225 results match your criteria Behaviour[Journal]


The misbehaviour of a metacognitive monkey.

Behaviour 2015;152(6):727-756

Language Research Center, Georgia State University, 3401 Panthersville Rd., Decatur GA 30034, USA.

Metacognition, the monitoring of one's own mental states, is a fundamental aspect of human intellect. Despite tests in nonhuman animals suggestive of uncertainty monitoring, some authors interpret these results solely in terms of primitive psychological mechanisms and reinforcement regimes, where "reinforcement" is invariably considered to be the delivery and consumption of earned food rewards. Surprisingly, few studies have detailed the trial-by-trial behaviour of animals engaged in such tasks. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1568539X-00003251DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4758523PMC
January 2015

A Brain Motivated to Play: Insights into the Neurobiology of Playfulness.

Authors:
Stephen M Siviy

Behaviour 2016 ;153(6-7):819-844

Department of Psychology, Gettysburg College, Gettysburg, PA 17325, USA.

Play is an important part of normal childhood development and is seen in varied forms among many mammals. While not indispensable to normal development, playful social experiences as juveniles may provide an opportunity to develop flexible behavioral strategies when novel and uncertain situations arise as an adult. To understand the neurobiological mechanisms responsible for play and how the functions of play may relate to these neural substrates, the rat has become the model of choice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1568539X-00003349DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5646690PMC
January 2016
1 Read

Natural variation in brain gene expression profiles of aggressive and nonaggressive individual sticklebacks.

Behaviour 2016 ;153(13-14):1723-1743

Genomics Core, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USA.

Within many species, some individuals are consistently more aggressive than others. We examine whether there are differences in brain gene expression between aggressive versus nonaggressive behavioural types of individuals within a natural population of male three-spined sticklebacks (). We compared gene expression profiles of aggressive male sticklebacks to nonaggressive males in four regions of the brain (brainstem, cerebellum, diencephalon and telencephalon). Read More

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https://brill.com/abstract/journals/beh/153/13-14/article-p1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1568539X-00003393DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5642941PMC
January 2016
5 Reads

Morality, Intentionality, and Intergroup Attitudes.

Behaviour 2014;151(2-3):337-359

Department of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology, University of Maryland, College Park.

Morality is at the core of what it means to be social. Moral judgments require the recognition of intentionality, that is, an attribution of the target's intentions towards another. Most research on the origins of morality has focused on intragroup morality, which involves applying morality to individuals in one's own group. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1568539X-00003132DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4336952PMC
January 2014

The neuroscience of social relations. A comparative-based approach to empathy and to the capacity of evaluating others' action value.

Authors:
Pier F Ferrari

Behaviour 2014 Feb;151(2-3):297-313

Dipartimento di Neuroscienze, Universitá di Parma, Italy.

One of the key questions in understanding human morality is how central are emotions in influencing our decisions and in our moral judgments. Theoretical work has proposed that empathy could play an important role in guiding our tendencies to behave altruistically or selfishly. Neurosciences suggest that one of the core elements of empathic behavior in human and nonhuman primates is the capacity to internally mimic the behavior of others, through the activation of shared motor representations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1568539X-00003152DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4172363PMC
February 2014
2 Reads

Integration of multiple cues allows threat-sensitive anti-intraguild predator responses in predatory mites.

Behaviour 2013 Feb;150(2):115-132

Group of Arthropod Ecology and Behavior, Division of Plant Protection, Department of Crop Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Peter Jordanstrasse 82, 1190 Vienna, Austria.

Intraguild (IG) prey is commonly confronted with multiple IG predator species. However, the IG predation (IGP) risk for prey is not only dependent on the predator species, but also on inherent (intraspecific) characteristics of a given IG predator such as its life-stage, sex or gravidity and the associated prey needs. Thus, IG prey should have evolved the ability to integrate multiple IG predator cues, which should allow both inter- and intraspecific threat-sensitive anti-predator responses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1568539X-00003040DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3672986PMC
February 2013
1 Read

Behavioral characteristics of pair bonding in the black tufted-ear marmoset ().

Behaviour 2012 ;149(3-4):407-440

Department of Psychology and Callitrichid Research Facility, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE, USA.

The present study describes how the development of a pair bond modifies social, sexual and aggressive behavior. Five heterosexual pairs of marmosets, previously unknown to each other, were formed at the beginning of the study. At the onset of pairing, social, sexual, exploratory and aggressive behaviors were recorded for 40 min. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/156853912X638454DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6261535PMC
January 2012

Individual variation in habituation: behaviour over time toward different stimuli in threespine sticklebacks ().

Behaviour 2012 Jan;149(13-14):1339-1365

Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA ; Bodega Marine Laboratory, University of California, Davis, CA, USA.

Habituation, or the relatively permanent waning of a response as a result of repeated stimulation, is a form of behavioural plasticity that allows animals to filter out irrelevant stimuli and to focus selectively on important stimuli. Individuals that fail to habituate might be at a disadvantage if they continue to respond to irrelevant stimuli; therefore, habituation can have adaptive significance. In this study we compared rates of behaviour over time toward three different ecologically-relevant stimuli (food, a male intruder and a gravid female) in threespine sticklebacks (). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/1568539X-00003019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4323190PMC
January 2012
2 Reads

Evolution of advertisement calls in African clawed frogs.

Behaviour 2011 ;148(4):519-549

Department of Biological Sciences, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA ; Department of Ecology, Evolutionary and Environmental Biology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.

For most frogs, advertisement calls are essential for reproductive success, conveying information on species identity, male quality, sexual state and location. While the evolutionary divergence of call characters has been examined in a number of species, the relative impacts of genetic drift or natural and sexual selection remain unclear. Insights into the evolutionary trajectory of vocal signals can be gained by examining how advertisement calls vary in a phylogenetic context. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/000579511X569435DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3978194PMC
January 2011
10 Reads

Population structure influences sexual conflict in wild populations of water striders.

Behaviour 2010 Aug;147(12):1615-1631

Center for Insect Science, P.O. Box 210088, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0088, USA.

In sexual conflict, aggressive males frequently diminish the long-term reproductive success of females in efforts to gain a short-term advantage over rival males. This short-term advantage can selectively favour high-exploitation males. However, just as the over-exploitation of resources can lead to local extinction, the over-exploitation of females in the form of harassment by aggressive males can yield similar consequences resulting in reduced female fecundity, increased female mortality and overall decline in mating activity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/000579510X510520DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3774177PMC
August 2010
2 Reads

Handedness for tool use in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): Sex differences, performance, heritability and comparison to the wild.

Behaviour 2009 Jan;146(11):1463-1483

Division of Psychobiology, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Atlanta, Georgia.

There is continued debate over the factors influencing handedness in captive and wild primates, notably chimpanzees. Previous studies in wild chimpanzees have revealed population-level left handedness for termite fishing. Here we examined hand preferences and performance on a tool use task designed to simulate termite fishing in a sample of 190 captive chimpanzees to evaluate whether patterns of hand use in captive chimpanzees differed from those observed for wild apes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/156853909X441005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2835370PMC
January 2009
14 Reads

Chronic perchlorate exposure impairs stickleback reproductive behaviour and swimming performance.

Behaviour 2008;145(4-5):537-559

Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3211 Providence Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508-4614, USA.

We describe behavioural changes in two generations of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of perchlorate. The first generation (G(0,2002)) was exposed as two-year-old adults to perchlorate in experimental groups ranging in concentration from less than the method detection limit (<1.1 ppb) to 18. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/156853908792451511DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3252385PMC
January 2008

Active and passive social support in families of greylag geese (Anser anser).

Behaviour 2005 Nov;142(11-12):1535-1557

Konrad Lorenz Forschungsstelle für Ethologie, A-4645 Grünau 11, Austria.

In general, support by social allies may reduce stress, increase success in agonistic encounters and ease access to resources. Social support was mainly known from mammals, particularly primates, and has been studied in birds only recently. Basically two types are known: (i) 'active social support', which describes the participation of a social ally in agonistic encounters, and (ii) 'passive social support' in which the mere presence of a social ally reduces behavioural and physiological stress responses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/156853905774831873DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3188404PMC
November 2005
2 Reads

Genotype versus experience effects on aggression in wild and domestic Norway rats.

Authors:
E O Price

Behaviour 1978 ;64(3-4):340-53

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Aggression in the female northern elephant seal, mirounga angustirostris.

Behaviour 1978 ;64(1-2):158-72

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April 1978
1 Read

The use of urine marking in the scavenging behavior of the red fox (Vulpes vulpes).

Authors:
J D Henry

Behaviour 1977 ;61(1-2):82-106

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Determinants of response of wolf pups to auditory signals.

Behaviour 1977 ;60(1-2):98-114

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[The role of vision in observational learning in rats].

Authors:
B Pallaud B E Will

Behaviour 1977 ;62(3-4):209-20

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January 1978

Catatonic behaviour in the Norway rat.

Behaviour 1977 ;62(1-2):190-208

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November 1977

Stress and increase of the corticosterone level prevent imprinting in ducklings.

Behaviour 1976 ;57(3-4):173-89

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February 1977

Territoriality and scent marking by Centris males (Hymenoptera, anthophoridae) in Jamaica.

Authors:
A Raw

Behaviour 1975 ;54(3-4):311-21

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February 1976