161 results match your criteria Biodemography And Social Biology[Journal]


Social and demographical determinants of quality of life in people who live with HIV/AIDS infection: evidence from a meta-analysis.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2019 Mar 18:1-16. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

e Social Determinants of Health Research Center , Saveh University of Medical Sciences , Saveh , Iran.

The aim of this meta-analysis is to summarize the available evidence on the social and demographic determinants of health-related quality of life (QoL) for HIV-infected populations in order to provide a direction to policy makers, planners, and program developers on how best to use their resources to improve the QoL of HIV-infected people. PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, and Cochrane electronic databases were searched (up to February 2017) to identify the relevant studies. A meta-analysis was conducted with procreate polled odds ratios (ORs and β) and the confidence intervals of 95% on determining factors of QoL in social and demographic terms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2019.1587287DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Associations between ethnic identity, regional history, and genomic ancestry in New Mexicans of Spanish-speaking descent.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 Apr-Jun;64(2):152-170

a Department of Anthropology , University of New Mexico , Albuquerque , New Mexico.

This study examines associations between ethnic identity, regional history, and genomic ancestry in New Mexicans of Spanish-speaking descent (NMS). In structured interviews, we asked 507 NMS to select from a list of eight ethnic identity terms identified in previous research. We estimated genomic ancestry for each individual from 291,917 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and compared genomic ancestry, age, and birthplace between groups of individuals who identified using each ethnic identity term. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2018.1545563DOI Listing
December 2018

Does the Functional Form of the Association Between Education and Mortality Differ by U.S. Region?

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 Jan-Mar;64(1):63-81

c Department of Sociology and Anthropology , Tel Aviv University , Tel Aviv , Israel.

To understand the education-mortality association among U.S. adults, recent studies have documented its national functional form. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2018.1468239DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5994609PMC

Using Allostatic Load to Validate Self-rated Health for Racial/Ethnic Groups in the United States.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 Jan-Mar;64(1):1-14

c U.S. Army Institute for Surgical Research, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics , San Antonio , TX , USA.

This study evaluates the validity of subjective health measurement for racial/ethnic comparisons in the United States, by assessing whether allostatic load (AL) is equally associated with poor/fair self-rated health (SRH) for different racial/ethnic groups. This study used data from the National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES) for 2006-2010. Multivariable logistic regression models were fit and stratified by race/ethnicity to study the association between AL and poor/fair SRH. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2018.1429891DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

HPLC-based Measurement of Glycated Hemoglobin using Dried Blood Spots Collected under Adverse Field Conditions.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 Jan-Mar;64(1):43-62

g Sociology Department and Carolina Population Center , University of North Carolina , Chapel Hill , NC , USA.

Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assays with venous blood and dried blood spots (DBS) are compared for 143 paired samples collected in Aceh, Indonesia. Relative to gold-standard venous-blood values, DBS-based values reported by the HPLC are systematically upward biased for HbA1c<8% and the fraction diabetic (HbA1c ≥ 6.5%) is overstated almost five-fold. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2018.1451300DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6173327PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Association Between Immigration History and Inflammatory Marker Profiles Among Older Adult Mexican Americans.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 Jan-Mar;64(1):30-42

a Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health , University of North Carolina , Chapel Hill , NC , USA.

Foreign-born Hispanics have better cardiometabolic health upon arrival in the US than their US-born counterparts, yet this advantage diminishes as duration of residence in the US increases. Underlying mechanisms explaining this paradox have been understudied. Using data from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging (SALSA), this study examined immigration history (immigrant generation and duration of US residence) in relation to biomarkers of inflammation (interleukin-6 (IL-6), soluble forms of type 1 and 2 receptors of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (sTNF-R1 and sTNF-R2), C-reactive protein (CRP), leptin, adiponectin) in a sample of 1,290 predominantly Mexican-origin immigrants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2018.1449631DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6075719PMC
March 2019
7 Reads

Parental Socioeconomic Instability and Child Obesity.

Authors:
Antwan Jones

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 Jan-Mar;64(1):15-29

a Department of Sociology , The George Washington University , Washington , DC , USA.

Using data from the 1986 to 2010 National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY) and the NLSY Child and Young Adult Supplement, this research explores how changes in parental socioeconomic status relate to child obesity over time. Results from linear mixed-effects models indicate that maternal educational gains and maternal employment transitions significantly increased their child's body mass index (BMI). This finding suggests that mothers who work may have less time to devote to monitoring their child's food intake and physical activity, which places their children at higher risks of becoming overweight or obese over time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2018.1449630DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Tykes, Toddlers, Teens, and Twins of Robust Mothers: Do the Offspring of Twinning Mothers Share in Their Mother's Robust Phenotype?

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 20;64(2):102-113. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

Population Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA.

Women who bear twins may possess a robust phenotype compared to non-twinning mothers. We examine mortality patterns for the singleton offspring of mothers of twins compared to the offspring of non-twinning mothers to determine whether they share the hypothesized robust phenotype of their mothers. Using data from the Utah Population Database, we show that both male and female singleton offspring of twinning mothers experience a survival prior to age 5, no survival benefit or penalty between ages 5 and 49, and - for males only - a statistically significant survival after age 50. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2018.1486697DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6425720PMC
December 2018

Inflammation and Cognition in Older Adults: Evidence from Taiwan.

Authors:
Megan A Todd

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(4):309-323

a Columbia Aging Center , Columbia University , New York , New York , USA.

Inflammation has been linked to clinical cognitive impairment, including Alzheimer's disease. Less is known, however, about the relationship between inflammation and normal, age-associated cognitive decline. An understanding of the determinants of all types of cognitive decline is important for improving quality of life in an aging world. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1403305DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Perceived Racial Discrimination in the Workplace and Body Weight among the Unemployed.

Authors:
Masanori Kuroki

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(4):324-331

a College of Business , Arkansas Technical University , Russellville , Arkansas , USA.

This study investigates the association between body weight and the likelihood that people perceive that they have been the victims of racial discrimination in the workplace among the unemployed. I find that unemployed obese men and women are 8.4 percentage points and 7. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1403303DOI Listing
September 2018

Spiritual Struggles and Interleukin-6: Assessing Potential Benefits and Potential Risks.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(4):279-294

a University of Michigan , Ann Arbor , Michigan , USA.

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between spiritual struggles and levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) with a subsample (N = 943) of participants who took part in a nationwide survey. This study, which was completed in 2014, was conducted in the United States. Spiritual struggles refer to difficulties that a person may encounter with his or her faith and include having a troubled relationship with God, encountering difficulties with religious others, and being unable to find a sense of ultimate meaning in life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1377058DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

"Inflammaging" and Estradiol among Older U.S. Women: A Nationally Representative Longitudinal Study.

Authors:
Aniruddha Das

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(4):295-308

a Department of Sociology and Centre on Population Dynamics , McGill University , Montreal , Quebec , Canada.

Despite accumulating small-sample and clinical evidence on "inflammaging," no population-representative longitudinal studies have specifically examined women's late-life inflammation trends. While a range of studies indicates estradiol's immunomodulation role, evidence is contradictory on whether its effects are pro- or antiinflammatory among older women. Using longitudinal data from the first two waves of the National Social Life, Health and Aging Project-a national probability sample of older U. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1403304DOI Listing
September 2018

Entry Body Mass and Earnings: Once Penalized, Ever Penalized?

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(4):332-346

b College of Pharmacy, Yonsei Institute of Pharmaceutical Science , Yonsei University , Incheon , South Korea.

It has previously been reported that an individual's body mass index (BMI) contemporaneously penalizes wages for women, but has no effect and sometimes rewards wages for men. In young adults, we estimate the association of BMI status with initial wages to assess whether initial BMI at the beginning of an individual's career affects initial and later earnings. We pooled data from 388 men and 305 women, aged 20-40 years, with BMI information for the first year of employment, using the Korean Labor and Income Panel Study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1403302DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

The Contribution of Weight Status to Black-White Differences in Mortality.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(3):206-220

a Population Studies Center, Population Aging Research Center , University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia , Pennsylvania , USA.

This article examines the contribution of weight status to black-white (B-W) differences in mortality at ages 40-79 using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We measured body mass index (BMI) based on the highest BMI attained and contrasted the contribution of BMI to that of smoking and educational attainment. We estimated both additive and multiplicative models. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1300519DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5657005PMC
July 2018
1 Read

Maternal Social Disadvantage and Newborn Telomere Length in Archived Dried Blood Spots from the Michigan Neonatal Biobank.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(3):221-235

d Leonard Davis School of Gerontology and Department of Psychology , University of Southern California , Los Angeles , California , USA.

Telomeres are the protective caps at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Short telomere length is associated with morbidity and mortality among adults and may mark the biological impact of social experiences. Using archived dried blood spots from the Michigan Neonatal Biobank, this study examined markers of maternal social disadvantage (educational attainment, receipt of public assistance, marital status, and race/ethnicity) from linked birth certificates as predictors of telomere length at birth in a sample of 192 singleton neonates born to non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic white, and Latina mothers aged 20-35 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1300520DOI Listing
July 2018
8 Reads

Does the Hispanic health advantage extend to better management of hypertension? The role of socioeconomic status, sociobehavioral factors, and health care access.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(3):262-277

a Department of Sociology and Population Program , Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado Boulder , Boulder , Colorado , USA.

Hispanics in the United States (and foreign-born Hispanics in particular) have relatively favorable health given their lower socioeconomic status compared to, for example, non-Hispanic whites. This phenomenon is often called the Hispanic health paradox (HHP). This study examines whether the previously documented HHP in hypertension prevalence extends to its management using clinical and self-reported measures from the 2007-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1353407DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5864248PMC

Racial/Ethnic Differences in Early-Life Mortality in the United States.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(3):189-205

a Department of Sociology and Population Program , IBS, University of Colorado Boulder , Boulder , Colorado , USA.

U.S. early-life (ages 1-24) deaths are tragic, far too common, and largely preventable. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1281100DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5729754PMC
July 2018
3 Reads

Association between discrimination and obesity in African-American men.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(3):253-261

a Program for Research on Men's Health , Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health , Baltimore , Maryland , USA.

The objective of this study was to examine the association between discrimination and obesity among a U.S. nationally representative sample of African-American men. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1353406DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5889913PMC
July 2018
3 Reads

Racial Disparities in the Association between Alcohol Use Disorders and Health in Black and White Women.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(3):236-252

a Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health , Boston , Massachusetts , USA.

Adverse health attributed to alcohol use disorders (AUD) is more pronounced among black than white women. We investigated whether socioeconomic status (education and income), health care factors (insurance, alcoholism treatment), or psychosocial stressors (stressful life events, racial discrimination, alcoholism stigma) could account for black-white differences in the association between AUD and physical and functional health among current women drinkers 25 years and older (N = 8,877) in the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Generalized linear regression tested how race interacted with the association between 12-month DSM-IV AUD in Wave 1 (2001-2002) and health in Wave 2 (2004-2005), adjusted for covariates (age group, alcohol consumption, smoking, body mass index, physical activity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and arthritis). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1335589DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6045433PMC
July 2018
29 Reads

Early-Life Socioeconomic Status and Adult Physiological Functioning: A Life Course Examination of Biosocial Mechanisms.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(2):87-103

a Department of Sociology, and Carolina Population Center , University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill , North Carolina , USA.

A growing literature has demonstrated a link between early-life socioeconomic conditions and adult health at a singular point in life. No research exists, however, that specifies the life course patterns of socioeconomic status (SES) in relation to the underlying biological processes that determine health. Using an innovative life course research design consisting of four nationally representative longitudinal datasets that collectively cover the human life span from early adolescence to old age (Add Health, MIDUS, NSHAP, and HRS), we address this scientific gap and assess how SES pathways from childhood into adulthood are associated with biophysiological outcomes in different adult life stages. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1279536DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5439296PMC
February 2018
28 Reads

Enzyme-Linked Immunoassay-Based Quantitative Measurement of Apolipoprotein B (ApoB) in Dried Blood Spots, a Biomarker of Cardiovascular Disease Risk.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(2):116-130

a Department of Anthropology , University of Oregon , Eugene , Oregon , USA.

Apolipoprotein B (ApoB) is a strong predictor of cardiovascular disease, which remains the leading cause of mortality in both higher and lower income countries. Here, we adapted an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) development kit for quantitative determination of ApoB levels in serum and plasma for use with dried blood spots (DBS). After confirming the dilution linearity of the assay for DBS, we measured ApoB in 208 venous DBS samples. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1283582DOI Listing
February 2018
9 Reads

Exodus from Hunger: The Long-Term Health Consequences of the 1959-1961 Chinese Famine.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(2):148-166

c Division of Social Science , The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology , Kowloon , Hong Kong.

This article examines the long-term health consequences of China's 1959-1961 famine by comparing people who stayed in Guangdong and endured the famine with people who crossed the border to immigrate to Hong Kong and thus escaped the famine. Based on data from the Hong Kong Panel Study of Social Dynamics (HKPSSD) and the China Family Panel Studies (CFPS), we focused on two health indicators-body mass index (BMI) and self-rated health (SRH)-of the cohort born before 1959. Our results show that the stayers who experienced the famine have a lower BMI than the emigrants, and they are likely to have a poor SRH. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1311203DOI Listing
February 2018
8 Reads

Family Member Deaths in Childhood Predict Systemic Inflammation in Late Life.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(2):104-115

f Department of Family and Consumer Studies and Population Sciences , Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah , Salt Lake City , Utah , USA.

Biological and epidemiological evidence has linked early-life psychosocial stress with late-life health, with inflammation as a potential mechanism. We report here the association between familial death in childhood and adulthood and increased levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of systemic inflammation. The Cache County Memory Study is a prospective study of persons initially aged 65 and older in 1995. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1281099DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6407705PMC
February 2018
12 Reads

Depression, Inflammation, and Physiological Risk in Late Life: A National Longitudinal Study.

Authors:
Aniruddha Das

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(2):131-147

a Department of Sociology , McGill University , Montreal , Quebec , Canada.

This nationally representative study queried effects of community dwelling older adults' depression and inflammation at baseline on over-time changes in surrogate markers of their cardiometabolic risk. Data were from the 2005-2006 and 2010-2011 waves of the U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1308245DOI Listing
February 2018
4 Reads

Processes Linking Religious Involvement and Telomere Length.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(2):167-188

d Kent School of Social Work , University of Louisville , Louisville , Kentucky , USA.

Although numerous studies suggest that religious involvement is associated with better health and longer life expectancies, it is unclear whether these general patterns extend to cellular aging. The mechanisms linking indicators of religious involvement with indicators of cellular aging are also undefined. We employed longitudinal data from the 2004 and 2008 Health and Retirement Study, a national probability sample of Americans aged 50 and older, to test whether average telomere length varied according to level of religious attendance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1311204DOI Listing
February 2018
32 Reads

Physical Functioning Trends among US Women and Men Age 45-64 by Education Level.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(1):21-30

b Department of Sociology , Syracuse University , Syracuse , New York , USA.

Functional limitations and disability declined in the US during the 1980s and 1990s, but reports of early 21st century trends are mixed. Whether educational inequalities in functioning increased or decreased is also poorly understood. Given the importance of disability for productivity, independent living, and health care costs, these trends are critical to US social and health policies. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19485565.2016.1
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2016.1263150DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5494255PMC
January 2018
19 Reads

"You've Come a Long Way, Baby": The Convergence in Age Patterns of Lung Cancer Mortality by Sex, United States, 1959-2013.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(1):38-53

b Department of Population Health and Disease Prevention , University of California , Irvine , California , USA.

We analyze lung cancer mortality by age and sex in the United States, 1959-2013. It is already known that male lung cancer death rates exceed those of women and that tobacco use is the leading reason for the sex difference. We elaborate on this knowledge by showing that unlike most causes of death, lung cancer mortality patterns by age are a very good fit to a quadratic-Gompertz model, i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2016.1262755DOI Listing
January 2018

Gender and Health Behavior Clustering among U.S. Young Adults.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(1):3-20

b Carolina Population Center and Department of Sociology , University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill , North Carolina , USA.

U.S. trends in population health suggest alarming disparities among young adults, who are less healthy across most measureable domains than their counterparts in other high-income countries; these international comparisons are particularly troubling for women. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2016.1262238DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5351770PMC
January 2018
4 Reads

Introduction to Issue on Gender Dynamics and Disparities in Health and Mortality.

Authors:
Eileen Crimmins

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(1):1-2

a Davis School of Gerontology , University of Southern California , Los Angeles , California , USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1293423DOI Listing
December 2018

Sex-Based Differences in the Determinants of Old Age Life Expectancy: The Influence of Perimenopause.

Authors:
April M Falconi

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(1):54-70

a School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley , Berkeley , California.

Studies using the sensitive periods framework typically examine the effects of early life exposures on later life health, due to the significant growth and development occurring during the first few years of life. The menopausal transition (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2016.1273755DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5656253PMC
January 2018

Parity Conditions the Risk for Low Birth Weight after Maternal Exposure to Air Pollution.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(1):71-86

c Department of Health and Medical Sciences , Andrzej Frycz Modrzewski Krakow University , Krakow , Poland.

Multiparous mothers have greater umbilical blood flow and thus more efficient transport of pollutants than primiparous mothers. We tested a hypothesis that multiparous mothers are more prone to have an infant with low birth weight (LBW) after prenatal exposure to air pollution. A study was conducted on a representative group of more than 74,000 singleton, live, full-term infants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2016.1264872DOI Listing
January 2018

Fertility History, Children's Gender, and Post-Reproductive Survival in a Longevous Population.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2016 ;62(3):262-274

d Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine , Università degli Studi di Sassari , Sassari , Italy.

The question of whether mothers' fertility history influences their post-reproductive survival has been addressed frequently in the scientific literature. Using data from Villagrande Strisaili, Sardinia, where longevity is higher than anywhere else in Europe, we analyzed the relationship between the fertility pattern of mothers who survived past age 50 (n = 539) and their post-reproductive lifespan. We find that, after adjustment for potential confounders (mothers' birth cohort, survival of spouse), the mothers who on average delivered their children later displayed a reduced mortality risk (‒2. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2016.1207502DOI Listing
November 2017
1 Read

Lifetime Trauma, Praying for Others, and C-Reactive Protein.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2016 ;62(3):249-261

c Department of Psychology , Bowling Green State University , Bowling Green , Kentucky , USA.

Research indicates that praying for others may offset the effects of stress on self-rated health and psychological well-being. The purpose of the current study is to extend this literature by seeing whether praying for others moderates the effects of exposure to lifetime trauma on a key marker of inflammation: C-reactive protein. The data come from a recent nationwide survey of adults of all ages (N = 1,589). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2016.1188367DOI Listing
November 2017
19 Reads

The Theoretical Potential for Selection on Determinants of Fertility to Cause Aggregate Fertility Increases in Human Populations.

Authors:
Stephen Cranney

Biodemography Soc Biol 2016 ;62(3):275-280

a Instructor, Sociology Department , Baylor University , Waco , Texas.

While prior literature on the genetics of human fertility outcomes and attitudes has generally yielded significantly positive results in developed-country contexts, the implications of this dynamic for the potential for intergenerational increases in fertility are rarely raised. Here the prior literature on the subject is discussed in light of its implications for future changes due to selection, equations traditionally used in human demography are integrated into an evolutionary biological framework, and speculative calculations on the change in future fertility assuming already published numbers for parities and heritability are conducted. Limitations and overall conclusions are discussed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2016.1212322DOI Listing
November 2017

A Longitudinal Study of Income Differences in the Height-BMI Relation among U.S. Children Ages 6 to 14.

Authors:
Jason E Murasko

Biodemography Soc Biol 2016 ;62(3):235-248

a Department of Economics , University of Houston - Clear Lake , Houston , Texas , USA.

Previous work has shown a positive height-obesity association in U.S. children that is more pronounced in those from lower-income families than in those from higher-income families. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2016.1169395DOI Listing
November 2017

Between (Racial) Groups and a Hard Place: An Exploration of Social Science Approaches to Race and Genetics, 2000-2014.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2016 ;62(3):281-299

a Department of Pan-African Studies , University of Louisville , Louisville , Kentucky , USA.

As the social sciences expand their involvement in genetic and genomic research, more information is needed to understand how theoretical concepts are applied to genetic data found in social surveys. Given the layers of complexity of studying race in relation to genetics and genomics, it is important to identify the varying approaches used to discuss and operationalize race and identity by social scientists. The present study explores how social scientists have used race, ethnicity, and ancestry in studies published in four social science journals from 2000 to 2014. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2016.1238299DOI Listing
November 2017

Validation of an Optimized ELISA for Quantitative Assessment of Epstein-Barr Virus Antibodies from Dried Blood Spots.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2016 ;62(2):222-33

a Human Biology Research Laboratory, Department of Anthropology , University of Oregon , Eugene , Oregon , USA.

Our objective was to validate a commercially available ELISA to measure antibody titers against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in dried blood spots (DBS) to replace a previously validated assay for DBS that is no longer available. We evaluated the precision, reliability, and stability of the assay for the measurement of EBV antibodies in matched plasma, fingerprick DBS, and venous blood DBS samples from 208 individuals. Effects of hematocrit and DBS sample matrix on EBV antibody determination were also investigated, and the cutoff for seropositivity in DBS was determined. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2016.1169396DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4968568PMC
November 2017
9 Reads

Population Distributions of Thymic Function in Adults: Variation by Sociodemographic Characteristics and Health Status.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2016 ;62(2):208-21

a Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health and Carolina Population Center , University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill , North Carolina , USA.

The thymus is critical for mounting an effective immune response and maintaining health. However, epidemiologic studies characterizing thymic function in the population setting are lacking. Using data from 263 adults in the Detroit Neighborhood Health Study, we examined thymic function as measured by the number of signal joint T-cell receptor excision circles (sjTREC) and assessed associations with established indicators of physiological health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2016.1172199DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4995111PMC
November 2017
6 Reads

Clostridium difficile Infection: An Emerging Cause of Death in the Twenty-First Century.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2016 ;62(2):198-207

a Department of Population Health and Disease Prevention , University of California , Irvine , California , USA.

Enterocolitis due to Clostridium difficile is major emerging cause of death in the U.S. Between 1999 and 2012, C. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2016.1172957DOI Listing
November 2017

Genome-Wide Profiling of RNA from Dried Blood Spots: Convergence with Bioinformatic Results Derived from Whole Venous Blood and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2016 ;62(2):182-97

e Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology , UCLA School of Medicine , Los Angeles , California , USA.

Genome-wide transcriptional profiling has emerged as a powerful tool for analyzing biological mechanisms underlying social gradients in health, but utilization in population-based studies has been hampered by logistical constraints and costs associated with venipuncture blood sampling. Dried blood spots (DBS) provide a minimally invasive, low-cost alternative to venipuncture, and in this article we evaluate how closely the substantive results from DBS transcriptional profiling correspond to those derived from parallel analyses of gold-standard venous blood samples (PAXgene whole blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells [PBMC]). Analyses focused on differences in gene expression between African-Americans and Caucasians in a community sample of 82 healthy adults (age 18-70 years; mean 35). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2016.1185600DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4972449PMC
November 2017
3 Reads

An Old Mom Keeps You Young: Mother's Age at Last Birth and Offspring Longevity in Nineteenth-Century Utah.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2016 ;62(2):164-81

c Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science , Lund University , Lund , Sweden.

This study analyzes the intergenerational effects of late childbearing on offspring's adult longevity in a population in Utah (United States) that does not display evidence of parity-specific birth control-a so-called natural fertility population. Studies have found that for women who experience late menopause and prolonged reproduction, aging is postponed and longevity is increased. This is believed to indicate female "robustness" and the impact of biological or genetic factors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2015.1124325DOI Listing
November 2017
7 Reads

The Changing Body Mass-Mortality Association in the United States: Evidence of Sex-Specific Cohort Trends from Three National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys.

Authors:
Yan Yu

Biodemography Soc Biol 2016 ;62(2):143-63

a Crawford School of Public Policy , Australian National University , Acton , Australia.

The association between body mass index (BMI) categories and mortality remains uncertain. Using three National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys covering the 1971-2006 period for cohorts born between 1896 and 1968, this study estimates separately for men and women models for year-of-birth (cohort) and year-of-observation (period) trends in how age-specific mortality rates differ across BMI categories. Among women, relative to the normal weight (BMI 18. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2015.1108835DOI Listing
November 2017

The Geographic Distribution of Genetic Risk as Compared to Social Risk for Chronic Diseases in the United States.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2016 ;62(1):126-42

a School of Medicine, Division of General Medical Disciplines , Stanford University , Stanford , California , USA.

There is an association between chronic disease and geography, and there is evidence that the environment plays a critical role in this relationship. Yet at the same time, there is known to be substantial geographic variation by ancestry across the United States. Resulting geographic genetic variation-that is, the extent to which single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to chronic disease vary spatially-could thus drive some part of the association between geography and disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2016.1141353DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4899969PMC
January 2017
1 Read

Neighborhood and Family Environment of Expectant Mothers May Influence Prenatal Programming of Adult Cancer Risk: Discussion and an Illustrative DNA Methylation Example.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2016 ;62(1):87-104

c Duke Cancer Institute , Duke University , Durham , North Carolina , USA.

Childhood stressors including physical abuse predict adult cancer risk. Prior research portrays this finding as an indirect mechanism that operates through coping behaviors, including adult smoking, or through increased toxic exposures during childhood. Little is known about potential direct causal mechanisms between early-life stressors and adult cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2015.1126501DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4851425PMC
January 2017
15 Reads

Estimating Telomere Length Heritability in an Unrelated Sample of Adults: Is Heritability of Telomere Length Modified by Life Course Socioeconomic Status?

Biodemography Soc Biol 2016 ;62(1):73-86

b School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology , University of Michigan , Ann Arbor , Michigan , USA.

Telomere length (TL) is a widely used marker of biological aging and is associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Recently, there has been evidence for an association between TL and socioeconomic status (SES), particularly for measures of education and childhood SES. Individual differences in TL are also influenced by genetic factors, with heritability estimates from twin and sibling studies ranging from 34 to 82 percent. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2015.1120645DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5117361PMC
January 2017
7 Reads

Genetic Diversity and Differentiation in Urban and Indigenous Populations of Mexico: Patterns of Mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome Lineages.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2016 ;62(1):53-72

g Departamento de Biología Evolutiva, Facultad de Ciencias , Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cd. México, México.

Aside from the admixture between indigenous people and people from overseas, populations in Mexico changed drastically after the Spanish conquest of the sixteenth century, forming an intricate history that has been underutilized in understanding the genetic population structure of Mexicans. To infer historical processes of isolation, dispersal, and assimilation, we examined the phylogeography of mitochondrial (mt) DNA and Y-chromosome lineages in 3,026 individuals from 10 urban and nine indigenous populations by identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms. A geographic array with a predominance of Amerindian lineages was observed for mtDNA, with northern indigenous populations being divergent from the central and southern indigenous populations; urban populations showed low differentiation with isolation by distance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2015.1117938DOI Listing
January 2017
13 Reads

Social Networks and the Heritability of Migratory Behavior.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2016 ;62(1):36-52

b Departments of Anthropology, and Epidemiology and Biostatistics , University at Albany and the Center for Social and Demographic Analysis , Albany , New York , USA.

A small but growing body of literature examines the relationship between genetics and human migration. These studies suggest that some DRD4 alleles, particularly 7R+, are related to migration. This is surprising from a sociological perspective, which views migration largely as a product of social and economic forces. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2015.1116374DOI Listing
January 2017
1 Read

African Ancestry, Social Factors, and Hypertension Among Non-Hispanic Blacks in the Health and Retirement Study.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2016 ;62(1):19-35

a Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences , Harvard School of Public Health , Boston , Massachusetts , USA.

The biomedical literature contains much speculation about possible genetic explanations for the large and persistent black-white disparities in hypertension, but profound social inequalities are also hypothesized to contribute to this outcome. Our goal is to evaluate whether socioeconomic status (SES) differences provide a plausible mechanism for associations between African ancestry and hypertension in a U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2015.1108836DOI Listing
January 2017