182 results match your criteria Biodemography And Social Biology[Journal]


The pandemic of 1918 and the heart disease epidemic in middle-aged men and women in the United States.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2020 Apr-Jun;65(2):137-155

Chartered Statistician, Kenosha, Wisconsin, USA.

Members of birth cohorts who were alive in 1918 and survived the influenza pandemic were likely to have been "primed" for heart disease in later life. We examine the hypothesis that the twentieth-century heart disease epidemic was a cohort effect reflecting the changing susceptibility composition of the population.We estimated heart disease death rates by single years of age for cohorts born in 1860-1949. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2019.1689352DOI Listing

Role of proximate determinants in recent and past fertility stalls in Bangladesh.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2020 Apr-Jun;65(2):119-136

Department of Sociology, Gender & Social Work, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

The two fertility stalls that occurred in Bangladesh emerged as substantial barriers in controlling its burgeoning vast population. The first stall occurred during 1996-2000 in the mid-transition of fertility, while the second stall occurred during the recent period 2011-2014 in the late transition of fertility. This article explores the role of proximate determinants in those stalls by using the data of Bangladesh Demographic and Health Surveys. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2019.1683713DOI Listing

Marriage dynamics in old Lower California: ecological constraints and reproductive value in an arid peninsular frontier.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2020 Apr-Jun;65(2):156-171

Economic Science Institute, Chapman University, One University Drive, Orange, California, USA.

It is commonly expected that natural selection will favor earlier reproduction, yet ecological constraints can force people to delay marriage. Furthermore, humans demonstrate sex-specific preferences in marriage partners - with grooms normally a few years older than their brides; however, the age at which individuals marry can influence the spousal age gap. We investigate factors influencing age at first marriage and age difference at marriage using nineteenth-century historical demographic data from Baja California Sur, Mexico. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2020.1728685DOI Listing

Income dividends and subjective survival in a Cherokee Indian cohort: a quasi-experiment.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2020 Apr-Jun;65(2):172-187

Program in Public Health, Anteater Instruction & Research Offices (AIRB), University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.

Persons with high temporal discounting tend to value immediate gratification over future gains. Low self-reported lifespan (SRL)-an individual's assessment of a relatively short future lifespan-concentrates in low-income populations and may reflect high temporal discounting. We use casino-based cash dividends among the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) as a quasi-experiment to test whether large income gains among EBCI members translate into increased SRL. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2020.1730155DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7250001PMC

Weight and economic development: current net nutrition in the late 19th- and early 20th-century United States.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2020 Apr-Jun;65(2):97-118

University of Texas, Permian Basin, 4901 East University, Odessa Texas, USA.

When traditional measures for material and economic welfare are scarce or unreliable, height and the body mass index (BMI) are now widely accepted measures that represent cumulative and current net nutrition in development studies. However, as the ratio of weight to height, BMI does not fully isolate the effects of current net nutrition. After controlling for height as a measure for current net nutrition, this study uses the weight of a sample of international men in US prisons. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2019.1681258DOI Listing

Assessing heterogeneity in menstrual cycles by means of a multilevel latent class approach.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2020 Jan-Mar;65(1):41-56

Department of Statistical Sciences, University of Padua, Padua, Italy.

In this paper, we study the problem of heterogeneity in cervical mucus hydration at different times relative to the mucus peak both between cycles and women, specifying and estimating appropriate multilevel latent class models for longitudinal data. We estimate multilevel and growth latent class models which classify women on the basis of the evolution of cervical mucus characteristics observed over the fertile period of each menstrual cycle taking into account that we observe a different number of cycles per woman and correlation over time between consecutive observations. The effect of potential covariates on mucus evolution patterns is as well evaluated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2020.1711703DOI Listing
February 2020

Perceived neighborhood social cohesion and cardiometabolic risk: a gene × environment study.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2020 Jan-Mar;65(1):1-15

Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.

People living in socially cohesive neighborhoods generally have better health. We extend this research by evaluating the hypothesis that perceived neighborhood cohesion may influence health by attenuating genetic liability for cardiometabolic risk factors. Using data from the Health and Retirement Study ( = 6615; mean age 69. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2019.1568672DOI Listing
February 2020

C-reactive protein response to influenza vaccination predicts cardiovascular disease risk in the Philippines.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2020 Jan-Mar;65(1):88-96

Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA.

Inflammation is associated with increased risk for chronic degenerative diseases, as well as age-related functional declines across many systems and tissues. Current understandings of inflammation, aging, and human health are based on studies conducted almost exclusively in high-income nations that rely primarily on baseline measures of chronic inflammation. This analysis investigates the inflammatory response to vaccination as a predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) among older women in the Philippines, a lower-middle income nation with rising rates of overweight/obesity and relatively high burdens of infectious disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2019.1597623DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7032592PMC
January 2021

The effect of social assistance on kin relationships: evidence from Roma communities.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2020 Jan-Mar;65(1):16-30

Faculty of Economics Subotica, University of Novi Sad, Subotica, Serbia.

This paper discusses the effects of social assistance on kinship relationships in Roma, a disadvantaged European minority population, and how variation in kin support affects self-reported health and reproductive success. Data were collected in 2016-7 in several rural Roma settlements in central Serbia. The sample consisted of 143 men and 221 women. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2019.1681256DOI Listing
February 2020

Effects of wife's and husband's income on wife's reproduction: an evolutionary perspective on human mating.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2020 Jan-Mar;65(1):31-40

Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

From an evolutionary perspective, for women mate choice may be of crucial importance particularly concerning resources needed for rearing children. In modern societies, however, resources in terms of income are often provided by both women and men. Nonetheless, the effects of a wife's and husband's socioeconomic status on the wife's reproduction have not been investigated on a broader level. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2019.1689351DOI Listing
February 2020

Biomarkers for demographic research: sperm counts and other male infertility biomarkers.

Authors:
Ronny Westerman

Biodemography Soc Biol 2020 Jan-Mar;65(1):73-87

Competence Center Mortality-Follow-Up, German National Cohort, Federal Institute for Population Research, Wiesbaden, Germany.

Some male infertility biomarkers are etiologically linked to idiopathic infertility in men, the direct cause of which often cannot be determined with conventional sperm count parameters. Open questions remain regarding the universal and generic infertility definitions that cover and combine the clinical, epidemiological, and demographic perspectives. The main effort in the application of these infertility biomarkers are accounted by more or less strict discrimination criteria. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2019.1706150DOI Listing
February 2020

Social and demographical determinants of quality of life in people who live with HIV/AIDS infection: evidence from a meta-analysis.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2020 Jan-Mar;65(1):57-72. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Saveh University of Medical Sciences, Saveh, Iran.

The aim of this meta-analysis is to summarize the available evidence on the social and demographic determinants of health-related quality of life (QoL) for HIV-infected populations in order to provide a direction to policy makers, planners, and program developers on how best to use their resources to improve the QoL of HIV-infected people.PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, and Cochrane electronic databases were searched (up to February 2017) to identify the relevant studies. A meta-analysis was conducted with procreate polled odds ratios (ORs and β) and the confidence intervals of 95% on determining factors of QoL in social and demographic terms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2019.1587287DOI Listing
March 2019
12 Reads

Associations between ethnic identity, regional history, and genomic ancestry in New Mexicans of Spanish-speaking descent.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 Apr-Jun;64(2):152-170

a Department of Anthropology , University of New Mexico , Albuquerque , New Mexico.

This study examines associations between ethnic identity, regional history, and genomic ancestry in New Mexicans of Spanish-speaking descent (NMS). In structured interviews, we asked 507 NMS to select from a list of eight ethnic identity terms identified in previous research. We estimated genomic ancestry for each individual from 291,917 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and compared genomic ancestry, age, and birthplace between groups of individuals who identified using each ethnic identity term. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2018.1545563DOI Listing
September 2019
1 Read

A simulation study of the role of cohort forces in mortality patterns.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 Jul-Sep;64(3-4):216-236

Department of Sociology, New York University, New York, USA.

This study uses the micro-simulation method to investigate the role of cohort forces in age-dependent mortality pattern. We test the micro mechanisms for cohort evolution and mortality selection, and how these two biological and demographic forces may interact with epidemiologic transition to shape the cohort age-dependence of mortality pattern in both early- and later-transition countries. We show that cohort evolution is due to the declining rate of mortality acceleration at the individual level, which is associated with lower initial mortality rates but not smaller variance of frailty distribution in later birth cohorts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2019.1568673DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6927337PMC

What Can Sociogenomics Learn from ? social by nature, .

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 Jul-Sep;64(3-4):237-250

Department of Sociology and Criminology, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, USA.

, the recent book by Catherine Bliss on the development and state of the field of sociogenomics, is far from perfect. Yet, this flawed book levies a mixture of erroneous and compelling questions about the state of the field of sociogenomics, many of which we as a field would benefit from considering: How should we bring the environment back in the post-GWAS era? How do the publication and funding incentives of our field influence the evolution of our research agenda? What role should social scientific theory play in motivating our research and interpreting our findings? How can we promote greater diversity in our research community and subjects? And how can we work to better control media and popular narratives of our research? The authors do not attempt to answer all of these questions definitively, but do argue that we as a field must grapple with them seriously to ensure that our ideals and reality as a field are more congruent. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2019.1597622DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6927480PMC

Perceived neighborhood social cohesion and cardiometabolic risk: a gene × environment study.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 Jul-Sep;64(3-4):173-186

Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.

People living in socially cohesive neighborhoods generally have better health. We extend this research by evaluating the hypothesis that perceived neighborhood cohesion may influence health by attenuating genetic liability for cardiometabolic risk factors. Using data from the Health and Retirement Study ( = 6,615; mean age 69. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2019.1579084DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6927540PMC

Genetic nature or genetic nurture? Introducing social genetic parameters to quantify bias in polygenic score analyses.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 Jul-Sep;64(3-4):187-215

Graduate School of Education, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.

Results from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) can be used to generate a polygenic score (PGS), an individual-level measure summarizing identified genetic influence on a trait dispersed across the genome. For complex, behavioral traits, the association between an individual's PGS and their phenotype may contain bias (from geographic, ancestral, and/or socioeconomic confounding) alongside the causal effect of the individual's genes. We formalize the introduction of a different source of bias in regression models using PGSs: the effects of parental genes on offspring outcomes, known as genetic nurture. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2019.1681257DOI Listing

Does the Functional Form of the Association Between Education and Mortality Differ by U.S. Region?

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 Jan-Mar;64(1):63-81

c Department of Sociology and Anthropology , Tel Aviv University , Tel Aviv , Israel.

To understand the education-mortality association among U.S. adults, recent studies have documented its national functional form. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2018.1468239DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5994609PMC
March 2019
2 Reads

Using Allostatic Load to Validate Self-rated Health for Racial/Ethnic Groups in the United States.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 Jan-Mar;64(1):1-14

c U.S. Army Institute for Surgical Research, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics , San Antonio , TX , USA.

This study evaluates the validity of subjective health measurement for racial/ethnic comparisons in the United States, by assessing whether allostatic load (AL) is equally associated with poor/fair self-rated health (SRH) for different racial/ethnic groups. This study used data from the National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES) for 2006-2010. Multivariable logistic regression models were fit and stratified by race/ethnicity to study the association between AL and poor/fair SRH. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2018.1429891DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

HPLC-based Measurement of Glycated Hemoglobin using Dried Blood Spots Collected under Adverse Field Conditions.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 Jan-Mar;64(1):43-62

g Sociology Department and Carolina Population Center , University of North Carolina , Chapel Hill , NC , USA.

Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assays with venous blood and dried blood spots (DBS) are compared for 143 paired samples collected in Aceh, Indonesia. Relative to gold-standard venous-blood values, DBS-based values reported by the HPLC are systematically upward biased for HbA1c<8% and the fraction diabetic (HbA1c ≥ 6.5%) is overstated almost five-fold. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2018.1451300DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6173327PMC
March 2019
3 Reads

Association Between Immigration History and Inflammatory Marker Profiles Among Older Adult Mexican Americans.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 Jan-Mar;64(1):30-42

a Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health , University of North Carolina , Chapel Hill , NC , USA.

Foreign-born Hispanics have better cardiometabolic health upon arrival in the US than their US-born counterparts, yet this advantage diminishes as duration of residence in the US increases. Underlying mechanisms explaining this paradox have been understudied. Using data from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging (SALSA), this study examined immigration history (immigrant generation and duration of US residence) in relation to biomarkers of inflammation (interleukin-6 (IL-6), soluble forms of type 1 and 2 receptors of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (sTNF-R1 and sTNF-R2), C-reactive protein (CRP), leptin, adiponectin) in a sample of 1,290 predominantly Mexican-origin immigrants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2018.1449631DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6075719PMC
March 2019
10 Reads

Parental Socioeconomic Instability and Child Obesity.

Authors:
Antwan Jones

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 Jan-Mar;64(1):15-29

a Department of Sociology , The George Washington University , Washington , DC , USA.

Using data from the 1986 to 2010 National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY) and the NLSY Child and Young Adult Supplement, this research explores how changes in parental socioeconomic status relate to child obesity over time. Results from linear mixed-effects models indicate that maternal educational gains and maternal employment transitions significantly increased their child's body mass index (BMI). This finding suggests that mothers who work may have less time to devote to monitoring their child's food intake and physical activity, which places their children at higher risks of becoming overweight or obese over time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2018.1449630DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Rethinking mortality deceleration.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 Apr-Jun;64(2):127-138

a Department of Economics and Business , University of Sassari , Sassari , Italy.

The evolution of mortality shows a marked deceleration at older ages. This phenomenon is generally thought to be an effect of selection: mortality decelerates because it progressively selects the most robust individuals in the cohort. Other processes, however, may contribute to mortality deceleration as well. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2018.1511414DOI Listing
November 2019

Darling I don't know why I go to extremes: a seemingly culturally universal and potentially evolved human tendency to hold extreme preferences and values.

Authors:
Satoshi Kanazawa

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 Apr-Jun;64(2):114-122

a Department of Management , London School of Economics and Political Science , London , United Kingdom.

Positive psychologists have observed, based on large cross-cultural data, that "most people are happy" and "life is pretty meaningful." Evolutionary and behavior genetic considerations suggest, however, that the human tendency to hold "extreme" opinions significantly above or below the scale midpoint may be more universal. Analyses of all relevant questions in the 2014 General Social Survey ( = 266 questions and 2,538 respondents) and Wave 6 of the World Values Survey ( = 138 questions and 79,805 respondents in 59 countries) show that, no matter what question one asks anywhere in the world, humans hold "extreme" opinions in nearly all (94. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2018.1490884DOI Listing
November 2019

New evidence on the impacts of early exposure to the 1918 influenza pandemic on old-age mortality.

Authors:
Jason M Fletcher

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 Apr-Jun;64(2):123-126

a La Follette School of Public Affairs, Department of Sociology, Center for Demography of Health and Aging , University of Wisconsin-Madison , Madison , WI , USA.

This paper provides new evidence of the impacts of early life exposure to the 1918 pandemic on old-age mortality by analyzing data from the National Longitudinal Mortality Study (n ~ 220,000). The specifications used year and quarter of birth indicators to assess the effects of timing of pandemic exposure and used Cox proportional hazard models for all-cause mortality outcomes. The findings suggest evidence of excess all-cause mortality for cohorts born during 1918 and mixed evidence for cohorts born in 1917 and 1919. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2018.1501267DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6613805PMC
November 2019

Erratum.

Authors:

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 Apr-Jun;64(2):171

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2018.1560080DOI Listing

Effect of Diabetes on Life Expectancy in the United States by Race and Ethnicity.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 20;64(2):139-151. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

Department of Global Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

We investigated the impact of diabetes on US life expectancy by sex and race/ethnicity using a prospective cohort study design. Cohorts were drawn from 1997-2009 waves of the National Health Interview Survey and linked to death records through December 31, 2011. We combined data on the prevalence of diabetes among decedents with estimates of the hazard ratios of individuals diagnosed with diabetes to calculate population attributable fractions (PAFs) by age, sex, and race/ethnicity at ages 30 and above. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2018.1542291DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6550350PMC
November 2019
3 Reads

Predictors and Implications of Accelerated Cognitive Aging.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 20;64(2):83-101. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.

Aging is a major risk factor for both normal and pathological cognitive decline. However, individuals vary in their rate of age-related decline. We developed an easily interpretable composite measure of cognitive age, and related both the level of cognitive age and cognitive slope to sociodemographic, genetic, and disease indicators and examine its prediction of dementia transition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2018.1552513DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6469682PMC
November 2019
1 Read

Tykes, Toddlers, Teens, and Twins of Robust Mothers: Do the Offspring of Twinning Mothers Share in Their Mother's Robust Phenotype?

Biodemography Soc Biol 2018 20;64(2):102-113. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

Population Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA.

Women who bear twins may possess a robust phenotype compared to non-twinning mothers. We examine mortality patterns for the singleton offspring of mothers of twins compared to the offspring of non-twinning mothers to determine whether they share the hypothesized robust phenotype of their mothers. Using data from the Utah Population Database, we show that both male and female singleton offspring of twinning mothers experience a survival prior to age 5, no survival benefit or penalty between ages 5 and 49, and - for males only - a statistically significant survival after age 50. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2018.1486697DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6425720PMC
September 2019
1 Read

Inflammation and Cognition in Older Adults: Evidence from Taiwan.

Authors:
Megan A Todd

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(4):309-323

a Columbia Aging Center , Columbia University , New York , New York , USA.

Inflammation has been linked to clinical cognitive impairment, including Alzheimer's disease. Less is known, however, about the relationship between inflammation and normal, age-associated cognitive decline. An understanding of the determinants of all types of cognitive decline is important for improving quality of life in an aging world. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1403305DOI Listing
September 2018
4 Reads

Perceived Racial Discrimination in the Workplace and Body Weight among the Unemployed.

Authors:
Masanori Kuroki

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(4):324-331

a College of Business , Arkansas Technical University , Russellville , Arkansas , USA.

This study investigates the association between body weight and the likelihood that people perceive that they have been the victims of racial discrimination in the workplace among the unemployed. I find that unemployed obese men and women are 8.4 percentage points and 7. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1403303DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Spiritual Struggles and Interleukin-6: Assessing Potential Benefits and Potential Risks.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(4):279-294

a University of Michigan , Ann Arbor , Michigan , USA.

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between spiritual struggles and levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) with a subsample (N = 943) of participants who took part in a nationwide survey. This study, which was completed in 2014, was conducted in the United States. Spiritual struggles refer to difficulties that a person may encounter with his or her faith and include having a troubled relationship with God, encountering difficulties with religious others, and being unable to find a sense of ultimate meaning in life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1377058DOI Listing
September 2018
4 Reads

"Inflammaging" and Estradiol among Older U.S. Women: A Nationally Representative Longitudinal Study.

Authors:
Aniruddha Das

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(4):295-308

a Department of Sociology and Centre on Population Dynamics , McGill University , Montreal , Quebec , Canada.

Despite accumulating small-sample and clinical evidence on "inflammaging," no population-representative longitudinal studies have specifically examined women's late-life inflammation trends. While a range of studies indicates estradiol's immunomodulation role, evidence is contradictory on whether its effects are pro- or antiinflammatory among older women. Using longitudinal data from the first two waves of the National Social Life, Health and Aging Project-a national probability sample of older U. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1403304DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Entry Body Mass and Earnings: Once Penalized, Ever Penalized?

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(4):332-346

b College of Pharmacy, Yonsei Institute of Pharmaceutical Science , Yonsei University , Incheon , South Korea.

It has previously been reported that an individual's body mass index (BMI) contemporaneously penalizes wages for women, but has no effect and sometimes rewards wages for men. In young adults, we estimate the association of BMI status with initial wages to assess whether initial BMI at the beginning of an individual's career affects initial and later earnings. We pooled data from 388 men and 305 women, aged 20-40 years, with BMI information for the first year of employment, using the Korean Labor and Income Panel Study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1403302DOI Listing
September 2018
3 Reads

The Contribution of Weight Status to Black-White Differences in Mortality.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(3):206-220

a Population Studies Center, Population Aging Research Center , University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia , Pennsylvania , USA.

This article examines the contribution of weight status to black-white (B-W) differences in mortality at ages 40-79 using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We measured body mass index (BMI) based on the highest BMI attained and contrasted the contribution of BMI to that of smoking and educational attainment. We estimated both additive and multiplicative models. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1300519DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5657005PMC
July 2018
14 Reads

Maternal Social Disadvantage and Newborn Telomere Length in Archived Dried Blood Spots from the Michigan Neonatal Biobank.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(3):221-235

d Leonard Davis School of Gerontology and Department of Psychology , University of Southern California , Los Angeles , California , USA.

Telomeres are the protective caps at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Short telomere length is associated with morbidity and mortality among adults and may mark the biological impact of social experiences. Using archived dried blood spots from the Michigan Neonatal Biobank, this study examined markers of maternal social disadvantage (educational attainment, receipt of public assistance, marital status, and race/ethnicity) from linked birth certificates as predictors of telomere length at birth in a sample of 192 singleton neonates born to non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic white, and Latina mothers aged 20-35 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1300520DOI Listing
July 2018
10 Reads

Does the Hispanic health advantage extend to better management of hypertension? The role of socioeconomic status, sociobehavioral factors, and health care access.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(3):262-277

a Department of Sociology and Population Program , Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado Boulder , Boulder , Colorado , USA.

Hispanics in the United States (and foreign-born Hispanics in particular) have relatively favorable health given their lower socioeconomic status compared to, for example, non-Hispanic whites. This phenomenon is often called the Hispanic health paradox (HHP). This study examines whether the previously documented HHP in hypertension prevalence extends to its management using clinical and self-reported measures from the 2007-2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1353407DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5864248PMC
July 2018
1 Read

Racial/Ethnic Differences in Early-Life Mortality in the United States.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(3):189-205

a Department of Sociology and Population Program , IBS, University of Colorado Boulder , Boulder , Colorado , USA.

U.S. early-life (ages 1-24) deaths are tragic, far too common, and largely preventable. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1281100DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5729754PMC
July 2018
6 Reads

Association between discrimination and obesity in African-American men.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(3):253-261

a Program for Research on Men's Health , Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health , Baltimore , Maryland , USA.

The objective of this study was to examine the association between discrimination and obesity among a U.S. nationally representative sample of African-American men. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1353406DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5889913PMC
July 2018
6 Reads

Racial Disparities in the Association between Alcohol Use Disorders and Health in Black and White Women.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(3):236-252

a Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health , Boston , Massachusetts , USA.

Adverse health attributed to alcohol use disorders (AUD) is more pronounced among black than white women. We investigated whether socioeconomic status (education and income), health care factors (insurance, alcoholism treatment), or psychosocial stressors (stressful life events, racial discrimination, alcoholism stigma) could account for black-white differences in the association between AUD and physical and functional health among current women drinkers 25 years and older (N = 8,877) in the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Generalized linear regression tested how race interacted with the association between 12-month DSM-IV AUD in Wave 1 (2001-2002) and health in Wave 2 (2004-2005), adjusted for covariates (age group, alcohol consumption, smoking, body mass index, physical activity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and arthritis). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1335589DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6045433PMC
July 2018
46 Reads

Early-Life Socioeconomic Status and Adult Physiological Functioning: A Life Course Examination of Biosocial Mechanisms.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(2):87-103

a Department of Sociology, and Carolina Population Center , University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill , North Carolina , USA.

A growing literature has demonstrated a link between early-life socioeconomic conditions and adult health at a singular point in life. No research exists, however, that specifies the life course patterns of socioeconomic status (SES) in relation to the underlying biological processes that determine health. Using an innovative life course research design consisting of four nationally representative longitudinal datasets that collectively cover the human life span from early adolescence to old age (Add Health, MIDUS, NSHAP, and HRS), we address this scientific gap and assess how SES pathways from childhood into adulthood are associated with biophysiological outcomes in different adult life stages. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1279536DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5439296PMC
February 2018
59 Reads

Enzyme-Linked Immunoassay-Based Quantitative Measurement of Apolipoprotein B (ApoB) in Dried Blood Spots, a Biomarker of Cardiovascular Disease Risk.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(2):116-130

a Department of Anthropology , University of Oregon , Eugene , Oregon , USA.

Apolipoprotein B (ApoB) is a strong predictor of cardiovascular disease, which remains the leading cause of mortality in both higher and lower income countries. Here, we adapted an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) development kit for quantitative determination of ApoB levels in serum and plasma for use with dried blood spots (DBS). After confirming the dilution linearity of the assay for DBS, we measured ApoB in 208 venous DBS samples. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1283582DOI Listing
February 2018
28 Reads

Exodus from Hunger: The Long-Term Health Consequences of the 1959-1961 Chinese Famine.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(2):148-166

c Division of Social Science , The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology , Kowloon , Hong Kong.

This article examines the long-term health consequences of China's 1959-1961 famine by comparing people who stayed in Guangdong and endured the famine with people who crossed the border to immigrate to Hong Kong and thus escaped the famine. Based on data from the Hong Kong Panel Study of Social Dynamics (HKPSSD) and the China Family Panel Studies (CFPS), we focused on two health indicators-body mass index (BMI) and self-rated health (SRH)-of the cohort born before 1959. Our results show that the stayers who experienced the famine have a lower BMI than the emigrants, and they are likely to have a poor SRH. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1311203DOI Listing
February 2018
10 Reads

Family Member Deaths in Childhood Predict Systemic Inflammation in Late Life.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(2):104-115

f Department of Family and Consumer Studies and Population Sciences , Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah , Salt Lake City , Utah , USA.

Biological and epidemiological evidence has linked early-life psychosocial stress with late-life health, with inflammation as a potential mechanism. We report here the association between familial death in childhood and adulthood and increased levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of systemic inflammation. The Cache County Memory Study is a prospective study of persons initially aged 65 and older in 1995. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1281099DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6407705PMC
February 2018
20 Reads

Depression, Inflammation, and Physiological Risk in Late Life: A National Longitudinal Study.

Authors:
Aniruddha Das

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(2):131-147

a Department of Sociology , McGill University , Montreal , Quebec , Canada.

This nationally representative study queried effects of community dwelling older adults' depression and inflammation at baseline on over-time changes in surrogate markers of their cardiometabolic risk. Data were from the 2005-2006 and 2010-2011 waves of the U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1308245DOI Listing
February 2018
6 Reads

Processes Linking Religious Involvement and Telomere Length.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(2):167-188

d Kent School of Social Work , University of Louisville , Louisville , Kentucky , USA.

Although numerous studies suggest that religious involvement is associated with better health and longer life expectancies, it is unclear whether these general patterns extend to cellular aging. The mechanisms linking indicators of religious involvement with indicators of cellular aging are also undefined. We employed longitudinal data from the 2004 and 2008 Health and Retirement Study, a national probability sample of Americans aged 50 and older, to test whether average telomere length varied according to level of religious attendance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1311204DOI Listing
February 2018
52 Reads

Physical Functioning Trends among US Women and Men Age 45-64 by Education Level.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(1):21-30

b Department of Sociology , Syracuse University , Syracuse , New York , USA.

Functional limitations and disability declined in the US during the 1980s and 1990s, but reports of early 21st century trends are mixed. Whether educational inequalities in functioning increased or decreased is also poorly understood. Given the importance of disability for productivity, independent living, and health care costs, these trends are critical to US social and health policies. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19485565.2016.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2016.1263150DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5494255PMC
January 2018
34 Reads

"You've Come a Long Way, Baby": The Convergence in Age Patterns of Lung Cancer Mortality by Sex, United States, 1959-2013.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(1):38-53

b Department of Population Health and Disease Prevention , University of California , Irvine , California , USA.

We analyze lung cancer mortality by age and sex in the United States, 1959-2013. It is already known that male lung cancer death rates exceed those of women and that tobacco use is the leading reason for the sex difference. We elaborate on this knowledge by showing that unlike most causes of death, lung cancer mortality patterns by age are a very good fit to a quadratic-Gompertz model, i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2016.1262755DOI Listing
January 2018
2 Reads

Gender and Health Behavior Clustering among U.S. Young Adults.

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(1):3-20

b Carolina Population Center and Department of Sociology , University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill , North Carolina , USA.

U.S. trends in population health suggest alarming disparities among young adults, who are less healthy across most measureable domains than their counterparts in other high-income countries; these international comparisons are particularly troubling for women. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2016.1262238DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5351770PMC
January 2018
18 Reads

Introduction to Issue on Gender Dynamics and Disparities in Health and Mortality.

Authors:
Eileen Crimmins

Biodemography Soc Biol 2017 ;63(1):1-2

a Davis School of Gerontology , University of Southern California , Los Angeles , California , USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19485565.2017.1293423DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6548185PMC
December 2018
1 Read