20 results match your criteria Biodiversity And Conservation[Journal]

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Long-term survival and successful conservation? Low genetic diversity but no evidence for reduced reproductive success at the north-westernmost range edge of (Poaceae) in Central Europe.

Biodivers Conserv 2019 27;28(5):1245-1265. Epub 2019 Feb 27.

1Institute for Integrative Nature Conservation Research, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Gregor-Mendel-Str. 33, 1180 Vienna, Austria.

Many steppe species reach their (north)westernmost distribution limit in western Central Europe. This also applies to , a rare steppe plant of calcareous rock/sand vegetation. To explore potential differences in reproductive success and genetic composition of peripheral populations, we analysed the absolute (north)westernmost occurrences in Western Germany and populations at the western margin (Eastern Austria) and the centre (Central Hungary) of the Pannonicum, representing a part of the continuous range. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-019-01722-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6399750PMC
February 2019
2 Reads

Basic mathematical errors may make ecological assessments unreliable.

Biodivers Conserv 2018 24;27(1):265-267. Epub 2017 Aug 24.

Hatherly Laboratories, Biosciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Prince of Wales Road, Exeter, EX4 4PS UK.

Environmental impact assessments (EIAs) are used globally as the evidence-base for planning decisions, yet their efficacy is uncertain. Given that EIAs are extremely expensive and are enshrined in legislation, their place in evidence-based decision making deserves evaluation. The mean is the most commonly used summary statistic in ecological assessments, yet it is unlikely to be a good summary where the distribution of data is skewed; and its use without any indication of variability can be highly misleading. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-017-1418-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6956893PMC

Snub-nosed monkeys (): potential distribution and its implication for conservation.

Biodivers Conserv 2018 23;27(6):1517-1538. Epub 2018 Jan 23.

1Section for Ecoinformatics & Biodiversity, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 114, 8000 Aarhus, Denmark.

Many threatened species have undergone range retraction, and are confined to small fragmented populations. To increase their survival prospects, it is necessary to find suitable habitat outside their current range, to increase and interconnect populations. Species distribution models may be used to this purpose and can be an important part of the conservation strategies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-018-1507-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6560942PMC
January 2018
1 Read

Honest advocacy for nature: presenting a persuasive narrative for conservation.

Biodivers Conserv 2018 30;27(7):1703-1723. Epub 2016 Jun 30.

1Present Address: Department of Geography, University of Cambridge, Downing Place, Cambridge, CB2 3EN UK.

Conservation scientists are increasingly recognising the value of communicating policy-relevant knowledge to policy-makers. Whilst considerable progress has been made in offering practical advice for scientists seeking to engage more closely with decision-makers, researchers have provided few tangible examples to learn from. This paper uses an English case study, but draws out important high-level messages relevant to conservation scientists worldwide. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10531-016-1163-1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-016-1163-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448358PMC
June 2016
12 Reads

Improving the role of global conservation treaties in addressing contemporary threats to lions.

Biodivers Conserv 2018 2;27(10):2747-2765. Epub 2018 Jun 2.

2Department of European and International Public Law, Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands.

Despite their iconic status, lion () populations continue to decline across the majority of their range. In the light of the recent decision (in October 2017) to add lions to the Appendices of the Convention on Migratory Species (CMS), this paper identifies the new and existing legal protections afforded to lions through five global treaties, and maps these protections against the most critical contemporary threats facing the species. It thus offers a new analysis of the CMS listing, and draws on existing legal reviews, to highlight the ways in which global treaties offer differing forms of protection for lions. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10531-018-1567-1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-018-1567-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6435094PMC
June 2018
16 Reads

Old concepts, new challenges: adapting landscape-scale conservation to the twenty-first century.

Biodivers Conserv 2017 5;26(3):527-552. Epub 2016 Dec 5.

1Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn Campus, Cornwall, TR10 9FE UK.

Landscape-scale approaches to conservation stem largely from the classic ideas of reserve design: encouraging bigger and more sites, enhancing connectivity among sites, and improving habitat quality. Trade-offs are imposed between these four strategies by the limited resources and opportunities available for conservation programmes, including the establishment and management of protected areas, and wildlife-friendly farming and forestry. Although debate regarding trade-offs between the size, number, connectivity and quality of protected areas was prevalent in the 1970-1990s, the implications of the same trade-offs for ongoing conservation responses to threats from accelerating environmental change have rarely been addressed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-016-1257-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7115020PMC
December 2016

Local and landscape scale determinants of macroinvertebrate assemblages and their conservation value in ponds across an urban land-use gradient.

Biodivers Conserv 2017 17;26(5):1065-1086. Epub 2017 Jan 17.

1School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, West Midlands B15 2TT UK.

Urbanisation represents a growing threat to natural communities across the globe. Small aquatic habitats such as ponds are especially vulnerable and are often poorly protected by legislation. Many ponds are threatened by development and pollution from the surrounding landscape, yet their biodiversity and conservation value remain poorly described. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-016-1286-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7010385PMC
January 2017

Land-use effects on local biodiversity in tropical forests vary between continents.

Biodivers Conserv 2017 27;26(9):2251-2270. Epub 2017 May 27.

1Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, London, SL5 7PY UK.

Land-use change is one of the greatest threats to biodiversity, especially in the tropics where secondary and plantation forests are expanding while primary forest is declining. Understanding how well these disturbed habitats maintain biodiversity is therefore important-specifically how the maturity of secondary forest and the management intensity of plantation forest affect levels of biodiversity. Previous studies have shown that the biotas of different continents respond differently to land use. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-017-1356-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6979682PMC

A pan-neotropical analysis of hunting preferences.

Biodivers Conserv 2017 25;26(8):1877-1897. Epub 2017 Apr 25.

1School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.

Hunting in the neotropics is a widespread form of resource extraction. However, there is increasing concern that current activities are leading to the decline and extirpation of vulnerable species; particulary ateline primates, large ungulates (such as tapirs and white-lipped peccaries) and large birds such as curassows. Hunting patterns are expected to be a product of two principal influences: the value of return for a given amount of effort invested into hunting, and cultural factors that determine the prestige and usefulness of prey. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-017-1334-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6979659PMC

What works in conservation? Using expert assessment of summarised evidence to identify practices that enhance natural pest control in agriculture.

Biodivers Conserv 2016 30;25(7):1383-1399. Epub 2016 May 30.

1Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 3QZ UK.

This paper documents an exercise to synthesize and assess the best available scientific knowledge on the effectiveness of different farm practices at enhancing natural pest regulation in agriculture. It demonstrates a novel combination of three approaches to evidence synthesis-systematic literature search, collated synopsis and evidence assessment using an expert panel. These approaches follow a logical sequence moving from a large volume of disparate evidence to a simple, easily understandable answer for use in policy or practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-016-1133-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7175675PMC

Diet characterisation of solitary bees on farmland: dietary specialisation predicts rarity.

Biodivers Conserv 2016 20;25(13):2655-2671. Epub 2016 Aug 20.

1School of Life Sciences, The University of Sussex, Falmer, East Sussex BN1 9QG UK.

Changes in agricultural practice across Europe and North America have been associated with declines in wild bee populations. Bee diet breadth has been associated with sensitivity to agricultural intensification, but much of this analysis has been conducted at the categorical level of generalist or specialist, and it is not clear to what extent the level of generalisation within generalist species is also associated with species persistence. We used pollen load analysis to quantify the pollen diets of wild solitary bees on 19 farms across southern England, UK. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-016-1191-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7175682PMC

Missing species among Mediterranean non-Siphonophoran Hydrozoa.

Biodivers Conserv 2015;24(6):1329-1357. Epub 2015 Jan 20.

Laboratory of Zoology and Marine Biology, Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche e Ambientali, Di.S.Te.B.A., Università del Salento, Via Prov.le Lecce-Monteroni, 73100 Lecce, Italy ; CNR-ISMAR, Via de Marini, 6, 16149 Genoa, Italy.

Hydrozoa of the Mediterranean Sea are well known and a recent monograph covers 457 species. Mediterranean non-Siphonophoran Hydrozoa comprises 398 species, an increasing number due to continuous updates, representing about 10 % of the 3,702 currently valid species reported in a recent world assessment of hydrozoan diversity. Many new records are non indigenous species, previously described species that occurred elsewhere and whose arrival was presumably caused by human activities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-015-0859-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4514666PMC
January 2015
5 Reads

Green algae in alpine biological soil crust communities: acclimation strategies against ultraviolet radiation and dehydration.

Biodivers Conserv 2014 2;23:1845-1858. Epub 2014 Mar 2.

Functional Plant Biology, Institute of Botany, University of Innsbruck, Sternwartestraße 15, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria.

Green algae are major components of biological soil crusts in alpine habitats. Together with cyanobacteria, fungi and lichens, green algae form a pioneer community important for the organisms that will succeed them. In their high altitudinal habitat these algae are exposed to harsh and strongly fluctuating environmental conditions, mainly intense irradiation, including ultraviolet radiation, and lack of water leading to desiccation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-014-0653-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4058318PMC
March 2014
17 Reads

High photobiont diversity in the common European soil crust lichen

Biodivers Conserv 2014 8;23:1771-1785. Epub 2014 Mar 8.

Organismic Biology, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstr. 34, 5020 Salzburg, Austria.

The genetic diversity of green algal photobionts (chlorobionts) in soil crust forming lichens was studied as part of the SCIN-project (Soil Crust InterNational). A total of 64 lichen samples were collected from four different sites along latitudinal and altitudinal gradients in Europe (Tabernas/Spain; Hochtor-Großglockner/Austria; Gynge Alvar/Sweden; Ruine Homburg/Germany). The dominant lichen species at all four sites was , often occurring with and Genetic identification of chlorobionts was carried out using the nuclear marker (nrITS) and a chloroplast marker (L-J). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-014-0662-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4058320PMC
March 2014
10 Reads

Improved appreciation of the functioning and importance of biological soil crusts in Europe: the Soil Crust International Project (SCIN).

Biodivers Conserv 2014 2;23:1639-1658. Epub 2014 Mar 2.

Department of Organismic Biology, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstr. 34, 5020 Salzburg, Austria.

Here we report details of the European research initiative "Soil Crust International" (SCIN) focusing on the biodiversity of biological soil crusts (BSC, composed of bacteria, algae, lichens, and bryophytes) and on functional aspects in their specific environment. Known as the so-called "colored soil lichen community" (Bunte Erdflechtengesellschaft), these BSCs occur all over Europe, extending into subtropical and arid regions. Our goal is to study the uniqueness of these BSCs on the regional scale and investigate how this community can cope with large macroclimatic differences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-014-0645-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4058319PMC
March 2014
18 Reads

Costing conservation: an expert appraisal of the pollinator habitat benefits of England's entry level stewardship.

Biodivers Conserv 2014 8;23:1193-1214. Epub 2014 Mar 8.

Centre for Agri-Environmental Research, University of Reading, Reading, UK.

Pollination services provided by insects play a key role in English crop production and wider ecology. Despite growing evidence of the negative effects of habitat loss on pollinator populations, limited policy support is available to reverse this pressure. One measure that may provide beneficial habitat to pollinators is England's entry level stewardship agri-environment scheme. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-014-0660-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3970849PMC
March 2014
1 Read

Managing climate change in conservation practice: an exploration of the science-management interface in beech forest management.

Biodivers Conserv 2014;23(14):3657-3671. Epub 2014 Aug 28.

Biological and Environmental Sciences, School of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA UK.

Scientific studies reveal significant consequences of climate change for nature, from ecosystems to individual species. Such studies are important factors in policy decisions on forest conservation and management in Europe. However, while research has shown that climate change research start to impact on European conservation policies like Natura 2000, climate change information has yet to translate into management practices. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-014-0781-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4550267PMC
August 2014
5 Reads

Wild canids, domestic dogs and their pathogens in Southeast Brazil: disease threats for canid conservation.

Biodivers Conserv 2010 23;19(12):3513-3524. Epub 2010 Sep 23.

1Programa de Pós-Graduação em Zoologia de Vertebrados, Pontifícia Universidade Católica de Minas Gerais-PUC Minas, Avenida Dom José Gaspar, 500, 30535-610 Belo Horizonte, MG Brazil.

Wild canids are under many pressures, including habitat loss, fragmentation and disease. The current lack of information on the status of wildlife health may hamper conservation efforts in Brazil. In this paper, we examined the prevalence of canine pathogens in 21 free-ranging wild canids, comprising 12 (crab-eating fox), 7 (maned wolf), 2 (hoary fox), and 70 non-vaccinated domestic dogs from the Serra do Cipó National Park area, Southeast Brazil. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-010-9911-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7088301PMC
September 2010

A pervasive denigration of natural history misconstrues how biodiversity inventories and taxonomy underpin scientific knowledge.

Biodivers Conserv 2010 Jan;19(1):291-303

AEON-Africa Earth Observatory Network, Departments of Geological Sciences and Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa.

Embracing comparative biology, natural history encompasses those sciences that discover, decipher and classify unique (idiographic) details of landscapes, and extinct and extant biodiversity. Intrinsic to these multifarious roles in expanding and consolidating research and knowledge, natural history endows keystone support to the veracity of law-like (nomothetic) generalizations in science. What science knows about the natural world is governed by an inherent function of idiographic discovery; characteristic of natural history, this relationship is exemplified wherever an idiographic discovery overturns established wisdom. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-009-9721-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3070238PMC
January 2010
17 Reads

Wildlife trade, consumption and conservation awareness in southwest China.

Biodivers Conserv 2008 21;17(6):1493-1516. Epub 2008 Mar 21.

Conservation International, Beijing, China.

Commercial trade in wildlife is the major cause of species endangerment and a main threat to animal welfare in China and its neighboring countries. Driven by consumptive use for food and traditional medicine, the large volume of both legal and illegal trade in wildlife has caused great destruction to ecosystems and pushed many species to the brink of extinction. Data gathered from trading hubs at ports, boundary markets, city markets and stores, indicates the large amount of wildlife traded in the region of Guangxi, Yunnan and Qinghai provinces, a direct result of the numerous wildlife markets available. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10531-008-9358-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7088108PMC
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