's disease: a review of the preclinical and clinical data and future prospects.

Bioelectron Med 2020 16;6. Epub 2020 Mar 16.

1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of California San Diego Health Sciences, La Jolla, CA USA.

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with an incidence of 0.1 to 0.2% over the age of 40 and a prevalence of over 1 million people in North America. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-020-00041-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098258PMC

Biomarkers and neuromodulation techniques in substance use disorders.

Bioelectron Med 2020 17;6. Epub 2020 Feb 17.

2Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.

Addictive disorders are a severe health concern. Conventional therapies have just moderate success and the probability of relapse after treatment remains high. Brain stimulation techniques, such as transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) and Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), have been shown to be effective in reducing subjectively rated substance craving. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-020-0040-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098236PMC
February 2020

Neural reflex control of vascular inflammation.

Bioelectron Med 2020 31;6. Epub 2020 Jan 31.

1Laboratory of Immunobiology, Center for Bioelectronic Medicine, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial chronic inflammatory disease that underlies myocardial infarction and stroke. Efficacious treatment for hyperlipidemia and hypertension has significantly reduced morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disease. However, atherosclerosis still confers a considerable risk of adverse cardiovascular events. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-020-0038-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7065709PMC
January 2020

Building a bioelectronic medicine movement 2019: insights from leaders in industry, academia, and research.

Authors:

Bioelectron Med 2020 31;6. Epub 2020 Jan 31.

In April 2019, a select group of medical, academic, and private-sector leaders in bioelectronic medicine convened in Geneva to discuss the potential for building a cross-disciplinary movement that would advance the field with key stakeholders - both those who are already active in research and commercialization as well as those who will influence the pace of development and uptake of innovative technologies and treatments. Hosted by BioSig Technologies and physicians from the Mayo Clinic, the roundtable was unique in its focus on what it will take to advance awareness of bioelectronic medicine, including a shared definition, unified narrative, and set of tailored messages to win over key audiences. The attendees developed a consensus on these issues and agreed to form a working group beyond the roundtable, which has since evolved into the Alliance for Advancing Bioelectronic Medicine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-020-0037-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098241PMC
January 2020

Pulmonary arterial hypertension: the case for a bioelectronic treatment.

Bioelectron Med 2019 10;5:20. Epub 2019 Dec 10.

Institute of Bioelectronic Medicine, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY 11030 USA.

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disease of unknown etiology that progresses to right ventricular failure. It has a complex pathophysiology, which involves an imbalance between vasoconstrictive and vasodilative processes in the pulmonary circulation, pulmonary vasoconstriction, vascular and right ventricular remodeling, systemic inflammation, and autonomic imbalance, with a reduced parasympathetic and increased sympathetic tone. Current pharmacological treatments for PAH include several classes of drugs that target signaling pathways in vascular biology and cardiovascular physiology, but they can have severe unwanted effects and they do not typically stop the progression of the disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-019-0036-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098229PMC
December 2019

Closed-loop neuromuscular electrical stimulation using feedforward-feedback control and textile electrodes to regulate grasp force in quadriplegia.

Bioelectron Med 2019 1;5:19. Epub 2019 Nov 1.

Feinstein Institute for Medical Research at Northwell Health, New York, USA.

Background: Transcutaneous neuromuscular electrical stimulation is routinely used in physical rehabilitation and more recently in brain-computer interface applications for restoring movement in paralyzed limbs. Due to variable muscle responses to repeated or sustained stimulation, grasp force levels can change significantly over time. Here we develop and assess closed-loop methods to regulate individual finger forces to facilitate functional movement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-019-0034-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098255PMC
November 2019

Prospective trial examining safety and efficacy of microcurrent stimulation for the treatment of sinus pain and congestion.

Bioelectron Med 2019 20;5:18. Epub 2019 Nov 20.

3University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA USA.

Background: Inflammation and swelling of the sinus and nasal mucosa are commonly caused by viral infection, bacterial infection, or exposure to allergens and irritants. Sinonasal inflammation can cause symptoms of nasal congestion, facial pressure, and rhinogenic facial pain or "sinus pain". A previous randomized controlled study demonstrated that acute treatment with non-invasive periorbital microcurrent stimulation resulted in a rapid and clinically meaningful reduction in self-report of sinus pain that significantly outperformed sham control treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-019-0035-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098235PMC
November 2019

Neuromodulation as a new avenue for resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock.

Bioelectron Med 2019 24;5:17. Epub 2019 Oct 24.

Translational Brain Research Laboratory, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY USA.

Hemorrhagic shock (HS), a major cause of early death from trauma, accounts for around 40% of mortality, with 33-56% of these deaths occurring before the patient reaches a medical facility. Intravenous fluid therapy and blood transfusions are the cornerstone of treating HS. However, these options may not be available soon after the injury, resulting in death or a poorer quality of survival. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-019-0033-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098257PMC
October 2019

Homeostatic activity regulation as a mechanism underlying the effect of brain stimulation.

Bioelectron Med 2019 25;5:16. Epub 2019 Sep 25.

2Department of Anatomy, Cell Biology and Physiology, Department of Neurological Surgery, Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Group, Stark Neurosciences Research Institute, Indiana University School of Medicine, 320 West 15th Street, NB 500C, Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA.

Hyperexcitability of the neural network often occurs after brain injuries or degeneration and is a key pathophysiological feature in certain neurological diseases such as epilepsy, neuropathic pain, and tinnitus. Although the standard approach of pharmacological treatments is to directly suppress the hyperexcitability through reducing excitation or enhancing inhibition, different techniques for stimulating brain activity are often used to treat refractory neurological conditions. However, it is unclear why stimulating brain activity would be effective for controlling hyperexcitability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-019-0032-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098242PMC
September 2019

3D-bioprinted tracheal reconstruction: an overview.

Bioelectron Med 2019 17;5:15. Epub 2019 Sep 17.

Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, The Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, 350 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030 USA.

Congenital tracheomalacia and tracheal stenosis are commonly seen in premature infants. In adulthood, are typically related with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and can occur secondarily from tracheostomy, prolong intubation, trauma, infection and tumors. Both conditions are life-threatening when not managed properly. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-019-0031-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098220PMC
September 2019

Neural activity regulates autoimmune diseases through the gateway reflex.

Bioelectron Med 2019 20;5:14. Epub 2019 Aug 20.

2Division of Molecular Psychoimmunology, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-15, Nishi-7, Kita-ku, Sapporo, 060-0815 Japan.

The brain, spinal cord and retina are protected from blood-borne compounds by the blood-brain barrier (BBB), blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) and blood-retina barrier (BRB) respectively, which create a physical interface that tightly controls molecular and cellular transport. The mechanical and functional integrity of these unique structures between blood vessels and nervous tissues is critical for maintaining organ homeostasis. To preserve the stability of these barriers, interplay between constituent barrier cells, such as vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, glial cells and neurons, is required. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-019-0030-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098223PMC

Neuroimmunomodulation of tissue injury and disease: an expanding view of the inflammatory reflex pathway.

Bioelectron Med 2019 13;5:13. Epub 2019 Aug 13.

1Division of Nephrology and Center for Immunity, Inflammation and Regenerative Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia USA.

Neuroimmunomodulation through peripheral nerve activation is an important therapeutic approach to various disorders. Central to this approach is the inflammatory reflex pathway in which the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway represents the efferent limb. Recent studies provide a framework for understanding this control pathway, however our understanding remains incomplete. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-019-0029-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098254PMC

Non-invasive treatment of patients with upper extremity spasticity following stroke using paired trans-spinal and peripheral direct current stimulation.

Bioelectron Med 2019 23;5:11. Epub 2019 Jul 23.

1Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Biomedical Science Division, Biomedical Sciences /Robot Lab, Laboratory of Clinical Neurorehabilitation Research, 350 Community Dr, Manhasset, NY 11030 USA.

Background: Muscle spasticity is a common impediment to motor recovery in patients with chronic stroke. Standard-of-care treatments such as botulinum toxin injections can temporarily relieve muscle stiffness and pain associated with spasticity, but often at the expense of increased muscle weakness. Recent preclinical investigations of a non-invasive treatment that pairs trans-spinal direct current stimulation and peripheral nerve direct current stimulation (tsDCS+pDCS) provided promising data for a novel approach based on bioelectronic medicine for the treatment of patients with post-stroke spasticity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-019-0028-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098221PMC

Neurorestorative interventions involving bioelectronic implants after spinal cord injury.

Bioelectron Med 2019 11;5:10. Epub 2019 Jul 11.

École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Campus Biotech, Center for Neuroprosthetics and Brain Mind Institute, 1202 Genève, Switzerland.

In the absence of approved treatments to repair damage to the central nervous system, the role of neurosurgeons after spinal cord injury (SCI) often remains confined to spinal cord decompression and vertebral fracture stabilization. However, recent advances in bioelectronic medicine are changing this landscape. Multiple neuromodulation therapies that target circuits located in the brain, midbrain, or spinal cord have been able to improve motor and autonomic functions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-019-0027-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098222PMC

Identification of hypoglycemia-specific neural signals by decoding murine vagus nerve activity.

Bioelectron Med 2019 11;5. Epub 2019 Jul 11.

Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Heampstead, NY USA.

Background: Glucose is a crucial energy source. In humans, it is the primary sugar for high energy demanding cells in brain, muscle and peripheral neurons. Deviations of blood glucose levels from normal levels for an extended period of time is dangerous or even fatal, so regulation of blood glucose levels is a biological imperative. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-019-0025-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098244PMC

Stimulating ideas for heart regeneration: the future of nerve-directed heart therapy.

Bioelectron Med 2019 26;5. Epub 2019 Jun 26.

Department of Cell and Regenerative Biology, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 1111 Highland Ave, Room 4557, Madison, WI 53705 USA.

Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. The blockade of coronary arteries limits oxygen-rich blood to the heart and consequently there is cardiomyocyte (CM) cell death, inflammation, fibrotic scarring, and myocardial remodeling. Unfortunately, current therapeutics fail to effectively replace the lost cardiomyocytes or prevent fibrotic scarring, which results in reduced cardiac function and the development of heart failure (HF) in the adult mammalian heart. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-019-0024-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098228PMC

Assessment of glutamatergic synaptic transmission and plasticity in brain slices: relevance to bioelectronic approaches.

Bioelectron Med 2019 10;5. Epub 2019 Jun 10.

1Laboratory of Immune & Neural Networks, Institutes of Molecular Medicine and Bioelectronic Medicine, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Northwell Health, 350 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030 USA.

Background: Glutamatergic neurons represent the largest neuronal class in the brain and are responsible for the bulk of excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity. Abnormalities in glutamatergic neurons are linked to several brain disorders and their modulation represents a potential opportunity for emerging bioelectronic medicine (BEM) approaches. Here, we have used a set of electrophysiological assays to identify the effect of the pyrimidine nucleoside uridine on glutamatergic systems in ex vivo brain slices. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-019-0022-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098243PMC

Collateral benefits of studying the vagus nerve in bioelectronic medicine.

Bioelectron Med 2019 16;5. Epub 2019 May 16.

1Center for Biomedical Science and Bioelectronic Medicine, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Northwell Health System, Manhasset, NY 11030 USA.

Studies on the role of the vagus nerve in the regulation of immunity and inflammation have contributed to current preclinical and clinical efforts in bioelectronic medicine. In parallel, this research has generated new insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the immunoregulatory functions of the vagus nerve within . The vagus nerve and other cellular components of the inflammatory reflex are implicated in the regulation of bleeding, cancer, obesity, blood pressure, viral infections and other conditions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-019-0021-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098239PMC

Investigational treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with a vibrotactile device applied to the external ear.

Bioelectron Med 2019 17;5. Epub 2019 Apr 17.

1Center for Biomedical Science and Bioelectronic Medicine, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Northwell Health, Manhasset, NY USA.

Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and debilitating inflammatory disease characterized by extensive joint tissue inflammation. Implantable bioelectronic devices targeting the inflammatory reflex reduce TNF production and inflammation in preclinical models of inflammatory disease, and in patients with RA and Crohn's disease. Here, we assessed the effect of applying a vibrotactile device to the cymba concha of the external ear on inflammatory responses in healthy subjects, as well as its effect on disease activity in RA patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-019-0020-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098240PMC

Spinal cord stimulation in chronic pain: evidence and theory for mechanisms of action.

Bioelectron Med 2019 Jun;5

Department of Anesthesiology, Center for Pain Medicine, University of California San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, CA, USA.

Well-established in the field of bioelectronic medicine, Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) offers an implantable, non-pharmacologic treatment for patients with intractable chronic pain conditions. Chronic pain is a widely heterogenous syndrome with regard to both pathophysiology and the resultant phenotype. Despite advances in our understanding of SCS-mediated antinociception, there still exists limited evidence clarifying the pathways recruited when patterned electric pulses are applied to the epidural space. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-019-0023-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6703564PMC

Design and testing of a 96-channel neural interface module for the Networked Neuroprosthesis system.

Bioelectron Med 2019 15;5. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI USA.

Background: The loss of motor functions resulting from spinal cord injury can have devastating implications on the quality of one's life. Functional electrical stimulation has been used to help restore mobility, however, current functional electrical stimulation (FES) systems require residual movements to control stimulation patterns, which may be unintuitive and not useful for individuals with higher level cervical injuries. Brain machine interfaces (BMI) offer a promising approach for controlling such systems; however, they currently still require transcutaneous leads connecting indwelling electrodes to external recording devices. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-019-0019-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098219PMC
February 2019

Cleveland neural engineering workshop 2017: strategic evaluation of neural engineering.

Bioelectron Med 2019 30;5. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

7University of Colorado, Boulder, CO USA.

The Cleveland Neural Engineering Workshop (NEW) was established as a biennial meeting in 2011, with subsequent meetings taking place in 2013, 2015, and most recently, June 2017. This fourth biennial NEW was hosted by the Cleveland Advanced Platform for Technology National Veterans Affairs Center, the Functional Electrical Stimulation National Veterans Affairs Center, the Biomedical Engineering Department at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, and Northwell Health's Feinstein Institute for Medical Research of New York. The workshop connects leaders and stakeholders in the neural engineering community who are devoted to developing and deploying technological solutions to those with neurological disorders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-019-0017-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098211PMC
January 2019

Bioelectronic medicine: updates, challenges and paths forward.

Bioelectron Med 2019 22;5. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

1Center for Biomedical Science and Center for Bioelectronic Medicine, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Northwell Health System, Manhasset, NY USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-019-0018-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098260PMC
January 2019

Proceedings of the second biennial Cleveland Neural Engineering Workshop 2013.

Bioelectron Med 2018 5;4:15. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

2Cleveland VA Medical Center, Cleveland, OH USA.

The Cleveland Neural Engineering Workshop (NEW) is a biennial meeting started in 2011 as an "unconference" to bring together leaders in the neural engineering and related fields. Since the first iteration of the meeting, NEW has evolved from "just getting together" to a more important purpose of creating, reviewing, and promoting a uniform strategic roadmap for the field. The purpose of this short report, as well as the companion 2015 and 2017 reports, is to provide a historical record of this meeting and the evolution of the roadmap. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-018-0016-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098232PMC
December 2018

Automated closed-loop control of diabetes: the artificial pancreas.

Authors:
Boris Kovatchev

Bioelectron Med 2018 7;4:14. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

Center for Diabetes Technology, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400888, Charlottesville, VA 22908 USA.

The incidence of Diabetes Mellitus is on the rise worldwide, which exerts enormous health toll on the population and enormous pressure on the healthcare systems. Now, almost hundred years after the discovery of insulin in 1921, the optimization problem of diabetes is well formulated as maintenance of strict glycemic control without increasing the risk for hypoglycemia. External insulin administration is mandatory for people with type 1 diabetes; various medications, as well as basal and prandial insulin, are included in the daily treatment of type 2 diabetes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-018-0015-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098217PMC
November 2018

RETRACTED ARTICLE: The quantum physiology of oxygen; from electrons to the evolution of redox signaling in the human brain.

Bioelectron Med 2018 17;4:13. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

Neurovascular Research Laboratory, Alfred Russel Wallace Building, Faculty of Life Sciences and Education, University of South Wales, Pontypridd, CF37 4AT UK.

Rising atmospheric oxygen (O) levels provided a selective pressure for the evolution of O-dependent micro-organisms that began with the autotrophic eukaryotes. Since these primordial times, the respiring mammalian cell has become entirely dependent on the constancy of electron flow with molecular O serving as the terminal electron acceptor in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Indeed, the ability to "sense" O and maintain homeostasis is considered one of the most important roles of the central nervous system (CNS) and likely represented a major driving force in the evolution of the human brain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-018-0014-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098224PMC
October 2018

Development of visual Neuroprostheses: trends and challenges.

Bioelectron Med 2018 13;4:12. Epub 2018 Aug 13.

Institute of Bioengineering, University Miguel Hernández and CIBER-BBN, Avda de la Universidad, s/n, 03202 Alicante, Elche Spain.

Visual prostheses are implantable medical devices that are able to provide some degree of vision to individuals who are blind. This research field is a challenging subject in both ophthalmology and basic science that has progressed to a point where there are already several commercially available devices. However, at present, these devices are only able to restore a very limited vision, with relatively low spatial resolution. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-018-0013-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098238PMC

Mapping the Brain's electric fields with Magnetoelectric nanoparticles.

Bioelectron Med 2018 6;4:10. Epub 2018 Aug 6.

1Center for Personalized Nanomedicine, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th ST, Miami, Florida 33199 USA.

Background: Neurodegenerative diseases are devastating diagnoses. Examining local electric fields in response to neural activity in real time could shed light on understanding the origins of these diseases. To date, there has not been found a way to directly map these fields without interfering with the electric circuitry of the brain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-018-0012-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098259PMC

Extracting wavelet based neural features from human intracortical recordings for neuroprosthetics applications.

Bioelectron Med 2018 31;4:11. Epub 2018 Jul 31.

1Battelle Memorial Institute, 505 King Ave, Columbus, OH 43021 USA.

Background: Understanding the long-term behavior of intracortically-recorded signals is essential for improving the performance of Brain Computer Interfaces. However, few studies have systematically investigated chronic neural recordings from an implanted microelectrode array in the human brain.

Methods: In this study, we show the applicability of wavelet decomposition method to extract and demonstrate the utility of long-term stable features in neural signals obtained from a microelectrode array implanted in the motor cortex of a human with tetraplegia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-018-0011-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098253PMC

Review of the role of the nervous system in glucose homoeostasis and future perspectives towards the management of diabetes.

Bioelectron Med 2018 4;4. Epub 2018 Jul 4.

Centre for Bio-Inspired Technology, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London, UK.

Diabetes is a disease caused by a breakdown in the glucose metabolic process resulting in abnormal blood glucose fluctuations. Traditionally, control has involved external insulin injection in response to elevated blood glucose to substitute the role of the beta cells in the pancreas which would otherwise perform this function in a healthy individual. The central nervous system (CNS), however, also plays a vital role in glucose homoeostasis through the control of pancreatic secretion and insulin sensitivity which could potentially be used as a pathway for enhancing glucose control. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-018-0009-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098234PMC

Realizing flexible bioelectronic medicines for accessing the peripheral nerves - technology considerations.

Bioelectron Med 2018 26;4. Epub 2018 Jun 26.

1Section Bioelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands.

Patients suffering from conditions such as paralysis, diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis could in the future be treated in a personalised manner using bioelectronic medicines (BEms) (Nat Rev Drug Discov 13:399-400, 2013, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 113:8284-9, 2016, J Intern Med 282:37-45, 2017). To deliver this personalised therapy based on electricity, BEms need to target various sites in the human body and operate in a closed-loop manner. The specific conditions and anatomy of the targeted sites pose unique challenges in the development of BEms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-018-0010-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098212PMC

Electrical stimulation of renal nerves for modulating urine glucose excretion in rats.

Bioelectron Med 2018 29;4. Epub 2018 May 29.

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI USA.

Background: The role of the kidney in glucose homeostasis has gained global interest. Kidneys are innervated by renal nerves, and renal denervation animal models have shown improved glucose regulation. We hypothesized that stimulation of renal nerves at kilohertz frequencies, which can block propagation of action potentials, would increase urine glucose excretion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-018-0008-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098252PMC

Recent advances in materials and flexible electronics for peripheral nerve interfaces.

Bioelectron Med 2018 23;4. Epub 2018 May 23.

1Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA.

Peripheral nerve interfaces are a central technology in advancing bioelectronic medicines because these medical devices can record and modulate the activity of nerves that innervate visceral organs. Peripheral nerve interfaces that use electrical signals for recording or stimulation have advanced our collective understanding of the peripheral nervous system. Furthermore, devices such as cuff electrodes and multielectrode arrays of various form factors have been implanted in the peripheral nervous system of humans in several therapeutic contexts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-018-0007-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098226PMC

B fibers are the best predictors of cardiac activity during Vagus nerve stimulation: Qing, vagal B fiber activation and cardiac effects.

Bioelectron Med 2018 20;4. Epub 2018 Apr 20.

1Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN USA.

Background: Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a promising therapy for many neurologic and psychiatric conditions. However, determining stimulus parameters for individual patients is a major challenge. The traditional method of titrating stimulus intensity based on patient perception produces highly variable responses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-018-0005-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098216PMC

Is-there a place for vagus nerve stimulation in inflammatory bowel diseases?

Authors:
Bruno Bonaz

Bioelectron Med 2018 3;4. Epub 2018 Apr 3.

1Division of Hepato-Gastroenterology, University Hospital, Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble, France.

The vagus nerve (VN), the longest nerve of the organism that innervates the gastrointestinal tract, is a mixed nerve composed of 80% of afferent and 20% of efferent fibers. The VN has anti-inflammatory properties, in particular an anti-TNFα effect through the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. The VN is a key component of the autonomic nervous system, i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-018-0004-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098256PMC

Standardization of methods to record Vagus nerve activity in mice.

Bioelectron Med 2018 15;4. Epub 2018 Mar 15.

1Center for Biomedical Sciences, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Northwell Health, 350 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030 USA.

Background: The vagus nerve plays an important role in the regulation of organ function, including reflex pathways that regulate immunity and inflammation. Recent studies using genetically modified mice have improved our understanding of molecular mechanisms in the neural control of immunity. However, mapping neural signals transmitted in the vagus nerve in mice has been limited by technical challenges. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-018-0002-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098227PMC

Electroencephalographic read-outs of the modulation of cortical network activity by deep brain stimulation.

Bioelectron Med 2018 15;4. Epub 2018 Mar 15.

University Grenoble Alpes, Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, GIN, 38000 Grenoble, France.

Deep brain stimulation (DBS), a reversible and adjustable treatment for neurological and psychiatric refractory disorders, consists in delivering electrical currents to neuronal populations located in subcortical structures. The targets of DBS are spatially restricted, but connect to many parts of the brain, including the cortex, which might explain the observed clinical benefits in terms of symptomatology. The DBS mechanisms of action at a large scale are however poorly understood, which has motivated several groups to recently conduct many research programs to monitor cortical responses to DBS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-018-0003-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098231PMC

Electrochemically stimulating developments in bioelectronic medicine.

Bioelectron Med 2018 15;4. Epub 2018 Mar 15.

1Regenerative Medicine and Cellular Therapies, School of Pharmacy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2QL UK.

Cellular homeostasis is in part controlled by biological generated electrical activity. By interfacing biology with electronic devices this electrical activity can be modulated to actuate cellular behaviour. There are current limitations in merging electronics with biology sufficiently well to target and sense specific electrically active components of cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s42234-018-0001-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7098225PMC

Cytokine-specific Neurograms in the Sensory Vagus Nerve.

Bioelectron Med 2016 ;3:7-17

Laboratory of Immune and Neural Networks, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Northwell Health, Manhasset, New York, United States of America.

The axons of the sensory, or afferent, vagus nerve transmit action potentials to the central nervous system in response to changes in the body's metabolic and physiological status. Recent advances in identifying neural circuits that regulate immune responses to infection, inflammation and injury have revealed that vagus nerve signals regulate the release of cytokines and other factors produced by macrophages. Here we record compound action potentials in the cervical vagus nerve of adult mice and reveal the specific activity that occurs following administration of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β). Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6039192PMC
January 2016
71 Reads

Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treatment of Inflammation: Systematic Review of Animal Models and Clinical Studies.

Bioelectron Med 2016 Jan 14;3:1-6. Epub 2016 Sep 14.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Department of Neurosciences, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been used since 1997 for treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy. More recently, an off-label use of VNS has been explored in animal models and clinical trials for treatment of a number of conditions involving the innate immune system. The underlying premise has been the notion of the cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway (CAP), mediated by the vagus nerves. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5756070PMC
January 2016
14 Reads